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Full text of "The Duluth Herald"




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Title: Duluth HERALD 



31:203 - 31:229 



125-1? 



Inclusive 

Dat s: 



Dec 1 
1913 



Dec 31 



1913 



Originals h eld by: MlIS X Other 

Prepared by: 



C. Leitner 



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Date: 

Dec 2,1981 



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Date: 



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THE DULUTILHERA] 




■ WW^ t LU 



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VOLUME XXXI— NO 



203. 



MONDAY EVENINQ, DECEMBER 1, 1913. 





UBLE THE EFFECT 
THE RATE DECISION 




HUERIA IS SAID TO HAVI 

TO VERA CRUZ- 



NEW TARIFFS 
BETTER THAN 
CALLED FOR 

"Spread" Between Duluth 
and Twin Cities Twenty- 
Eight Cents. 



PRESIDING OVER BIG 

SUFFRAGE MEETINGS 



— , — 

• —— — ■ 



Commission Ordered Only 

an Increase From Fifteen 

to Twenty-One. 



Twin City Rates Increased 
While Duiuth Gets Chi- 
cago Basis. 




WILL SPEND 
$5D0,00D FOR 
STRE£WORK 

Commissioner Outlines Im- 
provements to Be Made 
Next Year. 



Lack of Funds Stands 
Way of Much Needed 
Work. 



in 



FEDERAL BUDGET PUT 
AT $1,108,681,71 
FQRTHECOMINGYEAR 

ft 

CONGfflir 
QUICK CliANGE 





TWO CENTS. 



«^o» 



SPEAKER WANTS JOB 

OUTSIDE LEGISLATURE 



Secretary McAdoo Gives 

Congress Department 

Estimates. 



Week of Effort at 
Capital. 



Rates m.m the Ea-^t to the Twin 
Cities are increased, while the 
rates to Duhtth are reduoeil uiuler 
the new hike and rail tarifis issued ; 
by the Ix-at lines in accordance ; 
With the decision *A the interstate' 
commerce commission in the Du- 
lutli lake and rail case. 

Instead t-f the spread between 
Dulnth and the Twin Cities being 
imreased from 15 cents, t^r>t class, Ma|JQ,-|al ASSOCiatiOn BeQinS 

to 21 cents, as required by the ••"^«^ . . 

commission, the boat hues have 
increa>ed the spread to 28 cents, 
first cla<s. . 

The advancing ot the 1 win 
Cities rates is in accordance with 
the ■statement in the commission's 
order that reducing the Duluth ^ 
fues to the Chicago basis w-nu Id j 
relieve only a part of ihc discnm- i 
ination against Duluth. ' 

The btnt^fUs ..f the vihanpe to Du- 
luth nmv b.- mea^-ured by the- fact that 
thl inci-ei.''e \n the spread on f.r^-t 
class rat e.s is 12 cents over U .f nts 
or ncHrlv U«0 per .ent. On t)>e lower 
clup^fs It is even more marked. On 
t*rd class it is an even 100 Pfr cent, 
nri fourth cla.«.«« ISO per cent, cni fifth 
cla^'V ."5 per ,-.ni and on sixth class 

^^The plan" adopted by the boat lines 
WAS rt vealed today when a c()py of 
the new tariff of the Mutual Tran.« 
com pnZ^J^:^±J^:^^:i:i}±j^!Lj!^}±^^l—}l 
"(CmiTnujed on paee 16. sixth column.) 



Pperinl improvements approximating 
ff'CO.OOO, with the order in which they 
will be made, have been outlined by 
Comniissloner Roderick Mvirchison. 
head of the works division, for the sea- 
son of 1914. 

The conimlssioner declares that only 
the most urgent reason.s will prevail in 
any effort t«) have contracts let in other 
order. He states that the status of 
the cltys finances will be the rcKulalor 
and that each Job will be disposed of 
as the money becomes available. "No 
amount of fussing will help the t-ltua- 
tlon." ia his terse comment upon exist- 
ing conditions. Petitions are comiuK 
111 .steadily, each accompanied l-y the 
i.<|i,iest that the work be done Ilrst this 
lu xt spring. 

«'oupled with the paving and sewer 
work the works division executive \vin 
order a number of important repair jobs, 
the most important of which are rnen- 
tio'ied in his schedule. These incKJde 
the completion of a macadam surfac* 
on Orand avenue between Twcnty- 
flist and Flftv-fourth avenues west 



Steps From Extra to Regu- 
lar Session of Sixty- 
Third. 



Total $39,255,066 Under 

Estimates for Preceding 

Year. 



•Uashington. Pec. 1.— Congress 



will 

have to appropriate just $1,108, 681, Ti7 

' to operate the government of the 



Will Hear Wilson Tuesday; united state.; durmg the fiscal year. 

WIN ncai fWlloviii iM •'''191B. according to the estimates pre- 

CUrrenCy Bill Side- l pared by ea.h department and sent to 




FOUND 

NO TRACE OF 
HIM IN THE 
CHIEF CITY 

William Bayard Hale Has 

Returned to Report to 

Wilson. 



Querida Moheno Declared 

Not to Have Seen 

John Lind. 



Villa's Army Is En Route 

to Attack Chihuahua 

City. 



tracked. 



of 



■Washington. Dec. l.-A new sess'on 
congress— the second In President 
Wilson.s administration— began work 
today at noon. Vice President Mar- 
shall, as the noon hour arrived, d-v 
clared th« ola session adjourned 
•■without day." and i.. ^^e next breaU 
announced that ' ""b'f^" . » *^ .,"* 
sembled "in accordan^x wltU the con 

htltutlon 



the house today by Secretary McAdoo 
of the treasury. 
1 With this vast sum. the government 
! will maintain the battleships and 
t forts, and the armies in the stat^^s 
'and In the countries that border the 
seven seas; It will keep the scales of 
justice balanced, endeavor to retain 
the friendship of foreign nation.-?. looK 
after domestic prosperity, and seek at 
Intervals to discover new ways in 
which to better health, improve living 
conditions and investigate the merits 
of the thousand new things in Indus- 
try and commerce that come to Its al- 

estlniates submitted today are 



HENRY RINES 

Of Mora, Minn., Speaker of the ' Jt^j)^j^^j; (y )^y y )K») K »-y ) t (yi < c) t cy!iyyy »j> 
House of Representatives in the ^ ,„.rnTA rntktrc otrt/ S 
Last Lepislatu e, Who Has Filed * HUERIA COMES BACK % 



for Republican 
State Auditor. 



Nomination for 




More formality marked the opening | |o;, 554 067 in excess of the appr..pria 
In' the house. The chaplain ''"^v ........ 



nouov. The chaplain, Hev 
Ut-nrv N Couden, offered prayer, rc- 
ferrVng with particular emphasis to 
[he "great economic and ^-ocia prob- 
loinq which etincein the weliare 01 
the individual, the home, the gove n- 



first and Fifty-fourth avenues west '";; '"^„^ religious life of the natl m. 
the repairing or reconstructing of \Ne,t "^'^J^^' ^J ,,,,1 disclosed a Quoru-J 



.Superior ttriet between Twelfth and 
I Twenty-nfth avenues, and the resur 



(Continued on page 10. second column.) 

Wilson ls"u»^d to Make H, M. PINDELLIS TO 



It Administration 
Issue. 



i THE DAY IN CON&'^cSS fl 

X «c 

X SENATE. * 

S Me< nt 10 «. ni. nn«l ronrliided "^ 
#t tlie liuslneM.H of the extra weHxIon. ^ 
Si ronflrmiiiK delayed iiomlnatlonN. M 
^ \bout too e.»ptre«l unaetetl upon. ^ 
* ' Senator W cek.i Introduced a hill Hf 
It to restrict trnn«por»ntl«ii of mill- :^ 
^ «nr> forces and >uppllc!« to Tan- * 
m nma In American bottom*. "# 

■m Leaders anieed to delay rehum- ^j 
■^ Ing Cl»e 1«.HI»> lnve*Ilgatloii until * 
A ll»f (urreney bill 1h pnnMed. * 

Jk llrresHed and con\ene<l at noon. ^ 
^ brglnnlng the second «.oK!«lon of )!< 
^ the "iilxtj -third eonurei.K. * 

i Took lirl^-f rrcesH ^%hlle com- --,: 
« miitce iiotirird I'r.-shlenl Wilson *:^ 
2 ctnxKre-HH «as In ncsnIoh. ^ 

£ Hepublican I.tader (^Mllingrr ^ 
S indleated that the minority «\ould K 
m call « rnrrency caucus. ■)(■. 

2 -il!^ 

J iiorsR. « 

^ Mft at noon, beginning the new * 

^ HepreKcntatlie Henry Intro- •* 

^ duced bill to amend Sherman A' 

•jfc la»*. ^ 

^ Adjourned at 1 :<»T p. m. to noon * 

^ Tuesdaj. * 



Wa..hlngton. Dee. l.-The forty-fifth 

annual convention of the National 
; American ^Voman Suffrage association 

began here today with Pr. Anna How 
' ard Shaw presiding over an assembly 

of nearly 1,000 delegates froM all 
1 stuns of -he I'nlon. 
I A con8tltutl<.nal amendment extend- j 

,ng the ballot to women throughout j 
Ithe nation is the goal for which a> 
•week of meetings, speeche? Mnd hear- 
ings before eommitlees of congress 

will work. Addresses o' ^'^.l^.^^^^^JJ^ 
reports of oftiier.s and ^ommitte.s t^'oK 
up the tinu of the first .-ession ioda>. 
Spoke for Southern Women. 
The women of tlic South want to 
vote declared Mrt-. Tattle Jacobs of 
Bi;mingh.'m, Ala., today at the con^ 
ventlon. V. r.s. Jacobs .ailed herseif a 
liv ng refutati.Tn of the charge that 
ai bet n made in the halla of congress 
hat the (vomanhoud ^'.^he South does ; 
not want the .-uffrage.' It is an in 
d etinent." she .-aid. "of the .^outhern 
w,,man s Intelligence, which resent 
Nor Is mv position unique, original 01 
lonely— there are thousands of us. 

••The women of Virginia. Louisiana 
Tennessee. Kentucky. Florida. North 
/'HroHna. Alabaina-in fact in all the 
'^ouuVern states— are stirring, are real- 
U ng H e vote is the only honorHbU^ 
dignified and .«ure means of securing 
recognition of their aspirations and of 
their necd.«. 

I'rl* liege vl the Tlme«. 
"U Is a privilege to be born, to live 
in sKh .solil-stlrring timc.«: to under- 
stand th».t communion of Int^r' •;;t^. 
that mutual responsibility which the 
loUdar tv of the woman suffrage 
moveme,^t indicates. I r.-can hearing 
Ihe etTTinent fuffragist. Miss Mary 
lohns^n speak of the significance of 
the fact that no word in the Kngllsh 
language has exactly the same mean- 
ng and use for women, as the word 



A roll call diselo8»^d a quormu. 
something the hou.«e baa not had In 

'"""^ |TrV;i:Hetch, Bill 0--«»'J- , ,,, 

The senate began the s.ssion «!«» " 
firit days work already mapped out. 
Debate o,f the Helch-Helehy bill bo^an 

"St^was expected thr.t the rev'-^^J 
draft ..f the eurrency >''ll ^^'"^^ .^^■ 
; pj^nented late today ,'^2^ 'T""'?,,^*' ji^ 
bated during iniermlj^v.^ thedl^. 

son will renominate Henry M. r«ndell • J he j>rog^ram c^f ^^ -^."^^^ ""rl 
of Peoria. III., for ambassador to Huh- enforced, and th« "f* •ion?e? folTow- 
^la. Mr. Plndell fall.d of confirmation piven until tmnon^^^^^ 
m the extra se.^sion of ^"^ress The nK «" «; ,^^.,,. ^„ „o disposition to 
president will «h=o renominate all other ^ linger J^ progress of the hi! 



BE RENOMINATED 



appointees who failed^ 

normaUagain 

AT SCiHENECTADY. 

Schenectady. N. Y.. Dec. 1.— Normal 
rondltlons prevailed today at th^ plant 
of the «;eneral KUctrlc company. Ncar- 
Iv all of the 1,000 strikers who walked 
out last Tuesday returned to work. It 
Is estimated vhat the >-trlkers lo^t 
JITS 000 in wages while they were out. 



linger hibv i'-^-- "y~.-^ v,,ii 
inhntruct progress of the bill. 

The extra session terminated In the 
-^nate with the Introduction of « feN% 
btl is and re.«=olullons and an execi'tlNe 
leHslon of a few bills «nd r.solut oms 
session to confirm some of I resident 
Wilson's nominations. ...,-» 

Ten postmasters at Pni«»» /« "<" ^^T^ 
the onlv ones conllrmed and the sei ate 
r..(>»>sHed until 11:66 o'clock. 

The regttlaV December session, follow- 

mc without a break upon the heels of 

hfloi»«xtra session that has run sln<A3 



tions for the last fiscal year, but their 
total falls J39.255.066 below the esti- 
mates for that year. Exclu.sive of the 
postofflce, the estimates are as fol- j 

I.>egi»latlve establishment. J'.SSS.SSl. 
Fxe<utlve e.«tabli8hment, $30,609,268. 
/udldal fstal.lishnicnt. $l,i;4:',110-. 
Department of agriculture. $ia,061.- 

33" 

r'oBtoffice department, including par- 
cel post. $306.J»53,117. ,,-.,, 

Foreign Intercourse, J*.4j;.0<;. 

Military establishment $105 1!»3 544. 

Xaval establishments, $139,831,963. 

Indian affairs. $10,208,866. 

pensions $169,150,000. 

Public works. $97.91 7. 592. 

M"..s-ellaneoup. $84,393,213. 

rt«km&aent annual ajpropriatiwr.e, 
$131,196,407. 

For the >avF. 

For the preservation and completion 
of vessels alread y In com miB.'' ion or 



(Continued on page 10, third column.) 



EGG BOYCOTT | 
IS SPREADING 

Campaign Taken Up Among 
' Women at Wash- 
ington. 



Illinois Is Eleing Lined Up 

and Nevi/ York Fight 

Grows. 




i Tt* K\'r% -M\Tii t'liii.n ^ 

i IN wist ONSIX FAMILY. * 



* Ste» 
I Thi- t' 
in Sandn 

* All 
^ tng. 



lenN Point, WU.. Dee. l-— * 
^Tenty-nliUh ohild wan born ^ 
.ay to Mm. John Kontriiek. * 
of the twenty-nine are 



uek. -'if 
11 «- ^ 



the lone extra session w.-^^..^^ - - - ■_ ^t „_^ , •j_AL^-^t,-^W'kit'k'k*-¥itiifi 

7.^i;^^TT;rj;<niiri^¥rro, .ixth eoiumn.)i^***^MHMHi.*********^^ 




PITY THE POOR CARTOONIST. 
('LONG BOUT THISJ™E O' YEAR.) 



Mexico City, Dec. 1. — ProvUion- 
nl I*rei««ldent Huertn. >vhoi«e «lls- 
nppeuranee from the Federal 
capital gave rlKf to many ruiaort ^ 
today, returned tliin afternoon. ^ 
He had been \iNiting at a farm in * 
the vicinity. J" 

***^H<(-****-)|H!f* JNHNlHtHHNIH*; ***** 
Mexico City, Dec. 1. — Provisional 
President Huerta Is reported to have 
left the Federal capital secretly yes- 
terday morning for Vera Cruz, travel- 
ing over the Interoceanic railroad. 

The report originated with railroad 
officials who Claim to know of Gen. 
Huerta's departure at 4 o'clock in the 
I morning on board a special train. 

The- presence of Qaorida Moheno, the 
Mexican foreign minister, at the port 
of Vera Cruz, is said to have i-oma 
connection with the plan of Oen. 
Huerta to leave the country. 

Investgatlon failed to discover any 
trace of Huerta in the Federal capital. 
No official confirmation of his depart- 
ure was obtainable. 

Although the government may be 

bankrupt, the provisional prepldent Is 

i far from being without funds, and Is 

; not likely to be without money as long 

a!5 private' institutions and corporations 

possess funds. Persuasive method» 

I have already been used on these, and 

I in several cases have bo'^e marked 

' similarifv to the forced loans system. 

I In the" Mexican republic, there are 

' manv men rated as millionaires and 

several large corporations whose prop- 

, erties might be available for prospec- 

; tlve taxation. There are millions to be 

had for the taking, and no avenue 

which might produce funds for the 

! government has been overlooked. 

Hal* (n Watihlngton. 

....o- ^« - - Wasl.ington, Dec. 1.— President Wll- 

generallv. and took many signatures. | eon observed to callers today that the 
* ' Mexican factions se-^ med to be run- 

ning things ih a very interesting way 
at present, and that no development 
was contemplated so far as the United 
States was concerned. His visitors 
believ.d he had in mind the increas- 
ing number of e'onstiiutionalist vlc- 

AVllilam Bayard Hale, who talked 
with Gen. »"arranza and the Cf*nstitu- 
tionalist chiefs at Nogales. returned 



Washington. 'Dec. 1. — An fgg boy- 
cott was launched here today by Mrs. 
Ellis Logan, president of the Federa- 
tion of Wom.-n's Clubs. "Workers 
armrd with plelges in which signers 
were asked to Jigree not to buy eggs 
until the pricef are reduced, worked 
on the streets. In stores, at the suf- 
frage convention and about the city 




Llnlhic Vp IHInoiw. 

Chicago. Dec. 1.— An appeal to the 
members of all the woman's clubs of 
Illinois for the r help has been made 
by Mrs. John C Bley, president of the 
Clean Food clui, which has been eon- 
ducting a bovcott on eggs in an ef- 
fort to reduce he price in t^hicago to 

32 cents a dozen. The appeal is dl- (jnixn-^. '.•i^-^^" •• -^ • 

reeled to club members who are 'arm . J'"'"^"^ ^^'^'^.''jjj' J^^^ the"' president late 
dwellers in an effort to provide some J^^^^. ^j. tomorrow. 

means to get hem to send eggs dJ- , officiallv, nothing was known at the 
rect to the ciij members by means of | .^yj^j^^ Ho"use concerning the visit of 
parcel post. .k^ ' Querldo Moheno. the Mexican foreign 

Club members in other cities in the , w — ,.^.„.v, > 

«tate were urged to join In the boy- | (Continued on page 16. ith eoium.; 

cott on eggs and were asked to make 1 ~:rZ'7VZ.^:^r^7^ 

an effort to ale to drive out the com- MfiRTU RAKOTANS 

mis.slon firms who. Mrs. Bl-y said j 1^ U H I H UHr\U I HIH O 

were re.ponsib e for the high cost ot PREY OF WOLVES 



I'artooni-t 



"Oh my. I don't kn«m what to draw 



I tuii't think «»r a blooinlne thiiiK." 



(T'^imiTrued on page 10. third column.) 



TWENTY-TWO GRAIN BOATS 
CLEAR IN CLOSING RUSH 




W holcMale Price* Fall. 

The wholesale price of eggs tech- ] 
nicallv classed as ordinary firsts, de- 
clined 3 to 5 cuts in South A\ ater 
street today, f Ithough there was n< 
material increase in receipts. Deal^r.j 
would not say that the drop was due 
to the bovcott. but the women who 
are lighting the high prices derived 
much .'satisfaction from it. 

Announcement that the suit of the 
Federal gove nment charging tne 
Chicago butter and eggs board v^iXU 
violation of th.' anti-tru.= t law will !.»• 
brought to trial here this week, was 
another develo pment in the egg war. 

(Continued 0x7 page 10, second column.) 



Mandan. N. !».. I>cc. 1.— t.>«pecial to- 
The Herald.) — Killed and eaten by 
wolves near FareTlto^n, Alberta, waa 
the fate of Axel and Adolph Soder- 
strom two vounc homesteaders, who- 
sold their land in this county two 
vcars ago and took new nome'iteads In 
Alberta. From the meagre details re- 
ceived it appears the men were going 
from their claims to the nearest market 
point for supplloF. when overtaken by 
woUes. Searchers found their empty 
gun.s their knapsaeks. porti<»iiS of their 
clothing and a few bones. The location 
showed evidentes of a terrible strug- 
gle before the nien were overcome. 



Stocks Decreased Nearly 

11,000,000 Bushels in 

Last Two Days. 



Shipments for Fall Com- 
pare Favorably With 
Those of Last Year. 



In getting away twenty-two boats 
In the two days preceding the official 
close of navigation. Duluth elevator 
men had a busy lime of It up to mid- 
night last night.. 

All the grain under order was shipped ^ 
out resulting in stocks being decreased i 
10.748.000 bu as ^ompared ^^^^^^ ^^n 
?[o7e""u Tok76.00rbu all grains as | 
SoniDared with 5.156,000 bu a year ago. 
A canvas of the houses this morning 
Showed that steamer ''P^'L^, '"% ^,;,*;^ 
1.000,000 bu to go down the 'fj^^s '"''^ 
week at the increased rate of Insur- 
Tnce had b.en already chartered and 
It I s believed that amount will be sub- 

(Contlnued on page 10. first column.) i 



NATIONAL REFORM 
WORKERS CONVENE 

Sectional Conferences Oc- 
cupy First Day at 
Pittsburg. 

Pittsburg. Pa.. Dec. 1.— Sectional 
conferences of the annual convention 
of the National Reform assoeiation, 
which opened here today, were de- | 
signed to reproduce features of the 
world's Christian Citizens' conference 
held at Portland a year ago. At the 
conference of PUbUcedu-atlon Henry 
Collin.s Mlnton. president of the Na- 

Tional Reform , «'*'^^'^'«^«:'\"- n^ Tr^'f 
Cliristian pubic education: Dr. J. 
PoKgs Dodds of Sterling. Kan., took 
' UP the w..rld's conference report on 
the lilble. an<l local educp.tors spoke on 
the true basis of moral education and 
moral training In the public school. 

The national reform movement, at 
another conference, was taken up by 
Richard Cameron W ylie. L,.L. 1>., or 
this city the report of the world a con- 
f.renee commission on MormonLsm was 
made bv I'rof. O. F. Davis of New 
Uilhmond. Wis., followed by addresses 
and geoerai discussion. 



havp It." 



SEASON ENDS FOR MOST 
BOATS-NEW ORE RECORD 



Oh, I cr 




USE POISON GAS TO 
SMOKE OUT BANDIT 

Utah Offic ers Believe Lopez 
Will Try Break for 
. Freedom. 



Shipments Two Million 

More Than 1912; Ashland 

Figures Missing. 



...f. funny I dh.nt n.lnk of ,IU« idoa before. It ot«ht to niake a h.t w.thmebo^ 




^^;^^<r^^^ 



I "WcU, jou sctj 1 didn't know what to draw, so 1 tried Uds one," 



Bingham, Jtah. Dec. 1— Smudges 
were lighted early today in tho Utah- 
Apex mine, ivhere Ralph Lopez, des- 
perado, is making his last stand. V/ith 
all exits to tie mine except that of the 
Andy tunnel bratticed and sealed with 
mud. and witli poisonous gases floating 
bacl^ Into thi depths of the workings 
It was expect?d that the fugitive would 
make a breaV for liberty today. 

Much dynamite is stored In the in ne. 
and because Lopez could easily bh.w 
out a bulkhead, deputy sherifts wer^ 
stationed at each of the Jlfteen tunnel 
mouths with orders to thoot him on 

*' Nov 21 Loi.ez killed a Mexican mif>er 
and later In he day he killed the chief 
of police anl two deputies who pur- 
sued him. After a chase through sev- 
Irll counties he backtracked to Bing- 
harn and toolc refuge in the Utah-Apex 
mine where he killed two more depu- , 
ties last tiaiurday. I 



Some Owners Will Extend 

Insurance Until Dec. 

5 or Dec. 12. 



.So far as ore phipments, at least, 
are concerned, the navigation season 
of 1913 Is ended, and a new record 
for the shipments is established. ^Vltl^ 
regular vessel Insurance no longer in 
force, navigation in general is over for 
the year, but many of the vessels have 
obtained extended insurance to Dec. 5 
and some to Dec. 12. High premiums 
are charged for these extensions, but 
with the amount of coal, grain and 
package freight to be moved yet. it is 
conside'-ed profitable to meet the rates. 
With the figures from the Ashland 
docks missing, the Head of the Lal^es 
ore docks. Two H arbors Included. 

(Continued on page 10. first column.) 



t 



■I DEFECTIVE PAGE 

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Monday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



Wi:ATin:il — Cloudy weather tonight and Tuos(J;iy with prttbahly light rain or snow flurriM«; eastorly winds. 




p 



OAK HALL BUILDING 




WINTER 




F.roken sizes of our best early-in-the-season sellers. Not every si/e 
ill every lot; everyone can be fitted. 75 High-class Winter 
Overcoats to choose from. Overcoats made expressly for us by 
Strouse & Bros, and Kuppenheimer to sell at $25, $20, $18 and 
$14.45 — choose tomorrow at one price 




1 



40 OVERCOATS 



— the Ix'St values at the onylnal prices 
ever offered In Duluth. Its a direct saving 
to you of SS to $13 and It oli-ars the racks 
for us. Overcoats that ^old for |18. $1& 
and $13. choose tomorrow for 




ALL BOYS' OVERCOATS 

(Except Chinchiilas) |JI|| F DDSI^C 
AGES3to 7YcARS AT IIJlLr rillvC 



Koyn' Overroat-J — Ou\y .six 
to chose from — ■i^ea '» to 13 
years — odds and ends, .sold 
regularly $6 to $10. while 
they la8t, your choice for. . 



$1.00 




I 



StTTLE O^E MIMDRED 
CASES UNDER NEW LAW 



rase \o. 100 In the fllos of settle- 
mont.s of ixTj^onal injury claims uri'ler 
ttu' termf« of the workinKmen's oua- 
pensution act was tiled this morning: 
vith the rhrk of diatrlei court. 

The settlement was made by the 
■Puluth C'lu.'^hed Stone company In 
favor of r« ler Knlovlch, ag:id 1",«. who 
hfid his ri^:ht leg brui.sed Oct. 18 at 
the West l>iiluth stone cruahintf plant. 
lie received $_'?.70. 

other cases filed today Included the 
folhnvin*; settlements; 

Duluth Roller works, in favor f-f 



Carl Anderson, 29, finger cut, Oct. 29, 

$12. 

Virfflnia «ft Rainy I.,ake company, In 
favor of .John .'^mlth, fractured rib, Oct. 
I'lt. at Cus.son, $14. 

The Oliver Iron Minims: company has 
made the following pettlentents: 

,lohn I.onna. 28. .scalp brul.^ed. Meyers 
mine, Chisholm, Oct. 8, $16.50. i 

Jack l>opjln. 23, ullKht brulne*. Har- 
old mine, Hibbini^. Oct. 23, thirteen 
days' time at $T.y8 per week. 

Spasa Rodonlch. 24, cut flncer and ' 
b<i(ly bruises, Alpena mint-, VirKinIa, 
tw«'nty-two days' time at $6. 'JO per 
wt-ek. 

Steve Kondic. 33, bruise to thlRh and 
hips, Xov. 6. Alpina mine, $G.T5 weekly 
durins disability. 

Anton Rapartich, 41, scalp wound, I 
Oct. 11. Chisholm mine, Chisholm, 
$11.67. I 



FAIRFAX HARRISON 

SUCCEEDS FINLEY. 

New York, Dec. 1. — Fairfax Harrison, 
President of the Chicago, Indianapolis 
& I.oui.svillo Railway company, was to- 
day elected president of the Southern 
Railway company to succeed the late 
W. W. F'inley. 

P'airfax Harrison Is 43 years old. He 
was vice prt-sidcnt of the Southein 
railway n»*arly tlir«'e yt-ais, resiKUinK 
In 1910 to as.Hiime tin- presidency of the 
ChlcaKo. IndlanapMlls & Louiisvlile 
Railway comi>any, which Is controlled 
Jointly by the J^outlo-rn and the Louis- 
ville & Na.shville railroads. Me is a 
brother of Francis Ilurtcn llarri^ion, 
governor treneral of the I'hilipplnes. 



m KICKS ON 
T^nUPPLY 

One'Su)iday Passes Without 

IComplaints of Poor 

Service. 

;r }] 

For the first time 8in>>e the Inaugur- 
ation of the commission, at least, and 
probably for a much greater period, 
the officials of llio water and light 
<!>partment did n<>t receive a Hlnglc 
complaint yesterday relatlv* to the 
gas service. 

The peak of the load each week Is 
1 1 ached fcSundays. particularly about 
nt>on, and each Monday for months 
past ui>ward» of li.iif a doz.n persons 
havt registered "kicks" against the 
gas. 

Since he assumed charge Manat?er 
1». A. Reed Kas been deVotiiiK niuch 
of his time towards improvinn the 
gas service, not only as to the (juan- 
tity but also to the qu.ility. lOt'foits 
have been made to ItureMSi" tlo- .sup- 
ply at the times when the he.ivy de- 
mands are nunli/ upon it and close al- 
ien lion has been j»aid li> the c-haracter 
of the suppl>' itself. I'.ut once in sev- 
eral month.-) have tli«* tests h how n It 
to be under lh»* standard < ulled for In 
the city's contract with the Zenith 
Furnace company. The manager utates 
that the city expects to have the serv- 
i<e still further bettered in both re- 
spects. 

I'lans are now being made for tlu^ 
installation of additional governors in 
several parts of the <lty. It Is v-i- 
peeted tliat two will be placed this 
year, oiu- at Twentv -first avenue ejut 
II nd London roiid and the other at 
Victoria street and U Oodlund avenue. 
The K"Vernor.^' fiimtion U to regulMte 
the pressure, keeping them as nemly 
eijuitable as possible. At present ad- 
ditional sufvpiles of gas are let Into the 
mjiins by dejmrlment employes at the 
limes when the consumption Is heav- 
iest. 



husband has freijuently mistreated ii'^r 
and that on many occasions he lias 
pinched her until she was "black and 
blue." Anderson is also charged with 
habitual drunkenness She asks for 
the restoration of her maiden name, 
that of llilma Simi, and for the custody 
of their one child, aged 11. 



.Saturday morning on the charge but 
denied his guilt. 



I/Oitgern Are III. 

.Tohn Olson, 66; Con .<ullivan, 4', 
and Tom Reckerleg. 43; who obtained 
lodgintf at police headquarters during 
the ninht, were this morning found to 
be suffering from serious ailments and 
were taken this morning to the county 
hospital. They were examined by 
I'ollce .Surgeon Murphy, who ordered 
their confinement in tlie hospital for a 
short time. 

DiMorderllen KInrd. 

For creating a disturbance in a Su- 
perior street .store Saturday evening, 
• John Manna, 40 years old, and William 
j Stewart. 32. were ibis morning rir.ed 
I $10 each and costs or ten days. Tl:ey 
were arrested by Officer Andre on u 
charge of disorderly conduct. 




CITY BRIEFS 



l.ouae Leaf AceuuuliiiK SyKteiua. 

M. I. Stewart Company, 'i'hones 111. 

I. O. O. F. Women Meet. 

Home circle. I. o. < >. F.. Majestic Ro- 
bekah lodge No. 60. will meet Wednes- 
day afternoon willi Mrs. We.sley Medd, 
at her home, 127 Fast Third street. 



Get The 

Criterion 

for tlie mo.'it 
advanced stylo 

new.s — 5c at 
Pattern Depl. 





THK .STORi: FOR SERV1CF3 
ii3, 113, 117, 119 WcMt Superior bu, i>uluHi, Miuo. 



See the New 
$4 Shoe 

for business 

Women — smart 

— serviceable 

— Bensll)le — 

comfortable. 



rjstmas 




mtrnt-^J-^ 




^^M^ 




It's high time you were planning your 
Christmas gifts. 

We have planned on helping you for 
months and now we are ready as never 
before with things you'll like at 
prices you'll be glad to pay. 



YLAN 




The Wonderful World of Makc-Believe 

Is Ready. 

Santa Glaus has done his best for us. Here 
you will see a display of, toys that mean a glori- 
ous Christmas for the little folks who get and 
3 for the big folks who give these amusing toys. 

Here are J^^ifts for as little as a few cents and also marvelous toys for the child 
of fortune. No matter what price you wish to pay there is somcthinfj sure to be 
appreciated, and ever so many toys are instructive as well as amusin<.j. 



The Sale of Wooltex Coats at 

$ 1 6.50 to $30 Is a Splendid Surprise! 

Warm as was the weather Sat- 
urday, we did a big day's coat 
selling! Our trade certainly 
prefer these 

Advance Styles 

for, as several women put it, 
they felt sure of the style being 
'Vight" next season, as well as 
being ahead of the crowd now! 

Come and See These 
Ten New Styles 

on sale at $16.50 to $30.00. Try 'cm on— 
that's the way to judg^e them. 



Special for Tuesday Only. 

Engels' Art Store is offering as n 
special induc-ement all their beatitiful 
line of made-up trays at special prices 
for Tuesday only. 





nerkrr'M, tlie Art and Gift Store. 

Corner Second avenue west and I'ir.st 
street. 



Rrturnn From I.onar Trip. 

J. S. Ailing. Northwest editor of The 
TTerald. has returned from a three 
months' trip. He underwent an opera- 
tion at Rochester and followins: that 
spent several weeks with friends In 
New York state. 



Wife Wants Dlvoree. 

On the grounds of cruel an<l Inhuman 
treatment, Hilda Anderson yesterday 
started suit for divorce against Al- 
bert Anderson In district court .Satur- 
day, lira. Anderson ciaima that her 



WuN Disorderly. 

Mary I'eters bud to pay the court 
c(»8ts this morning, when ari-aigne.i 
on a charge of disorderl>- conduct. S^e 
was .irresled on the complnint of her 
landlady. She pleaded guilty and 
sentence was i^uspended on payment 
of costs. 

Senreh For Trunk'* Owner. 

.Joseph Holefsky of 908 Fourth avr- 
nue east, rejiorted to the i)olice .'^al- 
uiday night l*ial a trunk had biM-u 
given to him to deliver to 'y~'-\ l^ist 
Third street and that he was unaliU- 
to find such an address. He took the 
trunk home and nr>pe''l«'d to the liolico 
It his search for the owner. 



'^nX Hiiuwn Here. 

H. K. Romalne. mentioned in a dhs- 
patch from MiimeHpoli.s as bavin;; bei-n 
beaten last night by higlnvaymen ttien> 
and snld to be from Dululli. is not 
named in tlie n.-w directory. 'I'he clos- 
est to that name Is that jif Harvey 
Romans, a resinur;uit keeper at 5i;{ 
West .Superior street. Mot Mr. Romans 
was not in Minneapolis at the time, 
having been in his place of business 

her* all day. 

-^. 

Call Muntripal Calendar. 

Judge Winilom of the municipal 
co\irt will call the regular Jury <alen- 
dar tomorrow morning, 'i'lie cases tf) 
be disposed of during the December 
ternt inchnle th.it of the s'.ate against 
i:mil Angemi.-r, who Is charged with 
practicing medicine without a license. 
The others are Mc<;reevy vs. Helmer; 
Rose vs. Dully, and I'.oss & McKnighl 
vs. th'- Samaritans. 



Fine Crop of Applen. 

R. H. Salter has just rctuiPC'l from 
a visit to the country surrounding Lake 
Miniietonka, and says that the crop of 
■ipples in that part of tli.e state is the 
largest in Its history and the quality 
of the fruit Is of llic higlu'-'t grade. 
I'his is true, ho sniil, especialW of the 
We.'ilthles which are of fine color, de- 
licious taste and excellent firmness. 

♦ — - 

On Trial for I.nrorny. 

Charles Rinne. churged with grand 
larceny, second degree, was broUK^ht 
to trial In district court tills morning. 
before ,Iuds:e Dancer Hiid a jury. Rinnu : 
i.s accused of having during the month ' 
of September last stolen a quantltv of 
household goods and other effects from 
n cabin belonging to August lidstr.MU 
in seeiion 5, tl-l:.'. He ia being de- 
fended by J. \V. Reynolds. 

CnaielM' SoHul WodneNduy. 

The regular montlily sijcjnl of Du- 
luth lodge, fan. els of tlie World, will 
take place jtt iHd Fellows' hall. 18 
Lake ave nttrlh on Wednesday eve- 

ning. A », *e attendance is expected 
as that Is 'ecoming the rule at this 
lodge's meeitugs. 



Kendnll'M nody Not Found. 

The life-savers huve .so far failed 1o 
find the body of Howard C. K«'n<lall, 
pioneer Duluth resident, who fell in 
the ship canal and was drowned early 
Friday evening. It is believed that tlie 
body has drifted out In the lake, 

Guilty of I.areeny. 

Milan Dsbick. 27 years old, was 
found guilty of petit larceny in police 
court this morning, and was fined $10 
and costs or thirty days In the count> 
1ail. He was arrested Saturday morn- 
ing on complaint of Sieve Samenovich, 
who claimed that Labick had taken a 
I $10 bill from him and after buying two 
I eniph-vment tickets, failed to return 
! the $6". Labick asserted he received no 
I change at all He pleaded not guilty 
wUen arraigned Saturday morning and 
his trial took place this morning. 

-^ 

Will ^%ed In CiileaKO. 
William n. (Jarliind and Mi.s.=! I^illian 
r.roughlin, both of Duluth, were li- 
censed to marry in Chicago this morn- 
ing. 

..« 

Sehulie'N Triul Continued. 

The trial of ,Iacob Sciiuhe. 37 y<'ar5 
old. who was arrested Friday after- 
noon on a charge of petit larceny, was 
postponed from 10 o'clock this morn- 
ing until '1 o'clock Wednesday after- 
noon. The change was ma<le owing to 
the absence from the city of «'i(y IMos- 
ecutor (iurnee. Schuhe was arraigned 



Farmer .viues Railroad. 

Andrew J. Aiidcr.son. a fariiier liv- 
ing in siction 36. Vi-\%, is plfiintiff in 
suit brought before Jud^e Kn^ign in I 
district court this morninUr against 
the Duhith. MI'sube iv:- Northern Rail- 
road comp'^py. Anderson asks for 
$2,509 damages for ttie loss of timber 
from hi.'^ land during the summer of 
100J». He claims that the tlmb^r /as ' 
destroyed by a lire which, through ' 
the carelessness of the rallrond com- 
pany, start. >d VI Its right-of-way and 
spread to his land. 

FnrdoH'N I.ntrNt .fob. 

Charles Puidon. formerly of Duluth 
and for many years a resident of Ari- 
zona, has been elected secretary of the 
Warren District Commercial club at 
Ftisbee, Ariz. 



Salt on FronilNMory Note. 

M. A. llustafson started suit in dis- 
trict court Saturday against Herman 
R. Stonlund to collect $1'75 claimed to \ 
bo due on a promissory note exccttf^d ; 
April J6, If'lO. The note waa given to 
secure certain real estate. The Cnlon i 
.Savings association which holds a 
njorlgage on the property is made a i 
co-defendant In the action. j 

• I 

"Sfxs Lumber C'ontpany. 

Artidei of«»iii< orporatlon was filed ; 
SaturdayjafteWioon with the register of j 
deeds by fhe'Comstock Lumber com- i 
pany, whiiih Ib organized to engage in 
a wholesAle au# retail lumber business. 
'I'he capital ."uock of the lompany is ' 
$50,000 and the incorporators are i:r- 
win L. P^isher, Cleveland. Ohio; .lohn 
W. Comstock, "Duluth, and Ruebin Knox, 
Duluth. 



New IK'orld'ii Trarri Rerord. 

John Henry Meers. a nephew of 
President «',recn of the Kalioual Jiis- 
cult company, has just made a record 
breaking trip around the world, ad- 
vertising the I'needa biscuit, carrying 
a package of that brand of edible on ; 
the entire trip. He made the famous j 
"around the world In eighty days'"; 
look like a snail's pace, for he ma<le ' 
the trip In 35 days. 21 hours, 35 min- 
utes and 4-5 seconds. I 

The best previous record wa.«« made ! 
by a Fren<'hmrtn, Andre Jager-Sdiniidt, | 
who traveled the belt in 39 days, 19 
hours, 3 minutes. 37 4-6 seconds. 



Falitr Alarm. 

The fire department responded to a 
false alarm at Eighth avenue east and 
Fourth street late yesterday afternoon. 

Wounded Boy Rroorerti. 

Harold, the 18-ycar-old son of Miko- 
la Hlnsta of Cromwell, fort>-three 
miles west of Duluth. who was ncei- ' 
dentally shpt by a stray bullet on Nov. i 
23, will leave the hospital today for i 
his home. The boy was shot in tho 
hand and was brought to St. Luke's 
hospital a,fter the accident, by Dr. 
Harry Klein. 

« 

Aak Poller For T.odglnir. 

Nine men applied for lodging at po- 
lice headquarters during Saturday 
night and eleven asked for accommo- 
dations last night. They were all ' 
taken In by the officers. i 



Special Sale 

Of Metf s and 
Boys' 

Overcoats 

Regular prices all fall $15, $18 
and $20 — to close out at — 

*9.75 

Hart Schaffner & Marx 

Suits and Overcoats, 

$20.00 to $35.00 



In Our Boys^ 
Department 

Wc are clo.sing out Boys' 
High-grade (Jvercoats, some- 
what broken in sizes, hut all 
this season's models, in ages 
2y> to 10 years — 

Regular prices $4.00 to $7.00, 
to close out at — 

^2.95 

In everything else tiiat men 
and boys wear — Shirts, Shoes, 
Hats. Underwear, Hosiery, 
Gloves, Neckwear, all the large 
and small thing of dress, this 
store will be headquarters. 

Kenney & Anker 

409 and 411 West Superior 
Street, Duluth, Minn. 



wife Char 

In district couj i 
Impola, 21, Jiled st 
Albrama Impola, 
married at Ironw 
1902. The decree 
grounds of desen 
leging that while 
Ely he abandoned 
she says, took pi 
She asks for the 
children and the 
maiden name, Iha 



KCM DeMertlon. 

this morning Lmelia 
lit for divorce against 
30, to whom she was 
lod, Mich., on July 3, 

is asked for on "the 
ion. Mrs. Impola al- 

they were living at 

her. The desertion, 
ice on July 16. 1912. 
custody of their four 

restoration of her 
: of Emella Mottonen. 



automribiles and the building of the 
I'ord automobile distrlbutinif agency 
for Wisconsin was destroyed in a Are 
early Sunday, c-jusing damage of $12S.- 
000. The loss is nearly covered by In- 
surance. 



Two Sto 

Yesterdav moi 
McDonald of 427 
and the Trevlllio 
Lake avenue sout 
lice that their .« 
sometime Saturda 
erable gum. cand 
from the former 
in change stolen 
ter in the latter i 
investigating. 



ren Bntered. 

ning Mrs. Wiir.nm 

Lake avenue soith 
a Grocery store, 36C 
1, reported to the po- 
ttores were entered 
y night and consid- 
y and cigars taken 

store and about $7 
from the cash regis- 
Jtore. The police ore 



Automubtlf Agency Fire. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 1. Sixty 



NEW ROCKFORD. N. D.. 
CHURCH IS DEDICATED. 

' New Rockford, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The new First 
Methodist church of this city w.as 
dedicated yesierdav. Dr. !■:. P. ICob- 
ertson, president of Wesley college, 
being in charge of the exercises. The 
church was erected at a cost of $12.- 

I 000, and is one of the tinest small 

I edllices of worship in this section. 

I A conference of MethodL'^t minister* 
is being held here today, beinc in con- 
nection with yesterday's dedication. 
» 

Farmer LoMra Two FlnRera. 

Butlzville. N. D., Dec. 1. -(Special to 
The Herald.) — While feedinj:: a com 
shredder C. O. Hoffa. a well known 
farmer, had one hand caught in the 
rolls of the machine and two fingera 
wiTC torn off. 



Paris 



Nijw York 




Washington 



Cincinnati 



Duluth 





Correct Dr«s» for Womoi 



and OirU" 



ARE NOW HOLDING THEIR 

Readjustment Sales 

-OF— 

Women's and Misses' Suits, Coats, 
Gowns, Dresses, Furs, Blouses, Mil- 
linery and Juniors' and Children's 
Wearables at Savings of V4, Va and 
Va Their Regular Values. 

150 High Class Hats 1/2 

(Formerly $7.50 to $45.) 
Consisting of Velvets, Plushes, I'cau dc Pcrhe and other 
materials in black and colors, for street, afternoon and evening 



wear. 



^^omen's and Misses' Suits V2 

(Formerly $25 to $75.) 
Plain tailored and iio\ city styles. 

Wonderful Savings on Gowns and Dresses 

$125.00 to $150.00 Evening and Reception Gowns and 
Dresses now $85.00. 

$65.00 arid $75.00 Afternoon and Evening Gowns now 
$50.00. 

$39.50 to $49.50 Street and Afternoon Dresses now 
$35.00. 

$25.00 to $29.50 Street Dresses, $19.50. 

(All new styles and materials.) 

A PHENOMENAL COAT SALE 

$45 to $55 High-Class Coals at $35 

AL'itcrials are of fine imp(jrtcd Pcau dc Peche, Velours, Wool 
\'eIours and Brocaded Plushe.s — colors are Rose, Mahogany, 
CJolden, Purple, Goblin Blue and many dark colors in all the 
latest styles. 

$35 to $42.50 High-Class Coats at $18 

Materials of Chinchilla, Cut \'clour, Boucles, Cheviots and 
novelty fabrics. 

$29.50 to $45 High-Class Coats at $ 1 5 

Ones and twos left from the licavy week's selling — ^materials of 
Chinchilla, Eioucles, Broadcloths and novelty fabrics. 

Important Sale of Blouses at $6.00 

(Former values to $18.50.) 
Hand-made A'oiles, Soft Brocades. Nets, Shadow Laces and 
Crepe de Ch ne Blouses in the very newest styles for street and 

dress. 

IMPORTANT REDUCTIONS. 

ON FURS 

BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS FURS NOW 
$75 Genuine Russian Pony Coat . . $55 

(t. liapcl dyod. Ci\ct Cat Collar and Cuffs) 

$ 1 GO Genuine Natural Pony Coat . . $65 

(Extra choice skins) 

$75 Genuine Marmot Coat $55 

$ I 50to$ 1 85FineArcadian3ealCoats.$ 1 00 

$185 Amber Fox Set $125 

$135 Genuine White Fox Set . . . $100 
$185PointedFoxandHudsonSeaiSet.$l 35 
$42.50 Genuine Civet Fur Set . . $29.50 
$39.50 Natural Kit Fox Set $19.75 

IMPORTANT CLEARANCE OF 
GIRLS' WEAR 

Entire Slock of Girls' Coats at Vs, V2 and Less 

This inclu<les our entire stock of Plain Tailored and Novelty 
Coats; sizes 2 to 6 and 7 to 14 years. Materials of Ctiinchilla, 
Velvet, Corduroy, Zibeline, Cheviot and novelty fabrics. 

Entire Stock of Girls' Wool Dresses at ^4 Off 

Serges, Worsteds, Cheviots, Corduroys and Velvets. 

Entire Stock of Children's Head wear % Off 




JKShM 



/ 



H. 



>-«. 





r*- 



^»« » 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



li^Ui 




MAktNE NEWS 






NEW TYPE' LIGHTS WILL 
OF VESSELS STia SHINE 

Lessons of Big Storm Being Guides to Mariners Will Not 




ilb erstein& 

Company 




studied By Naval 
Architects. 



Be Discontinued 
Yet. 






aHigk- 



May Result in Radical Some Boats Will Be Oper- 



Changes in Boats Built 
in Future. 



dlh< vission a.« to the 



ated Until Middle 
of Month. 



of «hU. to be constructed L-»^*« officially closed Saturday night. 



An interesting 
future type 
for the Great Lakes Is being carried 
on in a Toronto. <»nt.. paper, and it 
has brouglit out Iron. W. E. Itedway. 
a Kadins naval archlttct. his idea of 
the Jtind of Bhip that soon will be 
corstru.ted for .^r-at Lakes service. 
He believes that the lespon of the re- 
cent marine Ul.aster ^ill ^f »'•''« „^ 
radical change in the type of -""P ana 
^uirgests the kind given in the pait 
of his letter here reproduced. 

"\ dally new.«papcr Is not the place 
for a technical diHcuF.slon. but it might 



Althov.gh navigation on the Great 



One Hund 

Class Suits 
at Exactly V2 Price 

Included j.re many \'elvet Suits, Duvctyn and VeUmr de 
Lainc Suits, as well as Broadcloths, Failles and High-class 
Suitings. ,, . , 

NOTE- To those not acriualnted with thp superior tailoring and 
finish ofour .suits thi.s ofrering will prove a pka.ant surprise. 



be interesting to 
10,000 long ton 
cla.s.Ned at Lloyds 
ton lake fr» ighier 
particulars are: 



bncMy compare a 

ocean ctrgo boat 

with a lo.uOO net 

not to classed. The 



Ocean 

Boat. 
, 4*0 

68. S 
, 41 ' 



Lake 
Poat. 
biO 

56 

31 

19 
2,000 

17.1 

'.'8 




Solid Gold Lavallieres from 
$4 to $150 

rhitinum Lavallieres with dianmnds or witli- 
cait them at prices to suit everybody. 



Length 
Ucam . . 
Depth . 

Draught •• -' 

Indlcutel H. P "'.OOO 

De^l'ia tJ length.... ll-Z 
Drau^htb to length.. -0.7 
Number >f watertight ^ 

"TlK*irare-tWos<-reen bulkheads in 
the main hold of the Uke freighter, 
which is about 3y0 feet long, but they 

"^^Tr.o""wo'boais ar« constructed 
within a .-n>all margin of_ precsely the 



many of the grain boats and package j 
freighters will continue their trips un- ^ 
til the middle of the month if weather 
condnions permit. Marine Insurance, 
good up to l>ec. 1, may be extended up 
to Dec. 6, and in some cases up to 
Dec. 12. 

Because of the extended business the 
iightht)U.s< s will maintain their crews 
indefinitely, in fact, until all the big 
vessels end their trips. Lights at the 
United States .«hip canal at the DuluUi 
harbor will be nuiintalned for several 

The closing of navigation will bo 
heartilv welcomed by the llghthou.sc 
crews on iht- lake.**. Many of tiie incn 
I will then step upon land for the f.rst 
time .since going into the .'service last 
' spring. As most of them do not take 
their families with th'-m to tlie ligiit- i 
house, the closing of the season Is the 
occasion for a homecoming. As the 
season will close so near the ChristnuLS 
holidays, the homecoming will be all 
the more joyful. 

Lonely Life. 
The life of the lighthouse tender. I 
ospeciallv If he does not take Ills fam- I 
llv with "him. is lonely. Only the pass- 
ing of ves.selu or the occasional visit i 
of the ruited States lighthouse ten- | 
ders. tlie Amaranth and the Marigold, i 
cheer hlin at his lonely quarters. , 

Know the CrewH. | 

Many of the old llghthou.=e keepers i 



Higli-Class $^ 

C(oa.ts at.... JL 





Former prices up to $39.50. 

Grouped in one lot to effect a quick clearance. Ones and 
twos of sorie of our most desirable lines; all sizes; black, 
navy, Copenhagen, gray and brown. 



same weight ».f ni> 



•tnl. 



U..:;;;na;^.^V.:siwogirde.-s y^'-e 

ftt deep the lake boat with about 
4.750 tons 



*.ooking "upon ' are acJira'nted with ntost of the vessel 



Established ^^^J 
1892 /<^^ 



Notice the EEE 
io llie Guarantee 









' 








• 



[SPALDING 

428 

West Superior Street 



JEWELE 
^7^Nii-d^ 428 m 

S^'THJS^ West Superior Street 



Till- inrkT- »r..i.» r../. f t 

Steel in a girder 5J0 feet 
.' A 01 f....t d«-en It does not, 

weak for tiie work .'he has lo per 
Torni; but that is what we want to; 

""•Vlovds- rules provide only for nor- | 

muls' ships with a '"r^'S ''L^'^'y^ck' 
sixteen depths to the middle Ucck. 
When they exceed this proport U-n .pe- 
iSa design^) must be ^ub.aitted to the 
' • mn, itice providing for the additional 
oni"tilhiil strent-th required and 
w en they are over thirteen depth.s to 
the iPPer deck, a substantial deck- 
house Tu't be built extending over 
liftlf the length of the vessel. 

"The loss of the Titanic tiught 
naval aSitects and the shlpi.ing 
"Vti generally -"-.valuable essons 
...mongst others that "O. '^f;'^^ \\'^^..\ 
ocean liner will < ver again be »)Uiit 
Tf h' r type. Would it be so very .•nir^ 
.rising afur recent events, to find 

hat H somewhat «»""»": **''';r"'i''reat 
may be experienced u: • n ^"f, *^^* f^ i 
I akes" That Is what ^n investigation 
would' determine. There ^^e .rr;'"/ 
points which might be protUably dls- 

RUSH GRAIN FROM 
CANADIAN PORTS 



cr^-ws or the lakes. When these crew.s 
pass thcie is a shout of greeting, and | 
now and then a bundle of magazines or j 
mail is thrown from the ve.'^sei's deck j 
to a small boat. These are eagerly re- i 
ceived bv the lighthouse keeper, who , 
is thus e'nahled to catch glimpses again | 
of the outside world and hear from the 
folks at home. 




WILL LAY Q 
TUGS SOON 

Several to Go Into Winter 

Quarters Within Three 

Weeks. 



If you ne<;d anything in FURNI- 
TURE, RU(}S or CROCKERY, don't 
fail to take advantage of our PRE- 
HOLIDAY SALE. 

We have dozens of 

DRESSERS 

to choose f rem. Our No. 443 Fumed 
Oak or Wjdnut Dresser, like pic- 
ture, regularly $25.00 to $29.50— our 

Prc-'holiday sale price— 





....^ 



HUNTING SEASON 

COST 135 LIVES 

Chicago Newspaper Tables 

Show Wisconsin Led 

List. 

Chicago. 111.. Pec. l.-The hunting 
season thi h ended yesterday . ost 135 

mes. according to a t"!')''/.^^ ^'"^ /7,'*i! 
rhi..iro Tribune. In t'.ldition llo Ptr- 



sons were injured, several '«*«'>• 

Wl^onsiii was the ^ "J"-' /^"^7*^„';,?V«ne 
reason, with a total ^^.f . ^^^'';,"*^ ■"1",*' 
dtad and t-ventyseven injured Mi. hl- 
gan cime next with twenty-e^ght d^ad^ 
und sixteen injured; New ^"""k %x h» 
third, wltn nineteen dead t'"^. ^^ven 
Jured. and Maine f^'"-"^'?- / »\^. ^',^'^7 
dc::d M line, however, led the list or 
injured with sixty^^ 

Special Tray Sale. 

Beautiful line of walnut, mahogany 
and inlaid woods will be put on sale 
at .special prlci-8 tomorrow only. 

en«;kls' art stoui:. 

7-9 First Avenue West. 



of Naimi Pleku. a young woman of 
New York Mills, on the operating table 
in Dr. Hunters office. The direct 
cause of the girl's death was held by 
the coroner to ha\ e been chloroform 
poisoning. 



iAfa** 



T 



YOUR MOST 
VALUABLE POSSESSIONS 

/A man's health and ^ 
hope of longevity are \ 
absolutely his most 
precious possession. 

In this cold climate the 
climinaiion of the internal 
hody waste, which is always 
t;-oing f-n, is necessary to 
good health. An overaccum- 
iilation of these impurities 
means nerve exhaustions, 
rheumatism, insomnia, etc. 

the sulphur 
vap^Tath 

is a natural and scientific 
wav of throwing off this 
waste and poison through 
the pores. 

You will sleep better, eat 
better and feel better by tak- 
ing them. 

Best Known Treatment for 
Rheumatism and Kin- 
dred Ailments. 

Expert men and women at- 
tendants. 

Duluth Sulphur 
Vapor Bath Co. 

426 West First Street. 

Both Phones. 



Office manager, accountant, 
and auditor, open for engage- 
ment January 1. A No. 1 refer- 
ences. Bond if desired. Per- 
sonal interview solicited. Write 
M 428. Herald. 



In the 

down 



FARMERj^SACCUSED. 

New York Mills Man Faces Serious 
Charges in Mill City. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. Dec. l._William 
Mattie, 28, a farmer near New York 
Mills Minn.. ha.«J been locked in the 
,ltv jail with "man-slaughter" opposite 
.ls\mrne on the police book. H.^ waa 
brought to MinneapoliH by I^dward 
Mulcahey. a city detective. , , 

It is believed the arrest of Mattie «s 
a st»p in the prosecution by the county 
attorney of the charge of P^-rforminR 
an illegal operation, on which Dr. c. H. 
1 Hunter is now awaiting a hearing. 
' Dr Hunter 3 arrest Friday followed 
a live days' investigation of the death 




RAIL INDICTMENTS 

ARE RULED VALID. 

Red Wing, Minn.. Dec. 1.— Judge 
Albert Johnson denied a motion of the 
Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul rail- 
' road, the Chicago Oreat Western Rail- 
I road company and the Chicago-North- 
western Railroad company, to quash 
' the indictments returned by the grind 
I jury charging the three corporations 
with a violation of the 2-cent pas.«en- 
i ger fare law. and the casea must pro- 

I ceed to trial. 

• 

Milpplng Turkey* Wentward. 

Medina. .V. !>.. Dec. l._(Rpecial to 
The Herald.)— Shipping dressed tur- 
keys westward by the ton is becoming 
a common habit here since Medina ac- 
quired Its reputation as a poultry cen- 
ter Two ton.s were recently expressed 
to Tacoma. one of the fast trains stop- 
ping here for the shipment. <ither large 
.shipments have been made to western 
towns. 



HERE'S 
A GENTLEMAN'S 
WINTER SHOE 

It's not so heavy as to 
be unconitortable — it's 
not too light to be serv- 
iceable — it's designed 
just right. It's a Sorcn- 
sen make. 




EXPERT FITTERS 




SEN^S 



123 West Superior Street. 



Gratonola $25 



E.VSV TERMS 

Double-Faced Records 65c 

A&k tor Catalogue 



EBMONT 

1» Third Avenue West 



Eight Million Bushels Sent 
East on Sun- 
day. 

Fort William. Out.. Dec. 1. 
fmul rush to get on their way 

[he lakes before n^^^"'*^*^* ^^"1 ir ^n 
avoid the necessity of having th.ir n- 
surance extended, twenty-five fr«»K»>|- 
r.rs.*^ carrjlng abl.ut 8.000.000 bush, ,.s 
f.f irrain cleared for the L.ast yester- 
dlv Forty-nine ctedmers were In 

'"xovembe'r^ has been a record month 
for grain shipments and more than 250 
V s.4ls have cleared '^o™ ^\h's harbor 
During the last week "\«'« ,^*^,^" J", 
v.ssels with something like 30 000.000 
bushels of grain havo^gone Last. 

FLAX-LADEN BOAT 

BREAKS IN TWO 

Steamer I. W. Nicholas | 
Total Loss in Lake Mich- 
igan; Gogebic Released. ; 

Alpena. Mich . Dec. 1— The steamer ! 
I W NMcholas of «^leveland. which 
grounded off North Point in Lake Hu- 
ron last Wednesday night, broke in 
[wo during the storm which swept 
that section of the lal^® ^-arly yester 
dnv She probably will be a total loss. 

' Tlie' crew remained aboard until hope 
of saving the steanjer was f^'^^^^^'^l^'^ 

I The bout was bound from i ort 
Arthur to Buffalo with 176.000 bush- 

'■^Thc lukmer <log. blc. coal laden, 
which grovmded here Saturday was 

r. leased undamaged. .,oi,ir.rohlv 

Th.' storm moderated considerably 

yesterday. 

DEVICE TO LOCATE 
SUNKEN VESSELS 



Meorge P. Lea Quee of Mountain 
Iron St. Louis county, has received 
letters patent for a new Invention, 
which he claims will be of great as- 
sistance m locating Funken vcssel.s. 

The Inventor declares that all of the 
vessels sunk during the storm could 
els ly have been located if they had 
been eiulpped with an Invention like 

^^ThP apparatus conslstB of a , buoy- 
eaupped with smal^ electric lights 
containers for rec.-rds. names of 
crews class of cargo, last messages 
which might be written by persons on 
board, and various ^ther information 
and is connected by cables with the 

^*^Tlfc' cables ar« wound around a reel. 
The cables are long enough to reach 
to the bottom of aWst any PO>nt In 
the tireat Lakes, and codld bo made 
lone enough to serve in' almost any 
oeln Sster. The hno^' rest.s on its 
Mde while on the ship. A 'rocker' 
turns the current atitomritlcally fron. 
the batteries Into thfe buhy when the 

^"-The^amfaratus Is ftesl^ned to rest 
upon the deck. prefeTably at the stern 
of the vessel, where it Would become 



Of the seven tugs of the T'nion Tow- 
ing company. It Is probable that at 
least three will be laid up for the 
winter within the next three weeks. 

Six of the tugs were tied up to the 
dock today. Until some of the up- 
take boats that will tie up here for 
the winter appear, there is little work 
1 for the tugs to do. 

Last evening was one of the clean - 
j est gf taways in the hit;tory of the 
; local harbor. Everything that was 
j sclicduh-d to I'o went by midnight. The 
1 harbor was cleaned ar.d until the boats 
I that are to bring back westbound 
I freight and then tie up here appear, 
there will be small use for the tug.s. 

There is an immense amount of 

grain to go down ihe lake.s, and it is 

1 very probable that there wlil be con- 

I sider ible towing of boats that are to 

I hold grain here In storage during the 

winter uionth.«. 



l^,r a real Bedroom Suite we invite you to '"M^^.^^^. ^"'^^ .^ ^^"j^f^ 
sian Walnut Suite in our east show window. l^"j;^'^ ^^^'^ 
able to purchase a beautiful Urcsser, !h54.uU 

52 inches long, at, sale price V *»y ^ 

We also liave a big showing of cheaper dressers f-"J ^^f up. 

China W^re and Cut (.lass we are closing at H T^y^coxinX. 

French Clhina Dinner Sets, 100 pieces on sale, only V5./&. 

IIun«!r<'»ls of 

ph'rcs at 
Half I'rlfo. 




In addition to this there will be a 
great deal of towing of boats tliat are 
to be tied up here for the winter. 

(■'apt. Vroman does not belkve that 
all of the tugs will be laid off for 
several v»'e< ks. 



Detroit Passages. 



camp in Chicago the election of an 



oficers. 

FORMEFiaATElBF 

KIT CARSON DIES 

Denver. Col..1i^^01lver T. (OM 
Scout) Wiggins of Denver s ^^^^ 
mous frontiersmen, died at ^.s resi- 
dence here Suriday at the age of 90. 
For a number of years he waa a mem- 
ber of Kit Carson's famous company 

of frontiersme)! and ^"•^f^'^;^,^""^^'; VI^ 
«on >n the Mcj^. lean war v,hc^re^ 

''■ His c .b"n wis one of the first built 
in Denver F.om 1848 to 1858 he was 



DIVORCES OFFICER 
OF ENGLISH mHi 



Detroit. Mich.. Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald..)— Up: Wyandotte, 2:15 
Sunday mf.rning; S. S. Havey. 3:45; 
<;len AviP. 11:45; Cadwell, noon; Saska- 

1 toon. 12:30 p. m.: Alleghany. 12:40; 

'Booth. B. F. .Jones, 1:30; Wallace. 2; 
M. Sicken. 4:40; i:tley, 5; Perseu.s, 5:10: 

i L. B. Miller. 5:10; Hemlock. 6:25; 1 

i Squire. 5:30; (irammer. 5:40; W. A. j 
Rogers, 5:50; I'nderwood, 11; John, 
Barium. 12:15 a. m.. Monday; Garret- i 
son, 4:15: Rutland. 4:40; Arcturus, 7:30; t 

•Allegheny, 8:30: W. H. Mack. Northern I 
Wa\»e. 'J:30; Shaughnessey, 9:40; Wid- j 
Iht Moore. 10; Bransford, 10:15; Dim-' 
inlck, Cadillac, Wente, barge, Odanah, 
10:20; Earling, 10:40; Dunn, 11. 

Down: .Joseph Wood, 10:50 Sunday I 
morning; Kosedale. 12:20 p. m.; Agas- : 
slz, Bo.'^ton, Davock. 12:30; Morrell, 
1 50; Kotcher. 2; Yosemite, 3:45: Dun- i 
ham. A. MInch, 4:40: Huron, 5; Ball! 
Brothers, 6; Indus, 2:30 n. m.. Monday: 
I'mbria, 10; W. A. Help. Ogdensburg, 
10:40; Samuel Mitchell, Wade, 11. 



plains. 



TEAMSTERS' STRIKE 
ON AT INDIANAPOLIS 



Indianapolis Ind.. Dec. l-^^'-^^";: 
Wallace established headquarters at, 
the police stavion early today «"d/«-»d j 
he would takJ personal charge of the, 
police depart.aent until the strike of 
the union teamsters and chauffeurs ; 



London. Dec. 1.— A divorce was 
granted today to Mrs. Ida M. French, 
daughter of Robert J. Wynne of Wash- 
ington. D. C., former American consul 
general In London and ex -postmaster 
general, on the grounds of Inndclity 
and cruelty on the part of her hus- 
band. Capt: Hugh Ronald Fr'^uh. now 
of the Fourth BattalK.n tTerntoria ) 
of the Yorkshire regiment and formL-rly 
of the Seventh Dragoon guards. No 
defense was offered and Mrs. I'/ench 
was given the custody of their fhlld. 

Mrs Fren.h testilled that her hus- 
band had beaten her several times, 
had dragged her about the /7<'n' t»e- 
cause she refused to get ^P "^ ^V ^ 
In tho morning to entertain bi.s com- 
panions, and once k irked her ^' ^"^ «h« 
was lying on a rug in front of the fire. 

The charge of infidelity of Capt. 
French brought In the name of Mario 
Celeste Beach, a Canadian <horus girl. 

The marriage took place in London 

(,n June 17. 1909. 

. • • 

To Cure a Cold in One Day 

Tako i.A.\.vrivi; iti:oMo uiimm-: T«hi..s nnjc- 

plst8 rWiiiid mon.y If It fall'i «» /;"re. ^- W. 
GKOVt'S 6l«ii«ture Is oil *arli buJ^ ''•'<'• 



Marquette Vote* CommUKlon Form. 

Marquette. Mich.. Dec. 1.— Marquette 
Saturday adopted a new charter pro- 
viding for the commission form or 
government. The charter won by an 
overwhelming majority. 



Sault Passages. 



Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., Dec. 1 — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Up: Stor- 
mount, 2 p. m. Sunday; (small) Miller, 
Nye, 3; Keawtin. (small) Hanna, lake 
T»ort. 4; Kopp, 5; Imperial, ♦^'orrlgan, 10; 
Butler, 12:30 a. m. : Monday; Wahcon- 
dah. 1-30; Martian, 4:30; Leonard, Col- 
llngwood, 10:30. _ , 

Down: Wells, 1 a. m. Sunday; Coul- 
by, Netleton, 10:30; Stadacona, 11.30; 
Victory, noon; Ontario, 12:30 p. m.; 
Oglebav. Hawgood, 1; Munro, 1:30; 
Heffelfinger, North Lake. 2; Shenango, 
3- Calumet, Kennedy, 3:30; Verona, 5; 
Thomas Barium. 5:30: Sinaloa, 7: St. 
Clair, 8: Noble, midnight: Du.stin, 12:30 
a m Mondav; Monroe Snilih, 2: Con'-s- 
togn 3:30; Calderia, 4; John McWill- 
lams', Paipoonge, <"urry. North Star. 5; 
Yates Sultana, 6: O.sler. 7: Sn\lth 
Thompson. 8; Fathflnder. Rochester 
Beacerton. Winona. 9; (large) Samuel 
Mather Bartow. Westmount, 10; MIll- 
nokett. 11: Manitoba, (large) Fitz- 
gerald, 11:30. 



of Indianapo is. \*l*?^,^';,;rce awaited 

last night '^^ '^^^if^V To;'''"''^" ''*"''•' 
tUTYlfeT'bad^^ist^ililh^a headquar- , 

^^"^^L .o T Varrell general organ- | 
l.e^orfhe 'ur iof: saVd §e strike order 

'^'^^^•e^a;;;"t;;r 'anV'Thc^ir^^f rlends were ^ 
hulrTod\.y hara.s.ing d«;^ver^., and a 

»'^^sfve'^ar'a7ienUY"to%o.^regate^ in 

^^^- ifrfVu^T-atS^br -L/ miunUd'po^ 
?'-Ji Several pedestrians were struck: 
on'the^'held' a^ul shoulder.^ but none . 
was seriousbjnjur^d^ j 

Washington Doc. 1.— Late Saturday' 
the senate confirmed the nomination, 
of L E Pinkhim o,' Massachuset s 
to be governor of Hawaii. The vote , 
was 26 to 21. 



Port of Duluth. 




Arrivals— Mary E. Elplii'-ke, Cepheus. 
J S. A.'ihley. M. Andrews, coal; Sclwyn j 
Eddv, steel rails. « u . ' 

Departures — Lakewood, Rochester, i 
North Sea. Tlonesta. Octorara. Cone- 1 
maugh. package freight; H. H. Bro\yn, 
W^" tern Star, O.lonel, C L. Hutchin- t 
son^ Pentland. Wickwire, Jr.. L C. j 
Smith W. C. Agnew. Normanla. \\ain-! 
wrlgh't Peter Rclss, A. E. Cornelius, - 
HA Eerwind. grain; Niagara. <;. <;. j 
Barnum, Cygnus, Steel K^^8^ /• J- "• , 
Brown, J ohn Sharpless. lig ht. 

Woodmen Insurgentii Resolv*. 

Ford du Lac. Wis.. Dec. 1— The Wis- I 
conFin assembly of Modern v\oodmen 

nfVhe-vessel. where it ^;ould ^<^-n- | ;;'»--^-J^; rfpe^al'of an^"awrJ;\c?:J 

rrhr4t?r^^^ht'feh;p^^h'oVd"^/in^k!iaT --^'"- ^' ^^^ ^^^^^ 



SAN DIEGO, 



CALIFORNIA 

—the bed place on the Pacific 
Coast to make profitable real 
estate in vestments. 

For Information write to 

G!«R.LAYBOURN 

4. 309 Owl Fdg., San Diego, ^^'^^-^ 

1 - 



Weakened Vitality 

IN MEii AND WOMcN 

is a sure forerunner of weakened 
nuntal vigor and energy, a shat- 
tered conFtitmion and, in the end, 
an early death irom some disease 
that could be easily overcotne by the 

ELECTRO-MEDICAL TREATMENT 

If you are suffering from some 
special, private trouble peculiar to 
the sex, or some Chronic disease, 
seek out the ELECTllO-MEDICAL 
treatment before some quick de- 
stroying disease .should find, in your 
conditon, an ea.sy prey. In such 
cases the constant strain upon the 
nervous system, the steady lo.ss of 
vigor and strength require some 
beneflcent, counteracting Influence 
and thl.s is supplied, as in no other 
way, by the wonderful curative 
and' rovUalixing action of the 
ELECTRCJ-MEDICAL treatment. If 
your health is in danger, if you are 
"run down." if you feel that "life 
Is not worth living." if you have one 
or the other of the diseases we treat 
— no sensible person will overlook 
the ELECTRO-MEDICAL Doctor.s. 
Inc., because they cure. Consulta- 
tion and examination free. 

NO. 26 WrsT SI rF.KIOH ST. 
(Above lit'Lscr's.) 

Electro Medical Doctors Inc. 



4 DEFECTIVE PAGE 




-J»— ,»_ 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 




MANY MENTIONED 
FOR STATE OFFICES 

Very Few Are Definitely Known to 
Be Candidates for Offices to Be 
Voted for in 1914— Much Fa- 
vorable Comment for Henry 
Rines— Sixth and Tenth Dis- 
tricts Are Congressional Storm 
Centers. 



No red tape or secret investigation in the Albert's Easy Credit 
Plan. You simply make a small payment upon delivery and 
agree to make a small weekly or monthly payment until the 
article is paid for. 

FEOWL 





CHRlSTf^AS DIAMOND 
SPECIALS 

What makes a more beautiful or 
lastini; gift than a diamond? We of- 
fer this week a genuine white dia- 
mond set in any style 14K solid gold 
ring, any style mount- ^OC A^ 
ing desired, tor ^2i9«UU 



MEftriNJURIOUS 
I ip THE KIDNEYS 

Take a miespoonful of Salts If 
Back Hurts or Bladder 
ntt-Ui Bothers. 

We an a nation of meat eaters and 
our blood is filled with uric acid, says 
a Wfll-known authority, who warns us 
to be constantly on Kuard against kid- 
ney trouble. 

The kidneys do their utmost to free 
the blood gf this irrilatiuR acid, but 
become wekk from the overwork; they 
tjet slutrgrish; the ellminative tissues 



Th.re is little doing in state ixilillc.-* 
these days except casual talk about pos- i elog: and°thu.s the waste is retained In 
sible candidates. The only ones who are the blood to poison the entire system, 
known to be candidates for stale office ; When your kidneys ache and feel 
are (^Jovernor Eberhart and t^auiuel U. j uke lumps of lead, and you have sting- 
Iverson, for the chief ofticu on the He- i inj; i>ains in the back or the i me is 
jiUblican ticket and Daniel W. Lawler cloudy, full of sediment, or the bladder 
cii the Democratic ticket. Others are j in irritabU-, obliging you to seek relief 
suppo.sed to be racing for various of- } during the night; when yi>u have se- 
ttees, but nothing about that is us yd vere headaches, nervous and dizzy 



made d-^flnilc 

• * • 
In short, this is the "mentioning" 
period. Scores of men are being men- 
tioned for the varlou.s otfioes, and i.io.^t 
of them will never be heard of again in 
connection with the offices for which 
ti.ev are now being nr.entioned. ThU 



spells, sleeplessnes.", acid stomach or 
rheumatism in bad weather, get from 
your pharmacist about four ounces of 
Jad Salts; take a tablespoonful in a 
«ias.-j of water before breakfast each 
morning and in a few days your kid- 
neys will act fine. This famous salts 
Is made from the acid of grapes and 



NAVY IS AT 
TOP NOTCH 



Secretary Daniels Says It 

Is at Its Highest 

Efficiency. 



Wants Conference of the 

Powers to Plan Naval 

Holiday. 



1 f.y^ Kiair.ri- r.f uli ramoaiiins and ii lemon juice, combined with lltnia, ana 
will L tirhlsloiy of this of; Tl.e r has been used for f^enerations to flush 
friends Jo It in Lrder to get tl^em in ' and stimulate clogged kidneys,. to. neu- 



the tUld so that should a possible 



tralize the acids in urine so it is no 
longer a snur«e of Irritation, thus end- 



chance arise they inay,nu,Ke a mjlit or li^^ ,* -"-;,"^,;."J^:-^^V;orde';^:"" 

to honor them or to ..well he"' "P | ^id Salts is Inexpensive and cannot 

a bit when they B«e their names In j^j^^^.. nij^^es a delightful effervescent 



^r^ mil 



.WlV(l/ 



DIAMOND "^ m 
EAR SCREWS €>« 



print 

• • • 
Th- re is ona candidate, however, who 
i i.s being •'mentioned" nuineroa«ly and i 

widelv indorsed, a».d who t>eeuis to be | 
' — at this long way i it — the con.iig P.an 
■ for the .state audltor.ship. That is Henry I 
' Kines of Mora, speaker of the latest j 

house of representatives and un able | 

ixccutive. Mr. Hines is unquestionably | 

tl»e leading candidate — having made his 
.announcement today — for the office, and | 

unle.ss something unlool.ed for shows : 
'up between now and the .lune prlmar- | 

i"S, it »<-ems reasonably certain that ' 
I he will arrive. That is the way the] 

stale press feels about It, and the state 



lithia-water drink, and nobody can 

! make a mistake by taking a little oi- 

I CHsionally to keep the kidneys clean 

and active. Agent. Wirtti's lied Cross 

drug store, 13 West Superior street. 



has been ir, the state l-.ousc so long 
that the m- inory of man runs not 
to the contrary. Sa:n would at 
least put n new crowd in office, 
and some of our frelnds might get 
the plums. 

Piffle! There will be no combina- 
tion as long as a man by the name 
of W. E. L<ee is hanging around utiless 



^ ,1., W.I I the combine*, uecidcs on Lee and that 

press probably judges the thing rlgniij. j ijj ^j^ry unllk.ly. And us to Sam put- 
• * * , , , , ting a n<'W t rowd in the state house — 

ndldate who is being , pjffie a^iuln. 

d Is .Senator Cashman for i « « • 



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Another ca' 

widely indorsed 

the Democratic nomination for gov- 

I ernor. SeJiator ra.<«hman is modest and 

i declares that he does not yearn for It, 

but h- Is being so generally urged that 

he may make the run. His ability and 

I honesty are unqu' stioned and his rec- 

t ord is of the highest order. 

• • • 
1 rongresslonally the two storm cen- 
ters of the state just now are In the 
Si.Kth district and in the new Tenth. 
In the new Tenth there will be at least 
[half a doistn candidates. Oongressnmn- 
at-Large .lames Manahan will mi- 
Idoubtedly be a candidate, rio will State 
I Senator .Swanson. Senator W. S. Dwln- 
i nell of Minneapolis is said to be cast- 
' ing an eye toward the office and if he 
i enters there Is no question that he 
'will tight for it and fight hard. J. 
Adam lUde is credited with an ambl- 
tion to return to contiress, this time 
from the Tenth, and th«re are others. 

In the Sixth Alvah Kastman. the St. 
• Moud editor, is being groomed, and 
there ar.i those who declare that Frank 
I Kddy, formerly in congress, caiuK>l bo 
counted out of the running. That I'on- 
gressman I.indb.rgh Is going to iiave 
a light on h\^ hands there is no doubt. 
The political editor of the Minneapolis 
.Fournal. Charles B. Cheney, has this 
' to say about the disturbance In the 
; Sixth: « 

The politi'-al status ©f Charles 
A. Lindbergh Is much discus.^^ed In 
the new .-'.nd revised sixth congres- 
sional di=;tricn. Lindbergh's action 
In accepting hou.~e committee as- 
signments as a Progressive Is 
taken to mean that he has defl- 
nitnly quit the Kepublican party, 
and "v.hile many are in.r-Mlulous, 
and believe he will tile again as a 
Republican, friends of the con- 
gre.ssman declare thtt he intends to 
file next year as a "bull moose 
candidate. 

Once this becomes known and 
accepted in the district, there will 
be big things doing poMiically. There 
will doubtless be a lively contest 
for the Republican nomination, 
which under ordinary circum- 
.stanc>?s would be good for election. 
Many will urge Alvah Eastman to 
run. and Frank M. Fddy Is another 
po.-->--lbiU»v. ilossip has connected 
the name of H. .1. Muxfield. former 
immigration comniis-Jioner, with a 
congressional boom. Maxfleld, who 
now is practicing law in Wadena, 
has declared that he i.-< out of poli- 
tics Asher Murray of Wadena, for- 
mer member of the legislature and 
a strong man in his section, may be 
pressed into the service. Hrain-rd 
is also quite likely to furnish a 

candidate. 

* • * 

Walker Pilot : Congressman 
Lindbergh belongs to no p.)lltl<*al 
party and he should be made to 
smell defeat. 



SEE OUR WINDOW 



TKc North Country's Largest Slioc Stor« 





218 West Superior Street, 



ST0CKH0L1V[T00 DULL 

Prince William's Wife Dissatisfied 
With Serious Husband. 

Stockholm. Sweden, Dec. 1.— Incom- 
patabillty of temperament is believed 
to be the re?il reason for the expected 
flivorce of Prince William, the second 
son of the king, from his wife, who was household 
the grand ducliess Maria Pavlovna, 
i 



tary attache. Col. Assanivltch, was 
practically dismissed front Sweden for 
spying. All sorts of goysip was caused 
by this exodus t)f the Russian con- 
tingent. Some reports had It that the 
princess had been engaged with the 
minister In the espionage which caused 
the downfall of the attache. 

In court circles, however, It Is said, 
that the rupture between the young 
royal couple was not unexpected. 

The atmosphere of the Swedish royal 

Is about the most homely, 

and even Puritanical, to be fnund in 



Alvah Eastman is too busy 
dodging political honors to S'^ek 
an office. That s the kind of men 
we want on the job. 

The editor of the Walker Pilot is 
certainly a true friend of Alvah East- 
man, and he might easily pick less 
sagaciously In hi«» choii-e of a favorite. 
Also It appears that the sentiment to- 
ward Congres.sman Lindbergh does not 
scorn to grow more favorable. 
• • • 

Litchfield Independent: Senator 
Cashman of Owatonna is men- 
tioned as among the eligibles for 
govern. )r on the Democratic ticket 
next year. He seems to be a pr''tty 
good man, but there is one thing 
that may beat him. He runs a 
nursery. ' and has shipped apple 
trees to farmers all over the state. 
Now when a farmer buys Wealthy 
trees at 75 cents apiece, and finds 
after planting and tending them 
8lx or eight years till they begin 
to bear, that they turn out to be 
some nondescript crab apple that 
even the hogs won't eat, he gets 
sore at the nurseryman who sold 
the trees. Cashman will stand or 
fall on his pa.^t record if he bobs 
up for governor. 

The Lit-hfield Independent is tak- 
ing the Bible literally — "Dy their 
fruits ye shall know them." Rut the 
Independent doesn't intimate that 
Senator Cashman's nursery stock 
out that way. It is generally 



Albert Lt»a Standard: According 
to Charles R. Ciieney in the Min- 
neapolis Journal it would not be 
nd\ i.sable for the Democrats to 
nominate a pre-einimently fitting 
man like Thomas E. Cashman, or 
w !■ may presume, the best man, for 
governor, because through some 
objection to his honest convictions 
and record !t would give some 
Democrats the shivers. 

The logical conclusion, then. Is 
that another candidate, of contrary 
convictions, good, bad or IndilYer- 
ent. would be preferable — anything 
to win This is far from being a 
high or com:iiendable standpoint of 
political principle or morals, and if 
adopted would apply to all nom- 
inations for office. 

Whitt. then, would be the hope 
and prospect for official integrity, 
effi.iency, the be.Mt service and re- 
form g overnrnentV 

And what, pray, would be the 
tonseq lence, sooner or later, to 
the political party th\t adopt.>< this 
as a policy or rule of action? 

It does seem to be rather an ex- 
tra. irdlnary admission that Charley 
makes, to-wil, that honesty and litnoss 
for the office of governor form a bar 
to the place. \i* it possible that the 
only kind of men who can hold the 
t)ffice of goveiiior of Minnesota ar<.' 
those w iio are ignorant and honest or 
able and diahonestV That is rather a 
nasty lling at the present and past In- 
cumbints. It would st-em that Charley 
hardly meant what he said. 
« • * 

Battle Ake Review: The spec- 
tacle of Eberhart and Iverson 
snouting for economy in state ex- 
penditures is enough to make the 
capltol tn table upon its founda- 
ti»)n. Whili- Ebeihart has been 
governor and Iverson auditor, state 
taxes have doubled and quadrupled 
with no earnest protest from either 
of them, or any appreciable effort 
on their part to reduce them or 
retrmch and economize expendi- 
tures over which they Iwive a large 
measure of control. Their agoniz- 
ing appeals to economy arc mere- 
ly plays to retain office, to befool 
the people and obtain political 
support under false pretenses. If 
the voters of Minnesota elect 
either of them to the gubernatorial 
chair, they deserve another in- 
crease of tftxes. Taxpayers must 
soak the tax-eaters or tiie tax- 
eaters will soak the taviiayers. 

Shouting by candidates ofttn is done 
so as to retain a hold on office. That 
is so obvious as to need no exploita- 
tion. Rut <he thing timt voters must 
do Is to pledge the legislative candi- 
dates. Tqe governor can't makt appro- 
priations. Uet a good legislature, 
backed by a good governor, one who 
means right and Is not afraid to try. 
at least, u whip the legislators back 
to their promises, and the tax matter 
will take care of Itself. 





forP 



i -^ "it 






aiiis 
Back 



Soak a towd in boiling hot water, 
•wrinti: it dry, place it over the part of 
the back that hurts for a few mo- 
ments. This opens the pores. Then 
rub in som? Omega Oil. Quick relief 
usu.iHv follows this siinpl'' treatment. 
Trial Louie loc"; jar^e bottles 25c, soc 



as a poet. The gay and lively young 
princess of 23 found life in Sweden, 
under chaperonage of her husband's 
extremely conventional pfirents, ex- 
tremely dull. Hence. It Is said, she fled 
to her father in Paris, and reiuses to 
return. 



HONEYMOON PAIR 

KILLED BY TRAIN. 



Cass Lake Times: Among other 
statements in Sam Iverson's an- 
nouncement as candidate for gov- 
ernor, he says: "Tnere should be 
"team work" among the heads of 
the several divisions of the state 
government." Holding the ribbons 
of the tandem team looks good to 
— Sam. 



But no matter whether one is for or 

against Mr. Iverson in this race, it 

must be admitted that the statement 

by the Times has nothing 

„, . Til 1 111 ^ J ^T'li wrong about it. Had there been more 

Champaign. 111., were killed and W 11- Je|^'^„Vork ttere wocld have been less 



KoUomo, Tnd., Dec. 1 — Ed Grlshaw, a 
farmer, and Mrs. "Wilber Youngman of quoted 



Washington, Dec. 1. — Immediate ac- 
quirement and operation of oil wells 
and refineries to furnish fuel for the 
navy, an International conference to 

secure a reduction of naval construc- 
tlcm, the addition of two dreadnoughts, 
eight destroyers and three submarlnt-s 
for the navy during the coming year, 
government manufacture of armor, 
more naval chaplains and religious 
leaders, better educational facilities 
for enlisted men and a graduated re- 
tirement law are chief recommenda- 
tions in the first annual report of Sec- 
retary Daniels. 

The secretary departs from the 
usual custom in addres.^lng the pres- 
ident in the first person singular, 
thereby adding to the directness and 
force of the report's statements. The 
report reflects his enthusiasm over 
the navy, declaring that the story of 
the year's work "by thi.'? patriotic 
body of efficient defenders of the re- 
public is replete with examples of 
courage, devotion, sacrifice and prog- 
ress." 

In High State of Kfflrlenoy. 
The secretary says the navy was 
never in such a high state of effi- 
ciency as today, and that in consid- 
ering Its future needs he has given 
less thought to the guns than to the 
iren behind the guns. Relieving that 
the efficiency of the navy as a fight- 
ing force will be in the highest sense 
promoted by the adoption of a serious 
and systematic course of Instruction 
aboard ship and at shore stations, he 
points out that the department is 
trying to make the navy a great uni- 
versity. Not only ordinary seamen 
but even petty officers have too little 
accurate knowledge, and this will be 
corrected by a .systematic course of 
instruction. Midshipmen of the grad- 
uating classes will be utilized as in- 
structors "with mutual benefit to the 
men and themselves," and to fit them 
for this work a short normal course 
will be added to the naval academy 
curriculum. As the war college is the 
apex of the navy system of education 
tlie department will try to have all 
officers pass through this training, 
using mail courses where advisable. 
FavorM "Naval Vaeallon." 
The recent propositi;)n of Winston 
Churchill, first lord of the Rritish ad- 
miralty, for a "naval vacation" meets 
with the secretary's hearty commen* 
dation In view of the tremendous in- 
crease In American naval expendi- 
tures. Pointing out that ten years 
ago the largest battleship cost $5,382,- 
tioO, while th>' next dreadnought will 
cost $14,041,000, Mr. Daniels asks '/hen 
is this accelerating expenditure to be 
reduced. He .adds that it Is "not a 
vacation that we need but a perma- 
nent policy to guard against extrava- 
gant expansionists." Time, he sug- 
gests, should be given to ship build- 
. rs to guard again:;t logs from a re- 
duction of the building programs. The 
secretary trusts that the L'nited States 
will take the Initiative, and that steps 
will be taken by a conference of all the 
powers to discuss reduction of liie 
lieavy cost of armies and navies. 

Secretary L>anlels says his building 
prog nam is not large, but is progres- 
sive and has been recommended "as a. 
ii.iddle course of wisdom," the reve- 
nues of the country not permitting a.5 
large an expansion in naval building 
.IS the uepartment might desire to en- 
ter upon at this time. That is the ex- 
planation for the proposed reduction 
of tie building program recommenvled 
by tlie general board, which contem- 
plated construction of four battleships, 
f.ixtten destroyers and one destrjyer 
tender; eight submarines and one 
tender; two oilers, two gunboats, one 
transport, one supply ship and one 
hospital ship. 

SiiggrHtM Armor Plate Factory. 
The secretary thinks that tlic tinif 
has come when the department should 
le freed from excessive prices charged 
by private manufacturers of armor 
plate, gun.s and gun forgings, torpe- 
does and other supplies and munitions, 
so he recommends appropriations for 
an ariiior plate factory and an Increase 
in the gun factor.v, the powder factory 
pnd the torpedo works. He refers to 
his efforts to secure reasonable prices 
from the armor companies, and assert;' 
that without its own plant the gov- 
ernment would be at the mercy of 
three manufacturers in time of war. 
History does not warrant an as- 
sumption, he adds, that the patriotism 
of these companies will prove supe- 
rior to their desire for profits, inas- 
much as during the time war W'th 
Spain was Imminent they refused to 
accept the price fixed by congress and 
declined to manufacture any amor 
intll they got their own price of |100 
more a ton than congress had de- 
termined on. The report comments 
upon contracts made by the compa- 
nies to supply foreign navies with | 
armor at prices much below those j 
charged their own government, and 
dirc'ts particular attention to the fact , 
that they at present supply armor for | 
the Japanete cruiser Haruna at 
j 406.35 a ton while charging ?.504 to ] 
$4 40 a ton for armor for the American ! 
battleship No. 3K. 

The rerommendation regarding oil 
' the'Vta'tei wt'llf' •'^"d refineries follows the tran."- 
ne: unani- i formation of modern navies from coal 
eemod'the'to oil burners. The report says the 
price of oil is steadily creeping up- 
ward l.*-- now twice as much as In 1911. 
and will be a staggering Item in the 
expense account of the navy in the fu- j 
ture unless the navy controls its own ; 
wells. Even now the navy is using 
30,000,000 gallons of oil a year, and , 
there Is likelihood that this will be ; 
In'^reased In the future to 125.000,000 : 
gallons, which n^u.«!t be purchased from 
the oil companies at their own price. 
Should Get Oil WcIIk. 
Therefore, Mr. Daniels urges, by the 
time the Panama canal is opened the 
navy should be producing its own oil 
from Its petroleum reserves in the Elk 
Hills and Ruena Vista fields of Cali- 
fornia: Its refineries should bo in 
operation, oil lands .should be leased 
In the mid-continent fi'lds and oil 
tanks erected at various ports. 

The report declares that too much 



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ber Youiismnn, husband of the wom- 
an. Wis fatally hurt Sunday when the 
carriage In which they were riding, 
was struck by a Lake Krle I'i We^tf-rn 
pnssen{?or train near Fairfield. Mr. and 
Mrs. Youngman were on their honey- 
moon. 



ment that Is stirring 
state right now. 



up the whole 



tJemidJi Paily Pioneer: Henry 
Rines and H J. Maxtield want to 
be state auditor. The dorks have 
been cleared by Samuel Iverson's 
announcement for the Kovernor- 
ship, an«i Jn<iications are that It 
will be] a fr^e for all race with a 
good field of entries. 

Now It •'JiftS boon announced that H. 
J. Maxfifld may run' for congres.s, but 
Mr. Maxfleld d«clarcs that he will not 
be a candidate for anything: that he 
is out of poliU--s. That will be a relief 
to the friends of Henry Uines of Mora, 
for the latter'.'' candidacy is receiving 
an indorsement throughou-t 
that narrowly escapes bei 
m'.iis, and Mr. Maxfield s 
only real dangci\ 

HOW'YOU MAY THROW 
AWAY YOUR GLASSES 

The statement Is made that thou- 
sands wear eyeglasses who do not 
really need them. If you are one of 
those unfortunates, then these glasses 
may bo ruining your eyes instead of 
helping them. Tiiousands who wear 
these "windows" may prove for them- 
selves that they can dispense with 
glasses If they will get the following 

prescription filled at once! Go to any j n,o'nc>A' has been spent a.shore for build 
active drug store and get a bottle of ings, "and too little for docks and war- 
aciivt "•"» " w »i, -.1, <,hli)s though no definite recommenda- 

Optona: fill a two-ounce bottle with shlP|. J^^"^^^^^, ^^^^ the location of new 
water and drop In one Optona tablet, ^jo^ks pending the building of "an ade- 
Wlth this harmless liquid solution quate and well-proportioned navy." 
bathe the eyes two to four times dally i ^^^^^J^l^l^ aVnUi^^fytn^loI 
and you are likely to be astonished at | ^^^'^ ^.he secretary reports, owing to 
the results right from the start. Many better educational facilities, trlp.s 
who have been told that they have as- | aboard for the benefit of foreign travel 
wiiij i»a»c M ,» I closer Intimacv between the en- 

tlgmatlsm, eye-f^tra.n, cataract, sore andj men and the officers. Surprl.;- 
eye-llds, weak eyes, conjunctivitis and | j^piy good results. It Is added, have 
other eye dlsarders report wonderful followed the disciplinary barracks, 
b.„,n.s ,rom the „.. o» <';'» 'ree Pr«- j wWch aro re„,lv-^sch.,o.s o_r_ -erection. 

scription. Get this prescription filled i "^^^^^ f^r desertion have Justified being 
and use it; you 'may so strengthen your ; returned to their ships. 

I More Chaplalni* Needed. 

1 More chaplains, many more, l.s the 
crying need of the navy, and .Secret.ary 



Rheumatism is "pain only. 

Not one case In fifty requires Inter- 
nal treatment. Sitop drugging! lUib 
soothing, penetra.lng "St. .Jacobs Oil 
directly upon tho "tender spot and 



relief comes instantly. "St. Jacobs Oil" 
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and can not burn or blister the skin. 

Limber up! Quit complaining! Get 
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Because youths 
li.^ by fair com 
rank higher tlia 
without compel It 
gests that con 
should name midt 
of such examina 
the same prlnclp) 
ness demonstratei 
tion — the secretai 
cient protection t 
by the arbitrary 
ity" in making 
marine corps, has 
ed to the rear, i 
never again stani 
merit. 

In conclusion, tl 
the apportlonmen 
annual appropriat 
retired officers ai 
sive. He cites t 
officer recommer 
becau.«5e of defec 
qualified for any 
line officer. Mr. 
retire him becau 
$77,000 in pay if 
life. Therefore t 
graduated retirei 
voung men In g 
slight defects si 



admitted to Annapo- 
petitive examliiation 
n those who enter 
on, the report sug- 
gressmen hereafter 
thipmen on the basis 
tions. Carrying out 
e — recognition of lit- 
1 in honest competi- 
y says that the an- 

possible favoritism 
marks of "adaptabil- 
appointments to the 

at last been relegat- 
ind he hopes It will 

1 In the way of real 

le secretary says that 
t of $3,23<J.8o4 of the 
Ion for naval pay for 
id men seems exces- 
he case of a young 

ded for retirement 

.ive vision, perfectly 

service except as a 

Daniels refused to 

se he would receive 

he lived his allotted 
ho report .suggests a 
nent law by which 
ood health but with 
lall not receive the 



same retired pay as an old officer en- 
tirely incapacitated. 

NGHT fOSAVE 

BEC KER TH IS WEEK. 

New York, Dec. 1. — Twenty-five rea- 
sons by Former Police Lieut. Charles 
IJecker should not be executed for tho 
murder of Herman Ro.^enthal, the 
gambler, will be presented this week 
to the state court of appeals. Becker 
Is now In Sing Sing prison under sen- 
tence of electrocution. His attorneys 
said the court probably would devote 
four days to hearing arguments on 
his appeal from conviction. 

Becker, says the appellant's brief, 
is "a victim of the greatest conspiracy 
of the age. He was not given a 
chance for his life. The effect of the 
ruling of the court made the trial a 
mockery." 
I One of the principal arguments In 
' Becker's behalf will be that of Sam 
1 Schepns, the chief corrobor.ative wit- 
ness for the state, was an accom- 
plice. His attorneys complain that 
I the trial was rushed through and that 
I Beclver was convirted by public opln- 
I ion. 



Slop Indigestion Tliis Easy, 
Simple Way -Samnel's "3-P" 



necessity for thi.s campaign for econ- ! eyes that ^lassos will not be necessary, 
omy and efficiency In state Kovern- j ,j,j^^„gQ^y,jjg.\vi,o are blind or nearly so, 

or who wear glasses, would nevt 



Darllnf? <luit!« Fedrral .Tob. 

New Y</rk. Dec. 1. — In oider to en- 
ter commercial life in tils city, Jo- 
si ph R. r>arling has resigned as spe- 
cial agent of the depanment of jus- 
tice at Washington, to become effec- 
tive about Jan. 1, next. 



Blwabik Times: A niaj.)rlty of 
the opponents of Eberhart are 
holding their fire. Thty are wait- 
ing to determine who Is lils 
strongest opponent and then with 
one Hcoord throw their support 
to that man. It's w.>rth the ef- 
fort, even thougii it siiould result 
lu the choice of Sam Iverson, who 



have 
required them if they had cared for 
their eyes Jn time. Save your eyes be- 
fore It Is too late! t)o not become one 
of these victims of neglect. Kyeglasses 
are only Ime crutches and every few- 



years they [must be changed to fit the 



ever-lncreVsing weakened condition, so every ship that has n< 
better see if you can, like many others, , young religious leader to 
eet clear, 'healthy, strong, magnetic a "welfare secretary. 



get - 

eyes through 

given. 



the prescription 



Daniels says it Is a reproach to the 
country that it now has only the same 
number that It had In 1842. He recom- 
mends not only an increase in the 
number of chaplains, but an appro- 
priation to enable him to employ on 

'"- no ch.i plain a 

be known as 

He thinks, 

here tliough, that there should be a ch.xp- 

llaiu for every 1,000 men In the service. 



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i suffering the dis 
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ing, no energy a 
ing generally "i 

' who can quiclily 

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j Made after tl 
famous French 
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Papain, Glycero- 
harmless ingredi 

! ed gelatin caji.sul 
to take, unlike 
pills. 

i Thousands of 



ind woman Is to-day 
comfort and distress 
h, Indigestion, bloat- 
fter eating, and feel- 
otten" all the time 
get rid of it if they 
Samuel's "Three-P" 

le prescription of a 
physician. These 1: - 
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Phosphates and ther 
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aien and women take 



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after heavy meals, eat what they want 
and never suffer stomach distress. It 
jiot only banishes indigestion but 
builds up the whole system, making 
life worth living. 

Don't deprive j'ourself another day 
of the pleasures of enjoying and di- 
gesting your meals. G<.t a package 
now. You are sure to be happy 
over It. 

Good druggists 
Samuel's "Throo-P' 
sizes, 
order 




everywhere 
capsulues, 
25c and 50c. 
direct from 
Samuel Chemical Com- 
pany, Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Guaranteed by Wm. A. 
Abbett, 3 stores. 



sell 

two 

Or 

The 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



.« 



i 










^ 



I 





Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 19:.3. 



Voull Do Better at Kelly's 



r^ 



•MH^ ■■■•MM**' 

\ 

: 

I 




PLEADS FOR 
BIG NAVY 



COMMITTEES 
ARE NhMED 



^he Morning 
Jj^Qurs are ihe 



General Board Wants Plan of Work Outlined By 

r-.-x.. i-:^ui n«**i« r» :««;/%« r.n CffL 



Forty.-Eight Battle- 
ships By 1920 



Commission on Effi- 
ciency. 






•t.O 




Shopping 



Says People Do Not Under- Will Remodel and Revise 



stand Situation at 
All. 



I>t.o. 1. — Admiral Dew- 

the nnval program the 

should ndopt if it Is to 

policies In the 

trnnsmltted to 

the report of 



■VN'ashlnKton, 
ey's views of 
I'lilted Stut»'3 
B^uard its International 
family of nations are 
I'resident Wilson with 
Secretary Daniels. 

The admiral's vieW3, which embody 
ihc recommendations of the navy gen- 
eral board, are that the fleet i^hould 
conf-ist of forty-eight bnttl. ships of 
the line before I'.'-'O, if possible, and 
that the building program should be- 
gin ihis y«"ar 



tlie System of Gov- 
ernment. 




tour dreadnoughts, 
fight submarines 



r 



if 




E Here's a Chance to Save 
Some Extra Dollars 
For Christmas Gifts 




c 

L 
£ 
A 
N 

I 
N 
G 



Ladies' Suits $1.50 

Ladies' Long Coats. $1 
Gentlemen's Suits . $1 
Gentlemen's Over- 
coats 5 '- 






D 
B 
Y 



more 



us a cent. 

Our Dry 
be as guCKl 



coat or fuit today 
pleased with your 




and ii you arc 
venture, don't 



not 
pay 



Cleaning and Pres.-inp is guaranteed to 
as that obtained anywhere in Anier-.ca. 




P 

R 
I 

C 
E 

8 



Laundry 

French Dry Cleaning Dept. 





■»..i 




US YOUR PRINTING ORDERS 

•MKiM POVVIIR PRlMINCi" 

{^ERRiTT & HECTOR, 

PRINTERS & BINDERS 

•Kush Orders a ! ka-.ire ' 112 WEST FIRST ST. 




>«';ir Willi 
sixteen dest riiyL-rs, 
and minor er-nft. 

Admiral Dewey points out th.it 
four first-cljiss ships were laid down i 
this year, they would not in<rease the 
strength of the navy, but would only 
replace the Indiana, Massaohusett.s. | 
Oregon and Iowa, which he declared ^ 
should bf withdrawn even from the re- j 
Berve lltKV 

Continual Iluitdlng Tulloy. | 

fontending for a continuing building ; 
policy unaffected by p«.litlcal parlies ; 
or change of administration it says: 

"The general board does not believe 
the nation stands ready to abandon 
or modlfv any of these well-estab- 
lished national pollcU-s. and repeats Its 
position that the naval policy of the 
country should be to possess a fleet 
powerful enough to prevent or answer 
any » hallenge to these policies. The 
absolute strength necessary to accom- 
plish this Is a question that depends 
upon the national policies of pro- i 
speetive challei.#ers and the force they \ 
can bring against us. and hence is re- ; 
latlve t id varies with their naval poll- j 
cies and building program. 

"The forecast of the board with re- 
gard to naval development In »>ther 
countries has piovud remarkably nc- , 
curate. 

Talk About War. 
"The absence of any dettnite naval | 
poli« y on our part, except In the gen- j 
eral board, and tlu- failure of the peo- 
ple, the congress, and the executive 
Bdvernment to recognize the necessity 
for such a policy, has already placed 
us in a position of Inferiority which i 
may bad to war; and this Inferiority i 
Is progressive and will ctmtlnue to in- i 
crease until the tieces.slty for a dell- | 
njte policy Is recognized and that pol- , 
icv put Into operation. j 

""The general board, while adhering • 
to trie policy it has consistently fol- | 
lowed for the past ten years, and be- 
lieving that the naval netds of th-> | 
ration call for a lleet of forty-eight 
.^hlps of the nrst line In 1920, recog- 
nizes conditions as they exist, and the 
futllitv of hoping or expecting that 
the ships and men Its policy calls for 
will be provided by ll'l'O. 

"Tlie board does believe, however, 
that this result may be eventually at- 
tained bv the adoption by the govern- 
ment of a delinite naval policy, and 
the putting of it before congress and 
the people clearly and succinctly. 
Fix ItrnponMlliliity. 
"By this method, responsibility for 
any ruptui'e of our peaceful relations 
with other nations due to our naval 
weakne.«;s, or any national dlsa.'-ter in 
war due to the same cause, will be 
dellnitely fixed. The general board 
believes that the people, with full un- 
der.^tanding of the meaning of and 
reasons for naval power, will in.^truct 
the legislative br.nnch of the govern- 
ment, and that that branch, with 
same understanding, will provide 
mtan.s. Uy the adoption and advocacy 
of a clearly defined, dennlto policy 
the department, with whom the re- 
, sponsibility Hist rests, will have done 
'• its part, and placed the responsibility 
with the people and the legislative 
i branch of the government. 
I "If the i)Cople. having been given 
the meaning of and the reasons for 
' naval power, fall to Instruct the con- 
gress the responsibility and th»- re- 
sultl'ig material loss and national 
miliaiion re:Us upon them; 
congress, having been 
the people, falls to 
then 



St. Paul. Minn.. Dec. 1. — At the meet- 
ing on Saturday afternoon of the effi- 
ciency and economy commission ap- 
pointed by (jovernor Eberh«r<lt to sub- 
mit a plan for reorganizing the state 
governmtrnt, resolutions were adopted 
outlining the work to be done, and 
committees were appointed by the 
el lirman. Charles V. Craig of Duluth. 
Three resolutions Introduced by C. A. 
Congdon of Duluth were adopted. They 
outline the commissions policy, which 
Is not to attempt to recommend new 
laws changing the existing rights and 
duties of citizens or the leclprocii 
rights and duties of the state, but will 
confine Itself to remodeling and 
Ing the system of government 
i efficiency of managen.eiit 
'. cenlrule responsibility 



revls- 
to get 
and to con- 
A resolution 
by T. T. Hud.«on of Duluth was adopt- 
ed expressing appreciation of the act 
of the unlver.-ity authorities in pla<ing 
at the commission's dlspo'-'al the service 
of l>r E. Dana Durand as chief statisti- 
cian, and stating that the v orU will re- 
Guire all of Dr. Durand"s time for the 



Q 
next 



six or elKht months. 

The fommltteeii. 

In annouiuing his ct>iunilttecs. Chair- 
man Craig said that they should con- 
sider the subjects assigned to I hem 
from the viewpoint of liie rt.-solutlonM 
Pdopted and report to the executive 
committee. . , 

T! e executive committee is composed 
of C P Craig, chairman; C. A. Cong- 
don' Duluth; Senator .lohn Moonan. 
Wase.a; .ludge C. F. Mc Ite. Minneapo- 
lis- Prof. John H. Cray. lnlveislt.v oi 
Miiinesota. The other committees fol- 

lo\^' ' 

KinancKC. administration and con- 
tral -Joseph Chapman, vice presid.-i.t. 
Northwestern National bunk. &«.'""•;- 
apolLs. chairman; \V P-^^^^'^""""' 
Winona: W. AV. Smith, hleepy 
i:iias Jacobson. Monte\ideo; 
J. Lanf International 1- alls. 
McCee will co-operate. 

Management and development 

;)ubllc domain, roads and 
Improvements — Hugh 
Minneapolis, chairman; 
H H. Dunn, Albert 



Eye; 
Frank 
Judge 



eluding 
ternal 
Hughes, 
resentatlve 



In- 

In- 

J. 

Uep- 

Lea ; 

Itepre- 

Minne- 

C. A. 



feature 



John Hohmnnn, Mankato: 
FcntatUe Thomas l^",^,*^l'^V.?;j 
apolis; V. S. I.ycan. HemidJI 

Congdon will <'"-'"^V.''" *'.v,^e» 
Education. Including those 
of state administration «•<>""-•>.'> 
called the humanities— J. A. ".«''' 
gan member of the state educational 
Commission, < han-nu.n; ;^--t<- /„,;,: 

Dean A. F. Woods, 
state college of "^jriculture: Hepre^- 

^^llS^^t^.-il^JI^Iuend^n^'^educa- 
tlon, to eo-opcrnte. _^,^_^^^„^ • ^„„,. 

and 



Putnam, Hlue 
er 
college 



son. Fergus Falls; 



the 
the 



WHAT OTHER CITIES ARE DOING 



D 



^ 



ECLARINC that the entire cit- 
izenship of Des Moines .should 
be represented Mayor Janies ; 
R Hanna has announced his 
plan for the investigation of , 
the city government by an 
efficiency and economy com- , 
mlttee The council adopted a rf 9*>l"- ^ 
tlon Inviting the general public to i 
name "uVh a committee to check every . 
dtpartment of the city. The nriayor's , 
SfaniTk" every Improvement league , 
Sierv commercial organization, labor . 
Ms.mbly and other live as.-oclatlon i 
to meet and name a delegate to be a 
member of a civic tonimiitee. 
committee, composed cf titty 
shall name an executive 
of five. The executive , ,i, 

either make the Investigation of the 
cltv administration or engage an 
flclentv engineer. The committee 
fo give the fullest publicity 
findings In every department 
iovernmtnt. The mayors 
make the in^<'«tlP«t»«" .. ^ 
representative of the entire 
•hip cf Des Mo ines. 

The Duluth city commission is now 
awaiting the report of the efficiency 
survey of the several departments 
made by Dr. M. «. Kastall. 

Ka«tall spent a month going 

local administration and will 

results in a report which 

any day. He went ov» r 



various features with the commission- 
ers in person and will embody all his 
findings in concise form, accompanied 
by recommendations for Improve- 
ment. 

The city officials wish all citizens 
to take an Interest in city govern- 
ment and if any committee or any 
representatives of any organization 
wish to go Into conditions for them- 
selves they will be given all assist- 
ance possible. 



This 
men. 
committee 
committee can 

ef- 

is 

to Its 

of city 

plan is to 

thoroughly 

citizen- 



TURKEY DINNER 



at 6 o'clock .. . . . 
LiUK'h nt noon. 

Served at Flr-t M. E 
<ljiy, Dec. 



60c 

35c 

. tinireli, Tue.s- 
2n(l. 



Dr. 
over the 
Bub?iiit the 
Is expected 



IN MEMORY OF 

HENRY TAYLOR 



DROPSY AND 

BRIGHTS DISEASE 



Friends of Late British Vice i^^-'^i^f 
Consul Attend Special 
Service. 



hu- 
and If the 
Instructed by 
provide the means, 
the responsibility Is theirs. 
People IJo >ot Undemtand. 
The general board bt lieves that 
onlv a laik jjf understanding of these 
views bv the people at large prevent.s 
the adoption of a consistent naval 
policy; and recommends to the d<;Pft fo- 
ment a system of extended publlcltj 
i In all matters relating to naval pol- 
I ley acting through patriotic organlza- 
tions. the press, or by whatever means 
a knowledge of the naval needs of 
the nation may be brought home to 
the people of the country, with the 
i meaning and reasons f^T them. 

"The general board believes that an 
underfctanding by the nation of the 
navy's rolo as a guarantor 
and an upholder of those 
and policies which have become a part 
and parcel of our natl(«nal 
will fix a naval policy that 
those needs. 

"From year to y^ar . 
formulation of those opinions In 
the general board has 
recommended a , . » 

based on the policy o a f/'^/y-*^^'« V^. 
battleship strength In 19J0. with 
necessary lesser units and auxiliaries, 
and these recommendations have var- 
ied only in the lesser units of the fleet. 
as developments and improvements 
have varied the relative value of those 
lesser units and the auxlli."-rles. 
WantN F'IxcjI Policy. 
"These recommendations have been 
made in the pursuance of a fixed and 
dXite poHcy adopted by the board 
for its guidance, after mature and 
liberate consideration 
ments Involved and 
estimate and forecast 
would be 



Supervl.-lon and arbitrament 
_,^ inVinr transportation 
u'de-LT.T Hudson. "^I.uluth. cbali; 
maS? E.- G. Hall. Minmapo Is: J. i- 
•Sullivan St. t loud; '.ev.r,:,. ^Z*^" 
Uler secretary to the governor; J .A 
Stoneburg. Cambridge. Trof. Ciay 
w ill co-operate. ' ' . 

Inspection, safrty, protection, san.- 
tatlon-Dr. C. Hagen. Moorhe:..!. 
chairman: D. A. WalLnce St Pai . 
Theodore Wold. Minneapolis; *;«;"«»' ^ 
Alfred Rustad, Wheaton; O. U. Nel- 
son. Spring drove. Senator Moonan 
will co-operate. 

TWO ARRESTED ON 

FARGO TRUE BILLS. 

VorfolU. Va.. Dec. 1.— Samuel T.. Har- 
ris president, and J. G. Thalaktr. sec- 
retary and trea;6urer, of the Capital 
Securities comi any. with head<iuarters 
Norfolk, were arrested 



Buy Diamonds for Christmas 
from a House that has 

A Reputation That Protects 

In all business and professions there is a not- 
able trend toward specialization. Constant study 
combined with long experience is the only method 
by which expert knov^ledge can safely be ac- ' 
quired. 

For over a quarter of a century this store has 
specialized on diamonds, and today our custom- 
ers are able to avail themselves of our knowledge 
and experience without any expense to them- 
se!vas. 

Moreover our long 
mond market enables us 
purchases and in turn :o offer our customers ex- 
ceptional values. 

Today our stock of diamonds is complete in 
every size and price. No such stock of fine dia- 
monds has ever been (Exhibited in this commun- 
ity before. 

We are proud of our diamond stock, our 
diamond prices and our diamond reputation. 

It means that our customers are satisfied, 
more than anything else it is to the good 
and friendship ol: our diamond customers 

that we attribute the growth and success of our 

business. 

Bagley S:? Company 

Jewelers and Silversmiths 
315 West Superior Street Established 1S8J 



experience m the dia- 
to make very favorable 



and 
wi 



In 



founxl 



Saturday 
against them 



upon Indictments . ....,.,.,.,„ 

in Fargo. N. D., charging to«''n>irac> to 
defr.aud by use of the mails The de- 

fenda'us gave ball for *X'd ^^'ta'^c^ 
tear Tuesday before a ^ "'ted Stat< a 
commissioner. They reHfted efforts to 
have them sent to Fargo. 




T WAY TO 

FIGHT 




of peace 
doctrines 



existence 
will meet 



since the 
1003. 
consistently 
building program 



We French Dry Clean and 
Press Men's Suits and Overcoats 
for $1.00 and guarantee the work 
equal to any obtained anywhere. 
Remember this a special ofler. 
Phone 2442, Yale Laundry. French 
Dry Cleaning Department. 

P. 0. FORCE SETS 

EIGHT mm mn 



Every Community House 

Will Wipe Out Ten Saloons, 

Says Rabbi. 



Lester Park Residents Con- 
sider Plans for Raising 
Buildinij Fund. 



) society and c on.panioiisliip." said I'r. j 
I Lefkovits. "Sirce the saloons win men ; 
t In this way. ,t Is the duty of the i 
i church militant to offer somethhig : 
better in the v ay of sc»cial centers. 

"The community hou-se will fill a ; 
long-felt want In Lester I'ark. for it i 
will be at once a playground and a ■ 
forum. It car. be made a pow. rful 
facnir for honest gov< inment. 1 hope 
you succeed <n building your commun- ; 
Ity house. If you do, you will not 
i only benefit L< ster I'ark, but the en-, 
tire city." ^ , 

Charles Palrrer. chalrnian of the fi- 
nance conmiitt e, whieli is arranging 
to raise enoujih money for the erec- 
tii'ii of a con ruunity building, gave a 
I short talk on the present plans of the 
I committee. It is hoped to raise J5,000 
bv nuans of a .sale of shares in a 
! holding company, each sl.are to cost 
$:;r.. The punha.'i'-r may pay for his 
share at a rate'tif ?1 a month, ttius 
exl< nding the period of payment to 
two years. 

RAPID mimi OF 

ALASKAN GLACIER 



Nearly everybody . 

the dropsy comes so fast in 



tUsease that the patient has to 
tapped that the case Is hopeless so 
as the old treatment Is 
never heard of a case 
required tapping until 
Compound was 



be 
far 
coricerned. We 
recovering that 
Fulton's Renal 
evolved. Under the 
Renal Compound recoveries are fre- 
aiiently reported even In this supposed 
hopeless stage. We will cite two cases: 
F H Chandler of Clay. .Vew \or\i. 
was a very serious case. As high as 
four Quarts of water were- drawri at a 
tapping. He was put on Fulton s Re- 
nal Compound and a year thereafter 
had resumed employment. 

Another— Patient six years old, the 
■on of AC. Dean of Oakland Cal.. was 
tanned eight times; even had to be 
Spped after being put on Fu ton'., Re- 
Sd Compound, but the tappings grew 
further apart and he made a recovery 
and was going to school at last ad- 

^'if^you have Brlghfs Disease do you 
not owe It to your family to try 
ton's Renal Compound be 
up? Druggists Eupplied by Leithhead 
Drug company. 

For pamphlet write 
Co.. San Francisco. 



A memorial service for Henry Tay- 
lor was held yesterday afternoon at 
St. I'aul's Episcopal < hurch. Dr. A. W. 
knows that when 1 Ryan conducted the service. Mr Tay- 
l^rlght's I lor was commended for his service as 



should be 
W'ord.s. the 



a British vice consul, as a business 
man, and for his home life. 

The meeting was attended by a 
large number of friends of Mr. Taylor. 
Music was furnished by the Scottish 
Rite Masons' quartet and Miss Gladys 
iieynolds. Dr. Ryan declared that Mr. 
Tayior had been one of the most faith- 
ful members of St. Paul's church. 

NEW MEMBERS FOR 

PALESTINE LODGE. 



de- 
of all the ele- 
after a careful 
of the future as 
the naval develop- | 
those foreign countries with | 
which conflict might be probable, and 
what should be our own development 
to Insure peace If possible, or supe- 
riority of force if war 
forced upon us. 

"Expressed in concrete 
'Dollcy' of the board has been to pro- 
vide the nation with a fleet equal or 
superior to that of any probable 
enemy, as a guarantor of peace; and 
Its forecast was that a fleet of fort> - 
eight battleships, with the attendant 
lesser units and auxiliaries, ready for 
action by 1920 would accomplish this 
result." ^__ ^ 

TITANIC LOSSES 

IN SUPREME COURT. 



Washington. Dec. 1. 
of the liability of the 



79, A. F. & A. 
conferring the 



Ful- 
glving 



John J. Fulton 



Palestine lodge, No. 
M., is this afternoon 
third degree on a class of twenty-two 
candidates at the Masonic temple. The 
ceremonies will be followed by a din- 
ner at 6 o'clock and later by the forty- 
fourth annual meeting of the lodge 
which will be held at 7:30 o'clock. The 
principal business to come before the 
lodge at its annual meeting is the 
election of officers and the reading of 
annual reports. 



— The question 
owners of the 
Titanic for payment In full of the 
millions of dollars of claims for loss 
of lives and property has come before 
the supreme court from the < Ircult 
court of appeals at New York. 



Liver 



j Are Cured . 

Is HOOD'S P 

) 25c. 

1 •%%^^%%%' 



Ills 

by 5 






Increase in Prrcels Post 

Business Makes Additional 

Help Necessary. 

Eight men will be added to the post- 
office force next week to take care ; 
of the Christmas rush of mail, accord- 
ing to I'ostmaster Cook. 

The extra help will assist only in 
handling the mall in the regular de- 
partments, Willie the parcel post deliv- 
eries are to be cared for by the reg- 
ular employes. Tho business has grown 
so heavy that it Is likely several mora 
men will be added to this department 

very shortly. . »v. * i,„ ^m 
Mr Cook announced that he will 
make a request of the department at 
Washington for automobiles for par- 
cel post delivery. 

suffragettTriot 

OUTSIDE OF PRISON. 

Dublin, Dec. 1.— Militant suffra- 
gettes outwitted the police Sunday and 
held A demonstration outside of Mourit 
Joy prison, where Mrs. Sheehy Sklff- 
Ington who was sentenced Friday to 
seven days imprisonment for Interfer- 
ence with the police during the visit 
of Andrew Ronar-Law. Is a prisoner. 
One of the speakers. Mrs. Kathelene 
Emerson, was arrested In a scrimmage 
which followed the appearance of the 
police. 

youth'sentenced 
to die i n canada. 

Calgary. Alta.. Dec. 1— Y; -Tasper 
r«,llins, aged 18. was couylcted by a 
lury early Sunday of tho murder of 
J p Benson, a homesteader at Cereal. 
Alta' and was sentenced to death. 
He was brought here from Kingston. 
Mo where he had confessed that he 
murdered Benson for his money 
burned the body and the 
hide the crime. Aftci? the 
fled to MlsBourl. 



That ten saloons would be wiped out 
by every community house erected in 
Duluth, was the declaration made last 
evening by Dr. Maurice Eefkovlts of 
Temple Emanuel, who spoke at the 
meeting cf Lester Park residents held 
at the Lester Park M. E. church. Fifty- 
fourth avenue east and Superior street. 
Dr Eefko\lts spoke at the Invitation 
,.f Pev. C. R. Oaten, pastor 
church. 

•I en out of every eleven 
attracted to saloons not by 
for drink, but because of a 



cf the 

men are 

appetite 

desire for 



PIMPLY? WELL^ DON'T BE 

People Notice It. Drive Them 

Off With Dr. Edwards' 

Olive Tablets. 



A pimply face will not embarrass 
vou much longer if you get a package 
of Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets. I he 
skin should begin to clear after you 
have taken the tablets a few nights. 

Cleanse the blood, the bowels and 
the liver with Olive Tablets. 

Dr Edward.s' Olive Tablets are the 
successful substitute for calomel— 
there's never any sickness or pain aft- 

*""DV*Nrdwa?dI"" Olive Tablets do that 
which calomel does, and Just as ef- 
fectlvelv but their action is gentle and 
«=afe Instead of severe and irrltatin|r. 

No one who takes olive 
ever cursed with "a dark 
a bad breath, a dull, listless, 'no good 
constipation, torpid liver, bad 



Tablets Is 
brow n taste. 



shack 
murder 



He 

to 

he 



feeling. 

disDosltion or pimpiy »"^'"- , ^ 

Or Edwards' Olive Tablets are a 
nnrelv vegetable compound mixed with 
bllve oil. you will know them by their 

oilve color. 

Dr Edwards spent years among pa- 
flent's afflicted with liver and bowel 
cmiplalnts and Olive Tablets are the 
immensely effective result. 

Take one or two nightly for a week. 
c!*»p how much better you feel nnd look. 
Voc and 2Bc per box. The olive Tablet 
Company. Columbus. Ohio. All drug- 
gluts. 



Gives Canada New Harbor 

Far North of Old 

Sea Coast. 

Washi.iptf.n, Dec. 1. — The news of a 
".stupendous retreat" cf one of the 
gla<lers In C.lacier bay. Ala.ska. sin.-e 
1911. an 1 of tiie fact th.-it had this re- 
treat oecurred ten years ago th" 
boundary of Alaska would have been 
puslied inland, adding mat* rially tc the 
area of our northernmost possession. 
is conve.\ed i;i a recent letter to the 
National Geographical ."ioclety, from 
l.,awrence Martin of tht department of 
geology of the L'nUersity of Wiscon- 
sin, one of tht greate.st living authori- 
ties on glacial movement;-. Prof. Mar- 
tin and the late Ralph S. Tair of <'or- 
nell university were the leaderb of the 
lini res<arch expedition of the N'a- ' 
tionnl «;e<-rg -aphlc society for the] 
study of Alaskan glaciers. 

(ilacler bay lies directly north of 
Chlchagof Islmd, one of the archl- : 
pelago ju9t iY the Houthernmost por- ! 
tlon of the coast of Ala.'ka. The boun- ! 
dary line, aft* r following the cost .sev- 
ei-al miles innard. in a northwesterly 
direction, "suddenly .«-h(,(4s soiilhw-esi 
for a distance of 100 miles, touching ' 
but a few miles ruirth of Olacier bay. | 
"One of tho glaciers In <ilaeler bay 
has had a stupendous retreat of three 
miles since Tarr and I were there In 
1911," reads I'rof. Martin's letter. "No 
one ever before recorded sc rapd a 
recession of t.n ice tc.ngue and no one 
ever win. tin one of the voUanos melts 
Its glaciers, js Mount Wrangell In the 
Copp'^r River basin, or Mount Dou-jlas 
on the Ala.-ki peninsula may do some 
day. This reireat of the Ice tongue In 
(Jlacier bay has extended that field 
from Alaska into Canada, giving the 
Domi'iion a new harbor far north of 
where they h ive previously had a hf-n.- 
coast, but not in a region where the 
present resov rces are liable to lead to 
International complications. Its a pity 
\ the recession didn't happen years ago, 
1 for then the boundary would have 
I been pushed Inward, adding materially 
i to the nrea cf Alaska." 
1 The Alaskin boundary tribunal, In 



i;'ft.1, d<< id d that the Pnited .•^tates 
was ciiiitied to a continuous strip of 
territory v\ lib h extended arourid tlie 
heads of all tlie inlets, thus exeluding 
all contact of Pritish t«rritory with 
the sea from Portland <anal north to 
Mount St. i:ilas. It al.'^o nxed the 
eastern or interior bouii<lary lino at 
designated nmuntaln peaks to conform 
to tills .ieclsii.n. This line extend prac- 
tii all^■ ten leagues from the u<ean. 
The section of the boundary line that 
is cut by this receding glacb r is a 
trifle ni<»re than one hundred miles in 
lengtn. lo for e\«ry mile of r»-cossl<>n 
more than one hundr<d square miles 
of territory would lu. ve been added to 
Alaska h::d this jdienomenon of nature 
o<<urr<d beftire the boundary di^sput* 
was ."rettled. 

SPITE fenceVeTd 

ceases FOR PRESENT. 

The rpite fence feud between Mrs. 
F. G. Oerman and H. R. Spencer, next 
door nelphbors at Lakeside, ha.-^ been 
smoothed <iVer. at least f<^>r the |>resent. 
The iMJunetifin suit which Mr. Spencer 
started against Mrs. <}erman was with- 
drawn Saturd.iy by the plaintiff. A 
f»w weeks ago Mr. Spencer secured n 
temporary restraining order prohibit- 
ing Mr.", (icrman from tearing d<'Wn n 
line fenee dividing their r>rop. rty. Mrs. 
<:ermari had claim* d that it w;i.« un- 
sightly and had thr«at*ned to te.ir It 
down, and, in fact, had the w«.rk pretty 
well accfunpllshed when the injunction 
was issued. 



WHAT'S INDIGESTION? 
WHO CARES? LISTEN! 

"Rape's Diapepsin*' Makes Sour^ 

Gassy Stomachs Feel Fine 

at Once. 



Time it! In five minutes all stoma* h 
distress will go. Xo indigestion, h* art- 
liurn, Kournesg or beh-hing <if gas. 



of undig* .sted 
bloating, foul 



is noted for its 
upset stonir^chs. 



acid, or eructations 
food, no dizzinefis, 
breath or headache. 

Pape's DiafiepKln 
speed in regulating 
It is the Hur* St, <iuicke8t and most cer- 
tain indlgcsti'-n remedy in the whole 
world, and l.<-sides It is harmles.s. 

Millions *»f m*n and women now 
eat their fav*.rite f*.od.s without f< ar — 
they know Pape's Diapepsin will save 
them from any stomach mls*-ry. 

Pba.se, for your sake, get a large 
fifty-cent case of Pape's Diap* psin 
from any drug store and put your 
stomach right. Don't keep <jn being 
miserable — life is l*)0 short — you are 
not here l*>ng, .so make your stay 
agreeable. Eat what you like and 
digest it; enjoy It. with*jut dr* ad of 
rebellion In the stomach. 
I Pape's Dinpep.'^in b< longs In your 
home anyway. Should one of lh<- fam- 
ily eat something which don't agree 
with them, or in case of an att.'»ck of 
Indigestion, dyspepsia, gastritis or 
.stomach derangement at daytime r 
' during the night. It is handy to give 
the quickest, .surest relief known. 




H DEFECTIVE PAGE 



_•—.»- 



— r- 



1 



ih 



T 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



«ai 



PERSONAL 



REFUSES TO 



n. N. Ci.-crMnpbfll <>t 61'.» Kast Fifth 
Kfret-t has left for the East on a busi- 
ness trip. 

tioorKe Li. nrozich. cashier of the 
First State Bank of Fily, is In Duluth 
today "^n route home from Chicago. 

I. <;<)ldljerK of the Hotel Holland has 
returned from a three weeks' absence 
from the city. 

(.Jeorpe McKay, formerly of the Hotel 
McKay. Is in the city for a short visit. 

Jack Marks of Minneapolis, former 
All-Amerif an fullback, is registered at 
the Spalding. 

I. Moran of Minneapolis is at the 
Spalding. 

W. 1'. Ol.'iun of Eau Claire Is at the 
Spalding-. 

J. V. Servis of Chicago is at the 
Holland. 

Mrs \V. r>. Werden of Deer River is 
Bt the M<Kay. 

H. J. Murphy of Lawrence. Wis., Is at 
the I.,en"X. 

I?. 1'. Sellers of Hlbblng Is at the St. 
Louis. 




Rev. Timothy Tyler Says He 

Will Continue to 

Preach. 



I.nilj'Minith Pl«rkle Plant. 

I^ndy.sntlth, Wis.. Dec. 1. — (Special to I 
The lier:ild.> -As soon as plans can '»e | 
perfected it is expected a pickle factory i 
win be .'Started and operated here by \f. 
.1. Wiulg & Mro. of Creen Hay. Wis.. ; 
extensive operators of Wisconsin pickle 
plant-". j 



The Store of Useful and 
Practical Christmas 
Gifts for Young Men 




Comfort for 
''Him'' 

Hire and there you will find a 
man who doesn't want to "change 
coats" after the daj's work is done 
— I>ut siK'h cases are rare. Besides 
the savins; in wear there is greater 
comfort in a smokincf jacket to slip 
on quick as a wink. 

More and more men are finding 
out that it is real economy to ;niy 
three, fc)ur or five dollars here for 
smoking jacket satisfaction. 



Rev. Timothy Tyltr, pastor of the 
African M. E. church of this city, 
against whom the advisory board has 
started ouster proceedings on a charge 
of drunkenness, is preparing to flghi 
his case. He denies the charges as false 
and says he will start legal action to- 
day to collect back salary. Furthermore 
he says he Intends to keep right on 
preaching in Duluth. 

Pastor Im Cheerful. 

Rev. Mr. Tyler was In a cheerful 
frame of mind today and talked freely 
of the ca.se. The action of the "board" 
PVlday night, he said, was not legal 
as c»nly three out of fourteen of its 
members were present in addition to a 
few visitors, who were not on the 
board. He .«aid the church was behind 
on his .-^rilary, but that he didn't care 
to say how much. His legal action, he 
said would be confined to securing hi.s 
salary. He declared himself opposed to 
securing damages through legal ac- 
tion. 

"It seems that there are people try- 
ing to make trouble for me," said Mr. 
Tyler. "J!ut they have no grounds for 
charging that I was drunk or put my 
wife and children out of doors." 

H. S. Merry, set retary of the board, 
who wa.-; present at the meeting dis- 
agrees with Mr. Tyler. He said today 
all of the members of the board except 
two were present at the meeting Fri- 
day night when oiister proceedlng.s 
were started, and that they would con- 
tinue the action started at that time. 
Mrs. Tyler declarejl to The Herald thi.'^^ 
nK)rninR that she had not ben driven 
from her home by her husband, and 
that she had h.ad no communicatioii 
with the church board. 

When Questioned Mrn. Tyler refused 
to. as she put it "testify against" her 
husband. She admitteil, however, that 
she left her home witli her four chil- 
dren on the night In question and went 
to the home of Mrs. A. Mason, where 
she remained all nifht. She admitted 
a quarrel with her husband, but as- 
serted that he did not offer violence. 

" I tliought it best to leave the house," 
she said in reply to a question; and 
further she admitted that frf>m his ac- 
tions she thought he must have been 
intoxicated to act the way he did, the 
quarrel starting over her refusal to 
let her little hoy piny with a knife. Hut 
she would admit nothing further re- 
garding Mr. Tyler's alleged drinking. 
X(j services were held yesterday at the 
church. 



BOY INJURED iN 



Y. M. G. A. mim 




A jury was drawn in .Judge Fesler'-i 
division of the district court this 
niorni.ig to try the personal Injury 
action which Mrs. Ellen Whnlen, 
; mother and guardian of Emmett Whit- 
ney, a ll'-year-old boy who was in- 
jured while using tlie baths at the Y. 
M. C. A., building on Aug. 8. 1912. 
has brought suit against the Younn 
Men's Christian association for $15,- 
610 damages. 

The young man slipped on a wet 
floor j'nd his naked arm went through 
; a plate glass window. The glass in 
; the panel. It is claimed, so caught his 
! arm that he was suspended until ho 
1 was released. He was b.'idly cut. 



TO STOP mmim 

m lAM, SHORE 



and 



We show a large assortment of 
Lonnging and Bathing Robes at 
popular prices. 

YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD. 




Dl LITH— SIPEWOR— VttfilWA 



To put :i stop to prouiisctious dump- 
ing on the lake shore. Dr. H. E. W eL- 
sler, director oi' public iicalth, i.s teeii- 
itig to enlist tile aid of residents along 

I l..i>nUuM road and otliers who live in 
liie district affected. 

I Tlii.s morning he wrote each of them 

' a letter requestinii that when they 
.see persons Uunipiiig in the proliiijittu 
Lerritoij t« inform the departinont, 
v.liicii will take the subsequi nt step, 
whicli may be necessary. VViienever 
sufficient evidence Ls available the 
guilty persons will be prosecuted. 

i Dr. V. eljscer states that it is impos- 
sible for the health department t<' 

' patrol tile beach and that he poli^i 

' force is so small hat no man can hi 
detailed from that department. I" 

I that reason he is asking the eo-op' . 
tion of those living where they ai 
liable to observe breaches of the dump- 

; ing ordinance. Many people like to 
promenade the beach during the sum- 
mer but this will soon be impossible 
if it is allowed to become a dumpin;; 
ground. The health director says thai 

' store keepers and people living some 
distance awaj' are the chief offender.^ 
and that the practice not only destroy.- 
the appearance of the beach and it- 
utility as a promenade but threaten.'^ 

I to become a menace to health. 




w^^m^i 



"^HiJT^ 



You Will Find Christmas 
Shopping a Pleasure Here 

Our magnificent stock of jewelry is full of Christ- 
mas suggestions. Never before in our history have 
we had such a splendid assortment of holiday jew- 
elry on display. 

Here you will find suggestions for gifts for 
father, mother, husband, wile, brother, sister, friend 
— in fact for everybody at a PRICK to suit 

We wish to emphasize price because we do not 
want you to get the erroneous impression that we 
sell high priced gems and jewelry ONLY, 

We sell moderate priced jewelry as well. In 
truth the greater portion of our stock consists of 
jewelry very reasonably priced. 

If j'ou are in doubt as to just what kind of a gift 
to buy come in and get our expert suggestions. We 
will be very glad to help you out in this respect at 
any time. 

Come in now and make your selections. There 
will not be the hurry and rush that there will be 
later and you will have plenty of time in which to 
choose your gifts. We will be glad to lay away any 
selection you make until a later date upon your 
making a small deposit. 

Henricksen Jewelry Co* 

332 West Superior Street. 



a 



s 















•in 



Grand 




K-X 




UR 

>ENING 























ifj i2U- 





«£l '^: C^ i'-^iS ^« 











ill 








Wc know the people of Duluth and surrounding country are always lookiny forward with great 
anticipationtoour Christmas piano sales— because they fully realize the wonderful saving it means 




X 





*% K 'fi'i I "TT .1 < 




lo.poy^ 









P|^198:i^| 






I fwi g iMW gwgryw r y p w w 



7K 




mTh 





.<."«.•=• 



We have made great preparations to supply the demand, and it behooves you, Mr. and Mrs. PIANO PURCHASER to 
give these WONDERFUL BARGAINS your immediate attention for we know a few ninutes spent in our store will readily 
convince you THAT NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE YOUR CHRISTMAS PIANO SELECTION. 

^"WE mt LOCAL REPiESENTATiVES FOR THE FOLLOWICI PIANOS; 



V/M. KNABE 
MEHLIN & SONS 



PRICE & TEEPLE 
CAPIN 



LEV/ISMAN 
SEGERSTROM 



KLINE 
ELSWORTH 



STEWART & CO. 
And many others. 






QUn EASY PAYMENT PLAN KhKEB ST POSSiiLE FOR Oi^E AND ALL 



Open 
Evenings Unfit 

S pa nia 






20 EA^X SUF^ERIOR l^XKEEX, DULUXM, IVillSJlNJ, 



Out-of-town buyers will be 
nlshcii Ip.rorniatioii r('ji>'arding 
IMano Hargains by filiiii:* out 
pon below. Write plainly. 

Xaiiio 


fur- 

«jur 
Cou- 


Address 









EARLY DAYS ON THE FORCE 



Sergeant Kenna Retires on Pension After Twenty- 
nine Years' Service— Recalls Early Days 
of Duluth Police. 



Sergeant John Ktnna, who retired 
from the police force this noon on h 
pension after a service of twenty-nl'ie 
years, spent this morning: at h« ad- 
quarters gathering his belongini?s and 
telling stories of the early police day"* 
ill Duluth. 

When Sergeant Kenna first camo op 
the force July \?.. 1884. tliere were 
only twelve officers in the depart 
ment, including Chief Davis. Alfred 
(Mlon. another policeman at that tinit, 
is today chief of police of the D. M. 
& N. docks. The others were Ser 
geant McLaughlin, Officers S. J 
Thompson, who later became chief, K. 
A. Benson, Ed Dwyer, Frank Horg.u.. 
Frank Clemens, Dan Donovan, Stew 
art and Westaway. 

Used Wheelbarrow. 

In those days rrisonera were taken 
to headquarters In a wheelbarrow. 
There were no paved streets and tii' 
drunken prisoners., who wero unabl'.- 
to walk, had lo be carted down maiJi 
street In a wheelbarrow. Later on 
the department obtained a patrol 
wagon, driven by horses. This last 
vehicle was in use for many years, 
being suppllanted by the Kato. which 
also went Into the discard about six 
months ago, when the r-re.sent auto 
patrol was purchased by the city com- 
nils.«ion. 

Two years after Sergeant Kenna 
joined the force. Patrolman Robert 
Smollett, the oldest man both In ago 
and service on the force today, was 
appointed. He is still patrolling a 
beat on Superior street. Officer Smol- 
lett was one of the officers who par- 
ticipated In the famous riot of 1889. 

The oldest records kept at police 



headquarters were then gone Into by 
the members of the office force ai;d 
Sergeant Kenna's statements wer-j 
verified. The records go back to April 
9, 1872 when the flrst recorded arrest 
was made. Michael Sandford was ar- 
rested on that day by Officer Thomp- 
son, wlio later became chief, on a 
charge of drunkenness. He drew a 
10 -day sentence. 

Flr«t Annual Ileport. 
P.Ttrick Doraii wa.s appointed chief 



Ladies: 

Holiday 
Haberdashery 

THE NEW ARRIVALS 

will interest you. As usual, 
many Exclusive novelties for 
gentlemen .from London, 
Vienna, PiHs and New York 

A. B. SIEWERT & CO. 

Hatters and Furnishers 
304 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



in 1889 and was a prominent figure in 
the riot early In July of that year. 
The first annual report over publislird 
l>y the Duluth police department wa.s 
issued for the year 1891 by S. C. Mc- 
Quade, who was chief at the time. 

This noon Sergeant E. H. Barber of 
the West Duluth station took Ser- 
geant Kenna's place as Inside ser- 
geant. 

ENGINEER SEEKS 

H EAVY DAMAGES. 

Claiming that he was obliged to work 
for twelve hours in the cab of an en- 
gine from which steam escaped In such 
quantities that he became overheated, 
burned and left a physical wreck, 
William F. Kirfman, locomotive en- 
gineer, is today asking a district court 
jury to award him $34,060 damages from 
the Duluth. Missaoe & Northern Rail- 
road company. 

Kirfman took out the engine from 
Proctor on the evening of July 1 at 
B p. m. and worked until 5 o'clock the 
next morning. He alleges that It was 
a very warm evening outside and that 
no breeze was blowing. In spite of 
the fact that he protested against tak- 

: ing out a defective engine, he did so 
and worked all night with it in the run 

: between the ore docks and Proctor, he 
says. 

' The defectiveness, he claims, con- 
.•-.Isted of the pipe union Joint in the 
drifting throttle pipe being out of 
proper condition. He claims that steam 
which escaped burned him severely and 
that It resulted In a wasting away of 
his mu.'^cul.-ir and nervous sy.^tems. 



STEAMSHIP MOVEMENTS 



TOO LATE 

TO CLASSIFY 



One CeiLt a Wcird Knch Insertion. 
No Advcrtiscmcni. Less Thon 15 Centa 

PEKFUMES — YOlf KN<JW MISS IIOR- 
rlgan's is the place for exquisite per- 
fumes. If you are one of the few not 
aware come in and we will prove it. 

A HARPER SHAB 1 POOTaT^M I SS~H() R - 
rigan's is a glowing, efficacious and 
luxurious shauipoo that cleanses, 
soothes and nourishes. 



Mr. and Mrs. Alex Johnson, 4914 Wa- 
dena street. 

ROXTliY — Mr. and Mr?. Alex Pontry 
of 626 We.<5t S. v.ntli stnet .are thi- 
parents of a daughter born Nov. 28. 

REICD — .\ son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. H. P. Reed, 322 West Third 
.'5tr<^et, on Nov. 23. 

HARK WELL — A daughter was born 
Nov. 26 to Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
Harkwell, 14*:i We.<=t Michif-.m 

street. 



Deaths and Funerals 



THE NEW STYL^-:S IN HAIR GOODS, 
hairdressing ani hair ornaments are 
at Miss Horrigan's. 

FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM FUR- 
nished flat; large clothes closet, pan- 
try, toilet, hot water heat, gas for 
cooking, and light furnished. 811 
East First street. 

FOR RENT— M0:DERN ROOM WITH 
board. Sixteeni.h avenue east; Mel- 
rose 1517. 

WAN J' ED— YOUNG! LADY ROOMMATE 
to share large l right room, centrally 
located; Catholic preferred. Write 
C 562, Herald. 

LOST —COMBINATION SHRINE AND 
Knights Templnr charm. Return to 
J. W. McDonald, sheriffs olYlce. Re- 
ward. .^____^__________« 

MARRIAGIE LICENSES. 



Ernest A. Rodin and Ida M. Spence. 
Fred Sandboe and Anna iMiristiaiison. 



Arrlvcdi Atl 

Columbia. New York. 

Reported By \Vlrel«'>*M. 

Siasconsett, Ma.'^a., Dec. 1. — Kaiserln 
Augusta Victoria, from Hamburg, 
dock New York tonight. 

Steamer Minneapolis, from London, 
dock New York Tuesday. 



WEDDING PICTURES are a specialty 
with Chrtstensen, 25 W. Superior St. 

SOLID GOLD W rTTT) rSo AND EN- 
GAGEMICNT Rl V'<1S made and mount- 
ed to ordoi at Henrlrks. n's. 



BIRTHS. 



LOCKHART — A daughter was born 
Nov. 29 to Mr. and Mrs. James H. 
Ijockhart, 2701 Huron street. 

JOHNSON — A son was born Nov, 26 to 



Si'. < il'i< )li» il., — Air.x. Mary St. <;.<>!>;,•. 
58 vear.s old. died Saturday evening 
at her home, 1124 East Third street, 
after a short illness. She Is sur- 
vived by three daughters and one 
son. Thev are: Celina, Alexandra, 
Anna and" J. E. St. George, all of 
thi.s city. Four sisters and two 
brother.s" also survive her. The fu- 
neral will be lield at 9 o'clock to- 
morrow morning from the St. Jean 
Raptiste church, with Interment at 
Calvary. 

SITNDHERG — The funeral of Carl Sund- 
berg. 31 years old. 632 West Third 
street, who died Saturday, will be 
held tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock 
from the Rethany Swedish Lutheran 
church. Interment will be In tho 
Lutheran cemetery. 



MONUMENTS. 

LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH GRADE 
monuments In the Northwest; call 
and inspect before buving elsewhere. 
P. N. Peterson Granite Co.. 2S0 E. Sup. 

~~ BUILDING PERMITS. 



To L. Ramstad, addition to 
brick garage. West First 
street, between Fourth and 
Fifth avenues $ 

To McKay Bros., repairs. Fifth 
avenue west and First street 

To M. J. Olson, frame dwelling. 
Fifty-sixth avenue west, be- 
tween Cody and Elinor streets 

To J. Gallop, remodeling, l]ast 
Seventh str«^et. between Fifth 
and Sixth avenues.., 



•••••••• I 



1.150 
1.000 

2,500 

1.600 



I 

i 



'*~^ 



"p 




T 



TT 



+ 



1 



< 
i 

> 

I 
I 



i 



« 

■f- 



— — I 



p* 



JHM* 








Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



^1 

■ 




r.nd Mrs. J. A. Myron ^j^^i^ildrcn of 
Minneapolis. 

* * • 

Mrs. J. B. Mishkr has returned fronj 
a trip to California and Mexico and 
will be at home with her mother, Mrs. 



Theodore HoUister of 
road for the winter. 

m * » 

Mr. and Mr.". W. T. Ste 
Albert, of 4717 <JladstO! 
todav for Kincardine, Oigy, 




Ltondon 



Reports on the national conventions 
ot the Home Missionary societies of 
the Method'st church held at Wash- 
ington, D. C, in October and of the 
foreign missionary societies held at 
Topeka, Kan., ^^ill be given at a spe- 
cial meeting of the mi.«slonary soci- 
eties of the city which will be held 
at the parlors of the First Methodist 
Eplcopal church. Third avenue 
and Third street, Wednesday 
noon by prominent speakers 

Mrs. Henjamln Longley 
president 



west 
after- 



TURNS SINGER AND SELLS 
VIOLIN FOR $12,000 



of St. Paul, 
of the Minnesota confer- 
tnce of the Women's Home Missionary 
poeietles, will speak at the meeting of 
the hf)me societies whieh will be held 
at 2:30 o'clock and will tell of the 
national home missionary meeting at 
Washington. Mrs. L<jngley is a well 
known and magnetic speaki r and has 
been a vlsi'or In Duluth many times. 

At 3:30 o'clock at the same place i 
the foreign societies will have their 
meeting and Mrs. A. W. Hradley. for- 
merlv of this city, now of Denver, 
Colo.", will report on the national 
meeting of the foreign societies which 
was held at Topeka. 

A s<)( ial hour will follow the talks 
and "11 women of the city interested 
in the reports or In meeting are cor- 
dially invited to attend. The hostesses 
ft r the social hour will be Mrs. Will- 
iam Moore and Mrs. W. J. 'Jalvin. 

WILL ELECT OFFICERS. 



Garfield Circle's Annual Business 
Meeting. 

The annunl business meeting of the 
Garfield circle \o. 4, Lndies of the O- 
A. H.. will be held tomorrow afternoon 
at 2:30 otloek at Memorial hall. There 
will be election of officers and plans 
will be made for the packing of the 
annual Christmas box. which will be 
eent to the old soldiers' home at Ano- 
ka. Minn. A full attendance l.s de- 
sired. 

ENGAGEMENT. 

Announcement Made at Inforrr.al 
Party. 

At an informal afternoon party' Sat- 
urdnv at wlilch Miss Ruby Seymour 
of 109 West First street was hostes. 
her mother, Mrs. Margaret Seymour 
announced the engagement of her 
daughter to James Alexander Robert- 
eon of this city. The announcement 
vas made bv cards liidden in a basket 

?f yellow baby chry.<anthemums which 
t.rmed the centerpiece, each card be- 
ing attached by ribbons to the place 
cards at the luncheon table. There 
•were ten guests, intimate friends of 
Miss Seymour. 

BOOK REVIEWS. 




the organization formed for the 
vounger people of the Catholic churches 
have planned a sale and silver tea for 
next .Saturday afternoon to be held 
;at the home of Mrs. John Monaghan, 
2221 East Fourth street, the funds to 
be used for Christmas charity work. 



Mrs. F. W. 
street has as 
Wright of St. 



Engagement Announced. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry (iloud announce 
the engagement of their 
Mayme, to Robert W. Dyson, 
ding will take place 



daughter. 

The wed- 

Christmas week. 



Class. 

Miss Florence Watt of 6703 
street entertained the members 
piano study class 
party Saturday 
mal program 



Entertained 

Otslgo 

of her 

at a Thanksgiving 

afternoon. An infor- 

was given followed by 

games. Those present were: 

MiSSCF — 



Myra Smith, 
Kllnor <;underson 
Jean McMillan, 
Catherine Harker, 
Alice t)aten, 
Adele Itussell, 
Ethel Russell, 
Elizabeth Brooks, 



Carol Rose, 
Ina Lindfors, 
Agnes Bradley, 
Flora Tanner, 
Madeline Palmer, 
Esther Johnson, 
Evelyn MoUard. 



BEATRICE LA PALME. 

Peatrice La Palme, who has just 
Joined the Century Opera company In 
New York, began her artistic work as 
did Mme. Sembrich by playing the vio- 
lin in concert. She piayed the violin 
on the concert stage for seven years 
before she went on the operatic stage. 
Then she joined the forces of the 
Opera Comlque, the national theater 
for the production of lighter operas in 
Paris. She came from the Opera Co- 
mlque to join the Aborn forces at the 
tVntury. Only last week she sold, in 
Montreal, the Stradivarius violin on 
which she used to play in concert. She 
got 112,000 for it. 



bride Is prominent In society here and 
a finished musician. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hoemer will make 
their home In Duluth. 



Church Meetings. 

An important all d:iy meeting of 
Trinity guild will be held tomorrow at 
the guild hall of Trinity pro-cathedral 
and all members are urged to attend. 

• • • 

The I'hilathea class of the First 
Presbyterian church will meet this 
evening at the pastor's study of the 
church at 8 o'clock. 

• * • 

The Lester Park Missionary 
will meet with Mrs. Theodore 
ter Wednesday afternoon at 2 
and Mrs. Charles Tanner will 
leader. 



♦ • • 
and Mrs. Will Kindy of St. Paul 
returned to their home after a 
visit here with Mr. and Mrs. H. M. 



the 



society 

HoUis- 

o'elock, 

be the 



Auction Bridge. 

Mrs. George d. Oliver of No. 2 Ches- 
ter Terrace will entertain at an auc- 
tion bridge party on Friday afternoon 
at the Spalding hotel. 



rt and son, 
street, left 
o spend the 
winter there. Rev. anCp'^VttF. Wilfred 
Clarke will occupy the Stewart resl- 
.lence during their absence. 
« « • 
Eaton of 4703 Cladstone 
her guest, Mrs. J. F. 
Paul. 

• • • 

Mrs. F. W. Palmer of 6001 East Su- 
perior street has as her week-end 
guest her niege, Miss Pyrl Hart of 

Turtle Lake, Wis. . 

• • ♦ 

Miss Kate Dodge of Lakeside, who 
has been attending school at Lawrence, 
Kan., has returned home and will enter 
the Central high school. 
« • « 

Mi=s Rosaline Mondshlne has re- 
turned from a visit with her sister. 
Mrs. B. Magoffin, Jr.. at Deerwood, 
Minn. 

Mr. 
have 

short . , ^ 

Weaver of 611 West Boulevard street. 

* * • 

J. T. Armstead of Fifty-first avenue 
east and London road has gone to In- 
dianapolis. Ind., called there by 
cerious illness of his mother. 

* • « 
Arnold Joerns of Chicago left 

city last evening after spending 
Thank-sgiving and the week-end here 
with his fath.r, W. O. Joerns of 114 
West Superior street. 

# * * 

Miss Margaret Hare has returned to 
St. Paul wh^re she is attending the Art 
Institute, after spending Thanksgiving 
with her parents at L.-ikeside. 

• • • 

Miss Ada Bush, who has been ill at 
the Asbury ho.-pital in Minneapolis has 
rettjrned to the home of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Bush, 5803 East Su- 
perior street. 

• • * 
Mrs. C. R. Oaten and daughters, Alice 

and Margaret are visiting relatives at 

• lilbert, Minn. 

♦ • ♦ 

Mrs. Robert DowBe* 
First street has as her 
ter, Mrs. Ferguson and 

lyn, N. Y. 

♦ • • 

Miss Kathryn Matter 
traveling in Europe for 
has returned to 



that 




Needlecraft Club. 

The Lester I'nrk Needlecraft club 
will meet Wednesday afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. James Ford. 5801 (.Men- 
wood avenue at 2:30 o'clock. 



Of 2027 East 
guest, her sis- 
son of Brook- 



Mothers' Club. 

The Bryant school Mother.s' club will 
hold its regular meeting tomorrow 
afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the school 
building. 



Lester Park Club Will Meet. 

The regxilar meeting of the Lester 
Park Literary society will be held to- 
morrow afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
Theodwre H(»Mister, 5014 London road. 
Mr«» D H. Williams will be l.ader for 
the afternoon an<l the subject will be 
"Book Reviews." Five-minute talks 
will be given ty different members of 
the club of books of the day. 
-'^ 

School Entertained. 

Pupils of the Lester Park school 
will give a prettv t ntertainment tri-i 
day evening at the Lester Park M. E. 
church under the direction of Miss 
Beinhorn. the principal. A program 
of music and readings will be given. 

Mrs. Oaten Hostess. 

Mr" <" R. naten will entertain the 
members of the official board of the 
L-tkesi<le M. E. church and their wives 
at her home tomorrow evening. 

^ 

Fitzgerald-Sessions. 

The m.-'.rriage of Miss Mary Fitzger- 
uhl aid Robert H. 
this city, took place 
Minneapolis and 
will be at home 



Birthday Party. 

Miss Marguerite Peffer of 912 Sev- 
enth avenue east was pleasantly sur- 
prised .Saturday evening by a num- 
ber of friends in celebration of her 
birthday anniversary. The guests 
w e re : 
Misses — 

Ethel Heller, 

Hazel Itoberts, 

Sue Peffer, 

Clara Broad- 
bridge, 
M< sers — 

Harold Rustad, 

Walter Pelland, 

Bill Hl.key, 

i:dward Clarke, 

Oliver Listed, 



Club Notes. 

Mrs. Robert Morris Seymour of J^t. 
Paul will hold the regular meeting of 
her le«>ture study class in "Dramatic 
Structure" tomorrow afternoon at 4 
o'clock at the Spalding sun parlor. 
* * * 

The regular meeting of the Evening 

Shakespeare class of the Twentieth 

<^entury club will be held this evening 

at 7:30 o'clock at the library club room. 

« « * 

The art class of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury club will meet tomorrow after- 
noon at 2:30 o'clock at the library club 
room. 



who has been 
three months 
Duluth. 
• « * 

Chlsholni of 1822 East 
Is In New York the guest 



Edna Mej-ers, 
Olive De Roche, 
Th<'resa Kone- 

czny, 
Victoria Benson, 

Wilbert Fish. 
Merlin McCabe, 
Victor Cayho, 
Frank Meyette. 



Linnaea Society. 

The regular meeting of the I..innaoa 
socletv will be held tomorrow after- 
noon at 2:30 o'clock at Forester.s' hall. 



Sessions, both of 

this afternoon at 

Mr and Mrs. Sessions 

In Duluth after Feb. 1. 



Rowland-Lightbody. 

Word has been received here 
marriage of .Samuel Lightbody 
perior, a prominent merchant > 
city to Mirs Elizabeth 



of the 

of Su- 

t that 

Rowland of 



Union eirove. Wis., which took plac« 
Saturday at the bride's home city. 



will 

flft- 

11- 



West Duluth W. C. T. U. 

The We.'^t Duluth AV. C. T. V. 
meet in regular ses.^ion ,'''>V">'S"^>' 
ernoon at the West Duluth publl. 
brarv on »Vntral avenue. 1 he subject 
for the afternoon will be "Helping the 
tV^V.^ 'wUh Mis C R. Keves as leader 
Tnd the ' hoJusseV for . the afternoon 
will be Mrs. B. H. Sinlth. Mrs. J. A. 
and Mrs. E. D. Abbott. 



Bundle Shower. 

Miss Margaret Nordfiuist whose mar- 
rl.nge to T. W. Palmberg of Zurich, 
Kan., will take place this month was 
the guest of honor at a surprise bundle 
shower given Saturd ly evening at the 
home of her sister, Mrs. Anton Peter- 
son, 516 Fifteenth avenue east. The 
evening was spent with games after 
which refreshments were served. The 
following guests were present: 
Misses — 



Lodge Notes. 

Members of the Home circle, of Ma- 
1e«-tic Rebekah :odge. No. 60. will meet 
Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock 
at the home of Mrs. Wesley Medd, 127 
East Third street. Articles will be fin- 
ished then for the box to be sent at 
i^'hristmas time to the Odd Fellows' 
homo at Northfleld, Minn. 
* * • 

Court Eastern Star. No. 86, IT. o. F. 
win meet tomorrow evening at tor- 
esters' hall. Fourth avenue west and 
First street for the annual election of 
officers. 



Mrs. A. M, 
.Second street 

of friends. 

• • • 

Mrs. L. M. Dickerson of 1221 East 
Third street has as her guepts Mr. anci 
Mrs. W. F. Hackett of Wakon, Minn. 
« • • 

Miss Mabel Chapman of Milwaukee 
has arrived for a month's visit her* 
with her sister and brother-in-law. Mr 
and Mrs. Louis L. Chapman of 31 : 
Second avenue east. 

« « • 

R. B. McFarlane of ,629 East Fiftl 
street has left for a month's trip t« 
Tacoma, Wash., and other points oi 
the coast. 

* * * 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Ryan and chil 
dren h-ft yesterday for their home aft- 
er spending Thanksciving at the honu 
of Mrs. Ryan's parents. Mr. and Mis 
Simon Clark of Hunters I'ark. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Patterson of 1S5! 
Wallace avenue have ns their guest 
Miss eiertrud:; B.-adt of Minneapolis. 

* * * 

Miss Helen Wharton of 1823 Wood 
land avenue has returned from a short 
visit at Ashland, Wis. 



Btatty 

Crookston Wedding. 

Crookston. Minn.. Dec. l._Saturday. 
Nov 



2**. at the 



inn., 
home 



of Mr. and Mrs. 
W H Miller. State street, the mar- 
riage of their daughter Ernestine^ to 
J. Stewart Roemer took place Rev 
Father Joseph Wurm of the cathedral 
Jarish officiating. A home wedding 
was permitted by special dispensation 
owing to the illness of the bride, 'who 
Is just recovering from a fever. The 



Marie Eckenburg, 
Inez Turnqulst, 
Sophie Johnson, 
Mary Nelson, 
Ruth Johnson, 
Lydla Oerdin, 
F]sther Johnson, 
Ellen I'erson, 
Carrie Olson, 
Slgne Olson, 
Lena Peterson, 
Teckla Chrlsten- 
son. 



Elizabeth Tofte. 
Hilda Erickson, 
Ruth Wilson, 
Ruth Boren, 
Elsie Anderson, 
Hilma Anderson, 
Ida Hendrickson, 
Alma Anenson, 
Esther Young- 

strom, 
Anna Hendrlcksoi 
Jennie Erickson, 
Anna Peterson. 



At Tea Rooms. 

Among those who were hosts at din- 
ner parties Saturday evening at the 
Glass Block tearooms were R. C. Jami- 
son, who gave a party of six. and 
Charles McLennan and George Barnum 

with parties of four. 

. — ^ 

Goes to Golden Wedding. 

Mrs. George W. French of 529 f^^ix- 
teenth avenue east has gone to lower 
Michigan to visit relatives and friends 
for several days. She will attend the 
golden wedding anniversary of her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Olcott, 
her old home In Albion, Mich. 



Miss Katheryn 
Ing at St. Cloud, 
her school after 
giving holidays 
and Mrs. R. E, 
Park. 

Mr. and Mrs. 
ters Park have 
Fitzpatrlck of 



Den f eld who Is teach 
Minn, has returned t' \ 
spending the Thankrv 
with her p.-irents, Mr. 
Dentelii of Hun ter. •- 



Hugh Steele of Hun- 
as their guest, Mrs. 
Minneapolis. 

• • * 

Sam G. Glnghold has returned to the 
Cnlverslty of Minnesota after spend- 
ing the Thanksgiving holidays with hi.- 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. Gingold 
1015 ><. East Second street. 

• • • 

Miss Norma Bartholomew of I-ake- 
side has returned from a six weeks' 
visit at Chicago and Milwaukee, Wis. 

• ♦ • 

Mr and Mrs. E. A. Fruehllng and 
duighter, Helen of Raymond, Minn., 
arc visiting Mr. and Mrs. Henry <;ab- 
bert of 226 East Second street. 



at 



M 



Iwardrobe Trunk Spec! 






TRUNK 



^TRQMtntMAlitR 

• zza *ESt riRST sTv 




and L. Club. 

Mr.s. .Tohn Doran of 5040 I.,ondon 
road will entertain the members of the 
M. and L. club at luncheon at her home 
ti.morrow afternoon at I o'clock. 

Sale for Charity. 

Members of the Guild of St. James, 
the organization formed for the pur- 
pose of aiding in the running of the 
St. James orphanage and the members 
of the junior guild, a new branch of 



Personal Mention. 

George E. Ilobson of 1217 East Sec- 
ond street has as his guests for the 
winter his mother, Mrs. E. A. Robson, 
and Miss Eyre of Chippewa Falls, A\ is. 

* • • 

S. S. Rumsey and Walter F. Schwedes 
left last evening for a trip to Iron 
Mountain, Mich. 

• • ♦ 

Mrs. T. Burdiish and daughter, 
Willie of Chlsholm, Minn., have re- 
turned to their home after spending 
Thanksgiving with relatives in Duluth. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Sellg returned to- 
day from Llgonler, Ind., where they 
spent Thanksgiving. 

« • * 

Mrs. Murray George and son, Wilford 
of Lakeside, will leave In a few days 
for a several weeks' visit with rela- 
tives at Mendon, Mich. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Myron of 6515 
London road have as their guests, Mr. 



TONIGHT' S ATTR ACTIONS. 

LYCEUM — Otis Kkinner in "Kismet." 
ORPHEUM — Vaudeville. 
EMPP.E."^S — Vaudeville. 
REX — Photoplay. 



^<-^-.f^ 






By PEGG Y PEABOD Y 



Small Leather Goods Repaired | gig 



A Cup 





a little 



Foothball Games Belie Hard 
Times. 

"Times arc going to be hard," I 
heard a voice behind me on the train 
remark to an Invisible party. The next 
moment my eyes alighted upon 
paragraph in the 
paper wherein was 
related that a rich 
>*oman had offered 
$1,000 for ten tick- 
ets to the Harvard - 
Yale game, which 
for less than two 
hours a week or so 
ago held the undi- 
vided attention of 
46.000 spectators 

Ten tickets 
$100 each were 
the beginning 
the expenses 



b the bfaat ihxxxg for shoppers. Drop In- 
to any druff store when y ou'vc flnish.-d shop- 
\aa and have a cupof booi'JonmadefPom AWMOUIT* 
BOUILLON CUBES before rtartina home and yoa 
vol reach there refreshed and rtimalated Instead of 
•n played out. It tastes of betf and f reah garden vpgw- 
tobles already seasoned. AU grocer* and dnwipaU. 
9m FlTM 8mipI««. Addr»i» Armaar Mid CompMT. CUcmw* 



successful 
lives In New 
her party to 
stadium, and 




She 



glraourtlBloiiillonSe? 




at 

but 

of 

of this 

ui-oman if she was 

woman ^^ s^euring the tickets 

York and had to transfer 
Boston and the Harvard 
then back again to New 
York The traveling expenses were an 
item that made a good showing- beside 
the thousand for the tickets, you may 
be sure. Her party must have been 
wined and dined several times during 
the course of their stay away from 
New York and entertained lavishly In 
many ways on a parallel with the mag- 
nificence of tickets at $100 each. 

The money spent in getting these 



people to and fro would make a good 
many of us independently comfortable I 
for life. The violets and the chrys- 
anthemums which were worn, and the 
silk flags of Harvard crimson and Yale 
blue that were waved represented a 
small fortune in dollars and cents 
which In the aggregate mounted Into 
the thousands of dollars. And the 
candy at $1 and more a pound which 
was consumed by pretty girls In pretty 
furs and great coats and the something 
else which shall be unmentionable, but 
which was consumed nevertheless In 
quantity, but not always by the pretty 
girls, are other Items which go to swell 
the fund. 

There are other items of expenses 
which may not well be overlooked. 
These are the millinery, the furs and 
the gowns, the coats and the accesso- 
ries of woman's wear, made specially 
to wear to the game. Probably there 
was more anxiety Interwoven with this 
expense than with any other. 

One might have seen many things 
and many people at the big football 
game in the Harvard stadium Saturday, 
but it is a pretty good guess th.at there 
was very little evidence of "hard 
times" among the tremendous gather- 
ing fortunate enough to have secured 
tickets, which can only be secured by 
Harvard and Yale graduates and un- 
dergraduates and faculty members and 
those with .a bank roll who are willing 
and able to pay fancy prices like the 
"$1,000 woman" from New York. 




"BERKEY & GAY Week" 

This Has Been the Opening Day of 
Our "Week of Courtesy" 

WE have promised you an artistic treat for this 
week, during which we have on exhibition 
a carefully seleci;ed display of furniture from 
the great establishment of Berkey & Gay, of Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

The exhibit will please you because of the beauty, ele- 
gance and splendid quality of the many exclusive pieces 
shown. 

Berkey & Gay furniture is always exactly what it seems to be. 
It alway.s reaches the highest order of excellence. The Berkey & 
Gay inlaid shop-mark has the same significance that is conveyed by 
the word "Sterling" when it i;^ stamped upon silverware. 

Come in tomorrow and look at the Berkey & Gay Flanders and 
Colonial pieces: the Chippenc ale, Sheraton, William and Mary, 
Adams. Louis XV and Louis X\T reproductions, all of which mark 
the highest achievements in tl\e art of furniture-making. This fur- 
niture is shown and sold by us exclusively in Duluth and vicinity. 

While our object this week is to make a special exhibit of this 
furniture and we have called it a ''week of courtesy" you will be at 
liberty to make such selections as you desire. 




GOOD 

Established J8SU. 



First Street and Tliird Ave, West 





AT THE LYCEUM. 

White Slave "Smello Drama" Is Pre- 
sented for One Night Only. 

Duluth got a touch of the "smello- 
dramas" of the type of "The I.ure" 
and "The Fight." at the L.yceu n last 
evening, in "The Little J^ost Sister," 
Virginia Brooks' white slave play. It 
is extremely broad throurrhout ind 
oversteps the limits of propriety. The 
play was presented before two hirgo 
audiences at the Lyceum incj.ter ye «- 
terday afternoon and evening. 

It may be the contention o^ the .au- 
thor that it is necessary to be sug- 
gestive in presenting euch a play be- 
fore the public, but at least the u.'-'e 
of extremely objecllonal terms might 
be eliminated. 

Such a theme as that presented In 
"The Little Lost Sister" might be 
tolerated on the stage If It were pres- 
ented In a big way and by a master 
hand, but In the present Instance it 
would seem that the aim was more to 
reap the harvest of dollars springing 
from the sensational advertising given 
such playp, than to present any great 
moral lesson. 
I "The Little Lost Sister" deals with 
the life of Elsie Welcome, a. .simply 
country maiden, who Is lured away to 
Chicago by Martin Druce, who makes 
this nefarious work his business. Mill- 
vllle had become too slow for Elsie 
and she wanted to see life. In Chi- 
cago Elsie sings In a cafe. White 
lights, wine, temptation. Elsie rebels 
and Is thrown out in the street. 

Just at this time Mary Randall, re- 
former, come.s to Chicago and stirs 
things up. She exposes the wealthy 
owners of property, who she declares 
are morally responsible for what Is 
going on In their buildings. She man- 
ages to save Elsie from taking her last 
slop, just a.s the young girl returns 
to the cafe, dressed In rag.«, and vir- 
tue triumphs again. It is the old 
melodrama in a modern and distaste- 
ful cloak. •• ^ ,, . 

Grace Hale as Mary Randall Is ef- 
fective, as is Louise Bergreen as El- 
sie Welcome and Blanche Dlx as Pa- 
tience Welcome. Ray Johnson as Mar- 
tin Druce presents a character study, 
which becomes the more objectionable 
the better It Is done. Fortunately the 
engagement was for one night only. 



.Veuman. pantomime comedian. Nn fact 
Mr. N'euman Is a good half of the act, 
and it Is as much hl.s silent comedy as 
the remarkable feats of Mr. Conchas 
that raises the act from an ordinary 
strong man turn to a real feature. 

N'euman is about the cleverest pan- 
limlme comedian the Orpheum audi- 
ences have seen. He Is a real artist 
in his line. His makeup l.s ludicrou.s 
in the extreme, and his actions so dif- 
ferent from the ordinary stereotyped 
efforts of average comedians, that the 
ludlence devotes most of Its attention 
to him while he is on the stage. Mr. 
'onchas is a Hercules with the figure 
of a Greek god. He does some re- 
markable juggling with heavy cannon 
balls, catching them on the back «.r 
his neek, as they are dropped from 
the "lly gallerv." His beautiful physi- 
cal development is not one of bulghig 
muscles. He looks like six feet of 
..steel like sinew. , . ^ 

The rest of the bill is light and 
frothv, but It offers plenty of 
. omedy and the Sunday night 
ence received it enthusiastically. 

There are two acts In which black- 
l:i<e comedy holds the boards. Kenny. 
.Vobody and Piatt consist of two biirnt 
cork comedians and a "Mr. Nobody. 
••Mr Nobodv" has been u.sed by other 
comedians, but his humorous Qualities 
still appeal. The race between 
popular perFonages known as 
Jones" and "Steamboat Bill 
lated In song by the two colored gen- 
tlemen," found a warm spot with 
audience. The other act in ^ 
bla-^kface comedy Is a feature, is 1 ne 
r,i:rglars' Union" offered by 
Thompson & Copeland. It 
and ready comedy sketch, and last 




iTiliE°iOIRD 




00, 



nd. 



Have for Tuesday, December 

AN EXTRAORDINARY OFFERING OF 

FANCY LiNENS 



at 



the following unusual concessions from former retail prices. 
S-ts of tible linen that would cost you at least $12 we will sell at 
Madeira lunch napkins that you have always paid $3.H8 

her.- at Ji(2.75. Some better at ^5.60, our special price »4.«0 
Mail orders filled on these goods same day received. 

PAUCI'L POST OR EXPRESS CHARGES. Phones. Mel. 384. Grand 884-A. 

41T XORREY BULIOIIVG 

On Superior .Street at Third Aveime Wt-^t^ 



»8.75. 
the dozen fi>r, 
the dozen. 
WE PAY ALL 



that is pleasing to see. They sing 

broad { some recent scuig hits and also in- 

audi- ; troduce some very clever and novel 

' dance number.«. They scored a hit at 

the opening performance yesterday 

afternoon anc. helped put life In the 

show. 

Closing the bill, which will continue 
until Wednesday evening, are three 
motion pictures, one of which shows 
"The Cranberry Industry of Cape Cod, 
which Is exceptionally entertaining, 
and the two < omedy films, "One of the 
Braves" and •'For His Loved One." 



The Herald.) — Silks valued at $1,000 
were stolen from the Amberson depart- 
ment store. An investigation showed 
they were taken from the rear of the 
store at night, then repacked from the 
original wrappings and cartons into a 
trunk or suit cases. 



two 
'Casey 
as re- 



the 
which 



Williams, 
is a rough 



night's audience welcomed it hilar- | 

'"'Alma Youlln returns with this 
week's bill. She is a former musical i 
comedy prima donna, possessing a • 
good soprano voice, a pleasing appear- 
ance and a good knowledge of st.igo , 
makeup. She sings three songs of the 
popular type, and meets with a ver> . 
fair reception. , 1 

The Four Original Perez have ai 
hazardous act on the ladder.-?. ] h*-lr I 
stunts are thrilling at times, and are i 
a novelty the line of gymnasium 

^^The loleen Sisters arc two young! 
women who combine tight wire walk- 
ing and sharpshooting. They do their 
shooting while balanced on the tight 
wire The sisters make a good ap- 
pearance and the act is a pretty lUtle 

"^Handers and Milllss drew a gener- 
ous measure of applause with an ec- 
centric routine of hat Juggling, danc- 
ing and stunts at the piano 

The orpheum photoplay this week Is 

•'.'Sophie's Hero." It closes a b»ll ^•»'«"-7; 

•offers a good measure of comedy, but 

which ts hardly up to the standard of 

last weeks pro gram. 

ATTHEB/IPRESS. 

Fair Bill of Vaudeville for First Half 
of Week. 

Not quite up to the usual standards 
of the Empress theater, the vaudeville 
that opened for a four-day en- 
is never- 



DENY INFLUENCING 

PEARSON AFFAIRS. 



bill 

traeement yesterday afternoon 

- varied and affords some novel 

for the theater-goers of 



AT TH E ORP HEUM. 

Pantomime Comedian and Strong Man 
Feature the New Bill. 

One act stands out on a rather light 
bill at the Orpheum this week, like an 
honest man In New York politics. 

It is the headline act presented by 
Paul Conchaa, ably assisted by Julius 



the less 
entertainment 

'^^Th^J'^be'ira'ci on the bill is the head- 
line number, the Richard Vanoss troupe 
of four acrobats, three men and one 
woman. They introduce some very 
good tumbling features with real snap 
Ind vim that makes their number an 
exceptionally good one. , , r, 

ooenlng the bill is Woodward, who 
introduces an original act consisting 
of spinning disks on his lingers Al- 
thouKh the number Is a good one, 
there is not much life to It. and t 
rather falls short of the average novel- 
tv act seen at the Empress 

The sketch for the week presented 
by Rose and Severns Is 'The Auto- 
mobile Disaster." There Is a little 
coniedy in the sketch, but it lacks the 
nunch, although the members of the 
Hct are both able actors. 

Relff Brothers and Miss Murray 
sent a very Kood song-and-danct 



Otis Sk nner in "Kismet." 

At the Ljceum tonight Edward 
Knoblauch's dramrx, "Kismet," ^vllh 
Otis Skinner in the principal role of 
Haij, the beggar, will be presented by 
Klaw & Erhinger and Harrison Grey 
Fi':ke. The company, including the 
singers, danc ;rs, musicians and super- ' 
numeraries, numbers 100 people, and 
tho scenic ec ulpment taxes the large 
stage at the Lyceum to its utmost I'.m- 
its. As a whole the production is said . 
to be the most mangnilicent and — 
through Mr. l-Mske's direction, the m')St | 
perfect in d< tall — that has been seen 
on the American stage In many years. 
Although w -Itten by an American, 
"Kismet" ha;5 been presented, during 
the past two years, in almost every 
country in Europe, and everywhere It 
has m^'t witl the same enormous suc- 
cess that it has won In the United 

The authot drew his inspiration for 
"Kismet* f re m Sir Bichard Burtons 
translation ff "1 he Arabian Nights 
though he coes not follow. In his 
dramatic composition, any partlcu'.-ix 
one of the fascinating storle:: of 
.Schecherez.ide. He has, however, woven 
Into his dr£ ma many Incidents and 
turns of speech that characteri>:o tho 
book with rtmarkable skill. His hero, 
Haij tlie Beggar, a fellow of nimble 
wit suavitv and great volubility. Is 
elevated, lii the course of the day, 
from his mendicant's seat In front of 
the mosque, to place -of honor among 
the mlghtv In Bagdad. The price he | 
pays 'or this advancement is his prom- i 
ise to murdtr the caliph. He falls :n 
his attempt upon Abdallah's life. Is ] 
thrown into prison and his beloved t 
daughter, Mnrslnah, l.s left unprotecltdl 
In the hand'? of the villainous Wazir \ 
Mansur. Bi t fate Is on the side of j 
Hajj this day, and by a series of happy | 
Incidents he escapes from prison, kills; 
the two men who have been his life- ' 
long enemies, and sees the beautiful 
Marslnah safely married to the C-iUph 
Abdallah. At the end of the day, how- , 
ever Hajj find.s himself back again on j 
his accustomed seat, clothed in beg- 
gar's rags. Fate has made a plaything 
of him for a few hours and at the 
[ end of the game has restored him to 
his place. 

Among thi other well known pl^.yers 

in the large company are George Gaul 

, Owen Meech, Richard Scott, Daniel 

1 Jarrett, Charles Newsom, Wiiliarf I or- 

I enz Harrv Sothern. Harold Skinner, 

Ernest Leeman, Merle Maddern, Grace 

' Hampton, Genevieve Delaro, Rosa 

Coates and Ninnle Palmer. 

Owing to the length of the perform- 
ance the curtain will rise promptly at 
8 o'clock. 



Washington, Dec. 1.— White House 
officials declared today that the United 
States government neither directly nor 
Indirectly had Influenced the with- 
drawal of the Pearson negotiations for 
concessions in Colombia. 



ZfteJ^iser,^ompaiii/ 






and 20 Wes,'. Superior .Sf., 
Xear First Aoe. ^y€tt 



FOR TIFSD \Y OXLY 

100 

Jumbo Sweater 

Coats 

Regular prices $6.50 and §7.00. 

$4.98 

An excellent garment for all 
kinds of winter sports. I'ractical 
and useful; while they last, spe- 
at $4.98. 



cial 



GREAT SHOWING OF 
CHRISTMAS 

Waists 

Special prices prevail now. 

OXE GROl P AT 88c 

(Worth to $2.50.) 

ONE GROl P AT $129 

< Worth to $3.00.) 

ONE GROrP AT $1.05 

^Worth to $4.00.) 



ore- 
act 



Rugby, M. D, 



D.. Silk Theft, 

Dec 1.— tSpecial 



to 



Flannel Shirts 

98c 

Four new styles; reg. $1.50 values. 
Buy early while the selections are 
at their best. Garments held for fu- 
ture delivery. 



ll 



Monday, 




JTHE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913 



THE DULUTH BERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 
I*abllKhrfl every evenlnnr except San- 
day by The Herald Company. 

Both Telephones — Business Office, 324; 

Editorial Rooms. 1126. 

> 

Eiiferfd as secom' clsM matter at the Duluth post- 
offlie under tlie uot ut cngress of March 3, 1870. 

OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DLLITH 



I consumer, $6.46, is the highest by far under election machinery which puts 
in the list, the average of the other 'the initiative on candidates, the right 
towns being $2.38 — less than half that ' kind of men, the men needed, will not 
of Duluth. Of course one large fac- enter the field as a rule, 
tor in that is revealed by the com- If Minnesota would take up this 
parison of per capita water plant ! vitally important matter as it should. 



debt — $30.50 in Duluth, and an aver- 
age of $7.06 in the other cities con- 
sidered. 

BUBScitiPTiox RATKS— By mail, pay- Bonds cost something— a fact that 

able in advance, one month, 35 cents; | few people seem to realize, even when 

three months, Jl; six months, $2; 

one year, $4; Saturday Herald. $1 per 

year; Weekly Herald, |1 per year. 
J)aily by carrier, city and suburbs, 10 

cents a week, 45 cents a month. 

Biibs'TiU-r^ will confer a favor by making known 
•.njr cuuiplkiiit of genlce. 

When chanBing the address of your paper. It la 
fmpoi'tant tu bIvc butli old and new addreisei. 

» , . . — -^— ^■^^— 

The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contracts with the distinct guar- 
anty tliat it has the largest circulation i actual 
In Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 
i ■ 



ALABAMA'S RIGHT TO REPRESEN-^ 
TATION. 

There seems to be some doubt 
pbuut whether the senate of the Unit- 
ed States will seat Senator Frank P. 
Glass, lately appointed to fill the va- 
cancy from Alabama; though it may 
be that this doubt is based nierely on 
the fact that the senate refused to re- 
ceive Mr. Clayton when he was named 
for tlie same vacancy. 

If this doubt has substance, it can 
mean but one thing: the senate is 
more cmiccrned about technical quib- 
bles tlian it is about the right of a 
•tate of the L'nion to its full repre- 
sentation in the congress of the Unit- 
ed States, 

For the point on which Mr. Clay- 
ton was rejected, and on which doubt 
about Mr. Glass's admittance is based. 
is a «iuihblc and a technicality. The 
senate's unchallengeable power K) be 
the sole judge of the qualifications of 
its members should be exerted to 
com])lcte Alabama's represcntatiur, 
and not to support a hairsplitting 
quibble. 

The legislature of Alabama has not 
specifically authorized the governor 
to fill senatorial vacancies, and this 
is the point on which senate quibblers 
rejected Mr. Clayton and may wish 
to reject Mr. Glass. They want Ala- 
bama to have a special session of its 
legislature to make this authorization, 
and they seem to regard lightly the 
fact that to do this Alabama would 
be put to the expense of a special 
election to fill about twenty vacan- 
cies in its legislature, and then to the 
expense of an extra session of that 
legislature, and very likely then an- 
other special election to fill the sen- 
atorial vacancy. All to acconiplisli 
^vhat the senate could accomplish in 
five minutes by exerting its right to 
judge the qualifications of its mem- 
bers. 

That the point is a quibble and 
nothing but a quibble is made clear 
enough by the fact that lawyers just 
as competent as those who are raising 
the point are completely convinced 
that Mr. Glass's appointment is en- 
tirely legal. 

Two things are of immensely great- 
er importance than this hairsplitting. 
One is that the state of Alabama 
should not be denied its full repre- 
sentation or be subjected to the great 
and needless expense of special elec- 
tions and a special legislative session 
because of mere technicalities. The 
other is that the nation needs every 
senate vote for constructive progress 
that it can muster, and another such 
vote is offered in the person of Sena- 
tor Glass. 

If the senate committee on elec- 
tions will construe the seventeenth 
amendment with full consideration of 
the riglits and needs of the nation and 
of a great state, and with no more 
consideration than necessarj' of slen- 
der and debatable technicalities, Mr. 
Glass will be seated, the representa- 
tion of Alabama will be complete, and 
there will be one more vote in the 
senate for progress and the people. 



they are bearing the cost through tax- 
ation or service charges. 

Conditions here and elsewhere dif- 
fer, of course; but that has nothing 
to do with the fact that Duluth's pub- 
lic utilities should be put and kept 
on a thoroughly businesslike basis, 
regardless of the "showing." If the 
facts make a poor showinjr, 
then the facts should be changed $0 
the showing will be good. 



If Xew York city gets Dr. Wiley for 
Its health commissioner, the rest of 
the country will be likely to sit up 
and take a little notice of New York 
at last. 



ON TO BEMIDJIt 

The annual meeting of the North- 
ern Minnesota Development associa- 
tion at Bemidji Thursday and Friday 
will be the most important in its his- 
tor}', and it should have the largest 
attendance of the most representative 
boosters from all parts of Northern 
Minnesota. 

Heretofore the emphasis in the 
work of the association has been laid 
on SETTLEMENT, with consider- 
able distraction caused by the issue 
of reapportionment, which is now set- 
tled. 

Hereafter the emphasis should be 
laid on DEV'ELOPMENT— the re- 
clamation of fertile acres from their 
handicaps of swamps and stumps and 
of inaccessibility because of lack of 
roads. 

The big thing before the N. M. D. 
A. is to induce the state to adopt a 
broad and business-like land policy 
and to take the lead in a development 
that will make it possible for settlers 
to make a living from the start. 



and if the country press would give 
it the prominence it deserves, the 
next legislature would be a body of 
men that would go down in the his- 
tory of the state. 

In every district in this state there 
is a man better qualified than any 
other man in that district for this 
high office. That man today prob- 
abl}- isn't thinking of becoming a 
candidate for the legislature. If you'd 
mention it to him, he would laugh at 
you. But if the people of that district 
got together and talked it over, and 
after threshing over the field decided 
that he was THE MAN, and put it to 
him on the ground of public duty and 
of high opportunity for public serv- 
ice, he could be impressed into that 
service. And if enough districts did 
that, the next legislature would 
MAKE HISTORY. 

The people of Minnesota will get 
whatever kind of legislature they de- 
mand. 

If they are neglectful, they will get 
a poor one; and they will deserve lit- 
tle pity if it be one that will despoil 
the state, increase extravagance and 
inefficiency, and raid the treasury 
for a thousand petty schemes of in- 
dividual aggrandizement and profit. 

If the people are watchful and 
earnest and careful, they can get a 
legislature that will set the whole 
nation talking about the MINNP:- 
SOTA WAV of handling public busi- 
ness. 

It's all up to the people. 



les over the division of 



wages contlnu 
the proffxl. 

If the workers gret anything In ad- 
dition tb-lvaj^es through profit-sharing 
they orityi £t what belongs to them. 

Profit-sharing Is a plain fraud, to 
bo worked upon the worker.s In the 
hope that it,^ill produce contentment, 
that mu^ ifeslred attribute of slaves 
the woij^ 4f*r in all ages. Content- 
ment \ri wajjfe-earncrs is as much an 
asset to! thjjj^capitalist as contentment 
in a cotv on^gentleness in a horse is 
to a fanmeii 

The trouDle at present lies In the 
fact that production is a social func- 
tion that is under private control. The 
remedy ^les In the socialization of the 
means eft prpduction and thereby ren- 
dering to each worker full social val- 
ue of his labor. This can be done 
only by the workers themsilves by 
organizing Industrial unions adminis- 
tered In such a way as to become ca- 
pable of directing affairs in its In- 
dustrial jurisdiction, these form a na- 
tional indu.strial council to care for 
the general Interests of all. As such 
an organization grows It gradually 
assumes all control of human affairs 
and our present political state which 
is a capitalist Instrument for oppres- 
sion of the workers, gradually falls 
Into disuse and finally disappears, giv- 
ing way to an industrial republic that 
win be an "administration of things." 
And the ballot? Yes, certainly, for 
all who believe and desire to work 




Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kelly. 



Washington, Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)-;rrhis is to deal with the 
horrible mistake made by Former Sec- 
retary of War Henry L. Stimson when 
he had his official portrait painted. 

The portrait now adorns the walls 
of the outer office of the secretary of 
war, face to face with pictures of Ed- 
win M. Stanton, William Tecumseh 
Sherman, and other grave old war 
secretaries and war heroes. There the 
picture is to remain through the suc- 
ceeding ages, as a constant source of 
Inspiration and comfort to the young 
of our broad land. 

Now let us suppose that you were 
about to have your portrait there. It 
1.S to be painted, mind you, not by the 
man who paints pictures on the sides 
of Ice wagons and on saloon mirrors, 
but by a high-priced artist, and the 
result Is to be permanent. You can't 
come around In a few weeks and sit 
again. Doubtless, In view of the 
company In which you are to bo 
thrown, you would wish to glare forth 
from those walls just as solemn- 
ly as anybody. When the painter got 
ready to use you for his target, you 
would undutlably put on your best 



On to Bemidji! 



Northern Minnesota Vrum BoostCTs to 
N. M. U. A. ConvenUou. 



Attend 



Twenty Years Ago 



Tnm The Herald of thii data. iSM. 



r^r. *u^ -„ 11 ti * 41. w I clothes, a high collar, roach your hair 

for the realization of the above, usej back 

the ballot that carries with It the 



above demand. 

But proflt-sliaring, bah I To use the 
phrase of Danl-1 De Leon of the X'ew 
York Daily People It is but "padding 
on the yoke tiiat blKstcrs the shoul- 
ders of the workers." 

WM. E. TOWXE. 

Duluth. Nov. 28. 

THE REALMURFeRERS. 



The navy general board says the peo- 
ple do not understand the great neces- 
sity for a big navy. For once the gen- 
eral board has stated a tremendous 
truth. 



THE OPEN COURT 

'Readem of Tlw Herald aro ltiTlte<i to mako free 
use uf tliU column to express Uielr Ideas aliout the 
topics of general Interest, but dLscussl'^na of ecx'tarlan 
rellglmw dlirerences are b.irrod. Letters must not 



To the Editor of The H.rald: 

Since the building of a new armory 
In Duluth has been advocated some 
criticism has appeared in the Open 
Court of your paper and unwarranted 
attacks hf>ve been made on members 
of the militia Tf<e have been brand- 
ed as hirelings and murderers who 
are always waiting for a chance to 
shoot down a poor working man. 

Since our critics are so well in- 
formed on this matter I would like to 
ask them to answer the following: 
How many times has the militia been 
called out and how many strikers 
have they killed In Minnesota since the 
first company was organized in 1863? 
How many children have beeu made 
orphans through such killings and 
how much property has been destroyed 
by the militia? How many strikes 
have we had during the same period? 
How many strikers, strike-breakers 
and uninterested persons have been 



To that end. the association <=hould r^««' 3»« words-ti.e sWter the t>e.Ver:"" flTeT'muit i assassinated and killed by strikers and 
. ^ ci3.^wi,iaiiuu .uuuiui 1,0 written on ..ne Mde of the ratxjr oiil.v, and they their sympathizers? How many chll- 



adopt and induce the state to adopt 
a new conception of reclamation that 
will include not only the reclaiming 
of submerged land by drainage, but 
of stump-covered land by clearing 
and of inaccessible land by road- 
building. 

With such a policy of development 
in ^ffcct, settlement would largely 
take care of itself. The land is rich, 
its yields are rapid and large, the 
markets are large and eager; given a 
proper policy of development, there 
is no place on earth that offers a 
richer opportunity to the homeseeker 
than Northern Minnesota. 

The N. M. D. A. has achieved great 
things, but its work has only begun. 
The need at this week's meeting is to 
reorganize and redirect its energies 
along these lines; and that calls for 
the best intelligence and the best en- 
thusiasm that Northern Minnesota 
can summon together at Bemidji. 

Duluth, of course, should be fully 
represented, for Duluth's growth will 
keep pace with and to a large extent 
must wait upon the proper develop- 
ment and settlement of Northern 
Minnesota. 



must be accompanied In every i a.so by the name and 
address of the urlter, though tliose neetl nut bo pub- 
lished. A sigueU laiier is alwajs more eHecUve. bow- 
ever.) 



dren have been made orphans through 
these acts and how much property has 
been destroyed by these s.ime people? 
Who is it that hires assassins to dy- 
namite homes of poor working men, 
trying hard to support a family, but 
refusing to be dictated to or join cer- 
tain organizations? Is it the rallitla? 
Who Is It that hires men to sneak 
around at night to blow up structures 
___ ^„i.i„„ 11 .1 , . . being erected by non-union labor? Is 

fn^ ^n th^ ^l\^l'^\''T'' ''*'°"} ^?°'': " the militia? Who Is It that objects 

car, ^nH fhl^t ^1^^,^*^^' «f. ^^^i'^^' to law and order? Is It the militia? 
cars and the "terrible fumes of at 

clear Havana cigar, are blind to ' 



STRAIN AT GNATS 

AND SWALLOW CAMELS. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

Why Is It that all tnese people who 



That Chicago woman who proposes 
to adopt fifteen babies of different 
rationalities must have given up all 
expectation of ever living In a flat. 



Congress Is getting some notion of 
how the rest of the country has had 
to keep Its nose to the grindstone for 
the last few years. 



scourges ten thousand times worse? 

Only the other day I was in a place ' 
and saw a man who was terribly af- I 
fllcted with syphillls being served food j 
and drink In the same dishes the rest j 
were served in. I 

Now, If a person has a mild case of 1 
the measles or some trifling disease, 
up goes a card advertising the fact, I 
while people with one of the most ter- [ 
rlble of dl-seases are allowed to run at ' 
large and poison others. 

Let's forget the little street car ar- 
gument and get at things worth while. 
Let us do this for humanity's sake. 
Thanking you for your valuable space, 
I am yours truly, 

JAMES CROWLEY. 

Duluth, Nov. 30. 



THIS HELPS START 

THE WEEK RIGHT. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

We wish to express to you our grat- 
itude for your hearty co-operation at 
the time of the Charity ball. Your 
generous donation of space and splen- 
did editorials helped In large measure 
to make the ball a big success and our 
work at the Children's Home more 
far-reaching. Yours very truly, 
IHE DIRECTORS OF THE CHIL- 
DREN'S HOME. 

By A. H. MACFARLANE, 

Assistant Secretary. 
Duluth, Nov. 30.— 



We admit taxes would be slightly 
ral»*d If bonds for an armory site 
would be Ipsued. So do strikes In- 
crease tajces when It becomes neces- 
sary to employ extra police and dep- 
uty sheriffs and we are not all Inter- 
ested In strikes, but have to pay our 
share of additional taxes. 

It seems we are only amateur.«t, not 
bf ing charged with a single killing in 
forty years, while our critics are pa.^t 
masters who rati boast of a long list 
of murders to their credit. 

A MILITIAMAN. 

Duluth, Minn., Nov. 29. 



Pass the Currency Bill I 



f 



NOT OPPOSED TO EIGHT-HOUR DAY 



TIME TO TAKE NOTICE. 

Too often in this state the gover- 
norship has been a red herring drawn 
across the trail of the people. 

By accident or design, the full at- 
tention of the people has been direct- 
ed upon this office, while special in- 
terests smuggled through a legisla- 
ture organized for their benefit." 

The Sauk Center Herald is right, 
therefore, in directing public atten- 
tion, even this early, to the import- 
ance of picking members of the legis- 
lature, both branches of which will 
be up for election next year. 

Says the Sauk Center paper: "Im- 
portant as the state officers are, it pirst. being a tr.ide unionist, whose 
should be borne in mind by the voters policy is .an 8-hour day, I could not 
that 



Chicago Tribune: The desire of the 
president and administration leaders In 
congress for continuous consideration 
and early action upon the Owen-Glass 

currency measure Is not only natural 
but commendable. Expedition does not 
mean haste, ajid closure has not been 
attempted. The measure has been un- 
der discussion for months, has been 
analyzed and drastically criticized by 
bankers and economists. Individually 
and In conventions assembled. The 
chairmen and banking committees In 
house and senate have listened to the 
leading experts, bankers and mer- 
chants. Many counter proposals have 
been offered, a Republican measure has 
been Introduced, the Owen-Glass bill 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I vlll pay to any person or persons 
the sum of $25 for proof that I am 
opposed to the police department be- 
ing placed upon an 8-hour basis. Some 
on^ hag been circulating the story 
among the policemen of the city that 
I was and am opposed to their being 
placed on the 8 -hour basi.<;. As far 
as I have been able to learn the story 1 sensible 



has been amended In 
portant respects, and 
modified. 

In the hou.«se caucus action forced the 
bill to passage, and this was justifiable 
in the first stage, for the possibilities 
of intermirfabW and unprofitable parti- i 
san tactics in that chamber are well i 
known. Consideration in the senate is I 
necessarily more free, and it will re- \ 
suit in ImproY»ments. But It should ^ 
not be too long drawn out. The Dem- I 
ocratlc arguments for reasonable ex- j 
peditlon, as summarized by Mr. ' 
O'Laughlin yesterday, are fair and i 



In neat, conservative fashion, 
and try to look as dlgnifledly smart as 
if you had just that minute arrived at 
the solution of an intricate problem In 
higher mathematics. 

• • • 

Did Henry L. Stimson approach the 
situation In any such attitude as that? 
No, frankly he did not. Instead of 
gitting out his Sabbath clothes when 
the painter came around, he deter- 
mined that he would make himself In- 
strumental in brightening up the por- 
trait gallery of the war department, 
and he hunted up the most ornate 
riding clothes he had. His family tried 
to remonstrate with him but he had 
his mind made up to go down to pos- 
terity looking like the cover design of 
the midsummer fiction number of a 
15-cent magazine. He put on a pair 
of tan riding breeches, a yellow coat, 
a yallery vest, a stock In place of a 
collar, seized his riding crop, clutched 
his gloves jauntily In one hand, jabbed 
a thumb Into a side coat pocket — 
which gives an effect only a trifle less 
Jaunty than slapping one's gloves gai- 
ly against the thigh — and then he 
fatrpped up before the painter and 
bade him do his worst. 

• • • 

The result is a work that seems to 
have been dune by Harrison Fisher In 
collaboration with George Barr Mc- 
Cutcheon and Richard Harding Davis. 
If one didn't know It was Stimson one 
would say just offhand that the man's 
name was Cecil Mainwarlng or Algy 
Trevor, and that In the closing chap- 
ter he will be forced Into marriage 
with an athletic young creature named 
Mathilda van Tulle. Certainly one 
would never suspect from the picture 
that Stlmson's name Is Henry. 

As a matter of fact, this tendency 
toward ornate portraiture In the war 
department gallery was started by no 
less a person than William Howard 
.Taft. Up until the time Taft retired 
as secretary of war, the pictures there 
had been either In army uniform or 
In the conventional black — but always 
sombre. Taft's double-width picture 
shows him in a light blue coat, white 
vest and red necktie. This color gay- 
ety on the part of his predecessor may 
have been Stlmson's Inspiration. 

Whatever may have given Stimson 
Ms notion, our prediction is thatwltli- 
tn two or three years his better judg- 
ment will once more gain control of 
the delegates whereupon he will come 
around coaxing for the privilege of 
taking his picture away and storing 
It in some good, quiet attic. But it 
will be too late. 

• * • 

Old Marc Smith, who is one of the 
senators from Arizona, smokes pon- 
derous, big black he-cigars, and 
smokes them practically all the time. 
Senator Tillman, on the other hand, 
quit smoking for his health's sake 
some time ago, and never touches a 
cigar. A short time ago Tillman and 
Smith were both seated with other 
senators. In a little committee room. 
Marc Smith, of course, was smoking. 
Tillman might as well have smoked 
Mmself, as every breath he took sat- 
urated his In.'^ides with the smoke 
Marc Smith was providing for the en- 
tire company. He complained to Smith 
about this. Whereupon the Arizona 
senator said: 

"Tillman, when you talk that way 
I feel toward you almost as the man 
did whose wife was sick so long. The , 
man said, you know, that he wished 



That'it the Proper Spirit. 

Grand Rapids ;ndependent: On to 
Bemidji! Is the err now. 

On Dec. 4 and E the annual mooting 
of the Northern Minnesota Develop- 
ment association is to be held. 

Itasca county wmts to bo there. 

Itasca county, aside from being the 
home county of (he president of the 
association, is the best county of the 
thirty-one In the territory covered by 
the asf-oclation. It is the second rich- 
est in assess-ed valuation, and It Is one 
of more dlversiflec. industrial develop- 
ment than any otlier. 

Itasca county owes It to itself to help 
the development movement. 

It has more to i.ain than any of the 
other counties. 

Let's have a rousing meeting of the 
Itasca county bra ich of the develop- 
ment association and send a good rep- 
resentation to the meeting at Bemidji. 

Let every community be represented. 

Let Itasca counl;,^ be heard from. 



Farnam C. Stone of the Well»- 
btone company Is reported to be slow- 
ly recovering from an attack of nerv- 
ous prostration, consequent upon th« 

n^rl!!'*' ^'^'^*'*'*^ "^ his old friend and 
partner. C. W. Wells. 



on^r^o^' ,^h®!'^'«od of Houston, Tex^ 
once a leading Duluth lawyer and 
cortv"'","^, ''Vr'"'-'' for S^ Lou",J 
^M?r^id'?rle"nd^r ^*^^' ^»^^^*"^ "^^^^ 



B<>nildjt Will Make Good. 

Bemidji Sentinel Soon the Northern 
Minnesota Development association will 
be holding its closing session of the 
annual meeting of that band of boost- 
ers. 

It was here foui years ago that the 
breath of life was; breathed into this 
organization and because Bemidji Is 
the birthplace of the association, the 



••'Mrs. J. L. Dickinson arrived from 
Minneapolis yesterday to spend Thanks- 
giving with her husband, the manager 
of the Woodward Clothing company. 

•♦•Miss Ring left last night for St. 
Paul to attend the wedding of her 
friend. Miss Agnes La Riviere, to C. P. 
Payne. 



s***C. H. Dunlap of New Duluth. for- 
merly of Vlroqua, Wi.s., has purchased 
the interest of Ed Howard In the An- 
nex saloon opposite the Spalding. 



•••J. .1. Mack and familv of West 
Duluth left today for Millbury. Mass., 
to spend the winter. 



of special 



coming conventloi. is one 
significance to this city. 

Bemidji should, and will, do her 
share toward making the coming gath- 
ering one of the -nost Important and 
successful of all the meetings held. 
Just at this time there are Important 
problems to be solved by Northern 
Minnesota and a general meeting of 
representative citizens from all the 
counties Interested can be made to re- 
sult In much good. 

The opportunity presented Bemidji 
to sustain her reputation for hospitali- 
ty and ability to convince visitors of 
her progresslveness and the possibili- 
ties of the surrounding country should 
be taken advantage of and, of course, 
every Beltrami cotnty town will have 
good delegations p -esent. 



•••The West Duluth Odd Fellow.s, at 
their last meeting. Installed the fol- 
lowing officers: Silas Buck. N. G.; Nell 
McKenzie, V. G.; W. B. Hartley, R. S.; 
Charles Hendricks, P. S.; J. W. Crooks, 
trustee. 



•••Latest reports from Chicago state 
that Francis Agnew. the well-known 
contractor, who was run over by a 
cable car, is now expected to recover. 



•••W. H. Watkins, who handled tha 
famous Detroit baseball team when 
they won the National league pennant, 
and who was once manager of the Du- 
luth team, will have charge of tha 
Sioux City club next season. 



•••B. Shanley, the contractor, re- 
turned from Fargo yesterday to spend 
Thanksgiving with his family. 



•♦•"Bob" Dunn of the Princeton 
Union is being boomed for state aud- 
itor. 



•••George Kirkham 
from a trip to Chicago. 



has returned 



Best iruMtlers; Bewt DMegatrs. 

St. Cloud Journal-Press: The an- 
nual meeting of tie Northern Minne- 
sota Development association will be 
held at Bemidji on Dec. 4 and 5. 

An excellent program has been ar- •♦♦Miss Sallie Gibbs and Mis.s Laura 
ranged, and several prominent men of | ghepard of St. Paul aro visiting Mr. 
the state will d( liver addresses of and Mrs. F. B. Ross 
practical value to the people not only 
of the northern section of the state, 
but to all the state. 

Stearns county Is entitled to ten 
delegates, and ten of the best hustlers 
chosen from various sections of the 
county should be S'Jnt to represent the 
best county In the commonwealth. 



Success Can Be IDxtended. 

International Fal.s Press: Don't for- 
get the annual mee'lng* of the Northern 
Minnesota Development association 
which meets In Bemidji Dec. 4 and 5. 
A good program Is being provided. 
The work of this sssociation has been 
very successful in calling the attention 
of the rest of the state and of the 
legislators to the leeds of the thirty 
northern counties. There is, however, 
much more to be d3ne. 



Snsgestlon Is PIcasins:. 

Grygla Eagle: The annual meeting 
of the Northern Minnesota Develop- 
ment association will be held at Be- *Vnen twilight apprcaches, the season 



•••Capt. C. C. Teare leaves in a few 
days for the East to remain until his 
marriage In the latter part of Decem- 
ber. Last evening, Mrs. W. H. Stults, 
with whom he has made his home for 
five years, gave a farewell dinner In 
his honor. Twenty young men were 
present. 



Do 



Do They Miss Me at IIomcT 

they miss me at home? Do they 
miss me? 
'Twculd be an assurance moat dear 
To know that this moment some lov'd 
one 
Were saying: "I wish he were here." 
To feel that the group at the fireside 

Were thinking of me as I roam. 
Oh, yes, 'twould be joy beyond meas- 
ure 
To know that they missed me at 
home. 



midji, its birthplace. Dec. 4 and 5. One 
thing alone among nany that might be 
mentioned makes the work of this as- 
sociation a necessity to Northern Min- 
ne.'?ota. The government still holds 
half a million acres of swamp land 
that will be patented to the state. It 
has been proposed ihrough The Duluth 
Herald that this laige area be given to 
the state with the express stipulation 
that the proceeds of Its sale must be 
devoted to the creation of a state rec- 
lamation fund, the term "reclamation" 
to Include not only drainage but road 
building and land clearing; and that 
this fund be made the nucleus of a re- 
volving fund with which to reclaim 
and put upon the market the state's 
enormous holdings in Northern Minne- 
sota. This .suggestion should be taken 
up at the Bemidji meeting, and plans 
for definite action arranged. 



many very Im- | si e'd either get well or — or do some- 
will be further thing." 

• • * 
President Wilson has a habit of 
writing statements to himself. He 
does It just as a matter of having 
memoranda on file, and to refresh his 
memory on what has gone before. 

The other day a report got out that 
the president was about to take the 
whole country into his confidence on 



MoKensie Has Done Good \%''ork. 

Cainbridge Independent-Press: The 
next meeting of the Northern Develop- 
ment association will be held at Be- 
midji early In January of next year. It 
Is understood that V.'. R. McKenzie, the 
able and efficient secretary of the as- 
sociation, will retire at that time from 
the active management of the N. M. D. 
A. This is to be regretted if true, as 
no man has been more active in the 
upbuilding of the association's strength 
than the genial secretary, and no man 
has done more for Jforthern Minnesota 
and the state at large than our own 
"Mac." 



That ever Is sacred to song. 
Does some one repeat my name over 

And sigh that I tarry too long? 
And is there a chord in the music 

That's missed when my voice is away. 
And a chord In each heart that awakens 

regret at my wearisome stay? 

Do they set me a chair near the table 
When ev'nlng home pleasures ar© 
nigh. 
When the candles are lit in the parlor 
And the stars In the calm, azure sky? 
And when the "good-nights" are re- 
peated 
And all lay them down to their sleep 
Do they think of the absent and waft 
me 
A wlilspered "good-night" while they 
weep? 



Do 



at noon or at night? 

shade round 



they mi.ss me at home? Do thejr 
miss me 
At morning 
And lingers o le gloomy 
them 
That only my presence can light? 
Are Joys less Invitingly welcome. 

And pleasures less hale than before 
Because one is missed from the circla^ 
Because 1 ani with them no more? 

—Old Son«. 



Civic Rlghtconsncss. 

William Allen White: Civic right- 
eousness, whether in the White Housa 
or at the ward caucus, after all i.s only 
the practical, efficient use of common 
sense, uncommon courage and com- 
mon honesty. 



started In the We.st end. If that in- 
dividual who seems to know so much 
about the question, would have given 
the following a little thought he would 
have seen where he Is wrong. 



"It Is declared," he says, "that delay 
In connection with the currency bill Is 
harmful to the business Interests; that 
the banks. Ignorant of the kinrd of 
legislation that will be enacted, are 
tightening their credits and calling 



Tt Will Be T'nuKiially Tniportnnt. 

Brainerd Dispatch: The Northern 
the Mexican situation. A w-ell au- ! *I'»^"<^"ot«- ^^^^^'oP*"""* association will 
thentlcated rumor came from the | »"eet In Bemidji on ]3ec. 4 and 5 in an- 
Whito House officer that he was at I ""al session. It Is expected that the 
work on a more or less exhau.sllve ' meeting will be of unusual Importance, 
statement showing every step that had I »» a" excellent projcram has been ar- 
had been taken in the case of Mexico ranged and prominent men of the state 
for the last several weeks. The Im- j ^'J'' deliver address-s of value to the 
rrcssion grew that this statement I People of the whole state. Every coun- 
v.ould be made public at 3:30 o'clock : *>' *" "'« northern part of the state 



enterprises 



DULUTH'S WATER PLANT. 

"We want to put the water and 
light department upon the most effi- that the legislative positions are of ! ^^^'^^^ *" that policy, and still be op- 
cicnt and businesslike basis possible." still greater importance. It is the I '^'*Second, 'being a Socialist whose pol- 
said Commissioner Mcrritt in an in- 1 legislature which in the last analysis lf>' l^ ""t only eight, but is more like- ' delay in currency legislation will hav, 

. •• T-i ir 11 o . .. ^.t 11 . Iv to be six I could not adhere tola bad effect upon a financial situatioi 

tcrview in The Herald Saturday eve- must settle all questions pertaining to JLtpoUcy and s?m be opposed to it by no means lacking in unpkasan 
ning; and of course thaj's what every- 4he welfare of the people." I would like to see the color of the i po.<*siblllt!es, and it could be justlfle* 



th.nt afternoon, 
correspondents 



and the 
sauntered 



newspaper 
In expect 



loans, and tliat want of the neces.'^ary 1 antly. But there was nothing doing 



:ry- 
body wants. 

If it is true, as Mr. Merritt inti- 
mates, that in the past reports have 
been put out "to make the best possi- 
ble showing to the public without due 
regard to actual conditions," then that 
policy should be changed. Whether 
the showing is good or bad, — though 
we shall expect to find it good, — the 
public is entitled to all the facts and 
the whole truth about the public utili- 
ties it owns. 

And, regardless of the conse- 
quences, the water plant should be on 
a thoroughly business basis, even if 
that involves the unpleasant remedy 
of increasing rates. 

The comparative figures in the 
table prepared by the department and 
published in The Herald with Mr. 
Merritt's interview are not, on their 
face, particularly flattering. The wa- 
ter rate paid by the home-owners, 
17^ cents per hundred cubic feet, is 
the largest but one and more than 
half the average outside of Duluth. 
J^uluth's average service expense per 



peopl 

Governors may propose, but leg- 
islatures dispose. 

Governors may recommend till they 
are black in the face, but their rec- 
ommendations are empty unless cryt- 
talized into action by legislative enact- 
ment. 

"It is too early," some one says. 
The special interests don't think i- 
too early. If you were gifted with 
the right kind of vision you would 
find them busy right now on the next 
legislature. 

"The people," continues the Sauk 
Center Herald, "should take the mat- 
ter of selecting legislative candidates 
in their own hands. Men should be 
discussed and gatherings should be 
held to discuss the best men for the 
positions, and when public opinion 
has been crystalized petitions should 
be circulated asking the man or men 
desired to become candidates. In no 
other way can a legislature of the 
character demanded by the times he 
secured." 

For, as the Sauk Center paper says, 



fellow's hair, the shade of his eyes 
and the cut of hla jib, who started 
that story. Tours truly, 

P. G. PHILLIPS. 
Duluth, Nov. 29. 



PROFIT-SHARING AND 

THE WORKING MAN. 



money Is preventing many 
from going forward." 

There Is no doubt that protracted 
legislation will have 
on 
t 
d 
only as against a measure so funda- 
mentally faulty as to be critically dan- 
gerous. The Owen-Glasfe bill is not so 
considered by conservative opinion, al- 
though that opinion holds that It 
should be further amended in some Im- 
portant features. As to that, the ad 



T he president had been at work on a 
statement all true enough, but It was 
addressed to himself. 

• • * 
Attorney General McReynolds does 
not drink or use tobacco, and when he 
swears he does so in a genteel, depre- 
catory vein that should not give the 
slightest offense to any one. 
Agate line 
(Copyrigbt, 1913. by Fred C. Kelly. All rights rMor\ed.) 



should be represent€d at this meeting. 



Life 



Too Much. 

The announcement that Presl- 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Dr. Eliot has favored profit-sharing 
as a remedy for Industrial strife. The 
Herald has commented editorially. It 



measure can be perfected save by trial, 
and the Owen-Glass bill Is In the main 
good, is being well considered, Is likely 
to be still further amended In fair 
compromise, and should be passed 



may seem startling for Dr. Eliot, cap- [ ;,.,thout undue delay. Its defects are 



italist hireling that he is, to state that 
the wage system must go. Many a 
street corner spouter has said the 
same thing. 

The wage system Is Inherent In cap- 
italism and the capitalist system of 
production has outlived Its usefulness. 

Wages are the market price of labor 
power, the money equivalent of that 
portion of labor's product absolutely 
necessary to sustain the worker. 

Profit Is the pet graft of the em- 
ployer. It Is unpaid wages. It Is coy 
and elusive. It suffers from demands 
of the workers for more wages and 
from many other disturbances. It Is 
the keystone of modern buslne.as. No 
profit and the capitalist ceases to do 
business. He protects it at all haz- 
ards. 

If the capitalists abolish wages and 
substitute profit-sharing then the 
same merry war that rages over 



ministration leaders do not disclose an dent Wilson has abolished cabinet 
arbitrary spirit, and it is hoped will I meetings should be received with the 
concede some further safeguards. No ] consternation it deserves in all con- 
servative strongholds. What is to be- 
come of this republic If our sacred In- 
stitutions are J.hus ruthlessly de- 
stroyed? 

The cabinet meeting has been for 
generations a kind of glorified round- 
the -flre-ln-the-rear-of-a-grocery-store 
confab. It has been valuable up to 
recently Because It took up the time 
of members In talk when otherwise j 
they might have been acting. 

The Idea of replacing talk by action 
seems to be one of President Wilson's 
hobbles. Something ought to be done 
about it or we shall all lapse Into a 
condition of innocuous idealism. 



To a Mighty Hunter. 

I'll never doubt your hunting tales 
again 
Or minimize your prowess with thet 
gun. 

For I h.ave lying here within my ken 
Your splendid gifl, a roast of veni- 
son. 

To say I thank you, is too little pay. 
And so I promise to return In kind 

On some resplendent future lucky day, 
When, gun In hand, a tethered deer 
I find. 



less to be feared, we believe, than long 
continued uncertainty and the injec- 
tion of the whole subject into a po- 
litical campaign. 

« 

Cf h»e Wishes. 

Pall Mall 0azitte: A "P. M. G." real- 
er sends us j^^e Ifollowing little story — 
certainly orife of the best of Its kind: 

To the great god Buddha came the 
representatiras of the Catholic, Prot- 
estant and J'ewish religions, to pay him 
homage. Bijddha, very flattered, told 
each of thefn that If they would ex- 
press a wish, It would be fulfilled. 
"What do you wish?" he asked the 
Catholic. Tlie answer was. "Glory." 
"You shall have It." said Buddha, and 
turning to t^e Protestant, "What do { 
you wish?" {"Money." "You shall have 
it." "And yon?" This to the Jew. "1 1 
do not want much." quoth he, "give 
me the Protestant's address!" I 



He 



captiV'5 and a pinioned 
cone looking in my 



must be 
deer. 
Or recklessly 
gun. 
I'm pretty sure to g ?t him and appear 
As great a nimrod then as anyone. 

— J. McKinnon. 
Duljth, Nov. 29. 



Satisfied. 

Everybody's: The Jew peddler rapped 
timidly at the kitchen door. Mrs. 
Kelly, angry at being Interrupted In 
her washing, flung open the door, and 
glowered at him. 

"Did yez wish to see me?" she de- 
manded. In threatening tones. 

The peddler backed off the steps. 

"Veil, if I did," he assured her, with 
an apologetic grin, "I got my vish, 
dank you." 



Envic us. 

Life: The archbishop had preached 
a fine sermon on "Married Life and Its 
Duties." Two old Irish women were 
heard coming out of church comment- 
ing on the address. 

"It's a fine sermon his Reverence 
would be after giving us," said one to 
the other. 

"It is Indeed," wa3 the quick reply, 
"and I wish I knew is little about the 
matter as lie does." 




_ THEATER 

Second Ave. E. and Superior St. 
AI.i:> THIS WEKK, 



PAIL COXCHAS. 

Kcnney-Xobody aiid IMatt. 

The Four Origliinl Peres. 

Alma Voulln. 

\%'illianiN. ThoinpNoii and Copcland. 

llauders and MiiliMM. 

loloen SiKters. 

ExolunlTc moving pit-tures, "Sonhie'ii 

Hero." 



Matinee Itniiy — Bent SeniN, 25rj 
MghtH. IO0, 25e, ,%0e and r.lr. 



Fitting Climax. 

Louisville Courier- Journal: "When a 
railroad Is complei ed they always 
drive a golden splkt at the end." 

"What of it?" 

"When the English militants get the 
ballot, I s'pose they will signalize the 
finish of the campaign by throwing 
a gold-plated brick .hrough a stained 
glass window." 



LYCEUM I TONIGHT 

AIVU TOMOR ItOXV M<;ii'i\ 

OTIS SKINNER 

Prices — £0c to ^2.00. 



WedneKday, Maude Pealy In 
Photoplay of Oulda's ^'Moths." 



ThurMtlay, Friday, Saturday, rii:ir- 
lotte Walker In ^'Thc Trull of the 
LoncMome Pine." 



EMPRESS fljiii^ 



VAIIJKVILLE. 
The Great Four 

RICHARD VANOSS TROUPE 

\%'ood ivnrd. 

RoMe and Severns. 

ReifT ItroK. and .Mlsn Murray. 

HumorouM Souks and Dnnres. 

Photo I'iays — LatcKt and Ilrst. 

Coming Thuntday — "THK HEART- 
BHEAKKRS," with Curtis Cook- 
sey. Seats selling. 




.M. 



noiu 



H 



■^ 



I 




4 



f 






i 




DULUTH HERALD 



T" 

I 
i 



I 

4- 



» '-* * 



fi ^ 




IRIS6EMAI-RUSSELL 
COMPANY 




Wholesale Dairy Products 

CIIIUTK, IRiim. 



-C; *r<* 






w 




PAINE & NIXON CO. 

Building materials. 
■Wtn.ie.iait g-lasB brjcfc. paid 




Home of the 

ZENETH BOX CO. 




HOME OF 

REX B8TTLEP BEER 

DU^v' ■ EfiEWiNS 4 MUTING CO. 




4'If P.KrW«N(.COMPAN 








RT2;SgWliiONS.FA.LHftER CO. 

Wboleiiair Fruit ami Prodac!:. 



"WHERE RAILS AND WATER MEET" 

DULUTH, THE GATEWAY TO THE NORTHWEST 

JOBBERS AND MANUFACTURERS WHO SERVE A GREAT TERRITORY 



-,:''^r 



Honne of the 



WINKLER BROS. 

CHOCOLATES 




# at 



•*i-,^ 



» r » « 



^^ 



Home of the 



DIAMOND CALK 
HORSESHOE CO. 



i 





^.^ 



Jr^a^fcsi^, 




.awasfc 



JOHN WANL CAKDY CIMNPANY 

OUtrlbittam a' Re> 4 Miiadv Choeolat«». 
I««nutarturer» o* fun Sugar C.andi«». 



KELSON & PETERSON 

GRAIN AXD FEEI; 
Elevator mill and -wareh^iUBe. 




STACY-MERRILL 
FRUIT CO. 

"VThnlesale 
FnUt aiid Prudnre. 




Home of the 
I. J. THOMPSON FUBNITUBE CO. 

New Duluth, Minn. 




i;; Stalls. ^'^- 




Hr^me o? the 



HATIftNAL CANDY CO. 

Maiiiifa'. :ur:iig cuiiffctioTifcra. 




Homf of the 

LEITHHEAD DRUG CO. 




J- 



F. A. PATRICK & CO. 

WhulaMir Dr> Goodt and Manutacturtn 

HalUK-s of Uxe faaifiu.-. Patri tDiUutl. NorUtdlB 

^oul I*Tti(luetii 




WH 01?ESALE<j>n tITAlL 

Both Phones 507 
Office: 306 Se!lwood Bldg. 



SANITARY ICE 













Hc>me o: 



-, f ♦ r- . 



DULUTH JMPERIALFIOUI 

DULUTH-SUPEREOR 
MILLING CO. 



CAR LOT? A SIECL^LTY 
JAMES HART. President. 





Home of the 



D«^ \\ II i-^i^nz CO., 

I Wholeaal* Tumltur*. 



KATIOIAl IRON CO. 



Whitney Bros. Co. 

CeiiTitiraetort 

Pik> Driver;. I>{i('k Builders 

Liirlilers 

Gf*neral TowiiiR and "Wrockinj 

SAND AND GRAMX 



WM. A. WHTTN'ET, 

Pres. and Treas. 

EDW. H. "W-HITXET, 

Vice Pres. and Mgr. 




HOME OF THE 



Zenith Furnace Co. 

Duluth, Minn. 












-Si- (, 

Home of tht 




DULUTH PLUMBING SUPF'UES. 



Duluth Trunk Co. 

220 West Superior St. 

Manufacturers of 

Trunks and Traveling Equipment. 

Esiablishi'd JtiS6. 




Shapiro- 
Tucker- 

Faust 

Co. 

Wholeuli 
Fruit tnil 
PrMluet. 





MarshaEI-Wells 

•re corryind tbe naznc of tkr Zenitk 
City and the fame of Zenitb Top- 

of-ttie-"«'orld 

HARDWARE 

from tke Icwa Line to the Acrtie 
Circle. — from Southern Caliiomia 
to Alaska and tke Ha'waiian laianda. 



'''*5«»». 




Home of the 



TWOHY-EIMON 
MERCANTILE CO. 




That poofl whiBlcr, 




ELUOn & CO. 

PACKERS 

WHOLESALE MEATS 



ARICOPA 



RYE AND BOUnBON. 

L i. Selig & Co. 

Sole amtrlhutem. 
401 and 4or> lA cHt Bllckicran Strr^t 





Ht)iut ot tne 

DULUTH CORRUGATING 
ROOFING CO. 

Marufn^turfrF of 
Shi-rt Mrtal Gf»o<U. 



WEKI^UKCT BROS, t CO., 

- Blank Book Mtc*.. Paper. Rulers. 





Wanuta- :urec 1» 



BURGESS ELECTRIC CO.; 




D. G. CUTLER CO. 

TThnlCRale 
BulldlnK natt^rlal and Salt. 

Afireut* Kbllay Island L.lm« Co. 




r^omt u 



PEOPLES BREWING CO. 




MARINE IRCN & SHIP 
B0ILDIN6 WORKS 

Marine Supplies of All 

Kinds. 




Kelley- 
How- 

Thomson 
Co. 

Home of 
the 

Hickory 

Brand 

Hardware 




HARD 



SOFT 



BAXTER SASH & DOOR 
COMPANY 

Lumber, sash, doorn. moulding., 
roofing and bulidlnf paper*. 



HIGH EFRCIENCY 

COAL 

NorthLandCoaICo, 

Correspondence Solicited 



WESTERN 
RUG CO. 




Home of th« 

MAirWELL CHEMICAL & MFG. Ca 

Manufacturere of Chemical Oil 
Soaps and Dlalnf«ctant«. 




NORTHEBil 



n f> r 



^-r^llf^ ccMPm 



USE Ul^tON MATCH CO. '6 
MATCHES. 

A hULVTE PUODUCT. 




Home 
of the 
Gitche 
Gamee 
Shoes 




Home of the 

CORIPL&ITEII LiiERICATiU 
I 6fL CD. 



f - 








yiN'^if. 



■^^ 



, THE VICTOR CO. 

I Poultry. Butter, E.er» end Cheese, 

I C .lie 5^'. .riip ! 

I I "Xm martial valuw amiltn ali kindi nr comnu 



J- 




IWJ & ZiMMERMliN, 

Inc. 

FURNfTURC AND DECOKATORS. 



BA.RXHE-MA.RTI% CO. 

Wholesale Grocers. 




C. F. WI6EERTS & S8I, 

Mail UP your rush orders. 

Hepaire for over 10.000 storet 

and furnaces. 

DULUTH. iWINN. 









BERTS 



BIBOS. 

Wholesale Fruits 

"The House With a Shipping 
Organization" 

126 and 128 
WEST MICHIGAN ST. 





ST. GERMAIN BROS. 

Mar iitHcruTc's 

Stained plasF m'.rrorR 

nias-e bf ■«■(;! iiic and resi?vterir.|:. 



KETTLE RIVER CO., 



ENGII^EERS AND 
CONTRACTORS 



All kinds of P.uiiatnfr Stone. 
Sandstone Pavmi;. Cr e o r u t e 
Block Paving, Creosote TinAbers 

Quarries at Port Wing, Wi*.. 
and SacdHtune, Minn. 

Cut Stone Plants: MlnneapoiiB, 
Superior and Sandstone. 



Mesiaba Boiler & 

Manufacturing 

Co. 

Manufiirturers of Statlonarr and 

MurJue Boilers, lank*- and 

bnicike StaoKs. 



The Larp«:it r^REDGE SPUDS 

ALauufacturcrf) in tim 

KortliweA. 




Where the 

"STOTT BRIQUETS" 

Are Made. 



ii 



> 

-i 




!■- 



- ■' ' 




10 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



MANY SETTLERS 

FOR NORTHWEST 

steamship Companies to 
Make Ready for Big Ex- 
cursion Business. 



extension •will carry grrain, Ct- which 
there Is ytt a great deal to be mot-ei.. 
It Is also said to be likely that several 
uninsured boats will start out this 
w.ek. 

It is claimed that were it not for 
i-oal, no ."hips would start out from 
lower lake ports this week, for tho 
rate on prain is considered far too low 
to warrant paying the extra insurance 
premium. Most of the boats that go 
down now with erain will hold it for 
storai^e at liuffaTo. 



telegrrfim to Mrs. 5olin C. 



an>_- 



rrospf-cts ar<; bricht for a l«T,h'ir 
number of settlers for Northtrn Min- 
m'ota. WiscoDs-in and. NortjL PiLKlit« 
during the wuii^Y ??hson than ever 
befor? f^av steamship company agents. 
The comp'anies are making arrange- 
ments for a larger holiday excursion 
business to Vorthtrn Europe than ever 
before* Scandinavian and Finnish 
Amt-riran-s. wiio visit the fatherland, 
gf-ntrally return with members of 
thftr family or friends. 

r-onditions point to a large number 
of settKrs fi.r the farming districts. 
A pood share of those who are seek- 
ing pafsap*- are farmers. These will 

tiifir friends acro.= s the water of 

opportunities in farming offe-.-ed In 

Northwest. 
K okstad. northwestern pnssen- 

agent for the .North Star line, says 
mo.st of the pa.«stng.rs are .'<ocur- 



tell 
the 
the 
C. 

that 



ing tickets for one 
Indicates that they 
for more than one 



passage only, whlcii 
will secure pas.^age 
on their return. 



TWENTY-TWO GRAIN 
BOATS CLEAR IN 

O-OSING RUSH 

(Continued from p age 1.) 

Btnntiallv increased by further book- 
ings within the next few da;.s. 

It is inten. sting to note that despite 
a d««i.ased spring wheat crop of about 
9l'.oifM'.('iK» bu as compared with a year | the 



Bv<^ rcctipts at l>u!uth for the pres- 
ent crop vf-ar from Aug. 1 up to Nov. 
30 aggrcg'ated TH.UM.litl bu as against 
81.3I5.7B3 bu last year. Shipment.-* 
during the sam»- period rame to 67,245,- 
661 bu as against 74, 601. ',(20 bu up to 
the corrt.= ponding pf-rlod in 1912. 
These figur».-< alte.^t the liberality of 
farmers marketings during the fall, 
and also the faet that a larger pro- 
portion of the grain was shipped to 
this point. 

Comjuratlve statistics follow: 

Domestic Pomestio 

Shipments Shipments 

Season. Season 

1!>13. 1912. 

42.427.377 52.949,268 

4.015.771 3,143,718 

630,632 1,638,141 

8.622.146 8.048.516 

8,405.618 1,745,365 

62.861 . 



"Wheat, bu. .. 

Oats, bu 

Rye. bu 

Parley, hu. . . 
Flaxseed, bu. 
Corn, bu. . . . 



Total, bu 64.154.405 

Honded 
Shipment.s 
Season. 
1913. 
, 2.223.564 
303.840 
458.099 
105.756 



Wheat, bu. . . 

Oats, bu 

Barley, bu. . . 
Flaxseed, bu. 



Totals, bu. 
G'j.d totals, 



Wheat, bu. . 

Oats, bu 

Rye. bu 

Rarley. bu. . . 
Flaxseed, bu. 
Corn, bu 



bu 



Totals, bu. 



■WT.cftt. hli. . 

Oats, bu 

Parley, bu. . 
Flaxseed, bu. 

Totals, bvi. 
G'nd totals. 



"Wheat, bu. 
Oats. bu. . . 
Rye bu. .. 
Barley, bu. 
Flax. bu. . 



bu 



3,091,259 

67,245,664 

Domestic 

Receipts 

Season. 

1913. 

44.8 40,336 

4.101,379 

934.744 

R.843.75rt 

, 6,414.506 

44,707 

65,179,428 
Bonded 
Receipts 
Season. 
1913. 
. 2.100.930 
. 2.154.671 
618.521 
70,644 

. 4.944.766 

70,124.194 

Stocks in 

Store as 

on Nov. 

30. 1913. 

6.100.000 

3.058.000 

312.000 

843.000 

257.000 



72,925,012 
Bonded 
Shipments 
Season 

1912. 

1,400.652 

25.866 

127.467 

122,931 

1,676,918 

74,601,920 

Domestic 

Receipts 

Season 

1912. 

56.406,002 

3.390,200 

1,705,068 

8.900,834 

8,869,141 



79.271.245 

Bonded 

Receipts 

Season 

1912. 

1,607,780 

56.416 

233.452 

146,870 

2,044,618 

81.315,763 

Stocks in 

Store as 

on Nov. 

30, 1912. 

3.239,000 

377,000 

70,000 

514.000 

956,000 

5,156.000 



Totals, b.i 10.570,000 

seasoiTends 

FOR MOST BOATS— 
NEW ORE RECORD 

(Continued from page 1.) 



WILL SPEWD $500,000 

FO R STRE ET WORK 

(Con tinued from page 1.) 

facing of FJast Superior street between 
^jxteenth p^^d Twenty. third av^nuej, 
TreaNury UepietVd. 

The funds were worked to the lim- 
it this season, with the result that 
the treasury is now practically de- 
pleted. The making and levying of the 
assessments is now under way. but it 
will be well towards spjring before the 
bulk of the money is collected. Street 
intersections and storm sewers are j 
paid from the permanent improvement i 
fund and the present intention is to 
govern the street jobs so that the def- | 
icit in that fund may be eliminated. 
For some of the jobs the commissioner i 
announces his intention of levying ad- I 
vance assessments. The statement ; 
follows: I 

"I'ontracts for the street improve- ! 
meats mentioned below will be let as 
nearly as possible and as far as funds 
will permit in the order in which they 
occur. Surface improvements and sew- 
ers are paid for from the same fund, 
and the less urgent paving work must 
give place, when nece.'^sary, to more 
important sewer contracts. All the 
funds have been employed to their lim- 
it in trying to cover as many as pos- 
sible of the improvements asked fc>r 
this year. As a result, the treasury 
at this time is empty and the work 
of recovering the outlays by assess- 
ment is now on. It can be seen that, 
' making proper allowance for the time 
required to prepare many assessments, 
some of them more or less complicated, 
advertising periods required under 
the ordinance, and the time allowed 
by the charter ft^r payments to be 
made after assessments are confirmed, 
th.Tt it will be well along towards 
spring before the larger portion of the 
money can be collected. But. having 
decided upon the order in whiih con- 
tracts will be let, each one may be 
disposed of as the required amount of 
money becomes available. N'o amount 
of fussing will help the situation, it 
can not be let any sooner. If sufficient 
reasons can be shown for ehr.nging the 
order of these improvements, it will 
be elianged up to such time as it 
may be considered proper to close the 
polls. 

I.lMt of Contrartn. 

"1. Victoria street paving, from 
Woodland avenue to Hartley road. 
(Contract let.) 

"2. Woodland avenue paving or 
surfacing from Fourth street to Aus- 
tin street (end of car line). Surveys 
for grades and estimates now being 
made. 

"3. "West Superior street and Oneo- 
ta street from Twenty-fifth avenue 
west to Forty-sixth avenue west. An 
advance assessment will be levied for 
this improvement. 

"4. Dululh Heights sewers. (Ad- 
vance assessment). 

"5. Vermilion road improvement 
from Fifth street to Forest Hill ceme- 
tery, a part of this road was formerly 
called Princeton avenue. Petition was 
filed and the work ordered done by 
the council early In 1912. This work 
therefore is entitled to be included 
among the first contracts let. For 
the reason however, that it serves 
to some extent the same territory as 
Woodland avenue, and as the money 
will be so greatly needed in other di- 
rections, if the consent of the prop* rty 
owners can be obtained, the whole of 
this improvement will not be made. 

"6. Vernon street paving from 
Cirand Forks avenue to the west line 
of I^ryanis addition. Petitioned for 
and ordered early this year. 

"7. First street paving from Nine- 
teenth avenue we.<t to, Thirtieth ave- 
nue west. Petitioned for in spring 
of this year. 

"8. St. Croix avenue paving from 
Xorthtrn Pacific tracks to Buchanan 
street and including Sutphin street. 
Petitioned for about midsummer. 
1912. 

"9. Lake avenue paving from canal to 
Twe'fth street. Twelfth street from 
Lake avenue to Minnesota avenue, and 
Minnesota avenue from Twelfth street 
to southerly end of avenue. It is not 
probable that the city will be able to 
meet its share of this large improve- 
ment next season, and as Lake avenue 
is used by vehicles much more than 
Minnesota avenue, it would seem ad- 
visable to let a separate contract for 
I the Lake avenue part of it. It would 



following 
Bley: 

^ricrnPy COneratulAtirns to you 
to the women of Chicago, particularly 
the Women's Clubs. All members of 
the league well in line. Non-members 
joining crusade daily. All will join 
when situation is understood. We 
must not retr.-at locally until national 
victory Is assured. 

Mrs. Heath said the crusade in New 
York is progressing rapidly and that 
results in the form of cheaper eggs 
are assured. AS fast as conditions jire 
understood by housewives generally, 
she explained, tiiey join in the boy- 
cott, promising to stand by the league 
until prices for both storage and fresh 
eggs are reduced. 




hours to dis- 
advocates of 
Suspended 
was a huge 
the legend: 



SUFFRAGISTS 

ON CAMPAIGN 

(•""ontlnued from page 1.) 

'fraternal' has for men, the inference 
being there has never been occasion 
to use it, or it would have been sup- 
plied. 

"Today we need that word, and here 
in Wasnington where they coin so 
many useful and necessary things — 
money, laws and excuses! sometimes) 
— may we not coin it- in fact, as we 
have in spirit? 

"For forty-five years advocates of 
woman suffrage have been coming to 
this capital city; nine national suf- 
frage conventions have been held here, 
this being the tenth. And while we 
know it will not be necessary for us 
to coi7ie back to you another forty- 
five years,- we are ready and willing 
to do it ,if need be." 

Appral to Wilson. 

The week's campaign was launched 
Sunday at a mass meeting. An as- 
semblage, which packed the theater, 
listened for nearly three 
cussions by conspicuous 
the woman's movement, 
above the drop curtain 
yelK)W banner bearing 
"We demand an amendment to the 
X'nited ."States Constitution enfranchis- 
ing women." 

The association adopted almost unan- 
imously resolutions introduced by Mj-s. 
Helen King Robinson, a member of 
the state senate of Colorado, calling 
upon President Wilson in his forth- 
coming message to congress "to adopt 
the woman suffrage constitutional 
amendment as an administration meas- 
ure, and to urge congress to take im- 
mediate and favorable action upon it; 
urging the senate to pass the amend- 
ni»-nt; and asking the house to create 
a committee on wom.in suffrage." 
OpponentM Were Sllencrd. 

The only protest was voiced by one 
of the delegates from Louisiana, 
backed by a small following. The | 
opposing delegates, however, were not | 
e\ en given an opportunity to explain i 
the reasons for their attitude. 

E)r. Anna Howard Shaw, president of ' 
the association, presided, and in her \ 

/cping address voiced the belief that j 
"a deliverance— a bpcedy deliverance — I 
of women is about to come through the 
action of the American congress and 
through the president of the United 
States." 

Introducing Mary Anderson, Mar- 
garet Hinch and Rose Winslow, all 
women industrial workers, who also 
spoke. Dr. Shaw said: 

"The right of the people to a voice 
In their own government Is the one 
point which we are directing our ef- 



forts to. We know no politics — no 
political parties. We stand for no 
c\av-p — for no race, but only for a voice 
for all the people In their own affairs." 

FEDERAL BUDGET PUT 
AT $1,108,681,777 
FO RCOIV ilMG YEAR 

(Continued from page 1.) 



authorized, the navy department wants 
$8,250,000; for the hulls and machinery 
of the two battleships and eight tor- 
pedo boat destroyers which Secretary 
Daniels wishes to build in the fiscal 
year 1914-16. ?7, 800. 000; for armor and 
armament of vessels authorized $10,- 
091,000. 

The sum of $300,000 Is wanted for 
naval defense mines and appliances; 
$150,000 for experimental work in high 
explosives; $170,000 for the naval sta- 
tion at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and 
$750,000 for additions to facilities and 
for the purchase of additional ground 
at the naval proving grounds, Indian 
Head, Md., Just below Washington. 

To extend the naval gun factory 
$400,000 is asked. 

IncreaKe for Army. 

Many increases are sought for the 

armv. f)f these a large number are 

■ explained in the estimates by the 

I statement that the army itself is larger 

'than it has been heretofore. One of 

Is $300,000 



be desirable also, if too^great objection | the Principal '"'^tary J^tems ^^ ^^.^^ 

,$150,000 is to be spent for fifteen aero- 

I planes, declared to be necessary if the 

from j L'^nited States is to keep abreast in this 



raised, to advance this job 



shipped for this season 2,098,658 more 
tons of iron ore down the lakes than 
last year. If the figures from Ash- 
land— not yet obtainable — show an ad- 
vatue in keeping with the other docks, 
there will be a smashing of all rec- 
year's record was over 
ahead of all previous 
total of over 48.000,000 
docks have closed down 
and the following shows 
ore docks 



etc., 
-first 



ave- 

from 
ave- 



ords. for last 

2.000.000 tons 

ytars, with a 

tons. All ore 

for the season 

the actual shipments from 

of the Head of the Lakes: 

Duluth & Iron Range. 10. (iTS.TlS ft.3T0.H70 

WLsKaU- I2.:;ril.li'6 10.4^.186 

Oreat .Vcrtnem n.liilO.SU io.yaj.602 

goo 6!te..^'<4 3t>5.112 

Northtrn Tu. Ific 31.1K4 



1911. 

c.4i:.:.2n 

t:.!«34.2ii9 

i'."3.ot;i 

177. 000 



'iy>t.-il<i 38.1t'5.5L'8 r.4.00«".,8:o 23.301.630 

Ex.ept for those on which extended 
insurance lias been obtained, the last 
boats to leave the Duluth-Superior 
harbor passed through the canal piers 
shortly before midnight last night. 
The H. A. Berwind was the last of the 

frain fleet to leave. She got out just 
ive minutes before midnight, but 
made the lake with that much of a 
margin. Under tlie insurance require- 
ments a vtssel must have started 
down the lakes before midnight of 
Nov. 30 to make her insurance good. 
ifteventem Ships Leave. 
Seventeen steamers loaded with ^ 

frrain left yesterday, and it is prom- ; 
sed that they will have calm and 
clear weather all the way down Lake 
Superior. The steamers were: Har- \ 
vey H. Brown, AVestern Star, Colonel, i 
Charles L. Hutehinson, John Sharpless. 
WIekwire. Jr., L. C. Smith, W. L. 
Smith, J. J. Boland, "W. C. Aguew. Nor- ! 
mania, Wainwright, A. M. Byers, Peter 
Rti.-^s. Zimmerman, Cornelius and H. • 
A. Berwind. I 

At 1 o'clock this morning the Lake- ; 
wood of the Port Huron & Duluth : 
fleet passed out with a cargo of pack- [ 
age freight. Her departure before 
midnight was not necessary in view 
of the fact that her Insurance has 
been extended to Dec. 12. Tills com- l 
pany will have at least two more ships , 
leave here before Dec. 12. The last j 
ore laden boat to leave this entry 
was the W. L. Brown, which passed 
through the Duluth piers at noon yes- | 
terday, and the last to go out of the | 
Superior entry was the Pathfinder of , 
the Pickands-Mather fleet, which left i 
Saturday night. | 

The .'•teamer Pentland loaded lumber i 
for Tonawanda at the Alger-Smith j 
dock and left this morning. This tin- ; 
Ishes the lumber shipping by lake for 
this season. 

Itegular luMurance Kxplres. 

The regular season's insurance on 
vessels and cargoes expired at mid- 
night and most ships got out of the 
rarious harbors of the <Jreat Lakes 
before that time to make their last 
trip. I'.ut in the matter of grain carry- 
ing boats It is announced that quite a 
number of applications for extension 
have been made and granted. These 
extensions give the boats until mid- , 
night Dec. 6, which will be next Fri- ] 
day. The American underwriters an- , 
nounce a rate f>f 1 per cent and It Is j 
expected that the foreign underwriters 
will ff.ilow suit. I 

Most of the boats that will sail from i 
lower lake ports will come up with 
coal, and those sailing from the Du- | 
luth-Superior harbor and from Port 
4rthur and Fort Willlarn under the 



were not 
to N'o. 6. 

"10. Fifth street grading. 
Piedmont avenue to Twenty 
nue west. 

"11. Helm street, grading 
Twenty-sixth to Twenty-,Mghth 
iiues west. 

"12. Paving Twenty-ninth avenue 
west from First alley to Third street. 

"13. Twentieth avenue east, paving 
from Superior to Jefferson streets. 

"14. Sixth street grading, etc., from 
Twenty-first to Twenty-fifth avenues 
west. 

"15. First street, grading and pav- 
ing, from Twenty-eighth to Thirty-first 
avenues east. 

"16. Third alley paving, from Lake 
avenue to First avenue west. 

"17. Colorado street grading and 
graveling, from Fifty-first to Fifty- 
fourth avenues east. 

"18. Wlcklow street grading, from 
Twenty-eighth avenue wtst to Michi- 
gan avenue. 

"19. Red Wing and Faribault street 
guttering and graveling from "Wood- 
land avenue to Colman's addition. 

"_'0. Sixth street grading, from Fif- 
teenth to Kighteentli avenues east. 

"21. Third avenue east grading, 
from Seventh to Eighth street. 

"22. First alley paving, from Sixth 
to Seventh avenues west. 

"23. Fiftli alley grading and paving, 
from Twenty-fourth to Twenty-fifth 
avenues east. 

"Only a few of the estimates have 
1 been made, but tho expenditure called 
for is not far short of $500,000. 
Many Sewers Wanted. 
"The foregoing and a number of 
sewers are on the waiting list. Peti- 
tions are coming in steadily, and with 
each one comes a special request 



to cope with 
in case of 



the work 
spring. 

"Tlie more 
provements in 
pavements laid 
but the net 
satisfactory 



be done first thing 



that 
next 



important street im- 

the list link up witli 

this year or previously, 

result will not be at all 

unless several other im- 



provements can be made which are re- 
garded as being in the 'repair class.' 
A macadam surface will be completed 
on 'Jrand avenue from Twenty-first 
avenue west to Fifty-fourth avenue 
west without deliy In the spring, and 
as soon . thereafter as advisable, the 
be oi!td. Plans and esti- 




road will 

mates are being prepared for repair- 
ing or reconstructing Superior street 
between Tw-ifth and Twenty-fifth , 
avenues west, and between Sixteenth i ff^f ^his 
and Twenty-third avenues east. Sev- i told: 
eral plans' will be prepared in each 
case, and as soon as possible counsel 
will be taken with the property own- 
ers as to which it will be most ad- 
visable to adopt. ' 



science and "be prepared 
other first-class powers 

The estimates for the good of the j 
militia are larger by many millions | 
than in previous years; $1*360,000 for 
field camps of instruction. $404,250 for 
equipment of coast artillery armories, 
$2,100,000 for field artillery material 
and $3,000,000 for ammunition for such , 
artillery for militia, are asked. ' 

For armament in fortifications, the ' 
estimate is $5,806,800, an increase of 
more than $3,000,000 over last year. 
This $3,000,000 is to be expended in the ; 
purchase, manufacture and test of am- ■ 
munition for mountain field and siege 
cannon and a large part of the re- 
mainder is to be used in altering old 
style field and coast artillery guns. 

Another large item is $892,000 for 
barracks and quarters at Fort Shafter, | 
and at Schofleld barracks, Hawaii. The 
estimate for continuing seacoast de- 
fenses in the Philippines and Hawaii 
Is put at $951,632. 

For the Panama Canal. 
Although tlie Panama canal prob- 
ably will be in operation long before 
the close of the fiscal year of 1915, the 
war department estimates that $26,- 
356,985 must be appropriated for the 
canal that year, which is about $5,000.- 
000 more than the current appropri- 
ation. According to the estimates, tlie 
number of the employes in the organ- 
ization through the 1914 fiscal year 
was 22,000 while in the fiscal year of 
1915 the number will be about 18,500. 
The organization on the isthmus and 
in Washington two years cost a little 
more than $12,000,000 and with 3,300 
tmploves off the rolls, thi.«< sum will 
be reduced to about $9,800,000. 

For miscellaneous material for the 
canal $10,459,000 is asked and $2,558,- 1 
350 is wanted for fortifications. Of I 
the appropriation, for fortifications 
$1,268,850, is to lie spent for army ' 
quarters to provide accommodations i 
in all for ten companies of coast ar- } 
tillery and $780,825 is for installation 1 
of ten 6-lnch guns , seven 14-inch 
guns and twenty-eight 12-inch mor- 
tars. 

For I-egnl Servloew. 
One of the most interesting items 
in the long list of estimates is that 
of $475,500, for salaries and expenses 
of special attorneys, examiners and 
agents of the bureau of corporations, 
an increase of $300,000 over last year. 
In a note accompanying the request 
additional sum, congress is 



EGG BOYCOTT 

IS S PREADING 

(Continued from page 1.) 



The suit was filed a year ago ani 
shortly after the board voted to abol- 
ish the committee. 



Mr.i. Heath confident. 

Xew York, Dec. 1. — In response to a 
message from Chicago stating that 
110,000 women had joined in the 
boycott in that city for cheaper 
eggs, Mrs. Julian Heath, president of 
the National Housewives' league, 
which Instituted the crusade,^ sent the 



This increase is due entirely to the 
plan projected for additional work to 
be done bv the bureau of corporations. 
This plan" has to do with: The facts 
on stocks and bond issues, holding 
companies, interlocking directorates, 
etc., the economy and efficiency of 
trusts and interstate corporations and 
conflicting state laws." 

The bureau of corporations, con- 
gress is reminded, was authorized to 
Investigate the business of interstate 
concerns in the act creating it. The 
proposed trust investigation would 
seek to show whether the modern 
trust or system of "monopolistic 
units" can do the required work more 
cheaply and advantageously than 
smaller competitive units. Between 
40 and 50 additional special investi- 
gators will be needed by the depart- 

"We may not be able to solve the 
problem dogmatically." says a foot- 
note "but we can adduce a great body 



Give Something 
That Will Bring 
Greater Happi- 
ness to the Home 




GOOD SENSE COMBINED WITH GOOD TASTE 

Urges a remembrance which combines the useful with the ornamental. A thousand 
and one such gifts are ready here at prices that you feel you can pay. 



Tennessee Red 
Cedar Chests 

and Matting 
Covered Shirt 

Waist Boxes 

MAKE FINE GIFTS 






Special 



A matting-covered box, 27 inches 
long, 15 inches wide, 12 inches 
deep, that others sell for $3.00 — 

OUR PRICE— 





Have US put one aside for you. 



Wriiing Desks 

A cliarniinj? IJttle 
Wrilins' Desk in the 
Fiinioil Oak. 

Strong, well built. 
Mission style, with 
one large drawer and 
one small one. A 
regular $8.50 value, 
OINLY— 

$5A9 

CASSEROLES 





M 




A. beautiful, well-built, nicely finished Col- 
oni il design Buffet in tho Golden Oak. Htis 
a 1 irge linen drawer on bottom, two smaller 
drawers for silver and napkins above, and on 
each side a roomy cupboard for dishes. Alto 
a h.rge bevel edge mirror with .«lielf aViove. 

See if you can duplicate this for $22.50 tlse- 
wh :re. 

For Only $n.85 



(Like out) 
SKVKX-INCH 

89c 



(T.Iko out) 
EIGUT-IXCH 

98c 




Pfii- those long eveniiiRs a regular $3.25 feath- 
eTM eight Folding (arcl Table 

At Only $2.19 



PUT YOUR BOOKS IN A SECTIONAL CASE 

No matter how few books you have or how many, you are not 
treating tin in right to leave them exposed on open shelves. The 
(lunn <jr Viking Ca.<e makes a splendid addition to the furniture 
in your home at a low cost and is one of the most useful articles 
you can add. We sliow ti»e eonipieto line. 



COMMENCING TODAY, DEC. 1st, WE 
WILL GIVE ABSOLUTELY FREE 

A .'.0-i>leee Dinnei Set with every purchase of S50.00 or over. 
A lOO-piece Diiuur Set wUh every purehase of $100.00 or over. 



i^ 



E 



Good Furniture, Carpets, Rugs, Draperies are part of the essentials of modern home life 

To buy these at the lowest cost is vour privilege and dutv. In our ex:remely large assortment we cut prices 
always to the minimum. You should buy these comforts here, however, ony when you are convinced that trading 
here is profitable to you. We are confident and know you will find it prr.fitable if you will honestly compare our 
goods with others as to quality, workmanship, style and the easy manner of paying for it we oiler you. 



wm 



Don't Forget to See Our Large Line of Electric Lamps and Smoker Sets and Stands 



cr^i 




CASH NOT 

NECESSARY. 

A LITTLE DOWN 

WILL DO. 




COMPLETC HOUSEFURNISHERS 



HA& 



Secood Avt. W, and Fir$t SL 




TRY OUR EASY 

PAYMENT PLAN. 

A LITTLE EACH 

MONTH. 




of facts which will throw light upon 
tlie question." 

For Trade Investigation*. 

The department of commerce ask.s 
for $100,000 to be used In investigat- 
ing the cost of production of articles 
dutiable in the United States, in lead- 
ing countries where they are produce I. 
These investigations are to go fully 
Into wages, material, costs, profits and , 
other features. .. , , , j *„> 

The sum of $150,000 is also asked for 
salaries and commercial attaches who 
are to be credited to the state depart- 
ment and who are to investigate and 
report on foreign manufacturing con- 
ditions of Interest in this ^o^'ntry-. . ^ , 

The census bureau wants .$825,000 for 
collecting statistics, of which $566,400 i 
is for a census of manufactures, tor 
an investigation of problems in con- 
nection with public utilities to deter- j 
mine the quality and cost of service re- 
quired in the regulation of utilities, the , 
bureau asks $100,000. * , , i 

For an investigation of the materials 
U'^ed In rails, wheels and axels and 
other railway equipment and the cause 
of their failure, $30,000 is asked for 
the bureau of standards. , 

Among other estimates from the | 
same department are $50,000, an in- 
crease of $45,000 for the salaries ami 
expenses of "comml.ssioners of cont-il - [ 
ation" in labor disputes and $168,000 , 
for the children's bureau. j 

Secretary McAdoo estimates that he 
will need $1,500,000 to collect the in- 
come tax. He says an Increase Is neces- 
sarv because the tax collection machln- 
erj will be perfected by the lime the 
appropriation is made, and b^/a^se n- 
vpstlcations will be made to determine 
cases^of?rxer withheld, and $50 000 an 
increase of $20,000, for investigation 
and experimentation to secure better 
methods of administration. 

TIckH and Cold .Storage. 

The department of agriculture asked 
$400,000 to use in eradicating the cat- I 
tie tick. This department lines Itself ^ 
i up with the department of justice and 
' congress to delve into the "P'^'-atlons 

of cold storage dealers. It asks $50 OOOJ 
I to investigate the preparations f^r, 
: market, the storing the freezing and , 
; other operations incidental to the 
, transportation of poultry and eggs; ] 
$150 000 to look into similar operation.^ 
in fish- $25,000 for an oyster invesllga- : 
tlon and $20,000 for a biological Inves- j 
ligation of food and drugs acts. j 

The sum of $54,280 is wanted to 'in- | 
vestigate" insects and insecticides, 
particular attention to be devoted to 



malaria-bearing mosquitos and the or- 
dinary house fly. 

The department wants $166,330 for 
inve.-^tlgating road-making, with $70,000, 
for field experiments. A request is 
made for $194,140 to collect and diffuse 
Infiirmation concerning the best meth- 
ods of marketing and distributing 
farm products, and $50,000 for demon- 
strations; In co-operation with the 
states of methods of livestock raising 
in cotton and cane sugar states. 
State Department Wants. 

The state flepartment evidences its 
determination to hot se American rep- 
lesentatlves abroad in bufldings fur- 
nished by the government by asking 
$250,000 for the purchase of a site and 
the construction of an embassy build- 
ing in Mexico City. $140,000 for the 
purchase of a site for the construc- 
tion of a building for the lega- 
tion at Berne, Switzerland. and 
$150,000 for the construction of an em- 
bassy building on ground now owned 
bv the United States in Tokio. 

For continuing work on public 
buildings of $6,111,283. Some of the 
principal items are 5190,000 for the 
Bangor, Me.. P«stoffice; $150 OOq f r 
the appraisers' stores an*^, ^-'^-Sil foi i 
the customs house at Boston; $350,000; 
for Brooklyn postoffice; $200,000 for 
Denver- $175,000 for Minneapolis; $120.- | 
000 for Mobile; $550,000 for the New 
Haven postoffice and courf.iouse; $100,- 
(00 for the Newport postoffice and cus- 
tom house, and $100,000 for the post- 
office at Yonkers. N. Y. 

River and Harbor 'Work. 

For continuing rivers and harbors 
work the wa'- department says it needs 
$41,483,895 which includes improving 
the waterway connecting Lakes Union 
and Washington at Seattle $305,000; for 
completion of authorized contracts in 
Ohio river below Pittsburg. $1,976,000. 
and for construction of locks and dams 
in same locality. $1,911,110; foi'^J'rovl- 
dence R. I., river and harbor, $500,000; 
for channel from Galveston to Texas 
City $900,000; for Portland, Me., har- 
bor.' $150,000; Boston harbor. $200,000; 
channel in Gowanus bay. New Y«rk, 
$300 000; removing obstructions in East 
river New York. $300,000; improving 
Hudson. New York. $750,000; improving 
Arthur Hill. New York, to deepen chan- 
nel' to twenty-five feet, $500,000. 
Passaic river. New Jersey. $150,000; 
Delaware river from Allecheny avenue. 
Philadelphia to sea, $1,000,000; inland 
waterway. Norfolk. Va.. to Beaufort 
inlet, N. C, $800,000; Ohio river below 
Pittsburg Improvement with a view to 



securing a navigable depth of nine feet, 
$5,000,000; improving Mississippi from 
head of passes to th{ Ohio. $6,000,000; 
Mississippi from mouth of Ohio to Min- 
neapolis, $2,650,000; C<li;mbia river. Or., 
$1,000,000; Humboldt, California harbor 
and bay, $225,000. 

CONGRESS IN 

QUICK CHANGE 

(Continued fro m page 1.) 

April 7, brought to tired law-makers 
today a new host of problems and the 
prospect of steady work for many 
months. 

The president will lead his first gen- 
eral message to congress at a joint 
session of the two houses at 1 o'clock 
tomorrow, and it is expected he will 
touch upon many of the problems to 
be taken up at the new sessioii. 
Senate Kevet Stopped. 

The senate practi< ally merged the 
old session into the new one by meet- 
ing at 10 o'clock todj.y to wind up tlie 
work of the dying session. Vice I'resi- 
dent Marshall, who had been absent 
for several weeks, vas in his place 
again as presiding o 'fleer. Democratic 
leaders were prepared to push the cur- 
rency bill forward as the chief busi- 
ness, and to hold the senate in daily 
session from 10 o'clock in the morn- 
ing until 11 o'clock at night until it 
is disposed of. 

While the senate is working on cur- 
rency legislation and disposing of the 
Hetch-Hetchy water supply bill, the 
house will start work upon the great 
appropriation bills, carrying more 
than $1,000,000,000 cf funds for the 
needs of the goverr merit during the 
year that begins next July. 

The annual estimrtes made by the 
treasury department were presented 
to tlie house when it assembled at 
noon. Preliminary ivork by the ap- 
propriations commitiees has brought 



several of the supply bills near com- 
' pletion, and an effort will be iv.ad» 
I to pa.=s the $13,000.00( District of 
I Columbia bill and the fortifications 

appropriation bill befc^re Christmas. 
May Work Over Holiday*. 
Democratic members of the senate 

worked all day yesterday to complete 
j their agreement on the currency bill. 
! so that the measure might be puslied 

for immediate consideration today. 

.Senate leaders hope that by h'lding' 

the senate to long hours the bill may 

be passed in time to permit a short 
, recess at the holidays. If it has not 
I bten acted upon the senate will forego 
I all vacation except en Christmas day. 



CHICKERING 
PIANO 



HQWABD, FARWELL & CO. 

18 and 20 Second Avenue West 

New Hex Tl.tatcr Bldg. 
W. T. ALLEN. .Mtr. 



\. 



./ 




THIS IS A CUT OF A MOD- 
ERN naii.i;r used in my 

REPAIR SHOP. 
MY I»RICES ARE RIGHT. 

CHRIS OLSEN, 

523 Wettt ]kiichigan Strcot. 



COLD WEATHER 

SNAPS 

AT THE 

BANKRUPT SALE! 

5(K' LunilwrnuMr^ Heavy S«K-ks, 
pair, arx-: 3 pairs. $1.00. 

Men's $1.50 aiul $1.00 Caps, 69c. 

C. P. LARSON 

113 K.\ST SI ri:H10R STREET. 
I. S. t.ttlnu, Maiiagrr. 



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Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 19121. 



- !»■■«- 



"« •• 



I ■^- 



SCOOP 



THE CUB 
REPORTER 



Scoop Thouglit Everything f n Bottles Was Cough Medicine 



By "HOP" 




DotAT Know VAi^AT 
30CH ^ 3e^O U)0KIK 





^\^V<e. OOl- ^^ LABEL 
P'*5\LE^AT-<5\SlN 





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OF 3Crt^^ 

MEwcv^ieiL 



^^^^TJ^'^^^^^^J^iAT WORD POH - 



^\DD\5^-XC{^Nt 



^^D VX-BOT" NOT To BS.-^ 




VlHTEKHALL^ 



Po\50kow5;ky 

meahs wat vts 



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NEWS OF 




liLJ 






ORT 




EST 



the same who earlier in the night held 
up F. A. Dickinson near his homo, 
rubbed him of his cash and watch, and 
escaped in an automobile. 



HUNTER nnix<;s nowv 

TlIUKK-I.KOiGIiD BUCK 



Ingr to do with the collegiate work, 
which will be conducted by the dean.s, 
and will devote his entire time to 
fiiianclne: the institution. 



BUND-PIG IS 
RONJN CAVE 

Minot Man Arrested on 

Charge of Running Very 

Novel Place. 



room and announced that the case 
woiild be continued. While nothinir 
else was aniiounct-d oflieiiliy. It is un- 
derFtcod that a settUrn.nt ha.s been 
made, t'le company r^i^reting to pay 
from 10 to 15 per cent of tiie face of 
the claims. Tae settlenuiit will rave 
to be agreed to by some of the ciaitn- 
antj before It becomes effective. 



CIRCUIT COyRT IN 
SlSmU AT HyRLEY 



Officials Raid Underground 

Saloon, Getting Big 

Liquor Supply. 



to 



ar- 

^ed 



December Term Has 
Heavier Calendar Than 
Usual. 



Hurley, Wis. 



Minot. N. D., Dec. 1.— (Special 
The Herald.) — Jack Connors was 
rested late Saturday night char; 
with coiidiictlns on© of the most 
novel blind-pigs ever discovered In 
North Dakota. It was conducted, say 
officials, from a cave under a va- 
cated bl.icksmith shop. Connors made 
an nllei;ed confession in which he 
desfrlb.d his method of operation. 

In raiding the place, officials found 
a big supply of liquor from which 
t^e alleged pigger had made exten- 
sive sales. 

SUITS"ARTmSMISSED. 

Actions Against Canadian Northern | 
Railroad Are Reported Settled. 

Fergus Falls, Minn., Dec. 1. — The 
suits for $175,000 against the Canadian 
Northern railroad being prosecuted In 
the Federal court here for damage.'* 
resulting from the fires that swept 
r.audotte and Spooner several years 
ago came to a sudden termination t5at- 
iir.lay afternoon when the attorneys, 
after a conference lasting the greater 
part of two days, entered the court- 



The Army of 
Constipation 

Is Growing Smaller Eve»7 Da7« 

CARTER'S UTTLE 
UVER PILLS •» 

rcspoosiblc — they ni 
oiuy give relief- 
thsy permsnently 
cure CoastSpa-., 
tioa. Mil 
lions US3 
lKf.m for 

nei», ladigestioB, Sick He«4«c&e, Sallow Sklo. 
SMALL PILL, SMALL DOSE, SMAa PRICE 

i Gem»iiie mustbcM Signature 



Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The December term of I 
circuit court opened hero this morn- j 
Ing. Judge G. N. Kisjord presiding. The } 
criminal calendar is unusually long 
for this district, there being eleven 
cases to be disposed of as follows: | 

State vs. Mike Oya. burglary; State; 
vs. Charles Mitchell, larceny from the 
person; State v.'". Mary McDonald, keep- ; 
er of hou.se of ill-fame; State vs. Mable j 
Lanzer, keeper of hc>use of ill-lame: 
State vs. Louis Bertottl, keeper of | 
house of ill-fame; State vs. John Duby, | 
larceny from the person; State vs. I 
Adolph Hein, attempt to commit rape; I 
State vs. Sam Magree, larceny from 
the person; State vs. J. C. Withmgton, 
malicious killing of dog: State vs. Jo- 
seph Le Clendre, arson; State vs. Rob- 
ert call, arson. 

On the civil calendar there are but 
two cases: Stanley Graiewskl vs. 
Mary Komlnski, and Mason Smith, 
American Central Insurance company 
et al vs. M. St. P. & S. S. M. Railroad 
company. ^ , 

The court fact cases are four In num- 
ber, as follows: Francis Justice vs., 
F.mma Justice; Melvina D. Webb vs. j 
Edward J. Webb; Iron Exchange Rank 
vs. Matt Kramer; Daniel Reld vs. Keo- 
watln camps, et al. 

Following is the list of jurors: 

Town of Vaughn— William Schafor, 
Arthur Williams, A. J. Bawden, A. A. 
Pawden, Ray Schafv-r. Mike Hughes. 
William McCarty, Neil Brennen, James 
Reid Charles McCauley. David Reid, 
Joseph Pollock. Peter Secor. J. A. 
Slender. Frank Beltki. Walter Shoen- 
garth. Felix Leurnen. Harlow Whitman, 
Andrew Olson. Matt Dalbec. 
Lucia. Henry Page. Frank 
Louis Volgt, Perry Sullivan. 
Secor; town of Montreal — An 
mont, Barney Qulpley 
John Rein, Ed 
town of Care 
Brown; town 



mafjazine and the barrel empty was 
fouud beside the body by Charles i 
Walker and his son Harold of Walker. ! 
wiio made the lind. The manner of ; 
death Is not explained. The body was \ 
buried at Watervllle. The deceased Is 
survived by his parents, one brother 
and four sitters. 

When Lnnt Seen Alive. 

John Carrier and his son William 
went to Northland Nov. 11 to spend 
the hunting season witli Albert Blair, 
a home=;teader. On Nov. 16 the two 
Carriers went Into the woods with 
Edward Blair of Freemont, who was 
also staying with Albert lilalr, to help 
the Latter bring out a deer that he 
had hung up the previous day. They 
rea.h^d a lU^ely looking place for deer, 
when IJlair proposed that the elder 
Carrier should go over across a hard- 
wood ridge while he followed the 
ridge and that young Carrier should 
skirt the edge of a swamp. 

The members of the party separated 
and that was the last time that Mr. 
Carrier saw his son alive. He followed 
the directions given him and about 
two hcui's later Mr. Blair appeared 
with his brother, and they told him 
they were going after the deer. The 
carcass was found iind hauled to camp, 
but young Carrier did not appear. 



Neg.^unee, MIeh., Dec. 1. — (Spe- 
cial to The lit raid.) — Uomluto 
Motto nhot n thr«M'-Ie;#?fed Iniek 
^hile hunting i><>M<<|« uf Glyun uud 
brou>;ht the bo<Iy I'ere. 
^ One «f the huclfc'M front legs 
4li ^ere entrlcly Mh^t off by another 
^ hunter Kome ; earn a|;o. The buck 
^ has uIno a fine polr of antlerx, 
^ «%ii:eh Me. Motto All. tend* to have 
^ niuuntod. 



v>i i 

t 
t 

* 



White Slaver Convicted. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. Dec. 29. — After 
deliberating for nearly twenty-four 
hours a jury in district court Satur- 
day declared Mrs. Hilda Rowland 
guilty of having attempted to entice 
a young woman to go from Minne- 
apolis to Winnipeg and lead an Im- 
moral life. Mrs. Rowland was arrested 
during the se-ssion of the International 
I Purity congrt'ss here early this month 
I and attracted attention of the dele- 
I gates. 



election of a pr jsident, secretary, treas- 
urer for the ensuing year, and for the 
transaction of ;iny other business that 
may legally cone before it. 

St. Hilaire — .V quiet wedding took 
place at the homo of A. E. Eckstrom of 
Black River Thursday, when Miss An- 
nie Rux was married to Carl Einil : 
Eckstrom. Rev. Frank Larson con- ; 
ducted the ceremony that made the 
couple man ani wife. The bride was 
attended by her sister. Miss Lillian i 
Uux. Fred Lorentson acted as best, 
man. 



REO RIVEH VALLEY 
TRESS A^E BUDS 



i\m 



INJUNC TION S' OUGHT. 

Effort to Prevent Collection of Re- 
clamation Service Dues. 

Sioux Falls, S. D., Dec. 1. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Arguments were made 
in Federal court here Saturday for a 
restraining order to stop the national 
reclamation service collections of cer- 
tain charges against reclaimed land In 
the Bellefourche district In the Black 
Hills. 

Involved In the outcome of the case 
direct iv are charges aggregating over 
$200,000 on 100,000 acres of land and 
Indirectly involving claims by the gov- 
ernment of several millions against 
reclaimed land all over the West. 



ffiSNHESOTA BRIEFS 



Pi 



MmM BRIEFS 



With 



%ttmm 

TVER 

PILVS. 



Archie 
Newett, 
William 
;us La- 
town of Oma — 
Anderson, Matt Luonen; 
rharles Krueger, Tim 
of Saxon — George A. 



Farmers Plowing 
Other Indications of 
Unusual Winter. 

Crookston, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — With the river still | 
open, farmers plowing and stock still ' 
foraging in pastures, the prediction by : 
the Indians and old-timers, based on 
the high beaver dams and rauskrat I 
houses is coming true. Many of the I 
trees are budding. The saving in f uel j 
Is only exceeded by the immense sav- 
ing of feed by the stockmen, the da'ry- 
men especially getting big returns 
from their cattle which are feeding on 
green rye and other green food special- 
ly adapted to milch cows, wliich costs 
nothing, leaving the silos practically 
untouched up to the present time. 



SCANL ON IS "DRY." 

Saloon Men Closing in Accordance 
With Election Result. 

Clnquet, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The saloons at Scanlon, 
which have been running contrary to 
law since CloQuet voted "dry," are 
closed for a few days. They will com- 
ply with tho state law that no liquor 
may be sold within a half mile of dry 1 
territory, and are . preparing to move i 
about I'OO feet from their present loca- j 
tion. It Is rumored that no other i 
saloons will locate in Scanlon. 



Houlde, N. S. De 



Fer, 



Patrick Auger. 




<^ 



msmm mniiws 

BODY IS fiEGOVERED 

William Carrier of Lower 

Peninsula Found Dead 

Beside Rifle. 

Ncgaunee, Mich., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Hcrall.) — The mystery surround- 
ing the disappearance Nov. 16 of Wil- 
liam Carrier of the lower peninsula 
who dropped out of .=?ight v/hlle deer 
deer hunting with his father, John 
Carrier, was cleared up when searchers 
found tho body with a bullet hole from 
a high power rltle through the neck. 
His rifle with four cartridges In the 



TS'orth DakotaiiM Alao Pro^vInK* 

Fargo, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — Plowing In December and 
p^.^ctlcally all of November Is a new 
experience for North Dakolans. For 
only one year in the past score has 
this been poi-sible. In that season 
plows were run in December and on 
Christmas day basenall games w^ere 
played under favorable conditions. 
There was a freeze early in November 
but the frost .'^oon left the ground and 
the tmusual conditionp have sln:e ex- 
isted v.lth plowing and other fall work 
proceeding just as in October. 



WILL UTILIZ E GAS. 

By-Product From Briquette Plant Will 
Be Usad in Burning Bricks. 

Hebron, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Using the gas to burn 
their brick, the Hebron Brick com- 
pany will manufacture briquettes from 
the coke. Lignite coal will be used 
and a $i.'00,000 plant will be Installed 
to manufacture the bririuettes. It is 
estimated that there will be a dally 
output of about fifty tons which can 
be sold f. o. b. here from ?5 to $7 per 
ton. For years the substation of tho 
department of mining of the state has 
been manufacturing briquettes here btit 
having no use for the gas have been 
unable to make it a profitable venture. 



SELLS PIONEER STORE. 

Fargoan, Mentioned for U. S. Senate, 
to Take Southern Trip. 

Fargo, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — State Senator W. P. PortCT- 
fleld, who has been prominently men- 
tioned as a candidate on tho Demo- 
cratic ticket for the United States 
senate, has sold his drug store in 
Fargo. It was one of the oldest In the 
city, and Mr. Porterfleld is a pioneer 
of the county. Before re-engaging in 
other bu»inet<s next spring, Mr. Por- 
terfleld will spend the winter in Costa 
Rica and Southern MiSL-issippl and 
Louisiana. He has for many years 
been a member of the state board of 
pharmacy and was president of tho 
druggists of the state. 



Cloquet — Citv Attorney J. A. Fesen- 
beck and Indian Agent G. W. Cross 
have returned from Crand Portage and 
Pigeon River reseervation on the Cana- 
dian border, each with a fine moose, 
and Mr. Cross with a big buck, as 
well. Walter Keifner, employed by the 
Northern Lumber company at Brim- 
son, shipped the largest deer out of 
Carlton county. The animal weighed, 
300 pounds, and went to St. Paul. 

Bemidji — Tlie members of the Junior- 
Freshman Llt^^rary society of the Be-, 
midji high school held a short meeting 
to elect officers for the en.'^ulng year. 
Kdwin J. Simons was elected president;] 
Hazel Seven.'ion, vice president and 
Miss Ella Anderson, secretary and 
treasurer. I 

International Falls — The marriage of 
Miss Eva Emerson and Louis Snod- , 
grass took place Thanksgiving day at 
noon at the home of the bride's par- : 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John Emerson, 
Third street. The wedding was a 
quiet one, there being only Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Liljblad there in addi- 
tion to tlie members of the family. The 
ceremony was performed by Rev. C. H. 
Blake, pastor of the Methodist church. 

Barnum — T. W. Newton, who recent- 
ly purcliaped the Polar farm of N. Muel- 
ler, come to town and wanted to swear 
out a complaint against Mueller, al- 
leging that Mueller had made threats 
to shoot him if he, Newton, Sid not 
deed the place back to him. Constable 
Charles Felgen returned to tlie farm 
with Newton on the following morn- 
ing and the affair was amicably set- 
tled, but Mr. Newton will hang onto the 
farm. 

St. Hilaire — The damage suit of Mrs. 
Mary Sherva brought against the 
Great Northern Railway company wa.s 
settled out of court last week by tho 
pavment to her of $800. Last year 
while walking across the tracks north 
of the depot, a board in the sidewalk 
flew up striking her arm and break- 
ing the bone. 

Hallock — A very quiet marriage 
ceremony was sohnenized at St. John's 
rectory on Wednesday when Jacob 
Stanton Fertig and Miss Lena Jullna 
Haugen, both of Bed River, were united 
in the bond.s of holy matrimony by the 
Rev. J. I'\ Cox, in the pre.«ence of Hal- 
fert Me'.vln Haugen and Miss Nancy 
Dorabelle Fertiz. 

Barnum — The annual meeting of the 
stockholders of the Carlton County 
Agricultural and Industrial association 
will be held at the Trading company's 
hall here on Saturday, Dec. 6. The 
business of the meeting will be the 



Houghton — Fve marriage • licenses 
were issued Friday as the county ] 
clerk's office as follows: Walter] 
Sampson of Houghton and Jennie | 
Thomas of Calumet; Peter Fountaine 
of Hubbell and Florence Rocque of i 
Lake Linden; James Gallassero of : 
Laurium and I iga Peter.son of Swede- j 
town, Calumet township; John Watti i 
and Mary Pasanen, both of Calumet, \ 
I and Alvin \/areham and Gladys j 
Franks, both of Lake Linden. | 

Torch Lake — At an early hour > 
Thur.sday mcrnlng Mrs. Lablanch 
passed away at the home of her son, 
Louis. The deceased had been ill for 
a few days anc. although she was well 
advanced In years the end was "not 
looked for. Mr.". Lablanch was born 
in Canada on May 30, 1827. 

Quincy — Ano her Quincy girl became 
a bride on A\ednesday evening last, 
when Miss Mai'y Crowley and John R. 
Lawrence were united In a quiet wed- 
ding at the p irsonage of Rev. F. 
Kron. Miss Crowley Is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Crowley of 
the Limerick ocation, where she has 
sp«mt her entire life. 

Marquette — Rev. Oscar A. Sandahl, 
who has been pastor of the Swedish 
Lutheran church for the past five 
years, together with his family, will 
leave for Wahoo. Nebr., where he will 
take up new duties. Mr.s. Sandahl 
and child left this morning, while Mr. 
Sandahl will leave Monday night. 
; Trom Stillwater, Minn., the family will 
' proceed together to Wahoo. 

Negaunee — AVhile on his way homo 

from the depot, Peter F. Bara.«a, the 

plumber, killc i a muskrat In front of 

tiie First Naliona! bank building by 

' kicking it. ?rr. Bara.sa .stated when 

' he first saw it he thought It was a 

I large rat. 

Ontonagon — The school board Is 
! planning on o))ening a school in South 
i Flintsteel dislrict. There are seven- 
' U en children in that locality of school 
age and as soon as the necessary 
i teacher can b'S secured school will be 
opened. The l)oard has rented a room 
' in the house formerly owned by George 
, La Fond for a schoolhou.se. 

L'Anse — Four of the big lumber mills 
In Baraga county have closed down for 
! a few month.s, as is the custom hero 
'annually at this time of the year. The 
• ilebard mill at Pequaming is still saw- 
' ing. The cutLing of timber for next 
'season's sawing is now under way and 
I an earlv start by the mills next year 
is predicted md a busy season is 
i looked forwari to. 



I at tho Catholic church in Westhope. oe- 
I curred the marriage of Miss May Mc» 
Cabe to John Domnick Orthou.-^e of 
I Kent, Minn. Rev. Father Gaydusek 
'performed tlio ceremony in the pres- 
ence of a ft'W friends and relatives. 
' Oakes, N. D. — Miss Etta Mclntyre 
and Wnltir Buttke of Oakes were mar- 
; rled at EUendale by Judge H. Wick- 
ersham. They will make their home in 

Wales, N. D. — St. Michael's church 
was the scene of a pretty wadding 
when Miss Agnes Piatz was united In 
marriage to P. Schneider. They will re- 
side in Wales. 

Langdon, N. D. — At the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. H. Mortenson of Langdon, oc- 
curred the marriage of Miss Aim* 
Wolf and Henry Morten.son. Rev. F. J. 
Hibbard officiated. Mr Morten.son i.3 the 
manager of the Langdon creamery 
plant. 

Fargo, N. D. — Rev. A. E. Peterson of 
the First Baptist church, read the 
vows Friday evening, tliat united two 
couples in marriage. The contractlnjf 
parties were Laurel B. Parks and Mary 
Coen, and Archie Coen and Mary Hoflt- 
man, all residents of Fargo. 

Devils Lake, N. D. — X reunion of 
I seven graduates of Maynooth college 
located at Kildare. Ireland, was held 
I in Devils Lake last week. The reunion 
i was the nature of a dinner at the 
I Great Northern, followed by a discus- 
sion broad enough to include every- 
thing from reminiscences rf college 
' dav.s to theologiv-al dissertations. The 
I Maynooth graduates here were Father 
j P. O'Reardon, Loma; Father Long, 
Park River; Father Ramsbottom. Ca- 
thedral, Fargo; Father Harte. Hope: 
Father <}alvin. Starkw.-fith<r; Father 
'McGeougl.. Wimbleton, and Father 
i O'Flynn, Mercy hospital, city. 



f 



in 



e 



From 



leago 

That's the new leaving time — effective 
November 30th — of the 

:press 

New York 

—after arrival of connecting trains from West 
and Northwest. Eleven New York trains over 

Pennsylvania Lines 

leave Chicago daily, including four ALL*STEEL Limited*. 

Or address 



Full information about 
fares, etc. , may be obtjuned 
from Local Ticket Agent 



W. E. BLACHLEY 

District Agent 
197 Portage Avenue, East 

Telepbone Main 427 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 



CRAZED BY MISFORTUNES 

I Is Explanation of Queer Actions of 
North Dakota Homesteader. 

Ryder, N. D., Dec. 1.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — Having been driven insane 
through brooding over his misfortunes 
Is supposed to have caused the recent 
acts of Charles White, a bachelor 
homesteader. After selling his relin- 
quLshment he fled. His four horses and 
machinery v^'ere mortgaged to the 
limit. He had a poor crop during the 
pa.-^t year and could make no payments. 
iJefore he left. White took an ax and 
attempted to break up the machinery. 
He is charged with Belling mortgaged 
property and embezzlement. Prior to 
leaving Ryder he made a second at- 
tempt to sell a relinquishment to his 
property after having already relin- 
quished the claim. 



BACHEL OR ViG TIfVliZED. 

Wisconsin Man Claims Belief 
Witchcraft, Cost Him $6,000. 

Marinette, Wis., Dec. 1. — That his be- 
lief in witchcraft allowed Mrs. Maggie 
Pileon, the supposed witch, to secure 
from him about |S,00(* In eighteen 
years, is the aliogatio« of Napoleon 
Morin of Crandon, Wis., in his suit 
against Mrs. Pileon and her husband, 
also of Crandon. 

Morin alleges that he believes In 
witchcraft and that Mrs. Pileon claimed 
powers as a witch. When the Pileons 
came to Crandon eighteen years ago 
they had nothing, attorneys for Morin 
allege, while Morin was then well to 
do. Now he has less than $1,000 and 
Mrs. Pileon is worth $12,000, they claim. 

NORTH~DAKOtTn DROWNED. 



Great 



DULUTH MAN S LUGGED. 

H. E. Romaine Is Beaten By Mill 
City Robbers. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 1. — Frantic 

cries from H. E. Romaine of Duluth 

early Sunday caused robbers to leave 

him bruised and bleeding In the street 

I after having severely beaten him with 

I their revolvers. His assailants are be- 

I lieved to have been the sam trio of 

automobile bandits. 

Andrew Nagle confessed, according 
j to the police that he attempted to rob 
I Mrs. Nellie Johnson, at whose home he 
I was rooming. Rev. David L. Holm- 
gren, aged 67 years, a former mem- 
I ber of parliament of Sweden, was 
pounced upon, beaten ana robbed by 
I lliree men, near his home here late Sat- 
I urday night. Mr. Holmgren fought his 
I assailants with a walking stick until 
j he was felled twice by blows with the 
; butt end of a revolver. The men took 
; $22 and a valuable watch from his 
' pockets and escaped. 
1 Th« police believe the robbers were 



Cando Man Among Victims of 
Lakes Storm. 

Cando, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Friends here have been 
notified of the drowning of Harry R. 
Haakins of Cando in the recent storms 
on Lake Huron. He was steward on 
the Harry R. Smith, a steel freighter. 
His body was found floating on 
lake several days after the storm. 



the 



GRIFFIN WILL FIGHT. 

North Dakotan Declines to Obey 
"Orders" to Leave Town. 

Ryder, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Claiming that he will 
not be driven from town and that he 
will fight It out. Dr. J. H. Griffin, or- 
dered otit of Ryder and removed to 
Makoti, i.s back. He was tho husband 
of the Mrs. Griffin who suicided fol- 
lowing the exposure of her relations 
with Druggist Hart. The latter was 
lined $500 and the people became indig- 
nant at Griffin for (ailing to prosecute 
as vigorously as was expected. It Is 
claimed that charges against the doc- 
tor will be preferred before the state 
medical board. 

FARGO CO LLEGE CHANGE, 

Dr. Creegan Retires as President of 
the Institution. 

Fargo, N. D., Dec 1. — (Special to 
Th3 Herald.) — An active campaign to 
finance Fargo college Is to be started 
immediately as a resul^ of the meet- 
ing of the trustees at which the res- 
ignation of President Creegan as pres- 
ident was accepted, Vice President 
Hansel, who was recently secured from 
Clilcago as financial agent, v.as made 
actiug president. Ue wUi have uotU- 



How To Hsal a 
Stubborn 



A Kome Method Sure to Re- 
store Flesh to Natural 
Health. 



WISGOP^K BilEFS 




Here are some very valuable facts for 
mi who have any blood trouble with ex- 
ternal sores. 

Do not cover any sore so as to Inter- 
fere with perspiration and the formation 
of protective scabs. Keep it clean and 
bandaged. If It Is a stubborn ccse. Hush 
your blood with S. S. S. This famous 
blood purifier works wonders. And you 
can easily give your blood a good, 
thorough cleansing by using S. S. S. 
There Is no need for anyone to be de- 
Upondent over the Illness of blood Impuri- 
ties. No matter how badly they attack 
fhe system or how unsightly becomes the 
pkln, just remember there is one Ingre- 
dient in S. S. S. that so stimulates the 
cellular tissues throughout the body that 
each selects Its own essential nutriment 
from the blood. 

This means that all decay, all breaking 
down of the tissues, is checked and re- 
pair work begins. S. S. S. has such a 
Bpeclflc Influence on all local cells as to 
preserve their mutual welfare and afford 
a proper relative assistance to each other. 
More attention is being given to scientific 
medicine than ever before, and S. S. S. 
Is the highest achievement In this line. 

Do not faU to get a bottle of S. S. S. 
to-dav. If your abscess Is of such a 
nature that you would like to consult a 
Bpeciallst, write to the medical depart- 
ment. The Sv.ift Specific Co.. 214 Swift 
Laboratory, Atlanta, Oa, 

Beware of any attempt to sell you 
something else for the blood. Many peo- 
ple hare been imposed upon by having 
some mineral mixture palmed off on 
them. Ask for S. S. S. and InsLst that 
S. S. S. is what you propose to get. 



Milwaukee — George "Williams, post- 
master at Kremlin, "Wis., wlio caused 
the arrest of Florence <!anible for al- 
leged theft o!' ?120 worth of stamp.", 
al.so was taken Into cu.'=lody. It being 
charged thnt he is more than $600 
short In his accounts. Both were 
brought to lyiilwaukee, where they 
probably will be brought before 
United States Commissioner Bloodgood 
today. The Kremlin postoffice is in a 
farmhouse in which the woman lived. 

Stanley — Otio "NVarner, aged 42, was 
shot near Jurip river and died at his 
brother's honi ;. Mr. Warner was com- 
ing out from his homestead, seven 
miles from Jump river with his broth- 
er and two ohcr men. A gun In the 
hands of a boy. walking on the trail 
behind, was discharged, the shot pass- 
ing tin-ouph 1 lio fle.shy part of War- 
ner's thigh. He died from loss of 
blood. . „ 

Prairie du Chlen — The 3 -year-old 
son of Rev. i^arry Milford and wife, 
while playing about the kitchen stove 
at their home in Retreat, a few miles 
north of this city, overturned a tea- 
kettle of wat^^r upon himself, terribly 
scalding his lead, face and body. He 
died soon af lerward. 

Oconomowoi; — Adolph von Miellen, 
manager of the Schlitz hotel, and 
Thomas Sc\illy of Oconomowoc, 
brought honu two large black bears. 
In addition to the deer secured on 
their hunting trip to Pentago, Mich. 

Eau Claire — The marriage of Miss 
Agnes Wrndt to Emil Kurth took 
place Thur.^dfiy afternoon at the home 
of the bride' 5 parents at Truax, the 
Rev. A. F. Augustine, pastor of St. 
John's German Lutheran church, per- 
forming the ceremony. The bride was 
attended by Miss Clara Wendt as 
bridesmaid and Miss Ella Kurth was 
maid of honor. The groom was at- 
tended ' by Albert Kurth and Edward 
Zutter. 

Chippewa :?'alls — A. touring car 
owned bv William Dunne of this city 
was partly destroyed by fire three 
miles out of Jim Falls Thursday aft- 

Eau ' Claire —The A. E. White Ma- 
chine works is a now industry just 
incorporated under the bonds of the 
state with a' capital of $50,000. The 
articles of Incorporation were recent- 
ly accepted by the secretary of state 
and the new concern Is making ac- 
tive preparations to enlarge the 
machine shoj and foundry business. 
The Incorporators are Albert E. 
V.hlte. AVUllt.m A. White and Geor- 
giana White. 




•^•^^^.^ii^i^i^iii^i^Jti^^ 



WFien Mffide 

Witl 

Calumet pastrj^ is good to 

look at, pood to eat.- Alw.-iys 
|i;jht, fluffy, tender and M'hole- 
9ome. Calumet i.s the one baking 
powder that is /ligh in quality and 
moderate in price. 

RECEIVED HIGHEST AWARDS 

World' Pore Food Expotitioa, ChicafO, IIL 
ParU Expoutkii. Fruce, Mtwrch, 1£12 



DAKliTA BBIEFS | 



Fargo, N. D. — A quiet but pretty 
wedding was solemnized when Miss 
Katherine Sundfor, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs L. I. Su idfor of Oak Grove, was 
married to W Ibur Targart, of this city. 
Tlie service was read at 3 o'clock by 
liev M. Brerston, in the presence of 
only the family and a very few Inti- 
mate friends. There were no attejidants 
and Mrs. Douglas McDonald played the 
wedding mar^h from Lohengrin. 

Weolhope, N. D.— Tuesday mornln» 




r^' 



^ DEFECTIVE PAGE 



■'•' r- 



! 



_»—.►. 



f 



1 

i 



12 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 




The Latest 

News Published 

on This Page 





EDITED 
BY BRUCE 



The Herald 

Sporting Gossip 

Is Reliable 




CONNIE MACK DECLARES 
WORLD' S SERIES A RE HONEST 

Famous Philadelphia Leader Writes an Able Arti- 
cle and Flays Those Who Have Attacked 
Honesty of the National Sport--- 
Paragraph Comment. 



PHILADELPHIA BOY 
IGNORES FEDERALS 



WISCONSIN MARVEL 
TO WRESTLE HERE 



BY BRUCE. 

BONN IK MAlK lias spoken. 
SiHlUcn tmitsic.ns of deafen- 
ing speech from tlie sc- 
pukhrc lips of the Sphinx 
would hardly have oc- 
ciis;.ncd urt-ater surprise. The s'.leut 
wizard of pennant winning teams, the 
tactiture lactioian of deep and dis- 
cerning qualities has come to ihe de- 
fense of the great national game in 
an article that is timely and well 
fcpt k(.n. 

In a currtnt magazine the manager 
of the wt„rid's ciiampi'.-ns gives fortti 
a statement that will sound g<'od to 
all of the lovers of the game that h.is 
come to be loi-ked upon as the national 
contest, the chief «>utdoor amusement 
of the rich, the poor, the aristocrat 
of gentle breeding and the plebian of 
the 5ilums. Speaking candidly, base- 
ball needs no defense, but in the end 
it is well that misstatements back in- 
to the faces (>i some whose chief dt- 
Ijglit it is to decry a sport that has 
unflinchingly, unswervingly and un- 
questionably stood for honesty 
throughout all of the years of its 
reign. 

Wfve heard this surly talk of th; 
world's series being fi.xed. Some 
piker who lost two dollars on the 

frame immediately became an abased 
ollower of this insurgent falsehood. 
Bu'^iness men whom you would ac- 
credit with superior judgment have in 
some instances allowed themselves .o 
become imbued with this unclean be- 
lief. Therefore it is good and proper 
that ine of the greatest leaders of tlic 
game, a man who seldc>m speaks a. .a 
therefore len«ls greater weight to h:? 
words; a gentleman of religious belief 
and a clean and praiseworthy life, 
should come forward and give the lie 
to the scandal of falsehood that has 
been started bv the very class of pan- 
sites the lovers of the game are fight- 
ing — the professional gambler, a saf- 
fron stripe of citizen who would nor 
hesitate to use any means to corrupt 
the players and fix the games. 

To those who have ever doubted 
the honesty of the gan.e, we would 
recomnund the reading of the story 
by Connie Mack. 

Baseball is the greatest game in ^.11 
the wi<le domain ctf sportdf.m. It is 
rapidlj- becoming international in its 
aspect. Wise followers of the sport 
have often and perhaps rightly pre- 
dicted that before the passing of many 
years every country upon the civil- 
ised globe will be playing the game 
that ftr years has been peculiarly 
American, it is well that we may hold 
our ideals clean and free from sus- 
picion and it is well that men of the 
worth and standing cif Cornelius Mc- 

Gillicuddy are in this pastime. 

• « « 

P. Iltnry cried with fervent pride, 
"It's liberty or croak." 

When declaiming high, with flash- 



ing eye, the enemy he smote. 

If dear young Pat were waxing fat 
in these declining days. fH ftl 

He'd prote'^t strong and likewise 
long against the white hope craze. 

* * • i 

As the original Ali-Amencan team ; 

the Carlisle Indians are doing pretty I 

well. ! 

« • • 

Now that the football season is | 

over the ordinary young man will -e- | 

ceive some slight consideration at the I 

various dc'miciles where various fan 

maids hang forth. 

« • * 

The war in Bulgaria may raise the 

price of the Turkish cigarettes. Gen. 

Sherman was right about the general 

effect of war. 

* * • 

The Federals m-'- cm-^loy Tom 
Lynch as president. F.ven a your.c: : 
and inexperienced league seems to Ix; ; 
able to profit by the mistakes of the ! 

National. ' 

* • ♦ 

Maybe Toe Rivers was encouraeed 
somewhat by the audacity of Geneial; 

Huerta. 

* • • I 

If the present high price of eggs ' 
continues even the Universitj' of 
Michigan may be compelled to cut 

out the training table. 

* • • 

The coach of the Illinois football 
team declares that he will win the 
conference championship in iQi.l. 
Here at last has the ideal optimist 

been discovered. i 

* * • 

The Federal prison at I^eavcnworth 
has a baseiiall team. Ground rules 

prohibit home runs. j 

* « * I 

"Dangerous Dan McGraw" and "At 
the (irave f>f Napoleon" are surely ' 
impressive poems for state and august 
occasions. i 

• * * ! 

President Elliott of Harvard edited '. 

five feet of illustrious and useful; 

books; Percy Haughton has coached 

several Harvard ft'Otball teams to the 

Eastern championship. Even Boston 

is divided regarding the respective 

merits of the cases. 

« • • 

George Washington cro5sed the Dela- 
ware, his beak v»as cold and 
blue — 

P. Revere was mentioned too, likewise 
his steed so true; 

But 'tis rot to compare these feats so 
rare, 

W ith those fifteen points kicked 

through the air. 

* • * 

Charles Erickley waits until after 

the game to pray: there seems small 

need for orisons before it. 
« • • 

Fielding Yost assisted in coachir:? 

the West Point team. Th\i is another 

important victory for the West. 

* ' • • 

You ask dear, what do wc hcr.r 




EDDIE COLLINS. 



abovjt the world tour trip. Not much, 
we fear, but this is clear, an authen- 
ticated tip: Thanksgiving dishes fur- 
nished fishes with sundry feeds upon 



the trip. 



DAUBERT LEADS 

AS BAT ARTEST 



Brooklyn's Star First Base- 
man Heads National 
League List. 

Xew York, Dec. 1. — Jake Paubert, 

Brooklyn's star first basfn^.an. is the 

Natlorjal leaerue's champion batsman 

for the season of 1913. The official 

battir.K Rveraffes, made public today, 
bhow him third on the list with an 
average of .360 in 139 grames. 

Of the two men nominally outrank- 
ing^ him, however, one. Tingling of 
Brooklyn, is a pitcher, and took part 
in but forty games, while the other, 
Charle.s McPonaUl of Boston, who 
played in but about lialf the season's 
g.iines, is no longer a major leaguer, 
having been released to an Interna- 
tional league team before the chj.se of 
the season. Yingling, the top man, 
batted .383 and M.Donald. .355. 




I line this fall. Letters to the Mexican 
' Country club and to Smith's former 
I home in Scotland have failed to locate 
I him and while his friends cherish the 
j possibility that he may be stalled 
I somewhere in Mexico, or resting itv. 
1 some secluded spot in the United 
States, they will be very much re- 
lieved if they can hear from him. 



BEELL WILL 

MEET WINNER 



Duluth Secures Contest 
Between Winner of Pe- 
ters-lrslinger Match and 
the Wisconsin Marvel. 



SELECT ALL- |MANY TEAMS 
STAR TEAMS IN THE FIELD 



Coaches and Football Ex- 
perts Choosing Many 
Mythical Elevens. 



On "Wednesday evening at St. Taul, 
Theodore Peters, claimant of the light 
heavyweight championship of the 



Two Minnesota Men Men- 
tioned for All-Western 
Eleven. 



Basket Ball Activities Will 



Soon Begin 
Duluth. 



in 



Basket ball activity in Duluth is 
due to start within the next two 
weeks. Preparations for the season 
are being made at the present time 
by the officials of the Duluth Boat 
club, which during the past few years 

has had one of the best teams in the 
Xorthwest in the field. 

Acc(,«rding to tlie information of 
Dennis Deiphton, last year's manager, 
most of the old players will be in the 
game during the present season and 



New York, Deo. 1. — Although the 
world, will meet Henry Irslinger, the football season of 1J13 ended officially 
famous English champion, a wrestler | ^^.j^,, the playing of the Army-Navy 

with one of the greatest international c^ ■, , , ,■ ,i ,-., - ^ ,* 

records ever made by a grappler. game Saturday, th"j leading coaches, ■ consequently the prospects^ f or a fast 

Arrangements have been completed players and authorities are sustaining i *^^"^ ^^"^ \^^y brigh 
by President Ryberg and otlier ofllcials gridiron interest du-ing the early days ' iurfng the i,ref;in!''s'i 
of the Greater Dulutli Athletic club for, ^ ^^ ^ ^ ... ,, . • i ♦ ^ v, „ Av, I'V . . 

the staging of a finish contest at the ; of December by selecting all-Amencan i to his own statement. 

Auditorium on the evening of Dec. 10 ' and all-sectional teims. Many of the ! ^^i.^'t'I^ iS.^''.,,S*'*'i\ J"!^*^ \^^i^ , . * 

between the winner of the Wednesday | coiches follow ove-y action of pupil i h'^l.t^f ti \V^ fi\\^^^^A^^^ plac n^ 

--. . . •' ■ '' a team in tlie field and endeavoring: 



Dennis -will 
m© 
ingr 




the 165-pound mark there is no man in ' Iron instructors and authorities still i Class contests f-re hpino- etot-.^,? u* 
the_world who can take the measure i are puzzling over th^ problem, the I the present time at the Y. il t\ A. 



of Beell. majority, having ccnlined their choice 

St. Paul followers of wrestling are ^^ Eastern combinations, the all-East- 
of the opinion that Theodore I'eters is ^^n eleven, by earlv consensus of opin- 
invincible and will defeat any man in [ j^^^ appears to be as follows: 
the world of his own weitrlit. ; j^^fj p^d, Hogsett. Dartmouth; left 

Ofllcials of the Duluth club desire . ^^^^^j^^ Tallbolt, kale; left guard, 1 active in the organization of teams, 
the best man in the world to meet ^etcham, Yale; center. Marling, Yale;! The Cathedral Athletic club is In 
Beell here, so that no matter who wins ' ' »• . • 



gymnasium and this season promises 
to be the most active of any of the 
years of the local association. I'hva- 
Ical Instructor Olson is a keen folUJw- 
er of the game and has been very 




extremity and the Lniverslty of Neb- i history of the ^port. 
raska on tiie other end, the consensus ' '*' 



! man be returned the victor in the com- 
ing contest. 

In the event of Irslinger winning the -•- ----- -'■—■ -■— —-.-- ""i 'i'k*^^*'k^^ 

I contest that will be staged at the of opinion is that the section named ^*-******* 

mammoth St. Paul Auditorium, the ; has developed this fall some of the , * 

.meeting between Beell and the Eng- greatest players it has ever known. * 

ilshman will take on the flavor of an Critics generally avarded Eichenlaub, ^ 

the Notre Dame fuilback his position, i ';; 
Tnere Is hardly a lissenting voice as * 



BUYS INTEREST 

IN BOSTON TEAM 



of the stock is owned by Oen. Charles 
H. Tavlor and Ills son, John I. Taylor, 
and the probability that John I . Tay- 
lor will be elected to the club's presi- 
denov, an office from which he retired 
late in 1911, is indicated. 

I^annin owns a small interest in the 
Boston National league club and re- 
cently was elected a director of it. Ile- 
garding this. President James E. Oaff- 
nev of the Boston Nationals said last 
night: 

"Lannin will sell his stock in my 
club and will resign from the board of 
director?'. I am sorry to have him 
leave us. He will be the right man to 
succeed McAleer, Mclioy and Stahl as 
half owner." 



McAleer, McRoy and Stahl 
Sell Stock in Ex- 
Champions. 

New York, Dec. 1. — The retirement 
of President James R. McAleer, Robert 

i McP^oy and Former Manager Stahl 
from ownership In the Boston Ameri- 
can league club i.*? declared to have | 
been effected through the sale of their • 

I stock aggregating a half Interest in i 
the club to Josepli Lannin, a Long \ 

■ Island real estate man, for upward.s of j 
f2L'0.000. On Dec. 10, it is said, the : 
formal transfer will be effected and 

I r.« w (.fficers elected. The other half I 



Chicago. Dec. 1. — Secretary McRoy 
of the Boston American league club 
returned yesterday from Hot Springs, 
Ark., where he closed arrangement.'* 
for the spring training trip of the Red 
Sox. He said it was news to him that 
his holdings in the cli* had been dis- 
posed of, but that the deal might have 
been coii;^ummaied without his knowl- 
edge. , . 

President Johnson of the American 
Icaeue could not be located. 

LEADIMG G OLFE R MISSING 

Willie Smith Feared to Have Met 
Mishap in City of Mexico. 

Chjcag :• Dec. 1. — Friends of '^'lllie 
Smith. former national open golf 
champion, admit that they fear some 
mishap may have befallen him in 
Mexico. 

Smith, who is the professional at the 
Mexh-an Country club on the outskirts 
of the City of Mexico, dropped out of 
sight after the open event at Brook- 




XRBRASKA MAY BE 

REJKCTKD BV BIG XI\E3. 



international affair. 



ARMY WINS THE 

ANNUAL SAME 



CliirnKO, Dec. 1. — The I'nlver- 



^ 
* 



to him. Craig of Michigan and Xor- * «*«>■ »'. ^'«'''«'«*'t"*"''..'*'*'!"*"'****'"/''"' IS 
Bren of Chicago, w.re given the half-'* admI«Kloii «o the >\ *-Ntern confer- ^ 
- = - - ^, cnre In to be nrte<l on at a meet- M^ 

^ InK of the BIp: Mne aothoritiei* ^ 
•if: here next Saturilay. 



Defeats Navy Team By the 

Score of 20 

to 9. 

New York, Dec. 1. — Forty-two thou- 
sand persons saw the Navy go down In 



back places and although keener 
rivalry was felt for the Quarterback 
position, the ability of Dorais of Notre 
Dame to run the team and his expert- 
ness as a drop kicker seem to make 
him the favorite. 

Solon of Minneso a is given one end 
almost .in mimously. His experience 



-^ Itepre»>entati\ e^ oi the eonfer- 
^ eiiee coIleiceK ^\e^e Kenerally ret- 
M^ (cent reKarilinK the probable ae- 
^ tion In the caKc, bat opposition to 
^ the enlargement of the orsanlca- ■}!/( 
^ tlon on the grrouud that It In un- ^ 



anl ability were considered us making ^ wieldly In knoivn to exl^t, and 



nt 



him excel all othe- wing men in the ^k ^vas presented an a formidabi 

Central states, though Rockne. the jJ; arRnment. wh.n the addition ot ^ 

Notre Dame captain, was pronounced j ^j^ \ehraska and Miehlgan ^as In- ^ 

nearly as good. lllller and Hennlng i ^ formally dUeuxfed at the meet- 4k 

of the Michigan Ag gies and Cherry of i Ak Idk at MadUon Iskkt hprin;;. ^ 

Ohio State were rivals with Hunting- , ^}t ^ 

* ^ \if ^ ^ vi- stf < i| -A 1^ 




DAUBERT FAILED 
MAJOR TRIAL 



other cabinet officers, senators, con- 

>f the mili- 
tary and naval service. Every seat 



.r„.„,e„ and t„. now.r o,. <h« ^">- ' ^^^^^^S^^^l.'S^^^ ^Ul^lUr,^ A"\^^^ BrOOklyll FlrSt 



was occupied and many more persons 
would have been seated liad space been 
available. 



of Wiscon.*;in have earned prominent i 
positions as guards . Otiier mentioned ! 



Baseman Did Not Make 
Good With Cleveland. 

One of the many peculiarities 



of 



ertson of Minnesota 

The all-Western eleven therefore 
would read about as follows: 

Ends, Solon. Minnesota and Rockne. 
Notre Dame; tackles. Butter. Wlscon- 









are Gallagher, Missouri, Harrison of ' 

Set in an oval of humanity was the ' ^^i^af^o. ^\^""*h„ "' iKV^'l^n^^'^^^'lVl] 
remade gridiron, protected from the ^/.^^^'jo State and Leonardson of the 
rain by a blanket of straw. To the ^'^hiRan Aggie.^ 

south on the side line was the Arnn-^^^^^UyisTonilke^^^^^^^^ crops up in Daubert beln» 

stand, to the north sat the Navy, with P-irtniiy is consiae ta d> i.iost experts ^ x. ..,/-,. , .. . 

the Held between flecked by a cross- ^||« best man playing the position. . considered by the Chalmers trophy 
fire of cheering that did not end be- f>thers who gain mention include Rob- commissioners the player most valu- 
fore the Army's color.s floated over the "tson o^ Aimnesot^i. thprefore able to his team in the National league 

field from the tops of the goal posts. ' ^ "^ "" »^ < ■ i' ^n eieven Tnerprore . 

I President Wilson and lils party es- 
; tablished precedent in dividing their 

' time at the game between the contend- . . *i. t^ , .. 

I ers. The president was a few minutes sm and Brown ^oith Dakota: guards. 
I late and the game did not start until Allmendinger, Michigan, and Keeler. 

he had taken his scat in an upper ^^l=■consin; .enter, De.s Jardien Chi- 
' grandstand box almcst directly over c^eo; ciuarterback. Morals. Notre Darnel 

the Army stand. When the first iialf nalfbacks, C ralg Allchigan and Nor- 

ended, he was escorted by Secretary of B^ren. Chicago; fullback, Llchenlaub, 

War (Jarrlson, .Secretary Daniels of the, Notre Danie^^ 

navy and Assistant Secretary Roose- j * 

velt to the navy side. Rain threatened 

every minute during the first three 

periods of the game and came in the 

last quarter in the form of a drizzle. 
A field goal by the Navy in the first 

quarter set the streamers of gold 

snapping wildly. For a moment the 

Army stand was silent, and then ; 

answered with a ripping cheer of en- ! 

couragement for their men on the 

field. In the second period the Army 

tied the score by scoring a field goal, 

and the Army stand went wild. 

But the greatest delirium was saved 

for the Army touchdown in the same 

period. Six hundred West Pointers 

rose to their feet as one man. tossed 

their caps on high, flashed their pen- 
nants of gold and black, and un- 
loosed their fires in wild hurraiis 



PREPARING FOR 

CURLING SEASON 



this year, for in 1907 the Brooklyn 
captain was declared not sufficiently 
competent to hold his berth with 
Cleveland. This year he wins th« 
Chaln>crs car. That same season Larry 
Doyle, who won the Chalmers car last 
season, was looked over by a scout 
for an American league club while ha 
was playing with Springfield of the 
', Three-I league and the scout advised 
against his purchase. 

Doyle cost the Oiants $4,500, which 
' was a record price for a minor league 
infielder in 1907. Daubert was acquired 
I by Brooklvn via the draft process in 
: 1910 for the sum of $1,000, the <;iant» 
i also putting in a draft for him and 
i losing out in tlie draw. Sir Jacob 

■ never was in danger of beln*? sent 
back to the minors after he reached 
the majors for the second time, and 
by June, 1910. liad been dubbed the 
Hal Chase cf the National league. He 

' falle.i to obtain memberslilp in the So- 
, ciety of the Three Hundred the first 
vear he was in the National league, 
but in 1911 he hit at a .307 clip and 
and in 1912 his record was .3^8. Thl* 
yeJir Daubert has boosted his .= tlck 

■ creilt to .350 and there 's a t>oss1- 
The opening hockey game of the sea- , bility that he may be the b.nttinp king 

v! 1 , 1 . V, X-, ■ t * ,1 in the organization in which he plays, 

eon scheduled wi :h \ irginia at the i j„ his first 128 games this year 
curling club on the evening of Dec. 12 pj^ybert procured 165 .«afetie,<, goin» 
may have to be postponed because of y^jti^ gg crlv in twenty-six contro- 



HOCKEY PLAYERS 
LONG^FOR WINTER 

Strenuous Training During 
Indian Summer Brings 
Cries of Anguish From 
Trepanier Students. 



pernicious warm 



versies. In each of fifty-six games he 



The greatest advance in PURE v 
GOODNESS ever made In smoking 
tobacco. P'^)^W^ 

Stag isn't just a little better. It's a revela- ^|j|wg^^v»,j^ 

You can't smol<e half a pipeful without realiz- JQ|^. 
ing this. Try \t and see. 

Convenient Packages; The Pound Hunr^idor, the Full- 
Siie 10-CentTin and the Handy Half-Size 5-Cent Tin. 




For Pipe and Cigarette 

EVER-LASTING-LY GOOD 



the persistently 
I weather. , ». j , , I made one lit; in crch cf tl.irty-cne. 

Rl Today officials of the club declared ^^.f, j^ ^g^h of thirteen, three, and In 
un |_OCa '^^'"S^"^,®"'''''.*' ^•'^ \^ V"^*^ '■^'^I'i''^* ^'i;®;fach of two. four. His large.M after- 
-- "" l-W'Jtllior six days to make ice, and that the i j^^^^g .^j^jj ^^^ willow were on July 14 

present weather give no indication of ^^^ ^^ q^ ^Y^,. flj-st named date he 
forcing the thermometer to a lower i secured four hits in four times at bat 
scale, there niight have to be a poet- ; „^ pierce. Overall and Reulbick of 
ponement of the opening contest of tne ; ^^j^^ cuhs and on the la.= t named date 
hockey season. , ^^ ^ ! he located Jimmy Lavender of the 

The candidates for the team are ; pr.iins for four smashes, hattingr 
taking long runs and going through j^^j^ist him five time.^i. Daubert has 



Games Will Be 
pointed. 



Ap- 



various exercises In the clubrooms. If 



i hit at a .428 clip against the rardl- 



the present brand of weather con- i ^^Is. and at a .403 pace acainst the 
- ..J - tv, I tinues, Billy Tretanier will have a ; T>Miii, <» TV-e Oub nitcher<! have vield- 



It is expected that the curling com- 
mittee of the Duluth Curling club 
will be appointed within the next few 
days. Some famous leader advised 
s 

^rd%ipe ^da",^"-ofThe"l^ndiV"n sum/ne-r I -,J^« ^^ral^;^-^-^*^ ^^ ^ -^^-■^'«" "' I n''-^]i»"''''"v'^'?,^"'?--"^S"^rl%^>;'l[o 
the officials; of the club have decided ^"S? su^'e' dc'es ,:ive them the once I ^'f^.-^.i^' (^V%.t'''arV'inefiX"o7 :2'79;''* 

over. He makes t lem wrestle and go 1 Daubert has made onlv a dozen er- 
through boxing stunts and various | ^(,„ ^j^i^ reafrn and only once has 
torturing exercises calculated to slap j^^ '^committed tv.o mi.'^plays in the 
the liver on the ^i rist and otherwise , g^i^ne content His biggest d.-svs work 



to prepare for winter 

To indicate the Interest in the curl- 
ing it is only necessary to state that 
one of the local hardware stores has 
sold so far during the season over 
f'fty pairs of rocks. 

clur'stated today \'haru "was' both , ^'2-"^^^ thc^y woul3 get about a week ' tw'^nn-onVchanoes that came his way. 
Gratifying and surprising L^r^^^^^ ^"^ then woald take to the .ce. , On April 14 he obtained four assists, 

gratir>ing ana surprising, now rapiuiy | ^.^^^^ ^^^^ alreacA- been at it for • .^^.^.j.^ji jg auite a lot for a first base- 

Indi.an 



make the anatomy behave. When this ' ^^ ^Y\e first corner was on April 29, 
form of exercise was started, the boys j ^-ij^n he cared for twenty out of the 



P. Lorillard Co, Est. I760 



the new members were sending in 
their applications. As the money comes 
In with the new applications, the ac- 
quisition of the large number of new 
members is a double source of grati- 
fication to the officials of the club. 

President Jones will appoint the 
curling committee which will have 
complete charge of all of the local 
games during the present season. 
• 

Life Cost in Hunting. 

Poston, Mass., Dec. 1. — The killing 
of 5,180 deer in Maine, Xew Hamp- 
shire, Vermont and Massachusetts this 
fall cost the lives of thirteen persons 
and serious injury to seventy-two oth- 
ers. The deer season closed in Massa- 
chusetts a week ago and ends in Ver- 
mont today, but hunters in Maine and 
New Hampshire have two weeks left 
In which to track their quarry. 



man. 



Daubert is cne of the sons of th« 
Kevstone state. I^elwellyn being the 



They have already been at 
about three weeks, and the 
summer weather hangs on. 

Each ".Septembe;* morn" wrings an 
expression of angu sh from each canJi- ' pVaoe where he was born. 
date for the team, for the Trepanier i 
brand of exercises is one that re- ; 
duces the pupil to a groveling mass 
of helpless liumanity. 



Army's New Captain. 

West Point, N. T., Dec. 1.— The Army 
football team, exultant in its victory 
over the Navy, returned to camp at 
noon yesterday. The football squad 
elected Vernon E. Prlchard of the sec- 
ond class as captain of next year's 
team. 



Coombs Oul of Hospital. 

Philadelphia, Dec. 1 — "Jack ' Coombs, 
the PhilaJtlphia American league 
club's pitcher who has been a patient 
in a local hospit^il since before the 
world's series last October, left the 
institution yesterday. He will re- 
main in this cit> for about three 
weeks before undertaking the journey 
to his home in ^!aine. 



BISON SENT FROM 

NEW YORK TO WEST. 



THE PALM ROOM 

ATTHE»PALDING 

M08T DELIGHTFUL AND LUX- 
URIOUS REI5TAURANT-IN 
DULUTH. 



Xew York. Dec. 1. — To repopulate 
the West as much as possible with the 
great animals that once abounded 
there by the thou.^ands, fourteen 
American bison were shipped yester- 
day from Bronx park here, where they 
were born, to Hot .«pring.«. S. D., 
where they will be turned out in the 
Wind Cave National park. These ani- 
mals, seven of each sex, represent five 
different strains. 

• 

AntoM Rare; Two Dylnpr. 

Tulsa, Okla.. Dec. 1. — Two persons 
were fatallv injured and three oth- 
ers severely hurt when a motor car, 
said to have been driven in a race 
with another car on one of the prin- 
cipal streets, ran into a curbing yes- 
terday and turned over. Een Block 
and Maurice Prince will die, according 
to surgeons. 



\ 



4. 

f 

I 



-J- 



i 



^ 



*< 9 




- ^ 



Monday, 




THE DULUTH HERALD 

r- wss —^ 



December 1, 1913. 



13 



WEST END 

HFRALD BRANCHi 
Herman Olson, IHnnaiser, isa« Went Superior Street. 



FORMER PASTOR AS 

CHIEF SPEAKER 



Wallin, R. Carroll, ^V'. Leonard, K. A. 
Franklin, Clust Carlson. Hagstrom. J. 
NjberK, A. Olson, A. Wieberg, A. Juten, 
Raih C. Leonard. Fred Olson, J. Peter- 
son, R. P. Jentoft and Mi^j Alexson. 

Swedish M. E. Notes. 



RINES ISj3 
CANDIDATE 



Rev. A. F. Elmqulst of Minneapolis 
raster of the Swellsh Bethany Luth- 
■ •ran church 

and Third street at the tiin-:; of Its ded- 
ication ten years aRO, will be the prin- 
rip«il speaker at the anniversary cele- 
bration planned for the church on Sat- 
urdJiy evening. The arrargements for 



The official board of the Swedish M. 
E. church will meet in the church 
Twenty-third avenue west I parlors this evening. 

■* i The Sunday school will hold re- 

hearsal for Us Christmas cantata in 
; the church tomorrow evening. 
I A reht-arsal will be held by the choir 
Wednesday evening. 

Mrs. M. Kron, 2521 West Second 
street, will entertain for the ladles' atd 
society at her homo Thursday after- 
noon. 

The confirmation class will meet 
Saturday morning with Rev. C. W. R. 
Wermine. 



Former Speaker^ o^f House 

Announces Hijj^elf for 

State Auditorship. 



NAMED BY 
THE PEOPLE 



F'fty years ago Rev. Father John 
O'Brien of Lowell, Mas.s.. recom- j 
men led to his parishioners and friends ' 
the prescription that restored him to 
h-*3lth and strength, so the people] 
named it Father. John's Medicine. It| 
cures colds, heals throat and lungs ; 
and build-i up the body. 

As a guarantee that the story of 
Father J«»hn's Medicine i-< absolutely 
true, the sum of $25.<XX).00 will be 
given to any charitable institution if 
it can be shown otherwise. 




West End Briefs. 



States His Position on Pub- 
lic Questions — !s Widely 
Favored. 



* 

m 
* 
The Westra Society of the P.ethany ^ 
Swedish Lutheran church will be on- i » 
tertained at the home of Mrs. Otto I * 
Halverson, 3814 West Third street. The I * 
hoste.ss will be assisted by her two * 
.sisters-in-law. Mrs. Peter Halverson^. 



RIMES' PLATFORM. 



* 
Keonomy in state Koveramrnt. * 
Rfduetlun iu uuiuber of Mtate 

departiuentN. 

i^uardiiiK the iirhool fund. ^ 

iMvextment of ntnte'-n truMt * 

fundM ill liome wecarltles aud sell- # 



Governor Eberhart, is making an ef- , 
fort to have the next meeting held in , 
SL Paul. ^^ I 

The delegates are Mrs. A. H. Bright, ; 
president of the state suffrage league; i 
Miss Norton. Miss Murphy and Mrs. I 
Gertrude Hunter of Minneapolis; Miss 
Theresa Peyton, pre.sident of the slate 
equal frinchi.se league; Mrs. George 
Kenyon and Mrs Lenora A. Hamlin 
of St. Paul, and Mrs. Julia B Nelson 
of Red Wing . 

tryWa 
new system 




The People's 
Handy ^ ^ 
Column ** 

t[With the approach of winter come thoughts of houseclean- 
Ing, when nis ny articles considered useless are sentenced to 
the'junk pile. Before executing the sentence, it will pay you 
to coiiiult the advertisements in The Herald "Repair" columns, 
where you wi: I find reliable repair firms, who can put the dam- 
aged articles :n first-class condition. 



t 



liiK of forclgu buiidtt. 



and Mrs. John Halverson. ' Tir inir n- ir -if -if itc -if ■*■*• ■^ ^ ■*■•*■*•*■ -^ ^ * *** ** * 

Mrs. Peter Olson, 1923 West First ^ if.tt^tt*^**^*^ ^'^*^**^^**** 

.street, will entertain Thursday aftor- ^ Henry Rlnes of Mora. Minn., today ^ 

announced himself as a candidate f or | 



ihe affair are being »nade by the Westra 
soci^ ty. 

An attractive program will be Slven 
in connection with the celebration. At 
the close of the program the women 
of the church will serve refreshments. 

The Bethanv Swedish Lutheran 
church was erected In ll»03. Its dedi- 
cation took place on Dec. G of that 
vear. The building cost the congrega- 
tion about $35,000. The church is one 
of the handsomest in the western 
of the city. 



noon for members of the Rebekuh 
Guild of St. Peter's Episcopal church. 

The Women's Home and Foreign 
Missionary Society of the tJrace M. E. 
church will be entertained Wednesday 
afternoon at the home of Mrs. James 
W. Preston. 2509 West Second street. 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermine will leave to- 
morrow for Two Harbors, where he j 
will conduct services tomorrow eve- I 
ning. ! 

The Allen Bible Class of the Grace | 
M. E. church. Twenty-second avenue i 
west and Third street, will hold Its i 
monthly social In the church parlors ■ 
Friday evening. A program is being 
arranged. 

Mi.ss Hulda Olson. 1823 West Supe- | 
rlor strtret. will entertain Friday eve- , 
ning at her home for members of the 
choir and young people of St. Peter's ' 
Epi.sc<n>fil church. 
I Miss Esther Segerman. 2208 West , 
F]ighth street, will entertain this eve- 
ning at a bundle shower in honor of 
Miss Lillian Johnson. 

For Sale — Oji monthly payments, lot 
near Twenty-third avenue west, 50 by 
110; price. $800. InQuire at St. Louis 
County State bank. 



the Republican nomination for the j 
office of state auditor, which will be j 
vacated next year by Samuel G. Iver- 
8on, already announced as a candidate 
for the Republican nomination for gov- 
ernor. The announcement of Mr. Rines 
haa been momentarily expected during 
the past week, so that while It come.s 
as no surprise. It haa the effect of 
clearing the atmosphere and letting 
those who favor him for the office 
know ofticially where they are at and 
permit them to act accordingly. 

Mr. Rines has for a ^ng time now 
been the subject of almoK-unanimously 
favorable comment in tffi pre^s of ihe 
state, and there does not; 8«em. at this 
time, to be much likelfljicipd of very 
serious opposition to hB|tt, •• Mr. Rines 



Probation Officer Frank Hicks is try- 
ing a system of paying fines on the 
Installment plan which he reports Is 
working out successfully. 

The police court Is working In conjunc- 
tion with Mr. Hicks and whenver he rec- 
ommends Installment paying of a fine, 
where it is the only way a prisoner 
has of making the payment io avoid 
going to Jail, the court permits it. 

"The plan is working out well," said 
Mr. Hicks this morning. 

This morning Thomas J. King. 48 
years old, was placed on the growing 
list of installment-fine payers. He 
was arrested Saturday afternoon by 
Officers Mnohan and Rlcketts on a 
charge of carrying a concealed weapon. 

He pleaded guilty in police court this 
morning and was fined $25 and costs 
or thirty days. 

Probation Officer Hicks had a short 
talk with King, after which the former 
recommended the Installment plan for 
the payment of King's fine. Judge ^ 
Cutting agreed and after King paid 
the court costs of $2, he was allowed 
to go on his promise to report once 
a month to Mr. Hicks and pay $1 
each week on the fine. 

Mr. Hicks has found the plan brings 
good rejults and proposes to reoom- 
r i mend its In every instance 
finds it will be justifiable. 



J^ Furnitu re and Pianos 
Qaj Refiiiished and 
IJtU Repaired. 

strictly high-grade work. Let me 
call and give you an estimate. 

THKO. TBLOMPSON, 
336 E. Superior St. Mel. 2828. 



Artistic Shoe Repairing 
Popular Prices. 

OREN^N'S 

Sr./hi/i>-lfrt//irArous'Dvunrm * 
123 West Superior Street. 





KEY. LOCK & SAFE WORKS 

Qun Repalrirg a Specialty. 

DULUTH GUN SHOP, 

aOS West I'^rst Street. 
Melrose 3469. Grand 2388-A 





Jos 



RMost com- 
epCt T picte shop In 
"^ the North- 

west. Mall 
Cq orders glvea 
O prompt 
attention. 
Meerschaums 
colored. 
Vanderyacht, lioarU of Trade Bld« 



where he 



APPROPRIATIONS 

FOR MINNESOTA 



Grassinger, the Tailor, 

Mulder of Good CloUies. Altering.' 

cleaning j 
and repair 
work done. 

211 West 

Superior 

Street. 

(Upstairs) 



iuinfll^ 




H. ODABASH, ^ 

Importer of 
ORTET^TAL Rl'GS. 

Repairing and Cleansin^t 
ai6H F.aat Superior St. 

Repairing and Clean inflf. 




end 



ASK COMMISSION 



TO ATTEND MEET 



FIRST MEETING 

OF NEW LODGE 




Lakeside lodge, U. D., Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, will hold Its 
flr<>t meeting this evening at the 
I Lakeside town hall. It is expected 
, , that between seventy-five and 100 

Members of the city commission ] Masons will be prei^ent at the affair, 
have be<-n invited to attend the meet- [ The new Masonic blue lodge recently 
Ing of the Fifth Ward Improvement ' received special dispensation from the 
club to be htld tomorrow evening at i Minnesota grand lodge to conduct its 
the Em*»rson school, Eleventli avenue i business and to confer the degrees of 
v.est and Third street. The meeting , the order. It Is expected that Its char- 
Is expected to bring out a large luem- , ter will be granted -within a few 
bf-rshlp of the organization. | weeks. 

A number of proposed Improvements ; The finst 



I ' 



Builds You Up 

Cures Colds, Bronchitis, 
Asthma, all throat and 
lung troubles. No alco- 
hol or dangerous drugs. 
Guaranteed. 



for the ward will be discussed. Among 
these will be Improvements for several 
streets on the hillside, the covering of 
Buckingham creek, street lighting and 
Bewers. The commissioners will be 
asked to give the chih members an Idta 
of what amount of thi.s w»»rlc can be 
accomplished during 1914. 

THREfWEDDINGS. 

Three weddings were performed by 
West end pastor;' Saturday afternoon. 

Miss Anna .Johnson and Axel W. 
Larson, both of Two Harbors, were 
married at the parsonage of the Sec- 
ond Presbyterian church, 21O0 West 
Second street. Rev. J. A. McC.aughey 
read the service. They left for a short 
wedding trip and will make their home 
at Two Harbors. 

Miss Ingrid Hay and Olaf Norman 
both of Cotton were married by Rev. 
Pwaney Nelson, pastor of the Swedish 
Baptist church, at the parsonage, 2212 
West Third street. They will reside 
i at Cotton. 

Rev. Carl G. Olson read the service."? 
for the wedding of Mis.s Agne.s M. 
I Peterson and Ernest E. Carlson. The 
I wedding took place at the pai'sonage, 
' 2305 West Third street. They will re- 
! side at 1007 tiarfield avenue. 

DIES OF BmGiTTS~DISEASE. 



officers of the new lodge 
are: James A. Robinson, worshipful 
mister; Jesse Norton, tienior warden; 
W. A. Hicken. junior warden; C. S. 
Palmer, secretary: Henry Bridgeman, 
treasurer; Thorwaid Hanson, senior 
deacon; Frank H. Hamm, junior dea- 
con; Frank Crassweller, senior stew- 
ard; S. E. Catherall, junior ^steward; 
P. M. Olson, first craftsman and E. B. 
Sutton, tyler. 



Special Sale. 



All our beautiful trays we put on 
sale at special prices for tomorrow 
only. 

EN'OEL.S' ART STORE. 
7-9 First Avenue West. 



MRS. LOVELAND IS 
FREED OF BLAME 



was speaker of the last;^h<i>use of rep- ] 
resentatives. and prove(JS;lilinself to be | 
an able executive and ^-member who 
has a good grasp of thft aftairs of the 
state. He is editor of tiid Mwa Times. 

Tho comments of theistni'- press in 
general Indicate a modt'' favorable be- 
lief in his capabilitlesi t^ fill the offico 
he seeks with honor ; to himself and 
benefit to the people of the state. Mr. 
Hlnes' announcenient fi^llows: 
Kino's Stutcnit-nt. 

"I have decided to beconie a candi- 
date for the Republican nomination for 
state auditor, and have made the neces- 
sary filing with the secretary of state. 
The auditor's office is one of the most 
important positions within the gift of 
tho people of this state, and in aspir- 
ing to this oftiice 1 fully, irealiiie and 
appreciate Its respon-sibiliiies and the 
opportunities afforded to give a public 
service of much value to the state. 

"Tho auditor is the state's account- 
ant; all slalms against tho estate must 
have his approval, and econonty and 
strict compliance with the law in ap- I 
proving claims should always be hia 1 
guiding motive. This policy, honestly ; 
pursued, has a wholesome effect and : 
curbs any disposition by slate depart- | 
ments to make needless expenditures, j 
Any other policy would tend to de- ! 
volop a disregard for the law's limita- ! 
tions and restrictions, and naturally 
would lead to extravagances, In the i 
verv nature of things the auditor 
should be the "watch dog" of the treas- 
ury. 

All Should \%'ork Togcether. 

"I believe that all state departments 
should work in harmony (With the leg- 
islature in an effort to keep down ex- | 
penses. In making appropriations tor 
the running of the state government 
the legislature must depend to a large i 
extent upon the recommendations of 
tho.^e whose duty it l.«rto administer the 
affairs of the state, and if these recom- , 
mendatlons are not based upon actual 



from The Her«U Waahiiidton Bureau. 
Washington. Dec. 1. — Estimates of 
appropriations for Minnesota projects 
submitted to congress today are as 
follows: 

Improvement of harbor at Agate bay, 
$D.00O. 

Mississippi river at the reservoir, 
$30,000. 

Completion of the high dam at Min- 
neapolis. $170,000. 

Warroad river and harbor, $2,000. 
Zippel bay, Lake of the Woods, $1,000. 
Red River of the North. $7,500. 
For public buildings, estimates of 
$13,500 for Moorhead; $23,000 for <.)wa- 
tonna, and $175,000 for Minneapolis are 
submitted. 

Estimates for the Minnesota Indian 
service include a provision for taking 
$185,000 from the Chippewa fund for 
the civilization and support of the 
tribe, of which $20,000 Is to be ex- 
i pended for the purchase of land for 
I the non-removal of Mllle Lacs Indian.?. 

Other estimates for Indians in Min- 
• nesota are: Pipestone school, $49,175; | 
1 support of Chippewas, §4,000; hospital ; 
' on lied Lake or Leech Lake reserva- 
I tion. $25,000; bridge across Missisaippi 
lriv<.r a*. Cass Lake, ?1,000. 



EXPFRT ' 

SKATE 

GRINDING 

Lock and Sf.fe Works and Gun 
Repairing. 
STKWART'S RKPAIR SHOP, 

18 N. Tlxird Ave. VT. Grand 3 11- A. 



Established 

in 

Duluth 

21 years. 



Reference- 
City 
National 
Bank. 



Key. 




428 West 




SHOPS: 



YOUR OLD 

SHOES MADE 

LIKE NEW. 

17 SECOND AXTC. W 
12 Fourth Ave W. 
10 First Ave. W. 




Jewelry and Watch Hospital, 




VERDICT FOR 

THE DEFENDANT 




E. C. Lange 
J. A. Herbert 

13 Lake 
Ave. North. 



Our upln>Uterlrig <1»- 
oartnieiit, clMu u a 
whittle- at your Joniiuid 
only llie most ou'i'p«t«iit 
mmi emiiIoyiMl Have our 
mui e»U aitii ^ve you 
asUmatss. 




MOTORCYCLE 

REPAIRING. 

Iiuliun Oil and Parts 

Get my fall price list 
of second-hand ma- 
chines — they are cheaper now thin in 
the spring. 

WALTER HOLMBERCi. Iu«liuii AgtMit, 
109 Eo^t Flr^t Stre>ot. 

Wucli for the 1914 iJeoi.-jo i;<iu(p In.llan. 



Box i!:)rlucs ai>'l hjilr 
matlxwiM cidiie to or- 
der; forlf »lyl«rt of 
tlcktiiff U) select fiom 
for a moderate charge 
tre will reiiorate your 
hair matirLrtrt aud re'utn 
Ik lA gijol as iww 




F. S. KELLY FURNITURE CO.. 

KcJly Builtiing, 17 and 19 West Superior St. 



A verdict for the defendant was re- 
turned this morning by a jurj' in Judge 
Dancer's divi.^ion of the district court 
in the per.=«onal Injury .suit brought by 
Jo.-^ephine Rothschild ag^ainst the Vir- 
ginia, Rainy Lake & VVinnipeg Rail- 
road company. 
.,r.«., nr^runi . Mrs. Rothschlld claimed, that while a 
., •.. ^?u^ ...)., Vt passenger from Duluth to Winnipeg on 

requlrement.s and necessities, the le.sult ' Canadian Northern train, she tripped 

i.s an added burden upon the taxpayers, r"- ^"'*"'» 

The auditor, because of his oft'lcial 
duties, becomes more familiar with the 




■^s. 



mi' 



Overhauling and 
repairing of auto- 
mobiles our spe- 
cially. Let us give 
you an estimate. 

MOOSE 
MOTOR CO. 

Orand and 56th 
Avenue* Wei*t. 




THIS IS A Cl'T OF A M<.)D- 
ERN NAILER USED iX MX. 
REPAIR SHOP. 

MY PRICES ARE RKiHT. 

CHRIS OLSEN, 

523 West Mithiifan Strei-t. 



flnance.'! of the state than any other 
state ofticial. If the state's money is 
being wasted through bad legislation 
approprlatlon.s 



he be- 



Portland, Or., Dec. 1. — Thirty sec- 
onds after a gruelling investlkjation 
extending over more than three hours, 

the coroner's Jury exonerated Mrs. i or unnecessary „„^ t h^^Hove 

Josephine Strickler-Loveland of all comes aware «JJ>}f ' J*^^^,f '^.^/„ ^^^^^.^il^ 
blame conected with the killing on he should make it ills dutj to ad^lsc 
Wednesday night of her husband. W. I the legislature of such evils in ordo 
A. Loveland, formerly of Duluth. | that they may be remedied. 

The Inquiry Into details of the kill- "I ara most lieartily '"/^v or of a re- 
Ing revealed the tale of the double ductlon In the number of our state de- 



ovor a piece of baggage, whlcli she al- | 
Icged, trainmen had carelessly left in i 
the aialo of a passenger coach and sus- 
tained injuries which she said had i 
left her a nervous wreck. The act- I 
dent, on whicli the suit is based, oc- 1 
curred on April 18, 1912. at Cook. Mrs. I 
Rothschild claimed that the coach was 
dimlv lighted and that while she was 
walking in the aisle the train gave a : 



Carl Sundbcrg. 31 years old. 4632 
West Third street, died Saturday at 
the Duluth hospital following an at- ; 
tack of acute Brlght's disease. Mr. 
.Sundberg was taken to the Institution | 
on Friday and survived the illness 
only twenty-four hours. He leaves a j 
widow and five small children. 

The funeral will be held tomorrow i 
afternoon at 2 o'clock from liethany ; 
Swedish Lutheran church. Twenty- 
third avenue west and Third street. 
Rev. Carl d. Olson will officiate. In- 
terment will be made in the Lvitheran 
cemetery. 



Father John's Medicine is for sale 
in DiiUith by William .\. Abbett. 205 | 
West Superior street, lUl West 
Fourth street. 932 East Second street. I 
aUo Boyce Druij Store, 331 West Su- j 
perior street; Wirth Druy Store, 13 1 
West Superior street, and practically! 

all other drug st..res in the city. If, ^^^ ScandlnaTil^T 
you have any ditficulty in getting ^ ventlst congregAtton 
Father Joim s Medicine from your 
drua:gi3t, write to Father John'3 
Medicine, Lowell, Mass., enclosinpr $1 
for a large bottle by express, prepaid. 



ADVENTISTS HAVE 

BAPTISMAL SERVICE. 



elopement of Loveland and Mrs. 3trlck- 
ler from their Minneapolis homej seven 
years ago. Just before the close Mrs. 
Loveland collap.sed. 

"Accidentally Inllictcd." the Jury de- 
clared the fatal wound to be; they held 
that Mrs. Loveland was "not crimln.illy 
responsible," and they further "acquit- 
ted her from all blame." The Jurymen 
after giving their verdict clustered 
about the weeping woman and con- 
gratulated her. Deputy District 
torney Collier, overwhelmed by 
sentiment displayed, immediately de- 
clarel her free, and she was taken to 
the liome of friends. 



OBITUARY 



FORM LETTERS 

Written, revised, primed, addressed, 
sjaled, mailed — they get the busl- 
ne-ss. Mailing list.s. Agents for 
The Tablet <fe Ticket Cu. Labels. 
(4,00a shapes). Hat Initials, price 
tickets, paper letters, advertising 
rovelties. etc.. etc. 



THE DULUTH LETTER SHOP 



ao?*-» I'ro vide nee Bldg. 

11. H. Wetzler. Mgr. 
Grand. 516. Melrose, 



516. 



Seventh Day Ad- 
held a baptismal 
service Saturday in their church, 
Twent.v-third avenue west and Fourth 
street. Four ministers performed the 
ceremonies. They were, besides A. W. 
Erlckson. pastor of the church, Mr. 
Edvardsen and P. Sorensen from Su- 
perior and (). Akre from Two Harbors. 
Mr. E<lvardsen spoke on the subject. 
"The Old Adam Dead and the New Life 
in Chri.st." 

After the sermon the candidates were 
questioned. Then they were baptized 
by Immersion. Twelve new believers, 
all adults, were thus baptized by two 
of the ministers. The song. "Just as 
I Am, Without One Plea." was sung 
as the candidates walked into the 
water. 



Hibbard tiarrett, son of William A. 
(;nrrett. president of the Chicago 
Oreat Western railroad, died In a hos- 
pital in Philadelphia, Nov. 20 of heart 
disease. The boy's fath.-r and mother, 
who made a record run from 
burg to Aboona In a special 
were at his bedside. Young 
was a student at Haverford 



Pltts- 
traln, 
(Jarrett 
college. 



E^d^vard I-. r.^nipboll, 81 years old. 
lieutenant colon.-l and Judg.- advocate 
on the staff of (ien. Meade In the Civil 
vvar was found dead in his home in 
Trinidad. Colo.. Nov. 29. Heart dis- 
ease is thought to have been the 
cause. 



Hoopes-Kohagen Company 

1110 EA.it fourth »»ree*. T-room howse $30.00 

14 M F,j.-.t Superior street, 10 room flat, 

,: i,.r.i 50.00 

A-siitibulA T?traoe. G- room Hat, modern 3.'.. 00 

4:.. MesalM iive:!ue, four rooRM 13. "^ 

♦ iO Tweniieth a»«ii'i« weat. 6-ri><>ra hoiue. . 13.00 

72" Fiist K'unli atnet, f lur room.-* 10.00 

4ti{ fJiUlat* sti-w:. T-room l!)U-i«» 18. iW 

Wi»'aii<l flaw. 1-room mojern flats, 

M'tfiin !i»«t, electrtu lltfUt. water aad 



17. Oi] 



STORES. 

5:3 lAkJ aveiiue souUj 

IS 10 W«»t Mii;hirfii: *tre*t and room*.. 

Zli tAke aveutM wuih 30.00 



30. OA 

75.0') 



CHICHESTER S PILLS 



MT. *»ny or your ^ 

WlAlloND MUANU PlU-f*. for «», 

yeir.knjrtnuEot.Sifeit.AlwiysRellibl* 

SOLDBYO«UOG!STSEVERYWHE«I 




Swedish Mission Notes. 

The Parthenoe society of the Sw»dl.-h 
Mission church. Twenty-first avenue ^ 
west and Second street, will meet in 
the church \\ ednesday afternoon. The 
hostesses will be Mrs. L. N. Johnson I 
and Mrs. O. I.,lndstrand. 

The Men's Welfare league will meet ' 
in the church Wednesday evening. "The ; 
! History of the United .state.s" will be 
I the subject discussed with Carl Staky 
as leader. 

1 The Ladles' Aid society will be en- 
' tertained Thursday afternoon at the 
■church. Mrs. Charles Johnson and Mrs. 
, Adolph Johnson will be hostesses. 
I A joint concert given by the choirs of 
I the Swedish l?aptist. Swedish Metho- 
I dist and Swedish Mission churches will 
be held Thuraday evening in the 
; church. Tlie money realized will bo 
used for the purchase of a vault at the 
Union cemetery at Hermantown. 
^ 

Swedish Baptist Notes. 

The board of deacons of the Swedish 
Baptist church. Twenty-.'^econd avenue 
west aud Third street, will meet this 
evening at the homo of the pastor. Uev. 
Swaney Nelson. 2212 West Third street. 

I The congregation will hold its 

'monthly business meeting in the church 

'parlors tomorrow evening. 

; The Young Ladies' society of the 
church has planned a concert and social 

I to be given in the church parlors 1 rl- 

I day evening. 

1 • 

Surprised By Friends. 

Mrs. Victor Juten. 2716 West Fourth 

street, was pleasantly surprised Saiur- 

i <iay afternoon by a number of her 

1 friends lu honor of her birthday. Music 

and game.-^ formed the entertainment. 

' I'iio guestd wer^: Mesdaui«a J. A, 



William J. Smith, brevet brigadier 
general of th- Union '^'■my. was strick- 
en with heart disease and died In the 
street in Memphis. Tenn., Nov. 29. He 
wafa veteran of the Mexican war a 
member from Tennessee of the f ".rty- 
tlrst congress and at his aeatli was 
Hresldent of a Memphis bank. He was 
90 years old. 

Howe Clark, 

of the nav.v. 



Rfar Admiral John 

fnrni.T medical director 

form. ")^^^^^^^ N. H., Dec. 1 from 

He was 76 years old. 



died in 
paralysis. 

Woman I« Suicide. .„.,„, 
Albany Mo.. Dec. 1.— Mrs. "W lHani 
r Hudson of Anadarko Okla. wife of 
i' former banker of Anadarko. shot 
nnd killed herself at the home of her 
father. No cause was given for her 

act. 

IverMon Fllen. 

St Paul, Minn.. Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— State Auditor Iverson 
7oday formally filed as candidate for 
Republican nomination for governor 
He announced his candidacy several 
weeks ago. 

Dnke of Connauprht Robbed. 

T ondon Dec 1.— The London police, 
it has become known, are searching 
for a Quanity of valuable jewelry 
which is missing from the residence 
of the duke of Connaught, the gov- 
ernor general of Canada. 

CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 

Bears the 
Siimature of 



sudden lurch which caused her to 
stumble over some baggage which she 

- - ^ „ ... ,f ^v,,, „,„* claimed blocked her passage. In failing 

partments and bureaus; but li tn« n 
legislature should fail to do its d 
In that regard. It should not pre 
the various departments from being 
conducted upon an economical and 
businesslike basis. i 

Ha* Miiffh E.'Kpertenre. I 

"My only claim to .support for this | 
office is my experience in the public 
service This consists of ten years as i 
coimty auditor of Kanabec county,' 
At- I four terms as a member of the legiela- ' 
the' ture and as speaker of tho house dur- ] 
ing the 1918 session. I believe that my 
legislative record will show that 1 
stood for what was for the best Inter- • 
ests of the state and that 1 have con- 
sistently opposed extravagant and un- 
necessary expenditures of money. If 
elected state auditor. I shall under- ; 
take to carry out the .same policy 
which was adopted In th<> organization | 
of the 1913 house: viz; The elimina- , 
tion of needless expense. The carrying 
out of this policy resulted In cutting 
I down the running expenses of the , 
I house to $47,000 (excluding member i 
' salaries and mileage which are fixed j 
'sums) as compared with • ' V". ..I A°/ ' 
the 1911 session, a reduction of JJ4,000. 
or more than one-third. 

"The state's magnltlcent gchool fund 
is a source of pride and sati.sfactlon to 
our citizens. This fund is growing 
rapidly and its ultimate proportions 
will depend to a great extent upon 
the manner In which the remaining 
state lands and mineral properties are 
managed. The future policy of the 
fctate in this respect Is a problem which 
the legislature and the people must 
settle but no policy should be adopted 
which will retard the development of 
tlie state's lands, or which will fail to ] 
bring to the school fund full value for; 
tJie state's holdings. Any official hav- . 
ing in charge the administration of the | 
state's lands should consider his trust 
a sacred one an<i guard well the 
state's Interests. 

Favorn Home Serurlticn. 
"I believe that all the state's trust 
funds should be Invested in home se- 
curities. Hy so doing the development 
of the state Is promoted, communities 
borrowing state funds secure a lower 
rate of interest and th'* amount paid 
out In Interest is kept at home to be 
returned to the people through the an- 
nual school apportionment. All for- 
eign bonds nn-v owned by the state 
should be sold as soon as possible, hav- 
ing regard to the provisions of the 
state Constitution which provides that 
the principal of state funds shall for- 
ever be preserved and remain Inviolate. 
This prevents the sale of such bonds 
for less than the an^^ont originally 
\ paid for them. , / 

"In conclusion I waa± to state that 
If chosen to fill the ofBt*P^f state au- 
ditor I shall give my^best efforts to 
the duties of the office, ^^ will be my 
endeavor to give the state a clean, 
honest and businesslike administra- 
tion. And with that purpose in mind | suffering from 
I place my candidacy .^i *-»>^,.^.a!?<^s_of , ^^.^,^,^1^ ^^at we are agents for the 



The Dtiluth Artificial 
Limb House, 

Inventors and Manufacturers of 
the Factis Cushion Socket Limbs 
and Felten Feet. t3 First Ave. 
Kast, Duluth, Miun. 



" *|claimed blocked her passage. In 
J,,;., she struck against a seat, 
vent '^^^^ plaintlft sued for $15,5. 

STATE BOARDIBUYS 
FORESTRY PAPER 



St. Paul. Minn.. Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The state investment 
board today purchased from the state 
forestry board $125,000 in certificates 
of indebtedness bearing 4 per cent in- 
terest, the money to be used for the ! 
acquisition of land in the Itasca state I 
park at the headwaters of the Mis- , 
sississippl river. The last legislature 
authorized the purchase of this land 
by the issuance of the certificates. 

Because of the condition of the 
money market it was found impossible 
to float 4 per cent securities at par, 
and so the investment board was ap- 
pealed to for relief. 

The board also authorized the pay- 
ment of $45,000 In school loans. Ex- 
celsior getting $10,000 of this amount 
for a new building. 

PLAY TODEPicf~ 

L IFE OF BEILISS. 

rdwar.l Pernard and his company of 
Jewish players will present 'The 
Jewls-h Martyr," a play based on the 
life story of Mendel Beiliss, who was 
recently acquitted in the courts of 
Kiev, liussia, on a charge of ritual 




Conie in here 
to have your 
clothes dry 
cleaned, 
ircised or re- 
paired. 




HE'S HAPPY— He hu i 
luit had his »td ilmmy ! 
Qiy* repaired at 

GUS* SHOP, ; 

Corner Fifth Avenue W. 
and Superior street. | 

Rubber. Celluloid. Horn : 
and Amber Stems: aisc 

Bowls for I'^lahsiili. 
Cla> or Meerschaum. 




New York Feather 
Dyer. 

Feathers dyed, cleaned, cur'.^d, n 

modeled in fancy de.'dgns; work e':ar- 

:.nteed. 13 West Set-ond St. Grand 



re- 



iuteed. 
343-A. 




JOHN R. 



HALL CLOCKS 

English, Swiss, Fren.li. 

Also Muj^Ic Boxes 

Repaired. 

30 years' experience. 

Have repaired the beat 

clock.s in Duluth. 

Old phone, Lakeside, 

300-:.v. Work called for 

ind delivered. 

HAWfLIN'S. JOHX R. 



If a man wrl>f> a 
better Ijotk. iireacli .i 
tK-tfer henii'iii, nialti' 
a Ijett^r mo'.i.ie trap 
than l.U uet«hi>ir— 
eveu though he 'julld 
hU hou5e m the 
woods — the world 
wui make a bealett 
path to Uin door. 

HAWKINS. 



Complicated 
Watclies. Ameri- 
can, Swi.ss, 
French and Enp 

lish Clocks 

Repaired by tho 

latest perfected 

factory process. 

Personal 

i .\ttenilon. 

JOHN' R. HAWKINS. 




Shoe Repairing 

Both hand and machine 
work. Our method of com- 
bining both proves 
satisfactory. Let us 
do your woriv. 

Chris Olsei, 

523 W. Michigan St. 




CAN YOU DO 
REPAIRING? 

Have you some special line of 
repairing that you are an e.-^pert 
at? If so, you should have a card 
in this column. 



jurj' will be 
the trial. 



kep: together throughout 



Kiev, Hussia, on a cnarg*. ui muai «_ 

murder, at the Lyceum theater next . j t () t r^) l c»*»»i i ;)K) i f ;iiJ»»* »J i c»t»**** ^*^ 
Sunday evening. The play is regarded **^^'*^*^^^^^''^'^^'^ "^ ^ 



as a sensation, and in five acts depicts \ * 
the life of Beiliss. together with the | ^ 
recent trial. In the afternoon the , ^ 
companv will present a musical play. : 
with songs and dances. The local en- 
gagement will be made under the 
management of L. Kantor. 



DILITTH VIi:WS TO ^„„,^.„ 
CO TO GERMAN \. 



* 



JURY COMPLETED 
FOR CRAIG'S TRIAL 



wa.=< completed today to try William 
B Craig for the murder of Dr. Helen 
Knabe. All but one are farmers. The 



LOCAL DRUGGIST SAYS: 
TAKE ONLY ONE DOSE ' 



««1 



We want to 



* 

* 

* 

* 

*■ 



J s. Van rieef, InMtrartor in 
the Duluth nwrmal Nohool, now 
HtudylDK Keo»,raph> In belpMe. 
(;ermany, has wTltt«^n to thin clt> 
UKklng for .•» panoramic picture of 
Duluth to hang In the Mcnlor ge- 
ography room at the university 
which he U altendlng. 

O. D. McCarthy, awmlwtant kicc- 
retary of th« Commercial club, 
who ha« the communication, In 
arranging to Hcnd a Iour panor- 
amic photograph of Duluth taken 
from the houl«v.ird. Mr. A an CIccf 
han roaucHted for some photo- 
graphn of vaHoun Iron mine* on 
the range, uluo. 

In hl» Icttei Mr. Van Clccf said 
that the ticrnan profcusor!* are 
much IntercJ ted In the geo- 
graphical conditions of Duluth 
and the Murrt'Undlng couutry. 



I 



sibly some snow over the extr-rne 
northern districts. Generally fair 
weather will follow for a day or so 
after that, but the eastward movem>mt 
of another marked disturbance now 
over Arizona probably will be att<=-nded 
by ra'ns over the southern and rains 
and snows over the northern districts 
from the Rocky mountains eastward, 
beginning about Monday mornintf 
along the eastern slope of the moun- 
tains, reaching through the plains 
states into the central valleys and the 
upper lake region about the middle of 
the week, and the lower lake region 
and the eastern states about Thurs- 
day and Fridav. This disturbance will 
be followed by fair and colder we.-ith- 
er that will reach the central valleys 
after the middle of the week and th« 
eastern stales by the end <.f the week." 



tell tho-se 
stomach 



in 
or 



Duluth 
bowel 



*^MHNt^NHHt^ »^MH|^^ ^^ 



the citizens of this state, asking only 
their candid and mature judgment In 
considering my claims for support." 




ASK SUFFRAGISTS TO 

MEET ll^Sf . PAUL 



From Th« Htrald Was 
Washington. Dec. 1.-^ 
Herald.) — The Minnes 
the national suffra'^e 



Buraau. 

rial to The 

legation to \ ^' 

convention. 



simple mixture of buckthorn bark, ; 

glycerine, etc., known as Adler-i-ka, ! 

the remedy which became famous by 

curing appendicitis. This is the most 
I thorough bowel cleanser known and , 
I JUST ONE DOSE relieves sour atoni- 

nch gas on the stomach end constipa- i 
! Uou almost IMMEDIATELY. You 
lll'be surprised at the QUICK action 

of Adlor-i-ka. W. A. Abbett, drug- 



THIS WEEKS WEATHER 



the national sunraKt- e..iivfin,i..u. "- --- j,- a* <Siii»rtrior street, 
backed by an official iuvitaUoa from gist, 20». .VS est Superior street. 



Washington. Oec. 1. — Another week 
of bad weather is ahead for the east- 
ern part of the country, according to 
to the weather bureau. 

"The eastwarl movement of a dis- 
turbance now over the lower Arkan- 
sas valley" the weekly bulletin says, 
-will result in a continuance of 
unsettled, rainj- weather during 
early days of the week over the east 
eru half o£ the couutry, with poa 



the 
the 



JEWELRY 

Of Rare Quality 

makes the better and m'>re 
acceptable Christmas gift. 

You will find what you are 
looking for at 

T. E. Relnharfs 




■I DEFECTIV E PAGE 

— I FT 1 r 



«c«c 



■^r- 



■^ -r^ 



i 



December 1, 1913. 



- \ 




AN OLD PRESCRIPTION 
FOR THIN, WEAK BLOOD 



EVELETH PAYS 
LASTJRIBUTE 

Edwin Anderson, Who Was 

Drowned, Buried With 

Military Honors. 



the Ely schools, and well known so- 
rially, while Mr. Anderson has for sev- 
eral years been connected with the 
Dulutli & Iron Rang-e railroad. After 
a short bridal tour they will make 
their home in P^mbarrass during the 
winter, where Mr. Anderson is sla- 
tioned since the clcse of the ore ship- 
ping season. 

DULUTH GIRL IS^ 
ELY HONOR GUEST 



Church Unable to Accom- 
modate Throng Anxious 
to Attend Last Rites. 



Evelrth. Minn.. D*c. 1.— (.Special to 
Th.' Herald.)— The funeral of Ediviii 
Arder.'^on. the young man who was 
drowned Thursday in a small lake 
Kbout rlfteen miles south of Eveleth, 
was held .Sunday afternoon from the 
Methodist church. The sermon was 
»„ea. hed by the pastor. Rev. O. D. 
Cannon, and Rev. P. A. Schwarz read 
from the Scriptures. Comi-any F. Third 
regiment, M. X. «I.. attended in a 
b..dv and performed the regulation 
militarv service at the grave, young 
Mr. Anderson having 
in the company 
to capacity, 
n»ore were 



l>een a sergeant 
The church was ttlled 
and more th«n as many 
unable to gain entrance. 
The tloral tributes were profuse and 
Miv beautiful. 

I'he vovii.g man, who for the past 
two years had been a letter carrur in 
the emphv i.f the local postoffice, wa:= 
th*- .-ion of C'hurles Anderson and a 
^roth»•^ of Harry Ander.«on. another 
letter carrier. Uc grew from a :Mnan 
bov to manhood in Eveleth and grad- 
uated from the loral higii sci.ool. 
tH\r-m Aid to StranKer. 

Andcr.«on and Eouis Amlrews were 
rKrnpir.g ai the lake, from which poiut 
thiy had betn hunting for several 
,Jhv< It was late in the afternoon, 
and the boys ha<l come Into <amp for 
the dav. when a man came up to 
door. The stranger wanted to go 
tump on the other side of the 
and being .somewhat under the 
ence of liqu(jr, he had become 



Mrs. Charles Roland Enter- 
tains for Miss Myrtle 
Johnson, 

Tower, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Charles Roland en- 
tertained about twenty-flve young peo- 
ple at her home Saturday evening, in 
honor of Miss Myrtle Johnson of Du- 
luth. The rooms were prettily deco- 
rated in pink and green. Pink carna- 
tions and ferns were used as a center- 
piece. A delightful lunch was indulged 
in, each couple helping themselves. 
Couples were decided by matching 
turkeys. 

Those present were: Messrs. and 
Mesdames William Pryor and Charles 
Roland. The out-of-town guests were: 
Misses Elsie and Luclle Shepherd of 
Whitewater, Wis., Myrtle Johnson of 
r>uluth, Ida Hilder of Gilbert. Other 
guests were: Misses Esther Strand, 
I.ngenla Jeffery, Blanch St. Vlnpent, 
Ethel Burgess, Esther Lofgren, Ina 
Lott, Elsie Howe, Helene and Jeanne 
Uallieu; Messrs. Herman and Albert 
(tlson. Axel Lofgren, John and Arthur 
Naslund. Reuben Johnson, Harvey Gor- 
don. Albin Kogelberg and Merrlt Helm. 

The Misses Alberta and Mlntie Kitto 
spent their Thank.-^glving vacation vis- 
iting friends in Ely. 



DiSTRfCT COURT 

TO OPEN TUESDAY 



Grand 



to 



NEW FEATURES OF 
EDUCATIONAL MEET 



their 

to a 

lake, 

Inilu- 

Icat. 

Fearing that some accident might be- ' 
fall him, young And-r.son decided to | 
talve the man around the lake to the i 
homesteaders h.>u.-e on the other side. | 
He reached his destination safely, but j 
before he .--tarted out again c.n his re- | 
ttirn trip tlarkn^ss had cipint upon hini. i 
So lie lit his little miner's lamp and \ 
I.rocccded around the lake again, in- i 
tending to rt trace his previous steps. 
Loui.o Andrew.* in the meantime waited i 
«t the Mj.rtinovich house, where the ^ 
bov»> were slopping, for the appearanott ; 
<.f Anderson's li^'ht, which he felt sure j 
l.e w««ulil use. The light appeared, and 
to aid Anderson In fiiuling the house, 
Andrews lit another lamp and went 
cut on the k-ke shore. Anderson's light 
had by this time disappeared. Andrews I 
wfis anxlt)us. He g.l his gun and tirei/ 
several shots; he also shouted and got I 
no response. He waited several hours , 
in vain tor the coming of his partner, j 
Knd aroused some other men in the 
hou.se and with them walked around the 
lake to the house where Anderson had 
tune. There he f<.und. as he feared, 
tliat Andf rson had left the place. An- i Admlni.straiion 
dr<ws a!id the other men stayed up the 
rcsi of the night and went to neigh- 
t>oring houses in search <t the missing 
but all in vain. At the liist 
of dawn they started out around 
Inke shore In the direction taken 
the mis.-^ing man. 

Fouii«l ilule 111 Icr. 
About a Quarter of a mile from tne 
place and about lOO fett from the shore 

In the lake they ditcovered a hole In 

the l<-e. and beside the hole lay Ander- 
son's cap, mute evidence of the sad 

talf. Thev knew that the young man's 

' v mun be at the bottom. His 
;>rii!ion ru.^hed to the farm of John 

I . i.;iut^ and gave the alarm, and Mr. 

Tekautz drove him Into Eveleth, whero 

he secured a party of men, tilling tlve 

automobiles, to go out to recover the 

bodv. His militia comrades, Lieut. 

Jenkins, V. W. Cartrlght and Lloyd 

Morrison, in a boat secured near by, 

found the body with a grappling hook 

after working about a half hour. 

I>eath apparently was due to exhaus- 
tion and the cold, there being no water 

In the lungs; and the hole, tilled with 

small pieces of ice and enlarged to 

about ten feet In diameter. Indicated 

that the young man, who was a good 

ewimmer, hail put up a desperate 

struggle for his life. 



Hibbing School Head An- 
nounces Speakers at Min- 
neapolis Gathering. 



and Petit Juries 
Be Busy at 
Virginia. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The December term of 
the district court will open here 
Tuesday at 11 a. m. There are about 
twenty matters to come before the 
grand jury for Investigation, the 
charges against the accused ranging 
from manslaughter to grand larceny. 

Among those held to the grand Jury 
Is Louis Cloon of this city, the charge 
! against him being manslaughter in 
j shooting and fatally wounding a 
1 miner near Gld Mesaba. two weeks 
I ago today, mistaking him for a deer. 
I The usual number of blind-pig cases 
j will come up for Investigation. There 
I are two cases of first degree assault, 
two of third degree assault and one 
' «>f Indecent assault. It Is not antlcl- 
' pated that the grand jury's deliber- 
I atlons will require much more than 
! two days. 

One Murder Trial. 
The criminal calendar Is expected 
to take up considerable time for trial 
as there are many important cases 
upon it. The most important is that 
of the State vs. Lazo Evlch, who was 
Indicted by the grand jury at Hibbing 
on a charge of murder in the tirst de- 
gree. Evlch is charged with having 
stabbed Dan Rukavlna to death at a 
blind-pig at Buhl on Pec. 12. 11H2. 
during a quarrel following a drlnklnii 
bout. He has retained Former County 
Attorney John H. Norton of Duluth 
and It Is understood his defense Is t<) 
be that he was attacked by Rukavlna 
with murderous Intent and that he 
was merely defending himself. 

The civil calendar Is a heavy one, 
there being a total of fifty-two 
Mf these 34 were continued 
last term and 18 are new 
this number 31 will be 
and 13 by the court 
nine divorce actions 
the term. 

tirantl and Petit 
The grand jurors w 
subpoenaed are M. E. 
drew Hawkinson, John 
ginla; S. K. Helps. J 
W. P. Chlnn, 




Williams' Pink Tills Purify 
Build Up the Life Stream. 



and 



If 
the 



your Mood is not fortified against 
multitude of disease germs that 
surround us, you risk benig a prey to 
sickness. You may not be able to 
put in a good day's work without a 
constant feeling of exhaustion. 

A simple, safe and effective blood 
tonic is found in Dr. Williams' Pink 
Pills. They supply the needed ma- 
terial to increase the number of red 
corpuscles In the blood — those little 
agents that keep up the needed re- 
serve strength. With your blood in 
perfect condition you will be able to 
ward off headaches, stomach trouble, 
"tired feeling" and lack of ambition. 

Sickness ;s unnatural. It is easier to 
keep well than to cure illness. Get 
out of the sick cla.=s by building up 
your blood through the use of the 
old-time and well-known blood tonic. 
Dr. William.s' Pink Pills. Get a pack- 
age today from any druggist. Use 
them regularly, according to direc- 
tions, and in a short time you will 
note a marked improvement in your 
general physical condition. 



FORECAST TILL 
TLKSDAY 

For Duluih. Huperinr ajid vlrinlty. 

Ini-liidtiig the Meeuba and Veriuilton 

iruii raiiges: Cloudy wciitlier toiiiElit 

■nd Tiieetlay with iiroliably Ug'.n 

rsln or siiow nunrlw: KlUrlii dm iiics 

in temr>€rat'jre; liclit ;o moderate 

ulnd., m,stly ea-Merly. EXIM.ANAT.ORY NOTES. 

ObttrralloM Uk.a at 8 ^ m-, M*f »tj-tab nchdiui lime. Air prmsurv ttdutcd lo lex lerel ^bCB*^.^ (< cbIiluoob lincV) {•a«s ibrou^ points ofcquil air jre^surc. 
pus through poiaU of e^tULj Jeaip«r»tuJ»; drawn oolj for ttn, tntiitig, SO*,\cd l6V , O <■'*". Q p^llj tlouHy; % >!uudjr, R ralo; 

tbc wind Firat tguit* KBp}'*''"*. •♦eonJ, precipitation of V ">^^ '" ""'K tor past 24 hiiur- third, fr:a>iiuuiu mud 'il miiv. 

I ll.il ~ = 



cases, 
from the 
cases. Of 
tried by Jury 
There are al.so 
to come up at 



A. 

Gilbert; 
George V. Heathcote, Joseph 
terson, Robert A. Clark, Nels 



Hibbing. Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald. )-S-Herbert Blair, local 
school superintendent, who went to , 
Minneapolis Friday to attend the I 
meeting to prepare a program for the 
session of the state superintendents i 
to be held In Minneapolis, March 23 i 
to 28, returned today and announces 
the program for the short course, a 
new feature of the meeting. Mr. Blair, 
who heads the department of super- 
intendents of the State Educational • 
association, announces that plans are i 
on foot to have some expert:-i in that 
partlctilar class of work on hand and I 
he anticipates much interest will be 
evinced bj' superintendents and edu- ! 
cators generally. 

The following have been Invited to ' 
speak: i 

Dr. Lichter AVittner. University of | 
I'enns'. Ivania. "Mental Rccardation." 

Dr. "L. D. Coffnan, University of 11- I 
llnols, "School Supervision." i 

Dr. C. A. Prosser of Xew York, sec- I 7; ri , _ ii,^„, w^- 

retary of the National Society for the COfOner S JUrV Unable 10 r 3X110111 Ver- 
Promotion of Industrial Education, 



.Jurorn. 

10 have been 
Fanning, An- 
tJill, Sr., Vlr- 
Itobb, Evele*h; 
SI vert Brendo. 
R. Pat- 
A. Clau- 
sen, C. A. Brltts, W. W. Bradley, J. E. 
Horak, Alfred Holm, Leonard Hed- 
berg R. B. Odell. B. J. Toben, John 
Tayler. Edward Thorstad, E. H. Pugl>, 
Emll Olson, I. S. Moore. Duluth. 

The petit jurors are Isaac \ anuofii- 
lln, Jacob Johnson, Virginia: L.M. 
JUtrkhart. Angora: Tollf T Mykclbye. 
Thomas McArthur, Alborn; I'eter LUja, 
Erick Llnd. Ezra E. Clemons, John A. 
Bovle. F. F. Leach, Ber.thardt Brader- 
son. William H. Luhm. Hans O. Holm. 
Daniel Falconer, David H. ( lough II. 
B Knox. C. W. Holmes. Roland <^iem- 
ot'is. John Llnd, Myron T. Sayer, J. l>. 
Hollihan. S. H. Howe. James 9 Lynn, 
lohn D. Boufford. Robert C. Mitchell. 
William Holm. R. G. Chamber.s Hans 
Brakstad. Paul Morneau, John M. Lil- 
Jander, Duluth. 




The weather 
man is making a 
little too good on 
his predictions of 
cloudy weather 
with rain or snow 
flurries. and he 
again hands that 
brand of predic- 
tion out for to- 
and tomor- 
A year ago 
there was 



I 'I'uesdav; colder in east portion t>j 

! night. 

I Minnesota — Unsettled weather tn- 

I night and Tue.-day, probably rain it; 
south portion tonight; somewhat cold- 
er Tuesday and In west ptrtion to- 
night. . ^ , 
Iowa — Occasional rain tonight and 
probably Tuesday; somewhat colder in 
north portion Tuesday. 



at 7:31 
at 4:21 
and forty- 
following 
weather condl- 



ANDERSON BURIED. 



night 

row. 

today 

snow. 
The sun rose this morning 
and will set this afternoon 
o'clock, giving eight hours 
seven minutes of sunlight. 
Mr. Richardson has the 
comment to make on 

"'Ditrlng the last twenty-four to for- j 
ty-eight hours rains fell over the lake 
region and Central valley states and 1 
light snow or rain over Colorado, A\>- 
oming, Utah and Arizona. Somewhat , 
colder weather prevails in British Co- , 
lumbla. Alberta. ^««katchewan Nor h- 
ern Montana and Northwestern .Nt.ith 
Dakota; in most districts to the ea.st- 
ward of the Rocky mountains -tem- 
D^ratures continue above the normal. 
No winds of any consequence ^'^Y"^*! 
in the lake region since Satuida> 
morn ng. Many reports are missing 
on account of inability of the AN est- 
ern Union to furnish adqimte wire 
service." 

General Foreoa«t»i. 

Ch.lcago, Dec. 1. —Forecasts for 
the twenty-four hours, ending at 7 p. 
m. Tuesday: 

Upper Michigan — Rain or snow to- 
night; Tuesday 



TrntperaturoN. 

Following were the high-st temper-' 
atures for the la.-!t twenty-four hours 
and the lowest for the la.st twelve, 
ending at 7 a. m.: 

HlKii Low I Mleh lx>w 



of Industrial 

Vocational I'd uc a Hon." 

Dr. David Sneddan. commissioner of 

education of Massachusetts, ".School 



man, 
J. ip 

tiu 
by 



ELY BOASTS OF 

MUCH BUILDING 



niilion Man's Death. 

Tower, Minn.. Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The coroner's Jury em- 
panelled by Dr. R. L. Barns found 
that Carl Anderson came to his death 
by a shot from a weapon In the hands 
of some person unknown. The funeral 
of Anderson was held Friday after- 
noon. Many friends followed the re- 
mains to the cemetery. 



to- 

occa- 
tempera- 



or snow 
unsettled. 

Wisconsin. — Unsettled weather 
night and Tuesday, probably 
sional rain; somewhat lower 
ture Tuesday. ,, - , * 

North Dakota — Generally fair to- 
night and Tuesday; colder tonight. 

South Dakota— Unsettled Aveaiher 
ttmlght and Tue.?day, probably snow 
flurries; somewhat lower temperatures 
tonight. 

Montana — Generally 



fair tonight and I 



.\bilene 

.M|)«ia 

Itattltford .... 

3<i«mMrck 

lloise 

Bcston , 

Itiitfalo 

r?. i ro 

Calgary 

iTwrluvtoii ... 

Chli-agi) 

Coiiionlla 
Peveiiixirt 

lieiiter 

I)t^ .Mollies .. 
Ucrils Lake . . 

1 Xxlge 

I>iit'u(i\ie .... 
DULUTH .... 
Kdmt iilPii 
Ksoaiial)a . . . . 
Fort isniith . . 
<;alt€-«-ti'!i — 
Uraiid JIaveii. 
Cirt-en Bay . . . 

Havre 

llfrlei.a 

UouBliton 

Uiirun 

ImllaiispoUs . 
Jaik'cnNlile .. 
Kaniloi'i-8 
K.'uisas City . 
Ki.iixUile ... 
T.a <'r..s>e ... 

lender 

L..ulb'.i'ie ... 

Matiison 

Maiduttt* ... 
Mc'^11. liie Hal 

MiiiipULs 

Miks « ily •• 
Miluaiikfc .. 
Miuiiedo:>a .. 



..60 
..46 

...a 

..44 
..42 
.44 

..S2 



.28 
<;2 
.56 



..36 

..54 

..40 

..46 

..52 

..36 

..5i». 

..12 

.'.74 
. . 56 
..46 
. . 46 
..40 

...46 

...Td 
..40 
..6f> 
..tiO 



..CO 
..4S 
..42 

.42 
..US 
..41 
..50 

. .S6 



4C 
42 
8 
34 
30 

46 
50 

16 

50 
46 
4S 

26 
.iO 

28 

44 
34 

14 

:*8 
50 
06 

40 

24 

:!8 
U 
52 
06 
28 
52 

26 
f.2 
42 

:-8 

12 

ii 
44 



Modena 36 



Moiifgonif ry 

Mcmtreai 

MoortuaU 

.VasliTiUe 

Xtn Orleans . . 
Nfc» York . .T . 
.Nirtli I'laUe . . . 

(thla.houia 

Omaiia 

Phofiils 

Pltrie 

PllLst'iirB 

Port .Artliur — 
PcrtlaiiO, Or. . 
Prlnca Albert.. 
Qu'.\i»pflle ... 

KaUi?!i 

Kai'itI t Ity ... 

Ht>.-fl)virg 

UiMtUcil 

St. ixjuis 

St. Paul 

SaJt Vskt City. 

San IM'fo 

Siiii I'^auci'^eo. 



70 
38 
.40 



.58 
.14 

.54 

.56 

.CO 

..42 

...'2 

.44 

..48 

..32 

..S2 

..f.O 

.44 

..46 

i.'ee 

..38 

..38 

..62 

.60 

Sank Ste. •Maiic.4l 

Se.attle 

Slit-riiiaii 

SlirtveiM rt .... 

Sioux fiiy 

.SixikaxiC 

SlrriiiBliflcl, 111. 

Srriiifflri.L Mo 

Swift Current.. 

Tanifia 

Tuledf 

W.iKhlngtt.u . . 

Wichita 

WllllMon 

Wliii.t'Ui'iCi:* •• 

Wiijnlp»^B 

Yellowsii'iie • . • 



28 

a 

28 
54 
62 



48 
4(1 
42 
36 
46 
34 
44 
10 
8 
40 
?4 

:-6 

50 
36 
SO 
46 

U 

:8 

46 



GAME SEASON 
COMESJO END 

Was One of the Most Suc- 
cessful Seasons in Re- 
cent Years. . 



ASTHMA GATABRH 

WHOOPING COUGH SPASMODIC CROUP 

BRONCHniS COUGHS COLDS 




C6TABLI8HCO 1870 

A simple, safe and effective treatment 
for bronchial troubles, without dosing the 
ilomach with drugs. Used wiih success 
for thirty-four years. 

Theaircarryingiheantiseptic vapor, in- 
spired with every breaih, makes breath- 
ing easy, soothes the sore threat, and 
stops the cough, assuring restful nights, 
Crcsolere is invaluable to mothers with 
voung children and a tcon to sufferers 
from Asthma. 

Sf'!^ us fosfa^ fcr 
descriptive booklet. 

ALLDKIGGISTS. 
Try Crcsf>l-ne Antl?fptic 
Throiit T;ili!'ta for the ir- 
liiatt-d tlir<at. Thfy are 
elraple.eirciiiveand anti- 
ft|it!c. 0( your UrtiPKist 
or from us, 10c in stiuiipi:. 

VAPO CRESOLENE CO. 

C2 CortUndt St., N. Y. 




Extensive Slaughter With 

Snow Absent Shows Game 

to Be Plentiful. 



.42 

.fe 

.42 

.44 



46 
82 
5S 
50 

40 

H2 
32 



^iO 

48 
46 
12 

t;2 

.',2 
40 
4& 

:i4 

16 

•.% 

16 



Klv. M 
Htrald.)- 
the M. E. 
in.-rried 



ISAy Couple \\><l«le«l. 

nn., Dec. 1. — (.Spetial to The 

-Kev. E. F. .Stidd, pastor of 

church, on Saturday evening 

Miss -^nna I^indborg and 



Cleorge Ander.-on. both popular young- 
residents of the city. The bride lived 
hert- sinte childhood. I.< a gr.iduate of 



Baking Powder Biscuits 

Ll^ht as a Feather 

By Mrs. Janet McKenzie Hill, Editor of 
the Boston Cooking School Magazine 

Baking Powder Biscuits made by this 
recipe are so far ahead of ordinary ba- 
king powder biscuits that, if once tried, 
yon will never use any other recipe. 
Try it the next time you run short ol 
bread. Save this recipe. 29 




Many Municipal and Other 

Improvements Made 

During 1913. 

Ely, Minn.. Dec. 1.— tSpeclal to The 
Herald.) — Ely has just closed one of its 
busiest building season.«, especially in 
municipal improvements. The white 
wav and cement sidewalks of the city, 
while not yet entirely completed, htiY<; 
nevertheless added much to the c.ty's 
looks. There has also be.-n ronsiderable 
building done the past summer. 

One of the flr.<<t buildings completed 
this summer has been that of the I'irst 
.•^tate bank. The bllldlng Is euuip- 
ped with the most modern cor.ven- 
lences. 

Build Fine Store. 

The Finnish Stock company, a co- 
operative concern, has built one of the 
finest stores in the Xorthwe.«t, and 
George Hosklns has just completed hie 
brick building and fitted it up for a 
meeting hall. There has also been 
built several tine residenee.«». Those of ; 
M. F. Skola. William Mitchell, Joseph 
Franzettl, Emll Lei no and others have 
been completed, and that of (Jeorge I... ; 
Brozlch will probably be completed this i 
winter .411 together Ely has taken on j 
a new life thi.s year. The school dis- I 
trit t will build another school building 
to cost in the neighborhood of $125, 00". 
The population Is Increasing and resi- 
dences are verv scarce. The First Na- 
tional bank has al.-^o been obliged to 
remove It.s landmark and replace it 
with a new building. rhe city nced.t 
badly a modern hotel. 

' BRlNGS^BACKyRIDE. 

Ely Railroad Man Steals March on 
I His Friends. 

I Ely, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special To The 

i Herald.) — Mr. < Jerry of the office force 
In the Duluth & Iron Range depot 
sprang a surpri.-<e on his friends here 
by getting married in Two Harbors 
last Thur.'^dav. .None of his friends 

1 knew about the wedding until about 
ten minutes before the bridal party ar- 
rived here. They will make their home 

' here, after a wedding totir to Mr 
Gerry's old home In New York. 



ELY BO ND EL ECTION. 

Voters to Pass on Question of Erect- 
ing New Building. 

Ely, Minn., Dec. 1.— (Special to The 
Herald.) — A special election has b;en 
ordered in District No. 12 to vote 
$125,000 for a new school bulldln?. The 
boird was recently authorized to pur- 
chase land for a site. The five build- 
ings now In use are crowded to 
capacity. 



raise funds to be used in lUjuldating 
the chur.h debt and desire through The 
Herald to request gifts for the sale. 
Is asked that all gifts be 
before Dec. 8. 



turned 



It 
In 



NEW APPA RATU S ARRIVES 

Hibbing Firemen Trying Out New 
Chemical Auto Truck. 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Fire Chief Mclllhargey 
and the other members of the depart- 
ment are elated today over the arrival 
of the big combination hose-chemical 
truck which they today put through 
various tests and from all accounts it 
gave ratlsfactlon. A runabout f-tr the 
chief and a combination patrol and 
ambulance will arrive later. 



TO BUILD STATIOMS, 

Canadian Northern Also Plans Other 
Improvements Next Year. 

Virginia, Minn.. Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Canadian Northern 
railway plans on expending about 
$500,000 next year on Improvements on 
this division including the construction 
of new, modern depots at Cook, Els- 
more. Harney, Angora, Simar, (jheen 
and Cusson. ^, , 

Construction work on the new de- 
pot at Cook will begin at once and 
the next station to be built will be 
that at Elsmore. Fifty miles of eighty- 
pound rails will also be included in 
next year's Improvement campaign. 

The worK of xemoving the old pub- 
lic library building has been started. 



VIRGINIA CHURCH SALE. 

Methodist Ladies' Aid Society Would 
Pay Off Church Debt. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Methodist Episcopal 
Aid society of this city is planning to 
hold a Chri.stmas sale Dec. 11-13 to 



Virginia 



E C Baklnd Powder BIscalts 

Three cups flour; ]i to Yz c tip short- 
eniug; 3 lei el tcaspooti/nls A' C Baking 
Foxvdrr; about 2 cup milk or water; 1 
ieaspoonful salt. 

Sift three times, the flotir, Fait and 

baking powder. Work into the flour the 

6hortcnin.c:, using lard or butter for 

ehcrtetiing. Then mix to a verj' soft 

dough with the milk. The softer the 

biscuit enters the oven, the lighter it 

cotnes out. Never knead baking powder 

biscuits; press the dough into shape and 

roll lightly. Cut in small shapes and 

bake on a sheet or very shallow pan in 

a hot oven. In placing biscuits in the 

pans place well apart, not allo^^•ing edges 

to touch, Small biscuits are better than 

'urge ones. Large biscuits do not have 

the proper amouut of time to jui-s? and 

bake. 

Have you seen the new K C Cook's Boc.W 
Brimful of nppetiziujr recipes th.it sitni>ly must 
be successful every time If the few simple direc- 
tlon.s are carefully followed. You would gladly 
pay 50 cents for this valuable book, yet we send, 
it ahso.'utfly/iff upon receipt of the colored cer- 
tificate packed in every 25-centc;jn of K C Bakinir 
Powdrr. J.^arKS Mho. Co., Chicnkro bUiall 

ouu do not bavc CsK^k's fiook cccUiiuitc«« 



>v ^■%^'^^^ '^:p;^^ 



Corrects 
Indigestion 



FIRED OFF PISTOL 

Virginia Joy Rider Arrested for| 
Strenuous Celebration. | 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Matt Hiskella will be 
arraigned before Judge Carey today to 
answer the charge of firing a weapon 
in the city limits. It Is claimed that 
he wound up a joy ride to Gilbert and 
return Saturday night with some com- 
panions by filing several .«hois In the 
air after getting back to town. He 
was arrested and released on $50 cash 
bail. 



POLICE AREWARWED. 

Force Must Not Work for 
City Candidates. 

Virginia, Minn.. Dec. 1.— (.Special to 
The Herald.) — Members of Virginia's 
police force will not be permitted to 
interest themselves in behalf of any 
of the candidates at the coming city 
election. Chief of Police Richard Rice 
has posted- a notice calling their at- 
tention to rule 85 of the manual Knd 
regulations of the polh-e department, 
which prohibits their taking any ac- 
tive part in elections with the ex,ep- 
tion of exerci.'-ing their franchise. The 
no*ice states that any violation uf the 
rule will be considered grounds for 
summary dismissal. 




HIBBING SELLING SEALS. 

Many Red Cross Seals to Be Offered 
in Village. 

! Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 1.— (Spe-ial to 
, The Herald.)— The sale of Red Cross 
! seals of which 10,000 have been or- 
dered for Hibbing by the Saturday 
club, began at the following places 
today: Palace drug store; tJalloway's 
dry goods store; Congdon's drug store; 
Eippm.an's department store; jlass 
jewelry store, a " " 
The members 
i ovwr 2,000 c£ them. 



of Rye 



{Nature's Breakfast Food 



the 
the 



Itasca baz.ar. 
club have taken 



Banishes 
Constipation 



Find MIsKliig Fanner. 

Biwabik, Mii.n.. Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Henry Moyhonen. a 
farni'^r living at Palo, eight miles from 
bore, lost his way while hunting last 
week and wandered about in the woods 
four days until found by Axel Lund- 
berg and taken to the latter's cabin 
where he wjj^ found by Deputy Sheriff 
Mollan of Virginia, who was dispatched 
by Sheriff Meinlng to find the missing 
man when the latter officer was noti- 
fied that Moyhonen was lost. He was 
too weak from hunger and exposure to 
leave Lundberg's cabin after being 
re.ecued, which accounted for his fail- 
ure to report his whereabouts. 

» 

Putting In Big Pump. 

Crcsbv. Minn.. Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— A big pump Is being in- 
stalled by the Pittsburg .-teel Ore 
company at Its stripping operations 
at Riverton to handle the quicksand 
and water that poured Into the pit, 
hailing stripping operations. 
• • 

Alloc Fire Ilnll Bldn. 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 1.— (Specinl to 
The Herald.) — The village council to- 
row afternoon will open and pass upon 
the bids foT erecting the new Alice 
tire hall. 



they will spend their honeymoon with 
friends and relatives. 

The bride has lived In this city since 
childhood and Is greatly e.«teemed by 
all who know her. She graduated 
from the Bessemer high school with 
the class of 1907. During her high t 
school davs she wa.'s prominent in all • 
the .--oclal doings of the younger set. 
She attended the Marquette normal 
school and taught in the Bessemer [ 
schools for two years and at the boo j 
last year. 

Mr. Frlck came here from Neilsvllle. i 
Wis., nine years ago. He has been in : 
business here for five years and ha.s 
been a great success in his line of j 

Mr. and Mrs. Frlck will make their 
future home In this city. | 

■ W. C. Miller, organizer of the Owls, , 
was here and organized an Italian i 
lodge here with a charter membership 
of 125 members. The following offi- 
cers were elected; Past pre.«ldent, 
Peter Xovascone; president, loe Chier- 
tano; vice president, Vlnceszo Ron- 
nlano; conductor, I.,ouis Viennl; treas- 
urer, Dominic Mlchella; secretary. Bert 
Pettlna; chaplain. Dotnenic Fritz; in- 
side guard. Tonl Colombo; outside 
guard, Louis Francesia. 

NOT ALLW OOL. 

North Dakota Official Scores Manu- 
facturers of Cloth. 

Bismarck, N. D.. Dec. 1.— (.Special to 
The Herald.) — Fraudulent practices In 
the manufacture and labelling of cloth 
are exposed by Prof. E. F. Ladd. pure 
fodo commissioner of North Dakota, In 
a current bulletin. 

I One sample of cloth, purcha.^ed for 
I all wool flannel, was analyzed and 
i found to contain two-thirds cotton and 
one-third wool, w hile still another 
! sample of "woolen cloak goods" was 
an.ilvzed to contain 10 per cent cot- 
ton, 10 per cent Au.stralian w ool, and 
80 per cent shoddy. 

That the ultimate purch.-\.=er has the 
right to knovv- Just what the material 
contains Is the contention of Prof 
Ladd. 



One of the most successful big game 
and bird .seasons of years ended last 
night. 

Despite the absence of snow, sev- 
eral thousands of .leer aim moose were 
slain in Xorihern Minnesota and many 
tiiousands of par. ridges and ducks 
were bagged. 

Approximately iJ.OOO big game li- 
censes were lssue<l in St. Louis county 
alone and the express companies op- 
erating in Duluth report that they 
nave handled over 3,600 deer and 
moose, weighing jver 500,000 pounds, 
riiese rigures do rot incluue me game 
animals which were shipped to scores 
of other stations ,n this county. 

The hunters st.U in the woods 
who have game liung up 
city, have hve da; 
it into the city, 
game after that 



provisional warrant charging "murder 
and other crimes," was adjourned to- 
day- until next Friday. Extradition 
papers have not arrived from Nica- 
ragua. 

• 

Folk Im InveMtlKntlnr. 
Washington, Dec. l. — postponement 
of today's hearing in the Zelaya case 
was at the instance of Zclaya's coun- 
sel here to afford Solicitor Folk of the 
state department an opviortunity to 
pass upon allegations that the project 
to secure the extradition of Zelaya is 
pdlitlcal, and that < ertain financial In- 
terests are Involved in an attempt to 
suppress the activities of the late 
president. 



CASUfiLTY MEN HOLD 
SESSION IN GHIGASO 



must be 
and Ush 



Banker Nearly l>ro>vnji. 

Bowbells. N. D.. Dec. 1. — (Spc ial 
The Herald.)— C. V. Alldrin, cashier 
the Burke County State bank In 

' cltv, wa.s nearly drowned In a 

! reservoir near the city, going 

I the thin 

I water. 



to 

of 

this 

railroad 

through 

ice Into about six feet of 



BESSEM ER W EDDING, 

High School Graduate Bride in Pretty 
Nuptial Affair. 

Bessemer, Mich.. Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The HeraldD— A pretty autumn wed- 
ding wag solemnized when Miss Mae 
Roman, eldest daughter of Mrs. Hilll- 
gan became the bride of John Frick, 
Miss Anna -Matieie was bridesmaid 
while the groom was attended by Con- 
rad Hansen.' Mr. and Mrs. Frlck left 
for Minneapolis and St. Paul where 



Grey Hairs 
never worry 
the woman 
who uses 



Ml 



She has none. Hay's Hair 
Health restores natural 
color to iJrey or faded hair. 
It promotes a natural, healthy 
growth, free from dandruff. 
It is not in any sense a dye. 

50c and $1 at all good drucsisti. For 

tampletcltlesend lOc AcdeiJci'snamc. 

t« Fbllo U«jf S»«cl*ltlct Co.. Ncwitit, .1. J. 



H. i. Jeronlmut, W. A. Abbut, Tredway Phar. 
maey, L. S. Mattox, A. E. 8wtiib!.r». 



or 
out.side the 
s in which to bring 
To keep protected i 
time a special permit ! 
secured ;rom the state game 
commissi on or its agents. 
Sonie 'J'rngedleK. 
The season ju.-^l clo.sed was not with- 
out its tragedies a number being 
wounded and sevtrai killed. For sev- 
eral years past the statistics have 
shown the acclde Us to be decrea.slng 
and those of thi.s '.ill bear out the dec- 
laration that they are becoming stead- 
ily fewer. This i:; due to several rea- 
sons, among them being the constant 
agitation not lo s lOot until the hunter 
is positive that he Is aiming at deer 
or moose and not at any movement In 
the bushes, and to the increa.sing cus- 
tom of hunters lo wear red clothes, 
avoiding any garment which iniglit be 
mistaken for the hide of a deer or 
moose. 

(innte More XunirruuM. 
The fact that so many deer were 
killed and found without the aid of 
snow is almost conclusive proof that 
they were more numerous than for 
years past. With snow the slaughter 
would undoubtedly have been much 
heavier, but that so many were 
bagged despite ibis handicap shows 
that the much-.'^o ight prizes were un- 
usually plentiful. Undoubtedly a great 
many deer were wounded which were 
never found, owmg to the inability 
of the hunter to follow them. 

The same condition prevailed last 
sea.»Jon. which was also without snow. 
j This has resulted In the Initiation of a 
movement to ha\ e the game season 
1 open later, when the probabilities of 
^ snow being on the ground w ill be 
i greater. It is ad nltted that It would 
i not be good Judgment to de.«lgnate the 
I opening according to the first snow- 
! fall, as that would not only be Indell- 
\ nite but would not serve the purpose. 
: As was the case this fall there might ! 
I be a fall of several Inches early in ; 
1 November, but the weather might 
moderate and th* snow vanish within 
a few doys. Many hunters postponed 
, their trips from lay to day. anxiously 
: hoping for a fall of the fleecy white. 
I As tiie season d "ew towards a close 
I many of these w?nt out witliout snow 
but others stayed with their determi- 
nation to stay In town unless they 
could have snov for their hunting. 
The result was hat they did not go 
out at all. 

I.a>T Violations. 

The season wan not without its law 

violations. Many "sooners" were ar- 

! rested by InspecLor of Wardens T. J. 

i Storey and his deputies before the 

I opening of the season .and later a 

I close watch on poachers arid pot hunt- 

) ers tended to juit a damper upon 

i those who make It a practice to shoot 

i deer and sell tliem to the "hunters" 

f who cannot shoot their own game 

This is often done and detection is 

difficult. 

consld?rable percentage of 
shipped each season and 
exhibited by the "mighty 
vere bagged with green- 
far as the "hunters" were 
In the transaction. Were it 
not for the activity of the game ward- 
ens much more cf this would be done. 
Many deer and lulte a large number 
of moose will b<; bought every hunt- 
ing season and the best that the 
state's agents c;in hope to do is to 
keep the transactions at a minimum. 

POSTPONE HEARING 
IN ZIILAYA AFFAIR 



Meet Wit-li Insurance Com- 
missioners to Discuss 
New York Ruling. 

Chicago. Dec. 1. — An important con- 
ference of state insurance commission- 
ers and casualty men was held here to- 
day. The meeting grew out of a rul- 
ing made by \V. T. Emmet, insurance 
superintendent of the state of New 
York, placing a limit on the expense of 
acquiring liability insurance. 

Insurance experts are not c>bjecting 
to the limit of 17 >z per cent a.« the 
ratio of expense In obtaining work- 
men's compensation Insur.moe, but the 
New York limit of 20 per cent for the 
acQiiif ition of other lines of liability 
Insurance is questioned by many of 
them. 

These lines of insurance, it is s.-ild, 
are more costly to obtain, and the ar- 
guumcnt is made that with a 20 per 
cent acqui.«ltion clause, It will be Im- 
possible to interest agents and broker.s 
in it to any considerable extent. 



GOOD JOBS OP[N 
WITH UNCLE SAM 



One civil service examination will 
be held next Monday and two on Jan. 
7, to fill government positions in the 
United States and the possessions. 
Particulars may be obtained from E. 
M. Barker, superintendent of the reg- 
istry department at the posioffice, 
who Is also local secretary of the ex- 
amining board. 

The positions for wliich examina- 
tions will be held find the respective 
salaries per vear follow: Chief mine 
surgeon, $2,400; laboratory assistant in 
phvsics, $yoO, and seed warehouseman, 
$1,200. 



St. 



Farmer Ituiiaway 

I'eter. Minn.. I>':c. 



A vei-y 
the deer 
"proudly" 
hunters" 
backs, as 
concerned 



Victim. 

1. — Two boys 
found the t'ead body of John H. Hnr- 
tew, Jr., a wealthy farmer of Cleve- 
land township, I.e Sueur county, lying 
near a vacant lot on North Front street 
in this cltv. Because he had been in- 
volvel In" trouble the night before, 
rumors were circulated that the farn-er 
had met with foul play, but the sup- 
position of the police is that hi.s t«am 
ran away and he was thrown out and 
killed. 



"SYRUP OF FIGS" FOR 
CONSTIPATED CHILD 

Delicious 'Fruit Laxative" Can't 

Harm Stomach, Liver and 

Bowels. 



Every mother realize.", after giving 
her children "California .'=iyrup of 
Figs,", that this is their ideal laxa- 
tive, because they love its pleasant 
taste and It thoroughly cleanses the 
tender little stomach, liver and bowels 
without griping. 

When cross, irritable, feverish or 
breath is bad, stomach sour, look at 
the tongue, mother! If coated, give a 
teaspoonful of this harmless "fruit 
laxative," and in a few hours all the 
foul, constipated waste, sour bile and 
undigested food passes out of the bow- 
els, and you have a well, playful child 
again. When its little system Is full 
of cold, throat sore, has stomach- 
ache, diarrhoea, indigestion, colic — 
renietnbor, a good "in.side cleaning" 
should always be the first treatment 

■ i given. 

,, , rt n««.^««^ Millions of mothers keep "California 

Habeas CCrpUS rrOCeeO-l. syrup of ligs- handy; they know a 

' teaspoonful today saves a sick child 
tomorrow. Ask yo«r druggist for a 
50-cent bottle of "California Syrup of 
Fig.s,"' which has directions for babies, 
children of all ages and grown-ups 
printed on the bottle. Beware of 
counterfeits sold here, so don't he 
fooled. Get the genuine, made by 



ings Are Set Over Until 
Friday. 

New York. Dec. 1. — Arguments on 
the writ of habeas corpus obtained In 
behalf of Gen. J. Santos Zelaya. ex- 
Dresldtnt of Nicaragua, held her« on a 



« 



'California Fig .Syrup Company.' 



"¥ " 



j^lSMBjn 



jsak. 




t 




- I ^« — ' 



■tiMi rf~^ 




Monday, 



THE DUI^UTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



16 



TAX RATES FOR COUNTY ARE 
ANNOUNCED BY AUDITOR 

I 

Total Tax Fund Shows an Bigger Road Funds and 



Increase of $1,713,- 
258. 



Extraordinary State Rate 
Responsible. 



CO.MI'.VnATlVE TAX I.EVIKS. 



<i)tatr taxr.i • 

County tnxrn 

•trhiiol tnxfx 

Cltlt-M, t1IIuk^« and town*. 

^^otitl ••••■••••••••••• 



1913. 

. 2.:t«<>, t77.0« 



1912. 

91.IM,752.47 

Ht«.962.7e 

2,.'{1.'S..S27.2 4 

2.300.06.1.44 

»«,577,«i05.»l 



^,^,«^,Q/^«/9«/%%«%«^«^%8««««%»^»^#«'C/9'9^S^'S^^^^>^'@^ 



InoreadC. 
JCH,77S.39 
30M,41(i.OO 
M),«54>.i2 
SS5, 112.59 



91,713,258.00 ^ 



After several weeks of tedious cal- [ 
dilution, the foiinty auditor's office has 
completed the conipul ;tti(>n of tax rates 
on which property owners in the varl- ! 
ous cities, villages, ortjanizod and un- | 
t>r«a!iized towns in St. Louis county | 
will pay their 1913 taxes. [ 

The rates are fiKured with the per- j 
Bonal and real property valuations 
made this year in arriving at the 1913] 
tax. Ken! estate taxes for 1913 fall 
due on Jan. 1 next and are payable ; 
In two lii.stallnients, tlie first one on 
or before March 31 and the se< oiid on 1 
or before Oct. 31. 1914. A 10 per cent! 
penalty attaches to all delinquent i 
taxes. ! 

Taxpayers of St. Louis county will, 
ray 51,713.258 more in 1913 taxea than 
in ISlli taxes, increases being noted 
not only in the amounts levied for 
local purpo.*»es by the variou.< citie.H, 
vlllaRes and town.s, but also in the , 
K-vies for .ohools. for county purposes ' 
and for state purposes. 

Tlie principal increase is in the local i 
levie.s for the cities, villages and 
towns, which .vhow a gain of §885. 412.59 ( 
over the I'.'l:; figure. The greatest fac- i 
tor in this im rease is believed to be 
an unprecedented tax levy made by 
the villige of Hibbing under it.s new 
Hdn.inistration. Tije amount levied ' 
this year for local purposes by the 
village was $750,878.95 as compared , 
with $278,489.88, an increase of 
§472.389.07. I 

niKvrrr Rond FuuiIk. i 

Another fai tor wiiich is believed to ■ 
r-Titer into the lucieased tax levit-s for 
local purposes among the various tax ! 
districts of the Cv>unty is the fact that 
the last legi.-jlature passed a law, 
which now permits a town.«liij» to lew 
20 mills instead of 10 mills for road 
purposes. In addition to the levy made 
by the townsliip officials, the county '• 
auditor is requi.'ed by law ti> add , 
1 mill for what is known as the "road i 
drnf.r fu!id." 

Tlie lew for school purposes 8hf>wa 
a gain of $50,650.42. While the in- 
crease is not an unusual one, taking j 
into consideration tht incrt-a^aes shown 
in the otlier l»vles, it indicates that in I 
all proi)ability -x number of the in- 
dependent school districts of the 
county have taken advantnge of th<- 
n»w state law removing the 15-mill 
limit nrd giving sciiool boards a free 
h.ind with no restrictions. The sanic 
lepi.slaturt- gave sciiool boards in tho.-.- 
districts of the county where there 
f.re high or graded schools auihorily , 
to levy 25 Instead of 15 mills, tne for- , 
nier limit. 

.StMte Tax Rate. 
The Increase in the tax for .<?tat > . 
purposes is tiie largest for many 



years, the jump being from $1,111.- 
752.47 in 1912 to $1,583,530.86 f( r 1»13, 
a difference of $168,778.39. The stale 
rate for 1913. 5.03 mills is the highest 
since 1865, the average slat, tax rate 
for thlrtv-seven years ending with 
1910 btlng but 1.K3 mills. Since 1910, 
the rate has gone from 1.47 mills to 
the present rate of 6.03 mills. The 
gain over last year alone was 1.4:j 
mills. 

An increase of $308,416.60 l.s shown 
In the taxes le\ied for county pur- 
poses. This increase may also be 
largely accounted for by new legisla- 
tion which permits tlie county board 
to levy up to 3 mills for road i)ur- 
poses. r.efore the pas-;age of tlie Dunn 
road bill, the countv bt.ard was pow- 
erless to levy more than 1 mill. The 
board availed itself of the privilege 
and made a levy of 1.5 mills whh.h 
will raise $530,152.28 or an increase 
of $2 10. ,''.65.75 over the amount levied 
for roiids last year. Other matters 
also figure in the increase for the 
county. Provision was made in the 
levy this year for the retirement of 

i the Missabe railrr>ad aid bond issue 

f of 1893 for $250,000 and .S85,O00 worth 
of tlie courthouse bonds. 

' County Rate. 

I In face of the increa.-ie on the levy 

I for all other county fund.*, is ni>ted a 
decrease In the general revenue fund 
of the county. The county board this 
year reduced the revenue fund from 

•$308,269.0 1 to .$2:59,261.12. a decrease of 
$r.9,008.t2, as compared with the 1912 
levy. The general revenue fund takes 

' care of the general running expen.sos 

I of the county government. 

I A comnarative statement of the 

■ levies for county taxes for the years 
1913 and 1912 follows; 

! 1913. 1912. !>«•• Inc. 

C'luniy rov- 

' eiMie funil$2M,2r,l.T.: f.'MI^.-Hi'y.T.l $C9.00S.12 

' P.Mjrfuinl. . r.y.lK.il.-. .'ly.nis.s* 22.81 

K..aiU . . •ioa.l52.2S Sil'i.JSti.Ja J#0,565.73 

iTjten-.^t ami 

fa",l'".. 235.4Sa.31 121,139.51 llt043.80 

■ Court l)Oii.>ra. 
I Haiiat >ns 

aiut Work „ 

fanu ... »t,2!»:.00 6S.59».iM 33.792.68 



Proctorknott 1 

"Spina Ind. 35 

'own of Alango. including state 

loan to district 42 No 

Aibf>rn ••••••• H 

Allen ^ 

A ngora • 4 3 

Ault 62 

Ault 60 

Ault 61 

Ault No 

Balkan Ind. 27 

Balkan Ind. 40 

Basset t 70 

Biwablk Ind. 18 

Biwabik 24 

Heatty 41 

Buyck 47 

Buyck No 

Breitung 9 

fanosia 10 

Canosia 55 

Cedar Valley 23 

Clinton 26 

Cotton • —J 

Cotton 49 

Colvin 56 

Culver 28 

Culver No 

I>uluth 20 

Duluth No 

lOmbarrass H 

Kayal Ind. 39 

Fern 45 

Field, including state loan to dls 

trict 53 

Fine Lakes, including state loan 

to district 19 74 

Floodwood Ind. 19 

Fredenberg 38 

French f*4 

tJnesen 8 

<Jrand I^ake 15 

(.Jreat Scott Bid. 3.^> 

llalden ♦>!> 

Herman ^ 

Indusi rl.al 17 

Industrial 1^ 

Kelsey '5 

Kugler .' 44 

Lakewood ^- 

I>avell -6 

Lavell Ind. 2i 

Lavell. including state loan to 58. -No 

Lavell No 

Leiding ^^ 

I..eiding, including state loan to 63 ».» 

Leiding No 

Linden tJrove, including state loan 

No 



T'.tlU S1.15.5.S79.3« ?'W6.9r,17« 

Net liK-reiir* li»l3 u\ec lUli. »3»8,41S.G<> 
The levy for the city of Duluth for 
city government purposes Is $835,055.35 
for 1013 as compared with $816,355.10 
for 1912, an Increase of $18,699.95. Off- 
setting this increase is a decrease of 
$15,135.39 which is shown in the levy 
for the independent school district for 
the citv of Duluth. The 1912 levy for 
the Duluth schools was $608,941.03 as 
compared with $593,805.61 for 1913. 

A comparative statement of the tax 
rates and levies for the 142 tax dis- 
tricts of St. Louis county for 1913 and 
1912 follows: 



Ind. 

*.'.". .ind. 
loan to 
Ind. 



.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
. Ind. 
.Ind. 



Names of Cities, Villages and School 

Towns — Dis. Xo 
Cltv of Duluth Ind. 

Fly Ind. i: 

Evelcth Ind. 3! 

Tow er 

Virginia 

Village of Alice 

Aurora 

Aurora, including state 
trict 24 

Bivabil< 

Brookston 

Buhl .,..••..••....•... 

Chisholm 

Chisholm 

Costin 

Fall L.ike 

Flt)odwood 

(iilbert 

Hibbing 

Iron Junction 

Kitine y Ind. 

Kitzvilie Ind. 

Mc Kin ley Ind. 

Merritt 

Me.-iaba Ind. 

Mountain iron Ind. 



Tot. Tax 
Rate 
Mills. 
36.3 
57.3 
31.8 
61.1 
43.7 



.1913 



-191' 



Tot. Taxes. 
$1,879,262.83 
127.098.91 
423.88li.02 
12,621.41 
651.971.38 
N'ow part of Stuntz 



13 41.3 



13 
21 
No 
35 
40 
-12 
21 
12 
19 
18 

25 
35 

- i 

18 
21 
13 
21 



43.8 
44.4 
39.8 
29.8 
32.6 
26.9 
25.1 
48.5 
39.0 
50.1 
19.8 
26.8 
36.9 
30.6 
46.7 
22 7 
40.'4 
21.9 



40.548.71 

45.221.35 

47,832.16 

729.85 

288,719.89 

499,133.61 

32,772.38 

420.60 

1,576.15 

2.059.20 

13,772.29 

1,616.021.95 

243.83 

35.363.15 

659.25 

3,613.55 

134.15 

6.376.66 

269,135.16 



Tot. Tax 
Rate 
Mills. 
35.3 
50.9 
23.4 
40.0 
37.1 
12.5 
S6.3 



38.5 
42.7 
S4.0 
20.0 
27.6 
22.9 
32.3 
51.2 
41.2 
48.7 
12.9 
25.3 
38.2 
29.1 
41.4 
19.9 
29.7 
11.2 



Tot. Taxes. 

$1,731,939.54 

113.016.99 

305,446.47 

9,067.84 

478.823.17 

36,875.22 

36,036.61 

47.078.58 

48,089.12 

743.95 

193,174.72 

425,138.42 

28,110.55 

557.24 

1,607.48 

2.095.64 

14.173.89 

951.400.11 

225.42 

1,918.76 

550.22 

3,306.87 

117.87 

4,533.61 

152,878.00 



D. II., 12-1-13. 







The first of December. 

Count the days before Christmas. 

Count the money you intend to spend. 

Count on us for practical presents for men and 
boys. 

We put the Clause in Santa Claus and this is the 
clause: 

Any present you buy here can be changed or ex- 
changed alter Christmas. 



Cold weather is coming and the overcoat ques- 
tion will bulk largely with most men. Any good 
style that's produced'this season is here. For $14.50 
we have a rather unusual garment, a genuine Wil- 
son Chinchilla Coat. 



This week, Sale of Children's Overcoats, worth 
up to $6 at $2.95. The average of the lot is nearly 
HALF PRICE. 



Duluth, 

MlUD. 




At Tiiird .\ve. 
VVcbt, 



CiaUiiAj Co 
Foot-Xote: Wear the Columbia $3.30 Shoe. 



41.1 
36.9 

40.6 

42.6 

31.9 

49.0 

28.4 

26.4 

40.5 

28.6 

12.9 

18.6 

15.8 

41.2 

30.4 

26.4 

37.1 

46.3 

39.2 

51.6 

24.1 

32.6 

37.0 

40.6 

35.6 

35.6 

41.9 

36.0 

29.2 

4o!4 

30.6 

56.2 

19.1 

38.6 



No 38.7 



23.512.31 T6.3 
408.46 Oisrnzed. 



13,025.71 
since 1912 

1,216.71 

1,997.16 

1.192.40 

2.722.55 

5.550,01 

5,117.69 

2,051.49 

2.71<t.65 

since 1912 

2.207.11 

2,354.03 Opg'nzed since 1912 

2,186.09 Org'nzed since 1912 



1,146.54 
2,362.00 
1,338.10 
3,020.80 
6.034.35 
6.688.55 
2.289.26 
3.212.92 
17.837.17 Orfe'mted, 
236.582.59 26.5 



i 



26.6 



WEST DULUTH 



HRRALn BRANCn OrFICKS: 
Jen«ca, 3S0 North 67th Ave. W. J. J. Moran, 310% N >rth Central 

Herald's West Duluth reportttr may bo reached after 
hour of going to press at 



Ave. 



Calumet 17.S-M and Cole 247. 



81,568.49 

22,715.76 

3,782.05 

12,135.60 

12,027.34 

13,228.23 

1,855.27 

1,509.15 

4,350.87 

4.176.32 

2,2t;3.55 

2.631.91 

4,978.98 

1,560.53 

128.33 

6.803.12 

6,4 42.98 

1,958.79 

93.275.57 

1,673.70 



..6. 
44,1 
?2.6 
47.4 
33.0 
43.1 
34.1 
19.4 
2D.4 
34.4 
35.1 
32.5 
34.3 
42.8 
27.2 
44.0 
25.7 
46.7 
14.2 
41.9 



2.586.01 31.8 



Moimtain 
Mountain 
Mountain 



.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 



including state loan to 



.Ind. 



50 
13 
18 
22 
39 
12 
18 
7 
31 

80 
14 
33 
21 

Xo 
32 
34 
41 
42 

No 



to 53 

Me.idowlands 

Metfaba 

Mit-sabe 

Mis.-taho 

Missabe 

Mor.'^e . . . 

Morcom . 

Midwav . 

McDavitt 

McDJivitt, 

31 

New Independence 
New Independence 

Nichols 

Ni<hol.s 

Normanna 

Northland 

Owens 

Owens 

I'ike 

I'rairie Lake, Including state loan 

to 19 

Rice Lake 

Rice I^ako • 

Itice Lake 

Rice Lake 

.Sol way • • 

Stuntz I"« 

Stuntz Ind. 

Sturgeon, including state loan to 

45 

St. Louis ^„ 

Tolvola. including state loan to 23 ii. 

Tlovola 

Van Buren 

Vermilion I.ake. 

loan to 46 

Waasa 

White 

White, Including state 
White 



5 

30 
55 
71 
43 

27 

40 

No 
36 



48.3 
50.9 
26.5 
42.1 
44.0 
33.6 
38.9 
41.7 
48.7 
37.7 
46.6 
♦ 1.7 
40.6 
4 3.1 
44.8 
Dissolved. 
35.6 
35.6 
33.4 
40.7 
31.3 

30. S 

71.0 
30.6 
27.9 
22.8 
18.0 
37.5 
39.0 
40.1 
39.4 

39,4 
52.0 
50.9 
21. S 
23.9 

o<> •> 

^ -' .M 

30.7 
39.7 
48.3 
34.0 

55.5 
32.5 
37.5 
32.5 
41.9 
44.4 
15. •» 



3,679.88 
4,291.53 
3,472.15 
3,226.12 
6,615.94 
7,844.22 

65,102.81 
3,168.66 

10,158.82 
3,362.46 



43.2 
49.1 
26.6 
40.0 
39.3 
24.3 
24.6 
38.6 
42.6 
33.0 



(0.590.57 

21,654.67 

8,207.03 

12.324.66 

10,069.02 

12,175.84 

1.698.96 

1,466.12 

2,086.87 

3,426.55 

2,192.94 

2,297.72 

8,071.27 

1,76«.57 

61. 6S 

7,43:M4 

5.150.10 

1,606.99 

65.740.89 

1.819.30 

2.029.8* 

3.246.74 
4.210.62 
3.491.28 
3,110.12 
6,865.60 
5,141.39 
69,470.87 
2,939.24 
8,977.91 
4,060.72 



MANY AT PAST I 

MASTERS' MEETING 



2,459.87 Org'nzed sinc*^ 1912 



3,255.60 
1,938.01 
8,796.93 
2.122.11 

2,766.15 
1,644.22 
8.587.81 
2,492.34 
6,180.37 

2,002.80 

11,928.78 

22.114.37 

175,773.10 

243.213.73 

258.21 

61.801,60 

2.505.75 

3,923.26 

1,623.24 



31.0 
36.8 
35.0 
37.3 
21,1 
34.9 
25.7 
31.7 
30.1 
44.4 

23.8 
58,9 
22.9 
22.8 
18.2 
13.8 
36.1 
31.8 
32.6 
34.7 



,433.28 
1,533.67 
7,074.55 
1,796.48 
1.621.62 
2.655.71 
1,107.95 
8,44:.S5 
6,373.81 
2,623.56 

1.502,57 

0.585.80 

17,769.44 

146,281.43 

202.236.09 

197.96 

44,721.29 

2,016.44 

3.ir.9.62 

2,575.36 



Euclid Lodge Entertains 

Proctor, Superior and 

Duluth Men. 

A crowd of nearly 200 Masons at- 
tended the "Past Master's Night" held 
by Euclid lodge No. 198, A. F. & A. M., 
at the West Duluth Masonic, hall. 615 
North Central avenue, Saturday eve- 
ning. Large delegations were present 
fi-om the uptown lodges, Superior and 
I'roclor. 

L. S. Nouman occupied the principal 
chair during the ceremonies. Other i 
past officers had charge of the other 
of£icl:ils positions. At the banquet fol- , 
lowing L. A. Barnes presided as toast- j 
master. | 

A number of the vi.cltors gave short [ 
adlresscs at the banquet. The prin- 
I cipal talks were given by George .1. 
Malh-ry, Mason M. Forbes, \V. B. 
j C.etchell, M. M. Meldahl and H. W.I 
I Banners Short talks were also given 
1 by F. H. Armstrong and George Coons j 
of I'roctor. 

The past masters were extended an 
Invitfttion to attend a similar attain 
he'd under the auspices of tlie Supe- 
rior lodge next Wednesday evening. 

GOOD programTrp.anged. 

Irving 



held in the West Duluth Commercial 
club rooms Wednesday evening. 

Fudld chapter, No. 69, E. O. S.. wlP. 
hold its annual ele?tlon of officers at 
the Masonic hall tomorrow evening. 

Mrs. N. C. Batiley, 110 North Fifty- 
fourth avenue wc-t, has been called 
to Chicago on accjunt of the Illness 
of her sister. 

The Young People's Society of Our 
Savior's Norwegian Lutheran church 
win meet in the church parlors to- 
morrow e\ening. 
Watch repairing. Hirst, W. Duluth. Adv 

SPEED MANJACS JAM 
NEW YORK COURTS 



New York, Dec. 1. — Violators of the 

automobile speed laws jammed the 

police courts tod.iy. Nearly 500 of 

them had been summoned to court by 
motorcycle policemen In a crusade 
Saturday and Sunday. Fines averag- 
ing $50 were lmp( s"d at the rate of 
one every two minutes. 



If you have not al- 
ready taken advantage 
of the 



1.374,15 Org'nzed since 1913 
3,051.57 36.6 



100.37 
83,219,92 
7,154,08 
11,830.38 
1.541.91 
1,718,65 
1,714,99 
1,474.61 

3.538,51 
2,028,49 
6,441,40 
807.04 
3.180.59 
B. 048. 68 
694,397.40 



Now part of Balkan 
919,59 



including 



loan 



, .Ind. 
state 

. . .Ind. 
to 13. 



68 
19 



1,099,13 
3,396.63 
3.797.71 
3,016.06 



Wuori 

I'norganlzezd 

lln(»rganized 

linorganized 

Unorganized 

Ifnorganlzed 

L'uijrganlzi'd 

CnorRanized (Sliver) 

Unorganized 

Unorganized, 

to 13 

Unorganized 
Unorganized 
Unor.ganlzed 
IT n organized 
irnorganized 
Unorganized 
Unorgnnizod 
Unorganized 
I'norganlzod 
Unorganized 
I'norganized 
Unorganized 
T'^norgnnized 
Unorganized, 



Ind. 



,Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 
.Ind. 



Incliuling state loan 



Ind. 



including debt to 63 



';o 
11 
13 
:;4 
57 

22 
9 
11 
12 
13 
18 
19 



24 

25 
26 
27 
31 
33 
34 
36 
38 
41 
42 
45 
62 
59 
No 
64 



30.7 
13.1 
67.0 
66.7 
59.0 

32.6 
68,5 
24.2 
26.2 
42.3 
30,6 
34.9 
35.9 
33.1 
21.3 

26. 7 
39.0 
21.6 
28.0 

23,3 
26.8 
21.0 
10.6 
25.8 
33.5 
17.7 
Now organized. 
15.9 2,274.67 

27.8 1.364.87 
36.4 1.992.39 
28.1 1,014.83 
45 7 2,536.49 
26.7 1,618.82 
37.6 1,447.60 



43.2 
18.2 
19,6 
22 7 
25.1 
31.5 
38.7 
24.3 

47.7 
36.8 
41.1 
40.8 
38,8 
39.S 
11.2 

15.9 

1 

28.0 
9.5 
30.8 
44.3 
50.3 



2,112.62 
81,00 
72,034.71 
5.866.95 
9.212.43 
1.160.62 
1.058.40 
1,351.25 
1.060.94 

2,084,28 
2,296.78 
6,037.20 
1,013,14 
2.9-3,58 
4.459.95 
618,611.84 
190,734.10 



Center 

a pleas - 

for the entertainment to 

tomorrow evening. The pro- 

from the affair will be used 



751 
or, 1 



,18 



1.818.43 
2.877,60 
3,078.6$ 



1.619.69 Org'nzed since 1912 



2,169.26 
146.218.44 
81,882.10 
4,158,68 
5,246,05 
8,707.62 
3.816.17 
6,315.00 
2,032.11 
2,337.18 
3,197.84 
5,097.06 
1,656.23 

1.286.86 
1.862.20 
1,302.29 
727.03 
2,415.09 
2,370.89 
3,033.28 



28.8 



Unorganized » Now organized 

Un')rganizcd ,' ' " ' 

Unorganized, Including state loan 

to 19 j5* 

Unorganized ^^" 



1.174.5: 



29.8 
17.« 



1,145,21 
90,978.68 



47. 

21.3 

23.7 

43.6 

20.2 

31.1 

32.3 

32.1 

17.9 

21.4 

41.2 

16.8 

18.8 

20.3 
25.3 
19.3 

9.1 
23.2 
29.0 
16.4 

7.3 
17.5 
25.1 
32.3 
32.4 
31.0 
35.6 
38.7 
2G.7 
35.2 

31.2 
13.7 



$8,290,863.91 



1.448.14 
90.962.91 
73.730.32 
4.287.36 
2,970.39 
7.666.37 
3,521.18 
5,196.03 
1,707,73 
1.862.98 
8,874.20 
5,791,63 
1,933.07 

1,082,19 
1,664.77 
1.128.08 
1,070.00 
2,132.23 
2,052.56 
2.812.35 
1,074.52 
2,503.57 
1,191.22 
1.744.36 
1,180.33 
1,721.96 
2.144.19 
1.220.02 
1,088.88 
1,696.88 

1,200.89 
70.982.99 

$6,577,605.91 



NO LEGAL 
OBSTACLE 

Dr. Dixon May Do Veterin- 
arian Work and Save 
City Money. 



Dr. Robert Dixon, the 



veterinarian 
take 



hired by the health department to take 
charge of the local cattle Inspection, Is 
fully*" qualified to^ handle "tP^lf^,^; ?»,'', 



ness man, whose death by shooting 
occurred ton days ago while Gordon. 
Hill and Mrs. Hill, were engaged in 
conference In the office of an attorney 
at Rl(hardton. 

Sensational evidence Is being antici- 
pated. Hill will make his light for 
acquittal on the plea that (Jordon com- 
mitted suicide; the prosecution is 
built up almost entirely on circum- 
stantial evidence. 



IT. S. WiirMhipit finll. 

Marseilles, France, Dec. 1. — The 
I'nited States battleships Vermont and 
Ohio with the fuel ehlp .Jason and the 
supplv ship Celtic, sailed fnom this 



port today after exchanging 
with the French batteries. 



salutes ! 



Duluth's Best Talent at 
School Tuesday Night. 

Members of the Irving Social 
gymnasium club have planned 
Ing program 
be given 

ceeds from the affair will be used for 
the purchase of api>aratu3 for the pro- 
IJostd gymni'sium. ' 

Among those who will appear on the 
program are some of Duluth's best tal- 
ent Among these are Miss Berta \ era 
Schmied, who will sing and recite; 
Mrs. Frank Barker, reading; Mrs. Jan-: 
Scully, vocal solo; C. O. Applehagen. 
baritone solo; Adams Glee club; Asbury 
quartet; an Irving school chorus; Miss 
lOmmalinc P.rett, reading, and Mi.ss 
Mabel Melin, piano solo. . ' 

It is propo.sed by the club to raise 
$70 An additional $50 has been prom- 
ised by the West Duluth Commercial 
club The money will. It is said, be; 
sufficient to purchase wrestling mat.^!, 
boxing gloves, volley ball and other 
portable equipment for gymnasium 
work. 

DIES WHILE WAITING 
FOR TR AIN TO DULUTH. 

Mrs. Anna Sather, 37 years old, wife 
I of John Sather of Proctor, died at 2 
o'clock yesterday afternoon while she 
1 was waiting on the Proctor platform to 
I take a train to Duluth in order to get 
I to St. M.ary's hospital. The body was 
i taken to Ulchter'.s undertaking rooms, 
I where funeral arrangements will be 
I made this evening. Mrs. Sather leaves 
' four daughters and her husband. 

OFFENDERS FOR THE 
MONTH M OSTLY DP.UMKS. 

"Drunks" were the principal offend- 
ers arrested by the West Duluth police 
during the month of November. Of the, 
thirty arrested and booked at the 
West Duluth .'itation fifteen w ere "plain 
drunks." Three were arrested for be- [ 
mg drunk and disorderly and lU^e fori 
disorderly conduct. The other offend- 
ers were as follows: Three for ob- ; 
structlng public highways, one for | 
driving on the sidewalk, one for In- , 
vpstigation. one for begging and one 
for trespass. 

W. C. T. U. Meeting. 

The West Duluth Women's Christian 
Temperance union will meet Thursday 
afternoon at the public, library, f en- 
tral avenue and Elinor street. "Help- 
ing the Poor" will be the subject dis- 
cussed. Mrs. C. L. n. Keyes w'lll be 
lead'-r. The hoste.^ses will be Mr.s. B. 
H Smith, Mrs. E. D. Abbott and Mrs. 
J. A. Beatty. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

August Neubauer of Minneapolis, 
former resident of West Duluth, was 
a week-end visitor In this end of the 

city 

Clement Krantz left last night for 
Minneapolis after spending the past 
four days at the home of his father, 
Ilev. J. A. Krantz, 706 North Fifty- 
sixth avenue west. 

Mrs W. H. Whet-ler. 902 North Fif- 
ty-fifth avenue west. Is visiting rela- 
tives in Southern Wisconsin. 

The annual election of officers for 
Zenith lodge. Royal Neighbors will be 




REDUCT 




■cmM^^^ 



BIG PURCHASE SALE 

do so new. It's the 
Greatest IVEoney Saving 
Event of the Season. 

Men's and Young Men's 

SUITS AND 
OVERCOATS 

$10 Suits aid Overcoats — 
Tariff Reduction Sale Price 




$15 Suits and Overcoats — 
Tariff Reduction Sale Price 




$20 Suits snd Overcoats — 
Tariff Reduction Sale Price 



officials 



raised by 
that Dr. Jolin 



the state ^ 
Is necessary i 



director. 



the 
that he had 
and is fully 
done by Dr. 
approval of 
the commis- 



with Dr, 
to any 
will be sus- 



the work, according to city 
and the city legal department. 

The contention has been 
some people interested, v,^.., 

McKay the veterinarian who has here- 
tofore done part of the testing for the 
department, is the only veterinaHan 
who can make tests of Interstate ship- 
ments They claim that he is the man 
who has been appointed by 
board and that his O. K. ^ , . », , 
bCfore the tests will be accepted by the 
state board. 

Dr H. K. W^ebster. health 
said this morning when this allegation 
was brought to his attention, and had 
been iVsed as a rea.son for retaining 
Dr McKay and continuing under 
old svstem. He stated 
looked Into this feature 
satisfied that any work 
Dixon will meet with the 
the state board. One of 
sloners took the matter up with (ity 
Attorney Clapp and the city attorney 
Informed him that he agrees 
Webster that no legal objection 
work done by Dr. Dixon 
tained whether his Inspections be of 
interstate shipments or otherwise. 

Dr Dixon is expected to reach 
city tonight and will assume 
ties tomorrow morning. He 
the work which was formerly 
between Dr. McKay at $75 a month and 
a cattle inspector at the same salary. 
The positions will henceforth be com- 
bined and the salary will be un- 
changed, as Dr. Dixon is to receive $150 
a month. In addition to testing cattle 
for tuborculo.'Hs and aiding in the edu- 
cational campaign which has 
ducted by the department 
vears past to improve 
"ply and local dairle.s, 
veterinary work 
ments. , , 

The city commissioners are 
that th»- change is a businesslike move 
which will not only improve the test- 
ing but win be an economy as well. 

POSTMISTER'STRIAL 

< 

Dickinson, N. D., Dec. 1.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— E. F. Hill. po.«tmaBter 
at Antelope, N. D., will be placed on 
trial tomorrow or the day foUowlne.. 
charged with the murder of C. C. c.or- 
don, wealthy Richardton, N. D., bu.5l- 



,;.^_^.^, ^-^:^....i|^-<l;v.>-..-- —<'^-^1r-^f^!^i<S> 



$ 



jL%9m 




$25 Suits end Overcoats — 
Tariff Reduction Sale Price 



Dated at Duluth, Mtnn, Nov. 17. 1911. 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, .Tudge of Probate. 
Attest: A. R. .MOKHnN', 

Clerk of Probate. 
Sepl Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Mina. 
E. P. TOWNE, Esq., 

Attorney For Petitioner, 
EOO-OOi. Torrey.Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 
D. H.. Nov. 17, 24. Dec. 1, 1913^ 

I tIiTi>KK TO examTn^e fInal ac- 
count — 

Stale of Minnesota. 

County of .St, Louis^-ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of 

tlie Estate tf Theodore H. Morgan, 

l^ecedent; 

The petition of Edward W. Blodgett, 
as representative of the .above named 
de -edent, together with his linal ac- 
count of th" administration of said 
estate, having been tiled in this court, 
representing among other things, that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying th.it said final account of 
said fidniinistration bo examined, ad- 
justed and allowed by the Court, and 
th It the Court make and enter Its tiaal 
uecree of distributictn of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
persons entitled thereto, and for the 
discharge of the representative and 
the sureties on his bond. It is or- 
dered, that said petition be heard, / nd 
said linal account examined, adjusted 
and allowed by the Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Booms in Hie Court House, 
in the City of Duluth In said I'ounty. 
on Monday, the 15th day of December. 
i;U3, at ten o'clock A, M,, and all per- 
son.V interested in said hearing and 
in said matter are hereby <tted ahd 
required at said time and place to 
.show c:iuse, if any there be. why said 
r)etition should not be granted. Or- 
dered further, that this order be 
served by publication in The Duluth 
Herall according to law. 

Dat.d at Duluth. Minn., .Nov. 1 *, 1913. 
Bv the Court. 

S W. GILPIN, .ludge of Probate. 
Attest: A. K. MnRTOX, 

Clerk of Probate. 
Seal Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 

E. P. TOWNE, Esq., 
Attorney for Petitioner. 500-503 Torrey 

Buildirig, lH.luth, Minn. 
D. H.. Nov. 17, 21; D ec. 1. 1913- 

SHI'.KlKi"S EX K« 'in- ION SALE. 
I'nder and by virtue of an l-,xe<'ution 
i-ssued out of and under the .^eal of -.lie 
District Court of the State of Minne- 
sota, in and for the Eleventh Judicial 
District, and County of .St. Louis, i n 
the loth day of November, I'tlS, uuon 
a .luugment rendered and docketed in 
said Court and County in an action 
therein, wherein Quayle Lars.m Com- 
panv a corporation was Plaintiff and 
Veri'Jil J. Ide, was Defendant, in favor 
of .said Plaintiff and against s^ald De- 
fendant Vernal .1. Ide. for the sum of 
.)i,e hundred thirteen and Sl-lo«> 
(^inSll Dollars, nnd seventeen and 
34-100 ($17.3 1) dollars inrreas.d ro.n.i 
amounting in all to one hundred thirty- 
one and 15-100 ($131.15), which said 
execution has to me, as aheriff of said 
St Louis County, been Tluly directed 
and delivered. I have levied upon and 
will -^ell at public nucti<in to ihe hiKhe.st 
, -ish bidder, at the Sheriff's Office in 
the Court House, In the City of Duluth. 
in .said County of St. Louis, on Thurs- 
dav the 8th day of January, 1914, at 
ten o'clock in the forenoon of that day 
.hU the right, title and interest that t^e 
above named judRment debtor had in 
and to the real estate hereinafter dc- 
'^cribed on the 13th day of Ji.iie, l'tl3. 
"that being the date of the filing of a 
■writ of attachment and levy tn said ac 
lion upon said premises, or ary inter- 
est therein which said judgment debtor 
Vernal J. Ide has since that day ac- 
<iuired The description of the prop- 
ertv being as follows, to-wit: L-t 
numbered three (3) In block num- 
bered thirteen (13) Hunter & Markell s 
frassy Point addition to Duluth, ac 
cording to the re<-orded plat thereof on 
file and of record in the office of the 
Bejilster of Deeds in and for St. LomIf 
County, Mlnie-sota, 
' Dated, Duluth, Minn., NoveUibcr 15lh, 

^'^^' JOHN R, MEININC,. 

Sheriff St, I..ouls r'otmty, Minn. 
By V. A. D,\SH, Deputy. 
HT<'.II I. M«CBi:.\UN. 

Attorney for Judgment Crevlltor. 
D. H., Nov. 17, 24, I>ec. 1, 8, 15. .-, 1917, 

SCMMoNS IN APPLICATION VOll 

UlXilSTRATION OF LAND— 
State of Minnesota, Count}' of St. 

Louis — ss. 
District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
In the matter of the application 
of Zinsmaster - Smith Bread 
Company to register the title 
to the following described 
real estate situated in St. 
Louis County, Minnesota, 
namely: Lots Twenty-nine 
I (2?»t and Thirty (30) In Block 
1 Nineteen (19) in Marine Divl- 
I slon of Duluth, ac< ording to 
I the plat thereof liled and re- 
corded In the office of the 
I Register of Deeds of said St. 
Louis County, Minnesota. 

Aiipllcant. 




A Store C'rowilod With Bargaln.s 
Awaits Voiir Chok-o. 

COOK & GITTIXSOX 





the 
his du- 

wlU do 
divided 



been con- 
for several 
the milk sup- 
he will do the 
other city depart- 

satisfled 



A S a Cliristmae Gift 

-^^" our dainty leather articles 
will remain for a lifetime a token of 
your esteem. Btrt to serve such ends 
your gift must be well bought. We 
cite some meritorious examples of 
this nature bcIowJ 

Rich Things in Leather That Will Appeal to Your Friends 

Dainty Lcatlicr Novelties for 
Milady or Gentleman 



L.-idies' Dresses Cases in the 
finest leather, equipped with 
genuine French ivory, always 
please. 

Hand Bags and Purses in all 
tlie latest leather creations. 

Sewing Bag, Sewing Box, 
Needle Ca.sc or an imported 
Sew ing Basket will surely please 
her. 



He also would appre- 
ciate a Dressing Case. A 
set consisting of a Shirt 
Bag, a Collar Bag, Tie 
Case and Handkerchief 
Case makes a most ac- 
ceptable gift. 

Bill Rooks, Letter Cases 
or Purses are necessities 
and good gifts. 



-Our Store the Ideal Gift Shop= 



Est. 

iS88 



Moritz, 

L'.\rale& 

Moriti 



V 



h 



OWN YOUR HOME 



We can give you an opportunity 
now which could not be more lib- 
eral — the chances are you will nev- 
er be able to duplicate it again. 

A modern, attractive, warm and 
well -located home for sale on rental 
pavments with NO CASH PAV- 
MK.Xr KEHlIltl*'"? 

If you ever mean to buy a homo 
you cannot affiid to lose this 
chance. See U3 at once. 

LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY, 

SF.LLVkOOI) 1ILU<;. 

Phones, 408; Sunday, Lakeside 125-L 



Duluth Trunk Co^ 

Mannfaeturrrn 

220 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 

// irs Leather We Have It 



r.l- 



IjKliAL. NOTICES. 

ORDER TO "eI'CAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 

State of Minnesota. 
County of St. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Caroline J. Morgan, De- 
cedent. 

The petition of Edward W. Blodgett, 
as representative of the above named 
decedent, togetlier with his final ac- 
count of the administration of said es- 
tate, having been tiled in this court, 
lepresent.ng, among other things that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying th.it said final account of 
i.aid administralion be examined, ad- 
justed and (illo'ved by the Court, and 
that the (7ourt make and enter its 
l<nal decree o:'. distribution of th* 
n-sidue of the estate of said decedent 
to the persons entitled thereto, and 
for the discharge of the representa- 
tive and tlie suietie.? on his bond. It li 
I rdered. That fald petition be heard, 
and said llnal account examined, ad- 
justed and allr wed by the Court, at 
lije Probate Court Kuums in the Court 
Houre, in the City of Duluth in said 
County, on Mo iday, the 15th day of 
December, 1!*13, at ten o'clock, A. M., 
and all perso'is interested in said 
hearing and in said matter are hereby 
cited and requ red at said time an-l 
pl.ace to .show -aufje. If any there be, 
why said petition sh</uld .not be 
granted. Ordefd further. That this 
order be terved by publieation !n The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 



P Ceorge Hanson, F. A. Pat- 
rick Building Company, Thad- 
eus Fowler, lA-ander Sinotte, 
City of Duluth, Unknown 
Heirs of .lames McCahill, de- 
ceased, Jane P. liailey, F. C 
B. Solen. Eugene H. C. Uailey, 
Lizzie E. Coleman, M. L. li. 
Rawliiigs, C. f{. Bailey. 11. W. 
Bailey, Unknown Heirs of 
Chancellor Bailey, dec^-ased, 
Frank Mason, and all other 
persons or parties unknown, 
claiming any right, title, es- 
tate, lien or interest in the 
real estate described in the 
application herein, 

Defendo nts. 
The State of Minnesota to tlie abov« 
named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the applicatifin of the 
applicant In the above entitled pro- 
ceeding and to lile your answer to the 
said application in the office of the 
cl«'rk of said court, in said county, 
within twenty (20) days after the 
service of tliis summons upon yoj, 
exclusive of the day of such service, 
;ir.d, if you fail to answer the said ap- 
l«llcalion within tlie time aforesaid, 
the applicint in this proceeding will 
apply to the court for the relief de- 
manded thei-ein. 

Witness, .1. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, at Dulutti, 
In said countv, this 22nd day of Novem- 
ber A. D. iyi3. 

J. P. JOHNSON'. 

Clerk. 
By R. E. JOHNSON, 

Deputy. 
(Seal District Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
FRANCIS H. DE CRO.XT. 
Attorney for Appli'ant. 

Ofll -e and Posioffice Address, 
606 Torrey Building, 
Duluth, Minnesota. 
D. H., Nov. 24; Dec. 1. 8. 1913. 



ORDER OF HEARIN<: ON PETITION 
FOR LTCKNSE TO SELL, MORT- 
GAGE OK LEASE LAND — 
State of Minnesota, 

County of St. I„ouls — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Timothy J., AValter. Ray- 
mond. Eldrldge and Lawrence De- 
merce. Minors. 

The petition of Selina Detnerce a."' 
representative of the above named 
minors, having been filed in this Court, 
representing, among other thing.-;, that 
for reasons stated in said petition. It 
Is necessary for the best Interest.s of 
thi» estate of .said minors and of all 
persons int'rest<d therein, to sell cer- 
tain lands of said minors in said peti- 
tion described and |)rayiMg that license 
be to .s« linn Demerce granted to sell 
the said land: it is ordered. That said 
petition be heard before this Cou,rt. at 
the Probate Court Rooms in the Court 
House In Duljth, In said County, on 
Monday, the 22nd day of December, 
1013, at ten o'clock A. M., find all per- 
sons interested In said hearing and In 
.•-•aid matti r are hereby cited ami re- 
quired at said time and place to show 
cause, if atiy tiiere be, why said peti- 
tion should not be granted. Ordered 
further. That this order be served by 
publication in The Duluth Herald, ac- 
cording to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., November 
28lh, 1913. 
, By the Court. , , ^ . ,, t. . 

S \V. OILPIN, .Tudgc of Probate. 
SearProbate Court., Si, Louis Co., Minn. 
I D. IL, Doc. 1, 8, 15, il'13. 



4 DEFECT IVE PAGE 

1 ■ J ' ! I I 1 



I' t 
I 



i 



f 






i 



ixf 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1013. 



•■•• 



WHEAT GAINS 
AT T^CIOSE 

Market Bulges on Decrease 

Shown in American 

Visible Supply. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, DECEMBER 1, 1913. 



Dec. — 

Dululh 

Minneapolis 
• 'hioago . . . 
Winnipeg . 

May — 

Duluth 

Minntapclis 
rhifURo . . . 
Winniiig .. 



December 
May 



December 
May 



Open. 



.81'-i 

.82'8-U 

• 87 '8 



Hisfh. 

.82'4- 

.86'8 

.82^- 

.87=14 
.87 »B 
.90»i 
.88'<« 



Low. 

.82-«H 
.80 -R 
.85 -8 



.86*1,-87 

.86 

.8it»*-«i 

.87%->/aa .88 Ub 



'lose. 
.83«8 
.82'8b 
.86 ^4 b 
.82 ^b 

.87-\-' 

.87b 

.?0^b 



Nov. 29. 
.82'* a 
.81^-1 
.86>„-' 
.8238b 



7=^, a 



.8 

.864i-\a 
.90'i,-'*b 
.8Sb 



r ago. 

.7S--R 
.79-8 
.81 
.78% 

.86-'g 
.85 
.SO 
.88 '. 



DULUTH 

Open. lllpb. 

.82 '-4 a .82 '/b 

.86^3a .87 



DURUM 

IjOW. 
.82 
.86 -H. 



MARKET. 

Close. Nov. 20. 
.82ava .82'4a 

.87a .86^4 



DULUTH LINSEED MARKET. 

Open. Uieh. L»\v. (Most-. Nov. 

1.38»2b 1.38»^ 



1.44»sa 



1.44'a 



1.37 
1.43 



1.37 »'j a 



1.43% a 



29. 
38 '/zb 
44»-b 



T'r ago. 

.81-4 
.86'2 



Yr ago. 
1.26 >4 
1.30% 



Flaxseed Turns Weak With 

Light Demand From 

Crushers. 



No. 1 northern .85 'ic; 



Diiliith Hoard of Trn«I«' 
Wlient biili;««I nharply Just 
rlotv under tlic Impetuw 
peotetl ileeri-ase ol SKt.UOO 

May 
VloNtd '?,e 
I 



1. — 
the 



Oee. 

before 

of an unex- 

bu .•«ho%%n In 

American visible supply. Ileeein- 

»\b.at elo-sed ' -o up and 

DfMM-niber durum 



up 



the 
ber 

and the >Iay option 'ic up_. 

off al ;{.'»> c. I«J^ 
at 52c for the bent 



Duluth tlo'^e- Wheat — On track: No. 1 hard, 86»4c. « i, > 

northern 83'k^83^c. No. 1 northern to arrive. 86 'kc; Montana No. 2 hard. 
"Montani nVi" on track. 84''ic; December. 83^o: May. S-^-^.S^'fec Durum 

_<m track: .No. 1. 83'«c: No. 2. 81 '„ It 81 He: to '^ViV'-VrJuVi'^'. .to arrive 
SI- .•• December 8'%c- May. 87c asked. Unseed — On track, fl.3.M^ to arri\e. 
Jl3>w. December $1.37 C asked; May. $1.43?8 bid. Oats-On track. 3«Hc; tc 

""'\4f•S^or■rJcXTs'^of dc^est^lc^ 515.447 bu: last year, 

30 4M7 bu last vear. 77.038 hu; barley. 79.524 bu; last year lb3, 
ikst ear 40.096 bu: flax. 113.603 bu; last year 395,bl3 bu. 

-of domestic prain-Wh^at 1.69«603 bu: last year 1.409.669 
last vear. 107.832 bu; barley. 951, 4o5 bu; last Near. 33. .252 
rye 8«,610 bu: la.st y^ar. 451 bu. flax. 483.074 bu: last year. 195.15. bu 

'Elevator receipts of bended prain— '\^ h'^at 
oats. 30,732 bu: last year, 780 bu; barlt-y. .'.44.5 
bu last vcar, 4,979 bu. . 

Shipments of bonded grain — ^^ heat. 



ADVAHCES 
IN STOCKS 

'J 

Hesitatiori at Start Gradual- 
ly Gives Way to Bet- 
ter Tone. 



No. 2 
84:^4c 



oats. 
4.569 bu: 

Stiipments 
oats, 96.775 bu; 



619.090 bu; 
"69 bu; rye. 



35.962 
bu; last 



bu: last year, 
year. 18,324 bu 



11,967 
flax. 



bu, 
bu; 

bu; 
1435 



Highest Figures at Close for ihoS 
Most of Speculative 
Leaders. 



44,000 bu; last year. 181.162 bu. 



unehanKt'd 



Oats 
rIoHfd 

grinlc. 

riosfd 

bid. . _ 

At Wtnnlpejr. Dceembcr 
uiid May at 37'.aC 



on Minnrapolln 
at .*»« -le bid and 



U 3U 

The 



>1ay ^*hent 
eallH at M7>ic 

oat.t rloMird 



ak 'oday 



wheat, Ts 
higher. 
Hour, '^c 
chant' d. 



wheat market was ■«^»' ., ^ ^.,., 
the influence of lower cables an. I 
iKund. Keceipts were lighter. 
-Of. ial news came i ul to m- 
ihe situation. Trading wa3 
and came within a narrow 



UJuhr 
Quiet ll 
end no 
flue/H e 
featureless 

"^^iHriinb.r wheat op.ned unchanged 
at 8J'..- and weakened '4C up to tiie 
final h. ur. The May option opened 
un-haiiged at 87 -'hC an<l h1.«o diclined 
»4«-. A fair demand was 
durum, and tht market 
ber option held steady 
82 'iC. Mav 



the 
sales 
receipts 
soon." 



pnce. 



reporl'^d for 

in the Dcceni- 

ai its opening 

durum op'-ned 



'sC 



86 



Ki- and weakened that much 



cff at 
more. 

A sharp falling off in 
predi' led from now on as 
the tendency noted among 
the West to hold tneir 
Stocks for higher price.-J 
last \ve»-k aggregated 
Bhipmt 111.-; as reported 
noon laiiie to 8,254, 
poit<<l that line 
points are filled 



receipts is 

a result of 

growers in 

remaining 

Reieipl.-^ here 

5,04!»,2!'6 bu ami 

up to Saturd.ty 

32 bu. it is re- 

elevators at interior Ian 

but expectations are j e.xpecte 

hipped 



fild lower: corn. \'S*;:1 

I'aris, wheat, unchanged; 

higher. I'.erlin. wheit. un- 

Jiudape?t. wheat. V»c higher. 

• « « 

A D. Thomson is a bull nn the pres- 
ent ;:ituation. -Said he todiiy: 1 be- 
lieve in buvlng a little wheat on 
breaks. There are more export 
tbitn reported and Northwest 
will show a big decrease very 

Oklahoma crop report. The Oklahoma 
crop wheat condition for I^t.^*;"ber 
88 per cent; acreage spwn compattd 
with last fall 13'J per cent. A record 
breaking crop Is expected. 

Broomhall cabled from ^Iv^'y^XV 
"The weakness in Rosano Saturda> 
and decline in America together 
latest advices of Hue weather 
gentina caused moderate 
and at the opening values were 
lower with pressure in March, t ollow - 
'the opening the "larket ;vas dull 
tending lower and prices fuilher 
>.d. Manitoba offers were larpei 
ral demand was uuletei. 
nts are lighter but 
the rniled Kingdom showe 
Increase and larger ""ivals are 
d. At 1:30 p. ni. the undertone 



wtstern red. 1; winter. 39; mixf-d, 76; 
total w-hnat, CI 5, last year, 712; flax 
88, la^t year, 38J; oats, 11. lasr year. 
31; rye, 4, last year, 9; barley, 15. 'nst 
year, 79; total of all grains, 633, last 
year, 1,214; on track, 250. 
* * • 
Clearances reported: Wheat. 626.000 



New York, Dec. 1.— Underlying 
ness was apparent through the 
noon stock market, although 
continued on a limited scale. 



firm- 

forc- 

buslness 

Hesita- 



tion in the early period gave way 
gradually to a better tone and ulti- 
mately the average of prices was 



decl- 
hin- 
con- 
Call 
time 



bu; flour, 
enual 874, 
I't.OOO bu. 



jn.OOO bbl; togither 
000 bu; corn, none; 



t iicy 
oatd. 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



Ing 

but 

lost 'sd. 

and the gent 

World's shipme 

amount to 



with 
In Ar- 
realizing here, 
"Q "ad 



the 
^d 



that < niv suffi'ient will be 
out to admit of space to ac.-ommodaie 
farmers' marketings during the next 
fev. Weeks at least. 

It is pointed out by operators 
the trading position for the 
mav be expected to be governed 
ly by Angentine crop 
breather was advl 



3id lower. 



thnl 

moment 

large- 

condillon^-. Fine 

ed through Argen- 



was easy „- . 

••('orn — opened '.^liVd lower 
realizing due to the very heavy 
on contract. Following the opeumfe, 
shorts covered and prices 

rn ^.d on the light world's shipments 
to the I'nited 



'U -4 ' 

particularly 



on 

tenders 

pening, 

advanced 

hipments. 

Kingdom. 



Wheat Is Easier on Selling Due to 
Argentine Weather. 

Chicago, Dec. 1. — tJeneral selling duo 
to fine weather for the Argentine har- 
vest made prices easier today In 
wheat. An increase of 39 per cent in 
the winter crop acreage of Oklahoma 
counted also against the bulls. World 
shipments, hov.ever, were light. The 
opening which varied from 'g'i'i'.c 
lower to a shade advance, was fol- 
lowed by a moderate sag carrying the 
market uniformly under Saturday 
night's level. 

Rains Improving the crops of Indi.i. 
added to bearish sentiment, but a lib- 
eral decrease In the visible supply led 
to a decided upturn. The close was 
steady, Vift^iRC to lofl'juc net higher. 

Unsettled weather tending to delay 
receipts brought about a show of 
strength in corn but the gains were 
not held by the deferred options. 



raised fractionally above Saturday's 
close. 

I'ossibility of supreme court 
sions today in important cases 
dered confident operations, as did 
ditions in the money market, 
loans renewed at 8 per cent and 
rates were higher. Can stocks grew 
weaker as lack of inside support be- 
came apparent, and by noon prominent 
preferred shares were between 2 and 
3 points lower. Their decline gave the 
whole market an easier tone. 

Bonds were irregular. 

American Can shares were weak- 
ened al the opening of the market 
today by the government's dlssolutioo 
suit, filed after the close 
stock fell l^i 



Wolverine 

•Ex-divldend. 
I'nlittted StoekN — 

Arizona & Michigan.. 

Bay State <Jas 

Begole 

Bohemia 

Fioston Kly 

Butte Central 

Butte & London 

I Cactus , 

I Calaveras 

I <'hlef Consolidated ... 
'Con. Copper Mining... 

Corbin Copper 

Cortez 

! Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Doble 

Dome Extension 

Ely Consolidated .... 

First National 

Coldfteld Consolidated 

Holllnger 

ton 

ose 

Mines Co. of America. . 

Montana 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Pearl Lake 

Porcupine "iold 

Preston 

Raven 

Smokey Dev 

South Lake . 

Southwestern 

Superior & < 

Temiskamlng 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont . 

Tonopah Exten.sion 

I'nited A'erde Extension 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon . . . 



41 



ll 



■ T 
.1 



Miami 
;i<>be . 



16c 
6O0 

1 \ 
46c 

Ic 
30c 

•> 

l>-4 

IM. 

1'* 

Be 
26c 

1% 
9-16 
10c 

5c 

2c 

2^ .2 
7-16 1 
16% I 

2% I 

ITi 

2 
94c 
60c 
42c 
80c 

Be 

5c 

2c 
10c 
25 

214 

"bc" 

14c 

6 

7'k 
1% 
3Bc 
IVfe 
6c 
9 



41 '.4 



IBc 
17c 

1 

1^ 
50c 

5c 
35c 

2'/vs 

1% 
3-15 

2-^ 
10c 
35c 

I'i 
ll-lo 
36c 
12c 

:U! 
3-16 

I'l: 
17>.& 

3*2 

•» 

2 '4 
98c 
.SOc 
17c 
95c 
15c 
12c 

6c 
16c 
75 

3H 

2»> 
15c' 
16c 

6'4 
7^^ 
1% 
4Bc 

10c 
2»^ 



MARKET LETTER 



fnvosiiirs nn^ ju<t bo^inniiig to roallzr that RKD 
oxtreniely clieap at pres«MU prit*'-. Th,. r.plciuli(i new 
report from tin' suiMTliiU-iuIent has eaii^ed a great 
this sloi'k. ami it Is beginning t«» fe<'l the rffeet ol the 



W.VKKIOR stork Is 

- re<v>vecl U\ the last 

deal of inquiry for 

biiyiiiK or<ler«- whieh 



are in the ma ket. Tlie lir.D WARHIOH mine is t-omins to the front 
with lots of ore belnj; opened up. and last reports indicate an ore Iwdy 
of unusual siz- is belnff opened on the 70«-lev«'l. where work is lieinff 
pushed with vl}i<>«*. Tills ore Is the regular sand earlMtnate silver-lead 
ore and earrio}, oxeellont values in both of these metals, 

I'nder the ttnns of the new two-yoar smelting ecuitraet whicli has just 
been signet! up with th<' Ameriean Smelting A: Ketinint; Cituipaiiy. these 
ores will be smelted on most advantageous t<Tnis. 

We regard UKD W.VRRIOH as eheap at anything under S2.00 p«r 
share and beli 've It will sell at this price Ix'fore the next thrt^e months 
have passed. There are many stoeks which it would pay to sell and 
invest pro« eeds in RKD WAHRIOR. 

LEWIS H. MERRITT & CO. 




common 



Saturday, 
and the 



the market was firm, \a 



It 



utting is no^ 
country in the 
has also begun 



tin:! this morning. < 
generi.l tli rough the 
north }>nd harvesting 
In the renter. 

rin.\»<eed SelN Lower. 

Flaxse. d sh< wed weakness from the 
opening with a uuiet call from crush- 
ers" interests. Foreign cables were al- 
so lowtr. A be-irish factor was im- 
parted in the situation by the rela- 
tive weaktnlng of the Winnipeg mar- 
ket, widening out the spread between 
the boards to 20 cents a bushel or 
about at an • xport basis. The n.,ir- 
ket wakened to the extent of 'g 1' Ic. 

December flaxseea opened unchanged 
at $1.38 -a and closed nt ?1.37'i and 
May opened unchanged at $1.14 >-2 and 
closed al M.43"s. 

At Winnipeg December flax closed 
at Jl-16'., and May at $1.24 -g. 

.Monday. 



At 1:30 p. m. 
•"•sd higher." 

Rosarlo closed on Saturday with 
heavy reali/:ing on the fine weather 
^nfl favorable hnrvesting returns from 
the north. Foreign bids for the new 

erop arc lowered. 

• * • 
AVorld-s shipme nt.«— Wheat _ ^htp- 
12 816.000 bu against lu. 440, 000 
t week and 12.720,000 
I'orn, 2,005,000 bu 
last week, and 



to 
for 



Xi 



Decem- 



bu last 

against 2,J88.- 

3,762,000 bu last 



No. 
No. 
Xo. 

Ko. 

No. 

No. 
Ko. 
No. 
Nt\ 
.No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
Nt>. 
No. 



iiaul 
liaol 



«'ush Sale."* 

\«hiul. 1- cais 
H Ileal. 4 rttrs . . 

HlKMl, 1 (Mr . . 



.$ 



Ill rUicui 
mnlitru 
III lUieiii 
111 r: he! 11 
uinlcni 
11; nlie;ii 
i.«M"tl.'tni 

l;iirii!til'. 
I! iL^Hhoiii 
:: 1: nlitr.i 
:; ! rllieiu 
•J .•icriin-m 
:; 11. nl!ir;i 
i iiotUiern 
3 i.i>rtlirt-ii 
:i LoiiliiTii 
'i iiiiMUeiii 
J inillitni 
■lui i-.htat, 
Jtejtvu-.l v.liiat, 
Kij«.'«^"'>i v.:uat, 
Ni>. 4 i.iir;liriii 
Miifiit. 1 
wlual, >i 
vtlieul. • 
uiirat. 1 
» lit-a'. . 1 
vH.eat, 4 
vl.ial. I 
.No graiif uinat 
Sajui'le vrvle 
Suulilf ^ruilc 
84IU. ie 
.No. 1 



lU lais 

:.:< lars 

: 1 rat* 

l.Ouu bu. in setilemmi 
.•^.'i(Mi iHi. to arrive 

;<,.'.«0 111, 10 arrive 

•it) cars 

j car-i 

1 lar 

I I l-iTt 

I car 

j far.-* 

3 >.'iirs 

1 car 

:i cars 

2 i-«;s 

1 car 



Mouu 
M> lit. 
Mo:a. 

.MdUt. 

.M»iit. 
Mdllt. 
Muiil. 



wl.rat. 
ttlK-at. 
wheat, 

ttije.'U, 
wlitnt, 

tiSieal, 

ulieat, 

2 lals 
wl;cut. 
v.'iect. 
tvlit'at. 
v.lieat. 
»!,ea;. 

K\ ;ical , 
wliirat. 
'.'.atat, 
«liea!, 

witeui. 

1 our 

1 car 

1 i-»r 

v>lival. 1 car ... 

< ar, No. I liaril 
>-ai-.-. No. :; hai' 

rar». .No. 
fiir. im g 



.»-.-» 

.M'i 

.84''* 
.%W 

.8i'4 

.ti:{ 

.s:;'i 
.s;w» 

.81 "8 

.t:"-b 

.SI'* 
.8J'» 



nu !its, 
bu las 
year. 
»iOO bu 
year. 

*. * * 
The Minneapolis cash market 
steady with the demand good 
<hoice and slow for ordinary wheat 
1 northern blue stem sold at '. 
December, and velvet chaff at 
(u 2c over December. Flour sales were 
moderate. Inquiries were good 
bids too low for acceptance. 

« • « 

for 



PrifH^s iitarted unchanged 
higher and rose still more 
ber. 

New buying was only limited and 
primarv arrivals were larger than ex- 
pected but attempts by shorts to cov- 
er tightened the market suddenly. The 
close was firm, •'<bC to >2'S-'»c above 
Saturday night. 

Heavy selling pressure chieflv 
brokerage concerns ^^eakened 
<>ni- firm alone unloaded a round 
lion bushels in the pit. 

I'rovlslfins went up grade 
hogs. Firi?t transactions ranged 



from 
oats. 
mil- 

with 



Tne 
pre- 
ferred •\. Loui.sville lost 1 -^ and Can- 
adian Pacific advanced a point. Changes 
otherwise wtre small and irregular. 

Secondary fluctuations did not altei 
prices much but the tone was better. 
.Northern Pacific and Pennsylvania was 
exceptionally strong. 

i:ffort8 to get prices down as a re- 
sult of the drop in the Cixn shares did 
not meet with success. Speculation be- 
came stagnant when the general ad- 
vance ceased. [ 

Missouri Pacific fell to 24>i. the | 
year's lowest, despite the better show- 
ing for tXtober than many other 
Western svstems. New York Central 
was also weak on its big falling off 
In receipts for the same period. 

The market closed firm. Trading was 
livened somewhat toward the close 
when a fair sprinkling of buying or- 
ders appeared for the important stocks. 
Lehigh Valley rose a point and the 
day's highest figures wore registered 
for some of the other popular specu- 
lators. American Telephone was the 
only exception and reacted over a 
point. 



Soath St. Paul I.ivoKtork. 

South St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 1. — Hogs 
— Receipts, 7,200; f'JilOc higher; range, 
$7.25 (^"^ 7.55; bulk, $7.45 y 7.50. 

Cattle — Receipts, 3.000: killers, 
steady to strong; steers, $5,501* 7.75; 
cows and heifers. $4.50116.60; calves, 
steady, $4. GO'S 9.00; feeders, strong, 
$4.30'U6.85. 

Sheep — Receipts, 2,000; 15c higher; 
lambs, $5.00 'iii 7.00: wethers. $3,751/ 
4.25; ewes. |2.504* 100. 

I/ondon StookM. 

London. Dec. 1. — American securities 
opened fjuiet and unchanged. Later in 
the forenoon prices Improved a frac- 
tion under light covering. In the 
afternoon Canadian Pae;fic advanced, 
but the rest of the list barely moved. 
The closing was dull. 




COMPANIES 
; SUBJECT TO THE 





Wa.=;hington, Dec. 1. — Mining corpor- 



ations must pay 
imposed by the 
act, according to 
the supreme cou 
Eight or ten 
been paid to th< 



Furni<-hed by 'lay 
West Superior utrect. 



& Stui'gls, 3 



26 



STOCK!*— 



I lllsli.! l-ow. I nose. 



\, 



•ir 



was 

for 
. No, 
'.ffi 3c over 
from 1'2 

but 



15c higher and there 
sul>sef!uent advance, 
t'ash dose: Wheat 



was an additional 



-No. 



96c: No. 3 red, 91 1*2 (g 93i«:c: 



2 red, 95<5i 
No. 2 hard. 



» • • 
«;raln stocks in Duluth elevator.? 
the week ending Nov. 29. 1913, giving 
changes in the week 
hard, 1,206.285 bu; 
6.435,657 bu: No. 2, 
171,024 bu: No. 4, 

12,!il'8 bu: no grade, ,.>.,fo i... 

red 123 bu; .■=pecial bin. 1.5,298 bu. 
durum, 1,242.295 bu; winter 
bonded, 530,151 bu; total .. ,„- -oq 

bu- domestic, decrease, _,.}0&,.. J 
^ ' bu 



88'.*.(fi 89»i.c: No. 3 hard. 87 -Vi 87 '4c; No. 

2 riorthern. 88!Jj89c; No. 3 northern, 
87 f^/ 88c;. No. 2 spring, 88-^1 88 ',^c; .No. 3 
spring, 8 7 f* 88c. 

Torn — No. 2, 72i,«'ff73c; No. 2 white, 
73'a73>^c; No. 2 yellow, 7B»2Ca'76c; No. 

3 71'"<<«72c: new. 66»^ra67e; No. 3 
white. 72''>(ft73c; new, 67^u'</68c; No. 



Wheat — No. 1 

No. 1 northern, 

8 10,895 bu; No. 3, 

2,238 bu; rejected, 

1,279 bu; western 

hin. 

352,812 bu; 
wheat, 10,- 



yellow, 73 1j 74c: 
Oat.s — No. 3 white, 
Kaii^ of prtccs: 



new. 68»2'ii69c. 
38"4C to 39»4C. 



97015' 



Wlieat- 

noo 

May . . . . 

Corn — 

Dec 

Mav 

Oats— 
Ptv 



Open. 

..s6'»-8r, 
.90Vt-'» 



whiter 

1 wiiiier 

; Ii;iiil winter 

a«le, har.l « inier. . 



ar. ti» K 
cars, -No. 
lar, .No. 

1 rar 

w»heaf, 1 car 

\»Ut6i, 1 car . . . 
tf.ade "!icat. 1 cat. . . . 
irtiieni. 1 cai . l"mleil. 



le. Iiiinl uiiiter. 
I liarU winter. . . 
ti.nril ni.itir 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

.No. 

No. :; 

No. 1 
Mixcil 

Mi\iil 

f.arle- 

Oa.U, 

Uuts, 

OaL<. 

Oats. 

OaU. 

No. -1 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Nu. 

No. 

No. 



I. M cars. beiKlc'l 

i,MU> I'U. !<• airive 

Iti rats ai.d ^a:t car.. 

IS lats ■'■ 

I.c(H.> bu, to aitive 

:< I ius 

:; cars 

; car. No. I 

No. 1 

No. :: 



i-ar, 
i-ar. 



II. nhii 
<!uruiu, 
iltiruru. 
iluriuu. 
<liii-ii:u. 
(i'.ir.:;ii, 
tluruiu. 

wl!l;it, 

Hlllilt, 

ulieul. 
. 1 car 

2 cars, 4 W 

1 <ar. 4-\V 

I .ar. o-O 

3 cais. l-NV 

1 car. 3-\V 

r.c. 1 <a' 

flax. 5 cars ^■ 

fla-X. 3 ".art 

flax. 7 curs 

fiii.\, l.jo bu, to arrive 

flax. '1 I a.-s 

flax. 'IIVM Iju, in arrive... 
flax. *W bu, to arrive 

llax. J cars 

nortlu-ni. .'ijO bu. to arrive 

flax, l.cOO bu. to ar;ive. . 



.83-4 

.%^\ ! 

.8)'« 

.»■•■■» 
.til->i 
.81', 

.;i-'ii 

.7!i-l, 

.7-^1 

.i»2 

.SL""i 

.83 

.bi-a 

.8.i 

.81'2 
.81-'8 
.83 
.81'-j 
.81 a, 

.4:. 

.:to»» 

.31>, 

.;;3'» 
.:r,>a 
.:;••. U 
..-.2 

1.40 

!.:«!'; 

1.40'5 
1.4«M,4 

!.:«'=** 

1.10 

l.:iu'» 

l.ot»^a 

l.jO'a 



, bu; bonded, increase, 123.210 

. vear ago, 3,749.194 bu. 

1 ■ Coarse grain.--Rye, 312.380 bu de- 
crease, 81,418 bu: flax, domestic -.564 - 
122 bu. decrease, 30,101 bu; bonded, 
104.745 bu, decrease, 357 bu: total tlax, 
2,668,8ii7 bu, decrease, 30.45L 

, lev, domestic, 936,313 

I 1,(101,165 bu;_bonded, 

1 crease, 155,676 bu; 

I 1.192.790 bu. 

I ed, 1,965,476 

I total <iat.- 

i 748 bu. 



total -^'«>' 



.7««4- 
.7(i«%-: 

.r?7U- 

.41 



Hisli. 

.8ti'i 

.70-4 
.70'i 

.?7-'^- 
.tl^i 



Low. 
.8.-.-ii 
.89\- 

.R7 
.41 



eio.se. 
.8«i»4b 
.1/OSb 

.TO-ib 
.70'4 

.4Ua 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

and 



bu; bar- 
bu, decrease, 
212,524 bu, de- 
oats, domestic, 
decrease, 21,661 bu: bond- 
„ bu. increase, 257.409 bu; 
3,058,266 bu, increase, 235,- 



Wheat Declines at First 
Turns Strong. 

Minneapolis, Minn., 
, turned strong today 
cllnes. Shorts 



Then 



* ♦ • 

Canadian millers have filed a peti- 
tion with t'-.eir government virging 
that some action be taken to remove 
the discrimination which at present 
exists between the ocean freight rates 
on wheat and flour exported from Can- 
ada to <;reat Britain. It is clainied 
that during the past year steamship 
ratis had bti n Increased from 50 to 
100 per cent; that the rates charged on 
Hour are from Ec to I2c per 100 pounds 
higher than on wheat, and that as a 
result, export business in flour had 
beer practically ruined. The millers 
contend that for ten years the average 
difference between the rates on wheat 
and flour was a little more than 2c. 
The freight rates on both were later 
advanced to 23c per hundred. They 
afterwards reduced on wheat but 
on flour, leaving a 
In favor of the raw 



MARKET GOSSIP. 



Duluth 
Wheat, 12 
cars; tiax. 



Cars of wheat 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 

Winnipeg 

Chicago .... 
Kansas e'ity, 
St. Lntiis, bu 



Cars 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 
"Winnipeg . 



bonded grain 
lars; oats, 9 cars; 
:: ears; total, -5 c 
.•» * • 

Satur- 
received: day 

515 

502 

1.951 

17 

S4.000 

115.000 

« « 

Satur- 
f linseed received: day 



receipts: 
barley, 2 
ars. 



bu. 



Foreign c'.o^m 



* 
cables: 




A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 



ATWOOO-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention given to cash 
grains. We give all shipmenta our 
personal aitenllon. 

DULUTH. MIXNEAPOLIS. 



were 

kept stationary 

\\ ide differtnce 

product. 

Hon. George A. Foster, Canadian 
minister of trade and commerce, sug- 
gested to the deputation that ap- 
peared before him that the steamship 
and milling interests get together and 
confer on the question. He expressed 
doubt J'.s to whtther anything could be 
done without joint international action. 

"American millers are greatly in- 
terested in the outcome of the Ca- 
nadian protest. Should a reduction in 
flour rates from Canadian ports go 
into effect, lines plying from American 
Atlanti<' ports would also be forced to 
follow suit," said B. Stockman, man- 
ager of the Duluth-Superior Milling 
comnany, this morning. "The re- 
moval of the di.vcrimination by the 
steamship companies would bring 
about a wonderful increase In our flour 

export trade." 

* * m 

A car of (Canadian wheat that 
graded No. 1 hard under Minnesota 
state inspection was sold at 86c a bu 
at Minneapolis on Saturday. Ten cents 
a bu duty was paid on the car, and 
also the freight from Fairmont, Sask., 
, to Minneapolis, or practbally at rhe 

. , , „„^ , I sarne price as wheat of like grade from 

LUerpool. t Minnesota or North Dakota. This 
transaction is taken by millers down 
there as foreshadowing other wheat 
importations during the winter months. 

• * « 
Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No. 

1 hard, 70; No. 1 northern, 166; No. 2 
northern, 71; No. 3, 19; sample grade, 
5; rejected, 1; no grade, 8: durum, 107; 



Dec. 1. — Wheal 
after early de- 
were forced to cover 

! and prices advanced sharply. Dellv- 
' eries on contract light. December 

'closed ^fp^^c higher than Saturday 
and May '4li\c higher. Local eleva- 
tor stocks increased 200,000 bu for two 
days. 

December opened 81l2e: high, iZM'iP 
•"sc: low, 80"«c; closed, 82'sc. 

May opened 86Vi; Th 86Hc; high, 87 ^c; 
low, 86e; closed 87c. 

Cash wheat: No. 1 hard, 85'^8 (?7 85"8c; 
No. 1 northern, 83^s '(' 85>«c: to arrive, 
835^ 1' 84'ic; choice to arrive, 85 'gc; 
No. 2 northern. 81 '-s fi 83 »i,c; No. 2 hard 
Montana. 83»8 ''o 84 »&c; No. 3 wheat, 
79H 'ft81'«c. 

Flax — Receipts, 43 cars; year ago, 
90 ears: shipments, 8 cars. Demand 
good. Closing price, $1.36 i.^ -^r 1.40. 

Parley — Receipts, 99 cars; year ago, 
187 cars; shipments, 62 cars. Parley 
steady. i:)emand good for better 
grades but slow for others. Prices 
unchanged. 

Flour — Prices were lowered 

count of recent declines In 

Mills reported only moderate 

Shipments, 68.308 bbl. In wood. f. o. 

1 b. Minneapolis, first patents, $3.95'f^' 

4.25: second patents, $3.75f(4.05; firsts 

clears, $2. 70 Tx 3.50; second clears, $2.60 

'>7i2.70. 

! Bran — Tn 100-pound sacks, f. o. b. 

\ Minneapolis, $19.00^3 20.00. 



Amalgamated Copper 

Am. Can 

.\m. Can pfd 

Am. Car & Fdry 

Am. Locomotive . . • . 

xAin. Sugar 

Am. Tel. <Sr Tel 

Anaconda Copper . . . 

Atchison 

B. F. Goodrich 

B. F. C.ood, pfd 

B. R. T 

•Canadiiin Pacific 
Central Leather .... 

C, M. & St. P 

Corn Prod 

Krie 

(Jranbv Con . . .' 

«;t North, pfd 

<;t. Nth Ore etfs. . . . 

Guggen. Fx 

Illinois Central 

Inter.-Met. pfd 

Lr uis. &• Nash 

Lehigh Valley 

Mexican Petrol 

Missouri Pacific ... 

National Lead 

Nevada Con 

New Ha.v Ml Ry 

N. Y. Central 

Northern l'acir:c .... 

Paciflc Moil 

Pennsylvania 

Reading 

Rep. Iron & Steel. . . . 
Fay Consolidated . . 

Reck Island 

Southern Pacific . . . 

Tenn. Copper 

'I he Texas Co 

Third .Wenue 

"Cnion Pacific 
IT. S. Rub. 1st 
*IT. S. Steel... 
IT. S. Steel pfd. 
I-tah Copper . 
Western I'nion 
VVestinghouse 



69 ! 
26 •■'li 
88 I 

42Si 
30 i 



68''fe| 

24*8 1 
87 I 
42 6* I 
30 



69 

25 •& 
87 

42-8 
30 



106 »4 
!120Nill9»4ril9U 

33H.1 33-'i,! 33 -^s 
92 I 92 I 92 
16 i 16 1 16 
78 'si 77';ii 771-j 
86-% I 86 •'■i, I 86 3+ 
223>«"223U:223Vs 

24 i 24 I 24 

98 I 98 98 

9(9 9 

1 26 "^4 1 26^4 26^4 

68 I 67=^4 1 '^7^ 
123»4 123 -8 

31'., I 31 'i 
45 V. 
106^ 



.1123''. 
.! 311.:: I 
.1 46 I 
.lioe'": 
. I 6 7 i'2 ' 
.il30'2 
.il46'j 
.1 45 I 
.1 251,1 
.1 44 i 
I6\t 
79 i 

10614: 

: 23 '4 I 

108^., 



'1.'. 



130i,.2 



4.1 *-2 

1061/2 
571/2 

130»,:. 



Cotton. 

New York, Dec. 1. — Cotton: Futures 
closed steadv. December, 13.14; .lanu- 
arv, 1.'?.00: March, 13.12; May, 13.03; 1 
July. 12.93. i 

Spot steady; middling uplands, 13.60; 
gulf, 13.75. 

THEPRODUCplARKET. 

New Vork- 1 

N'eNv York. Pec. l.--Uultci - Finn : rrreipts, .'..lOO ' 
tiiK; crciraory *.\;ra.s. .'Hi"3.'i.-: flr^Is, 27(i?;i2c; ^eo- 
*i;itW. .'.';;•«(« 2<;'jc: tlilnls. 22'2i:". iS'vc: licUl extras,} 
."^Pw:!'.'*; first,'). 27(rt2'.'c; fPCfUKl.". 2:('si«2«i"; thirds,, 
:;2'iC«2;<c: »talo ilaio'. t\nf<X. ;;!i(«.?2c: goul to rriiiie, I 
2»)if. aye; cimiiiii.li to fair. 22i'f2.".c: prucess extras, I 
2'|i':i"2t>o: imilaii.in creaiutiy fir«t*. 24i<«24Va'-; fac- ; 
lory current iiialic, firsts, 22'-;i'; seiiul^, 20 '2 i£' 21 Vic; 
rackliiB stock, held, 21("21'2c; current make, >o. i, 
2(K.i20'..S:C. 

«'lieest>— Stfail) : reccU;Is. 400 liozee; cfate. uhule ; 
n.ilk. helil specials. lt>»^(«lC\c; aviraKc fancy. 
mVic; frrah f-.t^-iils. ltl'4c; average fanc.v, l.")^4 (n Kic; | 
umler cr.i.les. 12'*(« K.'ic; <lal>ic«. lieltl. lO-'^t" 17c: ' 
Wlwciislu whole i.iilk <lal.<ie«, fresli. ir>»4 ("!«<•: held,; 
IH./ilii'jc; ittiii^ auiJ fla-i.-, leUelO^ic; Biaui.«. Idi \ 
ir.'^c. 

Krks sieaily: reitipM. 3,:'00 cases; fioh gatiicrcd . 
extras, jr.(..7 4Sc: cMra firrt.s. 41i<i4.",c: fir>ta. 42("4:;c; 
secoiuN, :;«fc'41c: thirds aiul iM.rer. 30(3o7c; dinles, ■_ 
2.'>("28c; chects, 2;Un 25c ; refrigerator, special iiiark.-. 
fjucy. :?0(«3«'4i; firsts. 28'-i''< 2iiHc; s«-(iinl«. '27W 
28c; tliInU to tlrits, on cUw-k. 24C'»28\ic: lontr giades. 
22e"2r.'sc; dlrtic*. 22(t'.26c; state, Pennsylvania and I 
neaihy 'hciincrj' whites. r.8(<iil.'i( : pallierctl whites. ,".6 1 
(«<!0c; heiiiicry linHvn.s. 48(?50c: mixed voluis. 42(a , 
48<.'; wesle-ai gathered whites, 4li(sJ3c. I 

Chif'Hgo. 

*"hicago. Dec. 1. — liuttcr, higher: re- 
ceipts, 6,(>06 ttibs; creamery e.xtr.as, 
32',^<'<; 33c; extra firsts, 31 'f; 32c; firsts, 
L'6#29c; seconds, 22i«irfi24c. Eggs 
lower; receipts. 4,568 cases; at mark, 
cases Included, SO'fiSec; ordin-iry 
firsts. 28fi32c: firsts, 35c. Potatoes- 
Receipts, 30 ears; unchanged. I'oultry 
— Alive higher; springs, 13c; fowls, 13c; 
turkeys, 15c. 



the corporation tax 
Paync-Aldrich tariff 

the decision today oy 

t. 

million dollars have 
government by such 
corporations, under protest, and 600 
suits and claim.*! were started to re- 
cover the money. The case came to the 
court through Slratton's Independence, 
Limited, of Coloiado, which ar-suceest- 
fully contended that proceeds from 
ores mined by f. corporation from iU- 
own premises was not "income" within 
the meaning of the corporation tax 

law, but a conversion of capital inte 
money. 

The court also held that the corpora- 
tions were not entitled to deduit tli- 
value of ore before it was mined •:: 
"depreciation." Chief .lustice Whit, 
and Justice McKenna and Holmes di.<- 
sented on the latter poitit. 

Coiiiinerelnl AgeiicloM. 

The principle was laid down today 
by the supreme . ourt that the business 
of commercial airents furnishing infor- 
mation as to thi! financial standing ol 
business men tc a commercial ratim.: 
house in another state, is subject to 
state "occupatio i" taxes and does );oi 
come under intei state commerce. 

The court upheld the con.-titutional- 
ity of the Kentu jky law taxing tiie oc- 
cupation of attorneys who furnish such 
Information. 

Commerro C oiuiiilNsion UpIirl«I. 

The uniform system of accountiiu 



DOUBLE THE EFFECT 
OF THE RATE DECISION 

(Continu(d from r-aee 1.) 



1 4 6 >^ ! 1 4 6 i^j 



46 
24 >,^ 
44 
15 S 



95%i 

106*4 

23V,. 

108 

160'..,159''h' 

19>4i 18*4i 

17"'f.l 171/fe' 

i3>, I ir.'ii 

871.4; 

28 I 



pfd. 



.1 87ii 
.1 28U 

.;ii2i4 
.: 39 
.1491-4 

.1 98 \ 

.! 54 'i 

.105 

.! 47 -» 
621/4 
63 \ 



4.1 

2 4 "'8 
44 

15 1.8 

771^ 

95 «H 
106 

2314 
108 
160 i-i, 

18 s; 

I 7 -^i 

II »i 

2«»i 



Ksln, 111., Pec 1." 



c:iicin. 

-r.i.uer — steady. 



1112i4ill-^.'4 
■39 '20 

1148^4 1I491H 
I 98 ^s I 9Sii8 

1 54i-;ii o4'Ki 
1106 :i06 

I 47i/i| 47% 
! 62 I 62 



1 



63^ 



6*« < 
J- 



•Ex-dividend Can. Pac. 214 per cent: 
Steel common. 1 U per cent: Am. Sugar. 
Union 



Pacific. 2 "a per 



on ac- 

wheat. 

sales. 



88 

43 

248 



Year 

. age. 

Tl:: 

868 

1,42:* 

48 

157,0<'O 

137,000 

Year 

. ag<». 

00* 

90 

218 



Liverpool tiratn. 

I..lverpool, Dec. 1. — Whe.at — Spot 
steady: No. 1 Manitoba, 78 l*4d: No. 2, 
7s li/id: futures weak; December. 6s 
lliidf March, 73 I'Ud; May, 7s li4d. 
Corn — Spot firm: American mixed. 6s 
8d: La Plata, futures firm; December, 
4s 9^4d; Janiuiry, 5s *«d. Flour — Win- 
ter patents, 28s 9d. Hops — In London, 
Pacific coast, £6, 6s @ £7. 



1»4 per cent: 

cent. Money, 7 per cent; silver, 56 •» 

New York Hourly Sales: «„ .r- 

.32,46n 
.64.700 
.66,609 
.78,252 
105,700 



11 a. 
Noon . 

1 p. m. 

2 p. "ni. 
Total . 



m. 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS, 

Closln quotations furnished by Gay 
& SturglB, 326 West Superior street: 

.\sked. 



LlHted StockJi — 



I Bid. 



XeTV York (irnin. 

New York, Dec. 1. — Wheat — Decem- 
ber, 95=^4c; May, 98isC. 



Midway lJor.se Market. 

Minnesota Tr.ii.»fer, St. Paul. .Minn.. Pec. 1. — 
Barrett & Zimmerman rcimrt : .\ few sales of hiir«eg 
were nuido to luiiibtjrlr.a Interests dutine the day. Fair 
retail demand fcr f«nn lior«es and mares. Shli>!noir.s 
were n.ade to I'ort .\rtliiir. Out. Clyndon and 
Stio»el l.ake. Minn.; Paik Falls, Wis., and White 
Dalo. Midi. 

ItriifterB, e.\tra $17.'-(f' 21.'. , 

Prafttrs, .-hclce ]40("170i 

Iir.ift<rs, lonimon t.i pord 8-'i('< l:!" 

Farm mares .md hoi-scs. extra 13,'>(^I8j : 

Farm marts and horses, choice 10.">(d l:«) 

Farm horse--, common to good 70t« 100 

l>cliverv horses 90«i 210 

I>riTers and s.iddU>rs 8."i('i210: 

Miile^j. acccrdlnc to size 110^22 



I 



SHIR TO 



H. POEHLER CO. 

(EstabllGhed 1855.1 

GRAIN COIUMISSIOM 

MINNEAPOLIS. DULUTH. 



ftANDALL, 
lELIABLE 

MENNEAPOLiS 




E£& 
BAIN 

DULUTH 




ITCHELL CO. 
ERGHANTS 

WINNIPEG 



ChlcaKo Llventock. 

Chicago, Dec. 1. — Hogs — Receipts, 
40,000; firm, generally 5c above Satur- 
day's average: bulk of sales, $7.60 Vf 
7.85; light. $7.15(&7.80; mixed, $7.15(?* 
7.95: heavy, $7.50Cd7.95; rough, J7o0g' 
7.60: pigs, $5. 00ft 7.15. 

Cattle — Receipts, 26.000; steady to 10c 
lower; beeve.i, $6.60#9.60; Texas steers, 
$6.65 W 7.70; Western, $5.90 f? 7.75^ stock- 
ers and feeders, $4. 80 ft 7.60; cows and 
heifers, $3. 30 »& 8.10; calves. S6.50C« 1 100. 

gheep — Receipts, 47,000; weak to 10c 
lower; native, $3.90 ti 5.00; Western. 
$3.90^5.00; yearlings, $5.10Trf..40-, 

lambs, native, $6,001} 7.60; Western, 
$6.0011 7.66. 



New- 
strong; 
closing, 
60 and 
Prime 
sterling 



New York Money. 

York, * Dec. 1. — Call money 

6'n8 per cent; ruling rate, 8; 

6f?8. Time loans stronger; 

90 days, 6*?r5i«: six months, 6. 

mercantile paper, 5i.2'S5';i; 

exchange steady; 60 days, 



'i 



$4.89.90; demand, $4.85.10. Commercial 
bills, $4.8014; bar silver, 56 is: Mexican 
dollars. 44c. (Jovernment bonds steady; 
railroad bonds irregular. 



Adventure 

Alaska 

Ahnieek 

Al,iomah 

Allotiea 

Amalgamated 

American Zinc 

Arcadian 

Arizona Commercial 

Poston »i Corbin 

Butte & Pallaklava. 

Butte & Sujierior . . . 

Chino 

Calumet & Ari'.ona. 

Calumet & Hecla . . . 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly U'est 

Fast Butte 

Franklin 

(•ranby 

♦ Ireene-Cananea ... 

Hancock 

Indiana 

Inspiration 

Isle Royale 

; *Kerr Lake 

Keweenaw .......... 

Lake 

La Salle 

: Mass Copper 

1 Mason Valley 

j Mayflower 

] Miami 

I Michigan 

\ Mohawk 

Nevada Con 

' Nlplssing 

; North Butte 

I North Lake 

I Old Colony 

I Old Dominion 

; t3jibway 

, Osceola • 

[Pond ('reek ..,, 

I Quiney -^ « 

•Ray Con. ...>►...« 

I Shannon 

Shattuck 

Shoe Machinery y 

Superior & P.oBtiJn 

I Superior Copper 

'. Swift f 

i Tamarack ■•^••l-' 

i Trinity < . . ». 

Tuolumne 

IT. S. Mining common.. 
I'nited Fruit 2} i: 

Ftah Consolidnteq 

rtah Copper 

Victori 

Winona 



I'l 

18-^4 

240 

95c 

30 

68 '4 

15i«: 
l'.i 
4'S 

50e 
4 

271. 

37 '4 

60 
388 

111^ 

3214 
214 
91^ 
2 '4 

67 

28*4 

12 
3 

i3n 

1614 

41* 

2% 

5 

3 7-16 
2 

3 3-16 

6 1.4 

211,4 



Copper ^- y \ 

ia I • -i-j, 

,81 |^a4«*^*>>** 



38 

1518 

8 
23 4 

1 

4 
47 
75c 
69 
17 
64 
17'-8 

6 
24 
47 

211; 
104'* 
26 

SVi 
70c 
361.4 
165',^ 

7% 
471^ 

1'4 

1^^ 



I'.i 
19 
245 

I's 
31 
69 
16 

IVi 

4'4 

75c 

4i« 
28 
37-'>4 
601*: 
400 
12 1^ 
32 li 

934 
3 

68 
29 



B. & B. SUIT 
IS SETTLEO 



Official announcement of a settle- 
ment in the Butte & Ballaklava ai.d 
Anaconda t^uit was made today, in a 
telegram from Butte to the effect th;it 
the case before the court had been 
clo.-ed. 

I. Frelmuth, president of the Buttc- 
Ballaklava Mining company, said t) 
day that the settlement of the svAi 
was entirely satisfact<jry to his com- 
pany. Said he: 

"It was a compromise, and like all 
compromises, was a case of give and 
lake. The Butte-Ballaklava comp.' ny 
gave certain ctiiicessions to the west 
of the vein and received equal conces- 
sions to the oast of it. We retain 

; practically as much as we had before 
the .^nit started. I consider the ad- 
justment a very satisfactory one to 
both sides, and both parties feel 

i pleaded about it." 

j After a quiet opening with a tend- 
ency to weakness, the market in min- 

' :ng stocks turned strong at Boston 

I today and closing prices were firm 

I with fractional ga!ns from Saturday in 
some Issues. Butte & Superior closed 

I a shade up at $27.62: .North Butte 25 
cents up at $23.50; Shattuck »1 up at 
S-24. Amalgamated Copper a fraction 

' off at $68.87 aiid Alaska t^old 38 cents 

I up at .$19. 

Business in Duluth 
limited and prices 

1 ui.ch.'.nged. Calumet 

! solidated met with a 
at 40 cents and Red 
75 cents. 

Quiney output in November was 
4C2 tons: against 269 tons in October 
and 178 tons in September. 
* • • 



is in form w h eh 
basis is the same 
the other boat lines. 

The class rates now 
Buffalo are: 

Class. 1 

Duluth 41 

Twin Cities . . 66 



indicates that the 
as that adopted by 



in effdt from 



o 

36 
49 



3 

28 
37 



Differentials 16 13 9 
'i he new ratci published 

Dululh 35 31 24 

Twin Cities . . 63 66 4- 



4 

20 
25 

~5 
are 

17 

30 



6 

18 



6 
151s 



16 

1'4 



U\2 

19 '-i 



13 



Diff<^rentials 28 24 18 

It will be seen that the uiffercntiais 
are Increastd an follows: 



Class. 
Present . . 
New 

Difference 



1 
,16 

,28 



13 

24 



3 
9 
18 



13 11 



4 

6 

13 

~l 



prescribed by the interstate commerce 
eosTimission for railroads was upheld 
today by tlie stipr«-me court. 

Kentucky Kntem Approved. 
Rates on grain and other commodi- 
ties over the Louisville &^ Nashville 
r.ailroad were today approved by the 
supreme court In the so-called Ken- 
tucky State rate case. The deci.= ion of 
the- Federal court of that stale was af- 
firmed. 

Child Labor Law Valid. 
The Illinois child labor law was to- 
day sustaitied as "i'onstituiional bv the 
supreme court In the case of Arthur 
Beauchamp, a 15-year-old boy who re- 
covered a verdict of $4,500 fr#;ii the 
Suges & Burns Manufacturing company 
for an Injured hand. 

Lackawanna MuKt Pay. 
The Lackawanna railrr.ad must nqy a 
$2,000 fine for transporting its own hay 
to feed mules in Its mines. That, in the 
;ipinion of the supreme court, was a 
violation of the commodities clause of 
the Hepburn law. and a conviction in a 
lower court was tr»day sustainea. 

Cut RatoN on DookM I'piteld. 
Cut rates dealers in coiiy righted 
books won a victory today whi-n the 
^.upreme court held that agreements 
aetween publishers and regular book 
■ellers not to sell bofks to those who 
resell to the public at less than the 
orice fixtd by the publisher, violate 
ilie Sherman r.nli-trust law. 

Can Tax Itank Stoek. 
The .^moskeag bank case, to test 
tlie ripht of New York city officials to 
rax stock of national banks without 
It-ducting the indebtedness of the 
• \\ ners of th' stock, was decided to- 
lay by the supreme court in favor of 
the city officials. 



HUERTAISSAIDTOHAVE 
FLED TO_yERA CRUZ 

<<'ont;nued from page 1.) 

minister, to Vera Cruz. He has not 
conferred with John Lind, according 
to Information here today. 

The policy of the American govern- 
ment continues to be one of waiting, 
while the financial blockade weakens 
the resources of the Huerta regime 
a?id the Constitutionalists press for- 
ward their vigorous campaign. 

Rear Admirtil Fletcli* r reported to- 
day he had received fi:rlher assur- 
ance from the Constitutional general, 
Aguilar, that noiie of his ftirces would 
interfere with the oil wells around 
Tampico and Tu-xpam. 

William Bayard Hale conferred with 
Secretary Bryan as a preliminary t> 
his conference with President Wil.son. 



More Than Expected. 

tlie decisie n in the lake 
the interstate commerce 



and rail 

eommis- 

to be 



In 
case 

sion ordered the Duluth rates 
reduced to the basis of 35 cents, lirst 
class from Buflalo. but the change 111 
the Twin City rates was not ordered 
by the commission. On the other 
hand the commission left the way open 
to the increasing by expressing 
opinion that th 



the 

Twin City rates were 

commission expressed 

lined "by an order"' to 

.-ase, and the boat lines 

the increase without 



3'& 


141; 


17 


4*4 


2\ 


5ife 


3T& 


2% 


3'% 


6 


21 -s 


1 


39 


151-:. 


8 1-16 


24 


H/2 


414 


47% 


80c 


70 


17VJ 


55 


17 "h 


6V« 


24 1« 


471^ 


2-s 


211/i 


105 


26 


4 


80c 


36% 


166 1^ 



curb stock.s va.i 
were practically 
& Montana Con- 
good call sellh'.g 

Warrior sold at 



STOCKS — 



Bid. Asked. 



Scott, 



Mtu'.tana. 
Corbin. . 
Sonora. . . 



Lacs, 



Butte-Alex 
Cactus . . . 
Celumet & 
Calumet & 
Calumet & 

Carman 

Chief Consolidated. 
Cliff Mining . 
Cuyuna-Mllle 
Denn Arizona 
Keating .... 
Rainbow T>ev. 
Red Warrior. 
San Antonio. 
Savanna .... 

Sierra 

Warren 

Warrior Dev. 



.% 



7.00 $ 7.25 


• • • • 


.02 


.04 


.06 


• • • • 


.06 


.65 


.70 


.27 


.32 


1.37 


1.60 


.60 


.70 


2.00 


2.60 


6.75 


7.25 


.88 


.95 


9.60 


• • • ■ 


.76 


1.00 


• ■ • • 


2.00 


1.00 


1.25 


.60 


.70 


6.00 


6.60 


.76 


.90 



too low. The 
itself as not in 
reciulre any incr 
have published 
an order. 

From the stf.ndpoint of comparison 
between the I'uluth and Twin City 
rates the new tariffs more than dottble 
the effect of tlie lake and rail deci- 
sion. The inc -ease of 7 cents first- 
class over the spread ordered In by the 
commission, is greater than the in- 
crease of 6 outs, first-class, which 
the commissior required by reducing 
the Duluth rpt<s to the Chicago basis. 
The members of the traffic commis- 
sion have not had an opportunity care- 
fully to check over the new rates with 
a view to dete -mining their effect on 
Duhith's future. The mere fact that 
the differential ft Twin Cities over Du- 
luth has been nearly doubled, how- 
ever, indicates the importance of the 
change. 

The new phase of the case 
garded as even more itnportant 
time than the decision itself. 

i shows a dispos tion on the part 

! railroads and >oat lines to re. 

' Imluth's position and extend it rates 

I that are equitable. 

The reduced rates to Duluth 
ing effective te Duluth. Dec. 1 
the Twin Citieit, .Ian. 1. 

I Word was received today from I ne 

; Herald's Wash ngton bureau that the 

• railroads had teen given an extension 

! of time to D* ?. 10 to file their 
tariffs, on the representation 

\ was impossible to get all of ih. 

I pared by Dec. 1, but the 

' Mutual compary 

; dh ative 

I will be. 

ghippeWas have 

I $5,63^1,889, HE SAYS 



is 


re- 


at 


ihis 


fo 


r it 


of 


Ih" 


■ognix»- 



A'llIa'M Army Moving. 

Juarez, Mex., Dec. 1. — eJen. Fran- 
cisco Villa's ad\-uice army of 3,500 

I rebels which is moving to attack Chi- 

i huahiia City. 225 'liles south of Juarez, 

' today reached a point 6J miles from 
the bordef. They were forced to d< - 
train there becaute of the destruction 
of the railroad. Preparations were 
made at once to march overland to 
the slate capital. 

Another train carrying 1,000 rebels 
was made ready here for the journi^y 
south. 

Northern Mexico, embracing the 
states of .Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahulla. 
Netivo Leo iiand Tamat!lip.as, ;.nd in- 
cluding the territorj' from the bort^.er 
to a line 500 miles southward, will 'oe 

: under the authority of the rebel forces 
within two weeks. The forces which 
are lighting Huerta will then join nt 
Guadalajara with a view of marchini? 
on to Mexico City. 

elen. Francisco Villa, the rebel 
leader, so announced yesterday. This 
campaign, he said, contemplated not 

I only the capture of Chihuahua City, 
but al«o the spreading e.f the rebel, or 

' Constitutionalist, authority 
fc<.uth. 

! He is to be joined in the 
later by Men. Carranza, the 
the revolutionary movement. 

So far as the nortli is concerned. 
Villa said, the campaign is between 
14.500 Federal troops and 20,300 reo- 
els. 



further 

interior 
head of 



becom- 
and to 



new 
that it 
^m pre- 
tariff of the 
is believed to be In- 
of 'what the new schedules 



111' 'llTll T 



4" 



DIac In Annoyed. 

Paris, L>ec. 1. — (ien. I'orfirio Diaz, 
former president of Mexico, who. ac- 
cording to a report from Mexico City, 
has been plaeenl on the list of avail- 
able un-asslgneei generals and may 
therefore be called upon by I'resie'.ent 
Huerta for active service, let it be 
known yesterday that he was in- 
tensely annoyed at the virions reports 
ccmcerning him. He declined to an- 
swer inquiries regarding his inten- 
tions. 

t rionds of Oen. Diaz poitit out that 
the ex-president is in his 84th year, 
and is somewhat deaf, and they add 
that his family agree that peace and 
tranquility are essential to him. 



OFFICE OF 
ELLVA'i'OR 



CHIEF TROYER ACTS 
AS PROSECUTOR 



48 
1'' 

IT; 



Owing to some previous engagement. 
Third Assistant County Attorney 
White was unable to attend municipal 
court this morning, and Chief Troyer 
conducted the pro.^ecutlon for the 
state and succeeded in binding Andrew 
Norhut over to the next term of the 
grand jury on a charge of attempted 
robbery in the lirst degree. 

With his police court experience of 
nearly twenty-five years. Chief Troyer 
handled the prosecution successfully. 

According to the story told the court 
by the proprietor of the Ryan hotel at 
5i2 West Michigan street, Norhut and 
a man known as "Scotty" attempted to 

hold him up. , , ^ . , 

The police have so far failed to locate 

"Scotty." 



Fi^m The Herald Wa»hin»«on Burrau. 
Washington, Dec. 1.— That the Chip- 
pewa Indians of Minnesota have a 
fund of $5,634 889 in the treasury of 
the United Stales is stated in a com- | ' 
munication to congress te)day from Scc- 
retarv of the Interior Lane. The sec- 
retary also states that during the las: 
fiscal year 8,326 acres of land were 
allotted to the White Earth^ Indian.s. 

ALL MINNESOf ANS 

THERE BUT WilLLER. 

from Tho Herald Washinffton Bui^au. 
' Washington, Dec. 1.— All the mem- 

■ bers of Minnesota congressional dele- 
: gation except Representative Millet 

' were in the house today when Speaker 

■ Cl-^rk called tlmt oody to order. Mr. 
I Miller has beei in the Philippines ami 

Is expected here about the middle oi 
I December. 



THF CONSOLIDATED 
CO.MPANY— 

Duluth, Minn. 
Tne annual meeting of th«> C<!nsoll- 
dated Elevator 1 <<mpany of t>uluth, 
Minn., will be held on Tuesday, De- 
cember 16, 1913, in the city of New- 
York, state of New York, at the office 
of Morton .•=!. Paton, No. 1 Broadway, 
Rt 12 o'clock noon of said date. 
G. H. SPENCER, 

Secretary. 



GAY&STURGIS 

326 WKST SI I'KitlOR ST. 
Member* of the New Vorii and Bom- 
ton Stock Kxehangen. 
LlNtrd Scourltlen Inrludlng FH .AC- 
TION' AL LOTS boDght and MoId on 
both exchanges. 

Spec'ai Attention to Losal Securities 

DIHl^CT rmVATK WIRI^ TO 
Boxtoii. Now York. Detroit, Chi- 
cago, iloughton and Calumet. 

\%> have a full and complete Sta* 
tlntloal Department, wlUeh U at 
your »»er*lce at ail times. Corre- 
ipondence nollelted. 

B. T. (iOOOELL, BcBldent Mnna^cr. 
W. J. NORTH, A««l«tant Manager. 
BOTH PHOr.ES 2210. 



I 

I 



¥ 



■•- 








. n. 4 


m^^m^mm 






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1 
■ 




■ 




: 








1 

i 1 


I 1 




ll 1 










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■■■■^pw 



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1 r auiL 



- • 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 1, 1913. 



17 



I 



TIME 
FOU 



TO FICH 
HEARIN'J 



jmm 



ORDER LIMITING 

CLAIMS. AND 

THKHKON— 

State of Minnesota. 

County of St. Louis — ss. 
In Probate Court. In the Matter of the 

Estate of Elizabeth Quick. Decedent. 

Letter.s of a<lininistration this day 
having been granted to T. W. Hoopes, 
It i.s ordered, that the time wltliin 
Vi-hich all creditors of the above named 
deeedent may present claims against 
hi r estate in thia court be, and the 
.same hereby Is*, limited to three months 
from and after the date hereof; and 
that the 3rd day of March, 1!<14, at ten 
o'clock A M., In the Probate Court 
Rooms at the Court House at Duluth. 
In said County, be, and the .same here- 
by l8. fixed and appointed as the time 
and place for hearing upon the exam- 
ination, adjustment and allowance of 
such claims as shall be presented 
within the time aforesaid. Let noti'-e 
hi:'reof bf given by the publication of 
this order in The Duluth Herald, 
provided by law. 

Dated Duluth. Minn 
1913 

S. W. niLPIX. Judge of Probate. 
Se.ql. Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
E. 1". TOWNIi. 

Attorney for Administrator, 
I>uiiith. Minn. 
D. If.. Nov. :i4, Dec. 1. 8, 1913. 



of 
be 



of 

of 

for 



as 



November 24th, 



MOKT'IACK FOKKCLOSUHE SALK 
Dffault has been made In the con- i 
dltion.*! (»f that certain mortgage exe- i 
• ulid by .Ie.-«sie M. Jacob.'ion and M. J. 
.Tacob.>»on, her husband, mortgagors, to 
Jerry ii. Hoeffkin, mortgagee, whlcli 
mortgage is dated November 27th. li»yi 
and recorded in the office of the Ue,^is- 
ter of I>eed» of the County of St. 
Louis, and State of Minnesota, on the 
tenth day of December l'.*07, in book 
14-' of mortgages, on page 154. Tiiat 
the amount due and ilaimed to be due 
on said niortgHge at the date hereof 
is ihrt-e hundred forty-four dollars. 
($34 1.00). 

Notice is hereby given that by vlrtu'3 
of the power of sale In said mortgage 
contained and pur.suant to the stat'ite 
In iuch criKcs made and provided said 
mortgage will be foreclo.=ied by the .sale 
of the lands and premises therein de- 
scribed, siluattd In St. Louis County. 
Minnesota, and described as follows, 
to-wit: . ^. _ 

T!-»- .Southwest Quarter of the >,orth- 
west quarter (.'<\VV» of N\V>4 ) of section 
twentv two (l2>. Townshl|) fifty-eight 
(58 >. range thirteen (13). according to 
the map or plat thereof on file or of 
record in the office of the Her^i.^ter of 
Deeds in and for St. Louis County. 
Minnesota. Said .sale will be inj-de by 
the sheriff of St. Louis County. Minne- 
sota, at the sheriff's main office In 
the Citv of Duluth. County of St. I..ouls. 
and Stale of Minnc.-^ota. on Friday, 
Januarv 30, l'J14, at ten o'clock A. M.. 
to pay" the amount duo on said mort- 
gage together with the co.sts of said 
ft>reclosure iiirhniing twenty-five dol- 
lars attorney's fees stipulated in said 
mortgage. 

Dated, November 22nd. 1913. 

JERRY 'i. H')I:KFKTN. 

Mortgagee. 
•WILLI AM FrU.«T. 

Attoinev for Said Mortgagee, 
401 to 40S N. Y. Life Bldg.. Mlnne- 
polls. Minnesota. 
r>. H.. Nov. 24. Dec. 1. 8, 15. 22. 1'9 ■ 1913. 

^rticTeTof incorporation 

— OF— 

COMSTOCK LUMBER 
COMPANY. 

We. th'^ undersiKned. do hereby aa.so- 
clate 'ourf»elves together for the pur- 
pose of forming a corporation in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Chap- 
ter liftv-iigl.t of the Revised Lav.s of 
Minnesota. 1^05, and for that purpose 
do lurebv subscribe and acknowledge 
the following certificate of Incorpora- 
tion: . 

ARTlt'LK T. 

The name of this corporation shall 
be COMSTOCK LIMREK C<>Mr.\NY, 
an'l the gener.jl nature of Its busine.-^s 
shall b<' to buy. sell. let. lease, phit, 
tiwn, improve and develop lands, tene- 
ments and hereditaments; to conduct 
logging operations, operate sawmills 
and planing mills and conduct a gen- 

OCEAN STEAMSHIPS. 



eral wholesale and retail lumber bu.?l- 
ness, and to construct and maintain 
such plants as are neces.sary for the 
conduct of such buainess; and the said 
corporation shall have the power to do 
all things necessary and incident to 
carrying out the express purposes 
herein mentioned, and to do any and 
all things and acts u.-^ually Incident, 
necessary, convenient, expedient or con- 
ducive to the attainment of any of 
the objects aforesaid, or to the conduct 
or management of the business of said 
corporation. The principal place 
business of this corporaliuii shall 
Duluth. Minnesota. 

ARTICLE IL 
The time of the commencement 
this corporation shall be the l.«t day 
December. 1913. an<l shall continue 
a period of thirty (30) years. 
ARTICLi: III. 
The amount of the capital stock of 
this corporation shall bo Fifty Thou- 
sand Dollars ($50,000.00), to be paid In 
In cash and property, or both, at such 
times and in such amounts and manner 
as may be determined by the Buard ot 
Directors of said corporation. 
ARTICLK IV. 
The highest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to whicli .said corporation 
shall at anv time be subject shall be 
One Hundred Thousand Dollars (?100,- 
000.00). 

ARTICLE V. 
The names and places of residence 
of the persons forming this associa- 
tion for incorporation are Erwin L. 
Fisher, I'leveland. i3hlo; John W. Corn- 
stock, Duluth, Minnesota; Reuben 
Knox, Duluth, Minnesota. 
ARTICLE VI. 
The government of this corporation 
and the management of its affairs 
shall be vested in a board of five di- 
' rectors, ail of whom shall be stock- 
1 holders, and who shall be elected an- 
nuallv by the stockholders at their 
, annual meeting to be held the flr.=st 
. Tliursdav in April of each year, and in 
I a President, Vice President, Secretary 
I and Treasurer, who shall be elected by 
' the board of directors at a place and 
In a manner prescribed by the by-laws 
of this corpornt'ion. The office of Vioo 
I Pr>.-sident and Treasurer may be held 
i by the same person. 
1 ARTICLE VIL 

Tlie names of the first board of di- 
rectors are John \V. Comstock, Duluth, 
! Minnesota; Reuben Knox, Dulutli, Min- 
nesota; Erwin L. Fisher, Cleveland, 
i Ohio; A. M. AUyn, Cleveland. Ohio, and 
i L. T. Pope, Cleveland, Ohio, and until 
' their successors are elected the officers 
shall be Erwin L. Fisher, President; 
.John \V. Comstock, Vice I'resideiit and 
Treasurer, and Reuben Knox, Secre- 
tary. 

ARTICLE VUI. 
The caoltal stock of this corporation 
Isliall be divided into five hundred (500) 
; shares of the par value of One Hun- 
! dred Dollars (?100.00) each. 

IN TIOS^TIMONY WHEREOF. AA e 
have hereunto set our hands and seals 
this 2()th day of .November, 1913. 

ERWIN L. FISHER. 
Rl'.UHE.N K.NOX. 
JOHN W. COMSTOCK. 
Signed. Scaled and Delivered 
in Prcience of: 
Hr<;il J. McCLEARN. 

WM. J. lan(.;lois. 



One Cent a Word Kach Tn.«ertlon. 
No AdverUsement Less Than 15 Cents. 

^JFOFsALE^qUSEST^ 



FOUR-ROOM MODERN HOUSE. 




?1, 975.00. 



DULUTH HEIGHTS. 



* 



Built of concrete blocks; hot w.nter 

heating plant; lot 50 by 100; full 

basement, bath, etc.; hardwood 

floors throughout. 



J150.00 Cash. 
$20.00 per Mouth. 



CHAS. 
Phones 408. 



P. CRAIO & CO., 

Sellwood Bldg. 



a- 
* 

# 



NEW HOUSE FOR SALK. 



*■»■ 

# 



Six nice, large rooms, all 
veniences (except heat); 
good location. West Duluth; 
S300 cash, balance like rent; 
13 very reasonable. 

See us at once. It's a snap 



con- 
very 
only 
price 



a- 

■ V 



WEST DLXUTH REALTY CO., 
6202 Ranisev Street, West Duluth. 
Phones: Calumet 328 -M; Cole 244. 



i6 

-v. 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



OMEUKE ROOMS 
IN REAL HOMES 



CJ 4 

I9t 



Men and women employed during the day need homelike 

rooms for rest and relaxation. 

. If you are not quartered in a homelike room you should 

and can be — read The Herald want ads. 

Women who have homelike rooms can quickly rent them 

to desirable roomers through 

Duluth Herald Want Ads 

Read Them For Profit— Use Them For Results. 



o 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xo Advertisement LcbS Than 15 Cents. 



* 

I* 

I* 

lie 
I* 

I* 



WHEN YOU WANT 

TO BORROW $10 OR MORE 

ON FURNITURE, PIANOS. ETC.. 

you naturally want it quickly, con- 
fidentially and at the most reason- 
able cost. You want to feel that 
you are dealing with a company 
who will consider your interests, 
give you every advantage and ex- 
tend the utmost courtesy and con- 
sideration at all times. 

DULUTH LOAN COMPANY, 

307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W. Sup. St. 

Open all day and Wednesday and 

Saturday evenings. 






«f.i•;.i-;.'•;V?^:^i■'f*^;^*^^*i-?^^•*^^A:;.-;.'>'^-3^•.^ 



SPECIAL R.\TES. 
SALARY LOANS. CHATTEL LO.W'S. 
These pay both principal and intcreat: 
you pay back 
you pay back 
you pay back 
you pay back 
you i)av back 
DULUTH FINANCF. CO., 
301 Palladlo Bldg. 
Open Saturday evenings until 9 o'clock. 



Borrow 
Borrow 
Borrow 
Borrow 
Borrow 



$10; 
$20; 
$30; 
$40; 
$50; 



$11.00 
$21.78 
$32.50 
$43.28 
$54. UO 



FOR SALE — NEW. SEVEN-ROOM 
house on East Sixth street; modern 
except heat; price $3,200 with terms 
to suit. 

FOR SALE — STRICTLY MODERN, 
eight-room house on Third avenue 
east and Fourth street; fifty-foot 
lot; pri(e $5,800; $500 cash, balance 
monthly. 

A. F. K READIER, 
406-7 Torrey Building. 

"XnhitneT'waLl CO. 



For sale or rent, fine, entirely mod- 
ern seven-room house at Lakeside, 
near car line; easy terms. (.639) 



For sale or rent, excellent six-room 
Park Point home; easiest terms. (629) 



WHITNEY WALL CO.. 
301 Torrey lUiildlng. 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

On this 26th day of November. 1913, 
before me, a Notary Public within and 
for said County and State, personally 
jippeared John W. Com.-tock. Reuben 
Ivnox and Erwin L. Fisher, to v.ie 
known to be the persons described In 
and who executed the foregoing certifi- 
cate of incorporation as incorporators, 
and they acknowledn^^d that tliey ex- 
ecuted the .same as their free act and 
deed, for the uses and jpurpoaes therein 
expressed. 

HUGH J. McCLEARN. 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis Co., Minnesota. 
(N'otarial Seal. St. Louis Co., Minn.) 

Mv commission expires Sept. 2, 1917. 



FOR SALE — NEW. SIX-ROOM 
house, Winona street. Woodland; 
water, sf-wer, bath, electric light; 
evervthit\g first class; $2,800; $500 
cash; balance on very easy terms. 
William C. Sargent, 102 Providence 
building. 



FOR SALE— TWO- 
four rooms and 
four rooms and 
hardwood tioors; 



FLAT BUILDING. 

bath downstairs, 

toilet upstairs; 

onlv $2,300; vvUl 



SITUATION WANTED. 

FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— THE REM- 
ington Typewriter Employment de- 
partment is the standard niedlam ft>r 
the placing of stenograpiiic help. 
When you want a good 8tenograt)her, 
just call Melrose 23(( or Grind IM. , 
We will take care of your i'equire- 
ments completely. No charge fcr 
this service. Remington Typewriter f 
company. No. 20 Fourth aveuje wefct. | 

isiTUATION ^'AN1'T:D by YOUNG j 
lady as stenographer and also for | 
general ofi'ice work; willing to b\- | 
gin with small salary for experience , 
and advancenvenl. Melrose 255 -K. 
Write H 634. Herald. 

SITUATION "W'ANTED"— AT HOUSE- | 
work or cooking, where 1 can take | 
my 5-year-old daughter with ine; i 
would leave city. Address Mrs. M. | 
McDonnell, 1915 Elmlra avenue, Su- i 
perlor. Wis. 

SITUATION \\ .XNTED — PRACTICAL 
nurse would like work, confinement ^ 
cases and also a.^^sist with house- 
work. Mrs. Sam .Suwden, 315 West 
Second street. Call Grand 2237-Y. 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
0jl[PAGE|8, 

PERSONAL 

ERSO.NAlT — LORENTZON METAL 
WEATx.iCR Sriill'— Wo equip with 
metal weather strips any kind of 
windovis and doors. We guarantee 
all windows and doors that we equip 
to be left in perfect working order, 
so that it will open and close prop- 
erly; will be free from rattling and 
will be dust, soot and rain proof. 
Lorcntzon Metal Weather Strip Co., 
618 East Second street, lower flat. 



_pmyA;rEH^ospiTAL. 

PRIVATE HOVIE BEFORE AND DUR- 
ing corfinenient. best of care by pro- 
fessional nurse; babies also cared 
for. Marga -et Finkle. Call Melrose 
2454. 16 \V>st Fifth street. 



PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES DUR- 
Ing confinement; expert care; infants 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 284 
Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 

Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife; pri- 
vate hospital and home; 329 N. 58th 
ave. W. Phones: Cole 173; Cal. 270. 



DULUTH REMEDIAL LOAN A.'^S'N. 
401 First National Bank Bldg. 
Organized by bui'iness men of tiiis city 
for the purpose of loaning money on 
amounts of ^10 or more on chattel se- 
curity. The only Chattel Loan As-socia- 
tlon in Duluth, licensed by the city, 
and whose rates comply strictly with 
the charges allowed by Minnesota laws. 

WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF~^ErT 
sonal security at lov.-est rates. Call 
on us, 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co.. W. 
Horkan. New 15^8-D; Melrose 3733. 



SITUATION WANTED— AS HOUSE- 
keeper In hotel or take charge of 

rooming house by middle-aged j Personal — Ladies' 
widow. Write F 554. Herald. 



PERSONAL— RJ'^NT AN ELECTRIC 
cleaner. $1 a day, makes houscclean- 
Ing easy, cleans rugs, mattresses, 
draperies, etc., special contract 
rates; hand machines, 25 and 50 
cents a -Jay. Moore Co., 319 West 
First street. Mel. 3248. Grand 2054-Y. 

PERSO.VAL — AMERICAN GIONTLE- 
nian of means, of good character and 
refined, seeks a wife of medium size, 
under 35; she must have a few thou- 
sand dollars in cash and be of Kood 
character also. Write with no fear 
of regret to Box 685, Portland, Or. 



MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wlfo; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east; Zenith 1225. 



. LEIITONE!;, 
Second strcc 



MIDWIFE. 2106 WEST 
Phone, Lincoln 475-A. 



MONEY TO LOAN — HU.VTERS— WE 
I loan money on rifles, shotguns, re- 
: volvers; will hold till next season 

before sold. Keystone Loan Co.. -2 

West Superior street. 

MONEY fC) LOAN— LOANS MADE OS 

I diamonds, fur.s, watches all goods of 

value; $1 to $1,000; lowest rate." in 

' city. Key.stone Loan Co. 22 W. Sup. St. 

; MONEY^ FOR SALARIED^EOPLE AND 
j others upon their own name; cheap 
I rates; easy payments; confidential. 
I H. R. Carr. 509 Lyceum building. 



WANTED TC^^M^ST^^^^^^^TlTni^^^^'im 
four furnished houselieoping rooni-»; 
no children 'Phone Melrose CSiC. 



BRAZING. 



_J/VATCHES^PA!REO^ 

Guaranteed main springs, $1: watch 
cleaned, $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. 1st. 



DYE WORKS. 



CA.ST IRON, .STEEL. COPPER, BR.\S.<; 
C. F. Wigfiirts & Sons. 410 E. Sup. St. 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co., 
19 Lake ave. N. Grand 1516; Mel. 1327. 



accept 
Write 



lot or 
K 515. 



acres as 
Herald. 



part payment. 



Minnesota, Department of 



State of 

State. 

I hereby certify that 
'itrunient was filed for 
office on the 28th day 
A. D. 1913, at 9 o'clock 
duly recorded in Book 
porations, on page 622. 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, E 
Secretary of State. 



the within in- 

record In this 

of November, 

A. M., and was 

X-3 of Incor- 




ENT- 
INDIA 

UISE' 

THROUGH 
the Medi- 



Bombs 



terranean, 
Suez Canal, 
id Indian Ocean 
■ and Colombo, 
idetrips through 
Holy Land and 
ping at interest- 
in Europe, Asia 
I, by the 

S. S. CLEVELAND «r) 

From New York. January IS, 1914 

93 Days— $700 and up 

Including sh:ire fxcurs.;ons and a!ln-cessary expenses 
Also cruises to West Indies, Panama 
Canal, Around the World, throuRh the 
Panuma Canul, and Mediterranean trips. 

Send for book Id, staling cruise 

HAMBURG-AMERICAN 

LINE 

150 West Randolph St., Chicago, III, 



OFFICE OF REcaSTCR OF DEF.DS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

S3. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
.strument was filed in this office for 
record Nov. 29, 1913, at 1 P. M., and 
wa.-4 duly recorded in Book 15 of Mijc, 
page 326. 

CH.\S. CALLIGAN, 

Register of Deeds. 
By S. L. PIERCE, 

Deputy. 
D. H., Dec. 1. 2. 191.?. 



CERTIFICATE OF INCORPORATION 
— OF— 

BANKERS TRUST COM- 
PANY. 



Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road. 

^Vermilion Route." 



rtt'i.iTH— 


l.e(iT*. 


Arrive. 


Knife lUvBT. Two Harbors. 


• 7ao».m. 


til :30a. m. 


T<>-.»er. Kl>, Winton. Au- 


t 3:l5p.in. 


• 5:35p.m. 


rura. BiwaUik. McKlnl«?>'. 


til :30p.m. 


SI0:l3p.m. 


Spaita. K»ektli. OUtjert. 




xl0:43p.in. 


Vligliiia. 







•— I>alLv. t— I'allJ e.xi'ept Sunda.v. t— Mixed 
train leaves daily fruiu KiftPetiih .\Teiiue Eaut Station. 
I — Mixed tr.tlii arrives daily cxrept .Sunday at Fif- 
teenth A\ei:uu Kobt StaUua. x — Arrived Uuiun Depot 

Sunday only. 



DULUTH. MISSABE & NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

Offleei 4^6 West .Superior St. 
Phone, 869. 



Leave. 



ArrlTC. 



I. 



( Hibbitisr. C'hlaholin, Vlrtliiia. Kve- 

*7 '40«m -i I'-'lh. '-'oleralne. Sharon, tMpjuu- 

tain Iron, .Spa.'ta. Ulv»abUi. 

UiULiiiig. Chl-.lirilra, Sharuu. 

Virginia. l':TeleUJ 

Coleraiiie. 

Virginia. Ciiisli' liu, Hlb- 

biiiK, Kveleth, 

Utwabik. 



•3:S<lp 



n 



1 

|-M0:3lani 



*3:2l»in 



•7:58pm i 



I 



['16 



:46pffl 



»— Dally. 
Ulualjik. 



f — i>aUy except Sunday. t — Except 



Cafe Observation Car. Missabe Range 
Points, Solid Vestlbuled Train. 



OULUTH &. NORTHCRN MINNESOTA RAILWAY. 
Offlcn, 5IQ Lonsiiale Bldg., Ouluth. 
Trains connect at Knife Itlver dally (except Run- 
day) with 1>. & I- it- trains leaving Duluth at 7:30 
■ • - ' ' ■' - " •" at 



D. & 1. U. traiiu 

a. ir.. arriving at Pulntli at j;".5 ji. m. Con:icct 
Cramer with Grand ilarals stage wlien running. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



Leare. 

t8l2am 

t8.20ani 

Arrive. 

t7.55pm 

}H.55pm 

t7.45pin 



STA'nOX.S. 



ie.lSpm. 

(Soo 
S6.45pm. 

(SoO 
§6.3Spm. 

5.40*01. 

6.3<Jam. 

§4.20um. 

§5.00«ni. 

$l0.20ain. 

§8.(t0aiii 



A rrlTC. 
§l0.30im «.40pi 



Duluth 

Liat Union Station.) 

. .. Superior SlO.OOam 

Line Union Station.) 
... Suierltr .... S9.50an tS.OOom 
(Union Depot.) teave 

Uoughtoa ...tll.OOpm 
. .. Calumet tlO. lOpm 

Islipeming ...j 1 2.20am 
.. MuKiuette ...Sll.30pm 
Satilt Sle. .Marie. §3.2Spm 
... iriontreul S9.5Upm 



tSlOpm 



t6.20am 
tS.ZOam 



SB.20pm Uoiitou SlO.OOam 

I.eave. 
t8.05am $8.ISpm 
tlO. oapmSlO 20am 

1— Dally " 



Montreal . 
New York 



S8.20.im 
§ti.30am 



. .§IO.OOam}IO.SOpm 
. . |7.t5pm t8.30am 



tx.<xifi Sunday, i— DaUj. 



For the purpose of forming a cor- 
poration in accordance with tiie pro- 
visions of Chapter 6S Revised Laws 
of Minnesota 1905. and the several 
law:3 amendatory thereof and supple- 
mental thereto, v.e, the underaigned. 
do hereby associate ourselves by .sub- 
scribing and acknowledging this cer- 
tllicate, specifying: 

ARTICLE I. The name of the cor- 
poration shall be Bankers Trust Com- 
pany. 

ARTICLE IT. The general nature of 
the business of the corj)oratioii shall 
be to acquire, use and improve, and 
for that purpose mortgage, lease, sell 
and convey, such real and personal 
property as ma.v be necessary for the 
transaction of Its business; to beccn.e 
purchaser In any foreclosure or judi- 
cial sale to which It Is a party, as 
trustee or otherwise; to accept or make 
any deed, mortgage or other Instru- 
ment necessary for the transaction of 
the business, loan money and secure 
such loans by mortgage, trust d«ed 
or pledge, purchase notes, bonds, mort- 
gages and other evidences of indebted- 
ness and securities, and to sell and as- 
sign the same, and convert them into 
cash, or into other authorized securi- 
tie.'^. or securities and property not e.K- 
pressly prohibited by law ; to guarantee 
a title to securities gold and trans- 
ferred by It; to become sole surety 
upon any bond without justification; 
to take and hold in tru.st any real or 
personal property, wherever situated, 
by order, judgment or decree of any 
court of record, or by gift, grant, as- 
signment, transfer, device, legacy, or 
bequest from, or by lawful contract 
with any public or private corpora- 
tion or individual, and manage the 
same upon the terms, conditions, limi- 
tations and restrictions therein de- 
il.ared or imposed; also to act as agent 
for the signature, counter-signature, 
registration, transfer, or redemption of 
certificates of stock, bonds, coupons, 
or other evidences of indebtedness of 
any such corporation or Individual, 
and otherwise act as general or special 
agent or attorney in fact In the ac- 
quisition, management, sale, assign- 
ment, transfer, incumbrance, convey- 
ance or other disposition of any real 
or pen^onal property, the collection of 
rents, the payment of ta.xes. and gen- 
erally as the representative of any 
such corporation or Individual; to tako 
and hold on deposit or for safe keep- 
ing money, bonds, stocks, and other 
securities or personal property which 
any public officer, or any trustee or 
other le-ral representative, or any 
public or private corporation, or per- 
son, may desire or shall be authorized, 
ordered or otherwise required by law 
to deposit in a bank or other safe 
depositary, or to pay into any court of 
record; to act as assignee under any 
as.iignment for the benefit of credi- 
tors; to be appointed and act as a 
trustee or receiver, as a guardian, as 
executor of any will, or administrator 
of anv estate, and a-cept and perforr.i 
any other lawful trust conferrtid by 
any court, or by any corporation or 
individual: to maintain and operate 
safe deposit vaults; and genernlly. 
without In any way limiting any of 
the foregoing powers and purpose.s, 
but, in addition thereto, undertalie. do, 
perform and carry on any and every 



FOR SALK— T"\VO-FL.\T BUILDING, 
four rooms and bath down and four 
rooms and toilet up; modern except 
heat; will accept vacant property 
part payment; only $2,300. Write 
K 614, Heral d. 

FOR- SALE — A BAR<:.\IN IN A 

seven-room home at Lakeside; mod- 
ern except heat; $160 down, balance 
at $25 per month; price $2,750. J. D. 
Howard & Co.. I'rovidcnce building. 



business which shall from time to *imc 
be lawful for a trust compriny or- 
ganized under the laws of the state 
o£ Minnesota to undertake, do, per- 
form and carry on. 

ARTICLE III. The principal plnrc 
of transacting the business tif the 
corporation shall be the city of Du- 
luth, in the state of Minnesota, and 
the period of the duration of the cor- 
poration shall be thirty years. 

ART1C1..L: IV. The names and place."* 
of residence of tho Incorporators are 
Albert L. Ordean, residing in Duluth, 
Minne.sot.x; David Williams, residing 
in Duluth, Minnesota; E. B. Hawkins, 
residing in Duluth, Mi'inc-ota; Th )nia3 
J. Davis, residing In Duluth, Minne- 
sota; said four intori>orato.-s shall com- 
pose the board of directors of tlie 
corporation until the first election and 
the address of each of said inforpora- 
tors is First National IJank Building. 
Duluth, Minnesota. 

ARTICLE V. The management of 
the corporation shall be vested in a 
board of four directors; the date of 
the annual meeting at which the 
board of directors shall be elected 
shall be the first Monday after the 
first day of the month of January in 
each year. 

ARTICLE VI. The amount of capi- 
tal stock of the corporation shall be 
Two Hundred Thousand Dollars ($200,- 
000.00), divided into two thousand 
(2,000) shares of the p»r value of 
One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) each, 
and be paid in, in lawful money of 
the United States, on call of the bt)ard 
of directors, and as may be provided 
by law; the highest amount of indebt- 
edness or liability to which the cor- 
poration shall at any time be subject 
is Twentv Million Dollars. 

IN TESTIMt>NY WHEREOF, we, 
the said Incorporators, have hereunto 
our hands and seals this twelfth 
of September, A. D. 1913 

ALBERT L. ORDEAN, 

D.WID WILLIAMS, 

E. B. H.\WKINS. 

THOMAS J. DAVIS. 
Presence of: 
S. B. IRVINE. 
DAVID DAVIS. 



SITUATION WANTED — AS .lANI- 
tross or cleaning in stores and offi- 
ces. Write 1104 West First street, 
flat 2. 

SITUATIO.N WANTED — SC H O O L 
teacher wants work dur'ng off 
hours, and vacation. S. 580, Herald. 

Sn UIVTIO.N \\ A .VT E I>1^iIaDIE.S' TAl- 
loriiig and fancy dressmaking. Call 
Melro.se 1177. 



SITUATION WANTED. 

MALE. 



SITUATION WANTED — AS STATION- 
ary engineer; have ttrst-class license 
llfteen years' experience; own steam 
engine indicator. 2012 Twenty-fifth 
street, Superior, Wis. Thone, Ogden 
391 -A. 



Ask your druggist 
for Chiohe:-ter I'ills, the Dianiond 
Brand. i<'or 25 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggitts everywhere. 

PERSONAL— WHO WANTS ME? I 
can do any kind of furniture and 
stove repairing, plumbing and car- 
penter work; promptly done and 
guaranteed. Call cJrand 1110- X. 

PER.SONAL— FLNE PECANS — SAM H. 
Jones of Mound, Louisiana, grows 
them; he ships direct to private cus- 
tomers everywhere by express or 
freight. 



Louis Dorfman, only experienced tailor 
In Duluth doing an exclusive clean- 
ing, dyeing and repairing business. 
15 Lake avenue north. (.Jrand 1477-D. 



SITUATION WANTED— FIRST-CLASS 
trimmer or buyer; ten years" experi- 
ence, open for pobitlon. I'an give you 
New York and Philadelphia refer- 
ences. Address B 560, H erald. 

FINE PI- 

references. 



SITUATK1N WANTED— BY 
anlst; best experience and 
Write J 55G, Herald. 



_WAJ\[riDJOJUY^__ 

WANTED TO BUY— FOR INVEST- 
ment, lots (In Duluth), acre tracts, 
timber, Improved or unimproved farm 
land. W. D. R.. box 212, West Du- 
luth station. 



WANTED TO BUY— CENTRALLY Lo- 
cated business property direct from 
owner; state price and terms In first 
letter. Address Investor, E 530, Her- 
ald. 



PERSO.VAL — 'Jet away from w.ashday 
troubles by sending your family 
wash to us; 5'^c per pound. Lutes' 
laundry, 808 E. 2nd St. Both phone.'i. 

Personal — The Comfort Beauty Par- 
lors; exi)»rt chiropody, manicuring 
and hairdrefcsing; service iri the word. 
Give us n trial. 20 W. Superior St. 




This directory is intended for the convenience of anyone 
desiring something a little out of the ordinary in their 
daily needs and requiring it in a hurry. The firms repre- 
sented below make a specialty of immediate service and 
will gladly furnish any information that is necessary. 
Remember, satisfaction is guaranteed by every advertiser 

JUST USE YOUR TELEPHONE 

SEE IT IN THE HERALD EVERY DAY. 



f 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 



liedoced freirrht rates to Seattle, I'ort- 
land, Los Angeles tmd nil coast pointv. i 
Dili. Van & Storage Co., 18 4th av. W."! 

APPE.\Dlcrri.S_Thcse eases always 
get ^\ell under Dr. Rlesland's care. 
Ko operations. 707 Palladlo Bldg. 



POIRIER Tr;NT 
East Supeiior 



& AWNING 
street. Both 



MASSAGE— MARGARET NELSON, 218 
W. Superior St., room 8. third floor. 
Also appointments at your home. 

PERSONAI. — LACE CURTAINS TAKEN 
home and done up, 35c a pair; also 
dyeing done. Melrose 6G36. 

Persotial — Combings and cut hair made 
into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 



CO., 413 
'phones. 

DULUTH TEXT & AWNINgToMPANY. 
Get prices. 1608 W. Superior Street. 



GRINDING. 



AT STEWART'S REPAIR SHOP. KEY 
lock and safe work. 18 North Third 
^avenue west. Phone, Grand 091 -A 



ACCOUNTANT. 



Hair, moles, warts removed; 
ions treated. Miss Kelly, 



WANTED TO BUY— SECOND - HAND 
roll top de."k, also atlas city of Du- 
luth; state price in first letter. Write 
E 557, Herald. 



Barker's Remedy for coughs, colds 
catarrii giiaranleid at r.oyce's. 



corns, bun- 
131 W. Sup. 



and 



Set 

day 



In 



(Seal) 
iSeal) 
(Seal) 
(Seal) 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, COUNTY OF 
St. Louis — ss. . r, . w 

On this twelfth day of September, 
A D 1913, before me, a notary public 
within and for said county, personally 
appeared Albert L. Ordean, David 
Williams. E. B. Hawkins and Thomas 
J Davis, to me known to be the per- 
sons described in and who executed 
the foregoing certificate of incorpora- 
tion, and acknowledged the same to be 
their free act and d^ed,^^ ^^^,^^ 

Notary Public. 
St. Louis County, Minnesota. 

(Notarial Seal). , .0,0 

My commission expires January 3, 1918. 

STATE OF MINNES(JTA, DEPART- 
ment of Banking.— ss. , . j * 

I Kelsev S. Chase, superintendent 
of 'banks "for the state of Minnesota, 
do hereby certify that I have examined 
the foregoing articles of incorporation 
of Bankers Trust Company, and 
same have been approved by me. 
that the name chosen for said 
company as given in 
incorporation has 
approved by me. ^ .„ , , , 

WITNESS my hand and official seal 
at St. Paul, Minnesota, this 15th day 
of September, A. D.. 1913. 

*^ KELSEY S. CHASE. 

Superintendent of Banks. 
(Seal. Department of Banking, State 

of Minnesota). 



Wanted to Buy — Second-hand furniture 
and stoves. Hagstrom & Lundqulst, 
2012 W. Sup. St. Lincoln 447-X. 

710 



WE BUY COMMERCIAL PAPER. 
Louis County Realty company, 
Torrey bnllding. ' 



WANTED TO BUY— A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for investment. 
1 69, H erald. 

Second-hand furniture and stoves. Joe 
Popkin, 231 B. Sup. St. Crixtid 2287-X 

H. POPKlN BUY.S~STOVES AND FUR- 
nlture. Grand 2337-A; Melrose 1482. 



WANTED TO BUY— LARGE OR SMALL 
home for investment. A 363. Herald. 

WANTED TO' BUY— IMPROVED OR 
unimproved rairhi lands. A 364, Herald. 



Wanted to Buy — Second 
and furniture. Grand 



■hand stoves 
16«5-A. 



FOR RENT — FINE COR.NER STORE, 
201 North Central avenue; In best 
bu.slness district in West Duluth; size 
26 by 80; steel celling; full cement 
basement; also large warehouse in 
rear; newly decorated throughout; 
rent very reasonable. W. C. Sher- 
wood & Co.. 118 Manhattan Bldg. 

FOR i: ENT— FLATI RON BUILDING, 
Thirteenth avenue west and Supe- 
rior street; modern; adapted for 
I oarding house; will rent stores 
separately. J. D. Howard & Co., 
Providence building. 

FOR RENT— LARGE, ROOMY STORE 
at 1816 West Superior street; well 
adapted for mercantile purposes; 
special Inducement to responsible 
party. F. I. Salter company, 3025-303 
Lonsdale building. 



MATTES 3N & MACGREGOR, 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Coiinaelurs and Systemlzers, 

700-"01 Aiworth Bldg. 

'Phones: Melrose 47 00; Grand 71. 

f] d! HARLOW'E, 304 EXCHANGE 
building, 'i'elephone, Melro.se 3654. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 




A. Haakonsen, dealer 
and expert repairing: 
at J. W. Nelson's, 6 
East Superior atreet. 



ARCHITECT. 



BO.STo.> MUSIC CO.. MUSICAL MEK- 
chandise. IS Lake avenue north. 



PATENTS. 



I'ATENTS — ALL 
See Stevens, 716 



ABOT'T 
Fidelity 



PATE.VTS. 
building. 



W. B. Roe, irchltect and builder, 412 
I'rovidence building. Grand 862. 



ASrIES REMOVED. 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING; 

FOR PAINTING AND BECoiiATlSilTe 
loungdahl & Diers, 223 W. 2nd S 



ea 
t. 



Ashes, cinders and manure 
away; teaming done. H. B. 
both phones. 



hauled 
Keedy, 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 



WANTED TO BUY — HEIFER CALVES. 
Address B 423, Herald. 



_STOCKSJll^ B ON DS^ 

IF G 640, WHO IS ADVERTISING 
some Cuyuna Iron & Manganese Ore 
company stock, will take his cerlifi- 
catc to the office of the company, 
716-717 Torrey building, we have a 
cfish buyer for the same. 



FOR RENT— BARBER SHOP IN NEW 
Rex hotel at Twentieth avenue west 
and Superior street; fine shop and 
splendid location. John A Stephen- 
son & Co., 232 W^est First str eet. 

FOR RENT — SPACB ON SECOND 
floor of No. 24 West Superior street; 
fine location for dressmaking, mil- 
liner or similar business. See N. J. 
Upham Co., 714 Providence Bldg. 



CUYU.NA- 

300 shares 

per share. 



the 

and 

Trust 

said articles of 

been and is hereby 



FOR SALE — 300 SHARES 
Mille Lacs. $2.20 per share 
Cuvuna-Duluth. 90 cents 
W r I t e D 655, Herald. 

FOR SALE — SIXTY-FIVE SHARES 
Me.saba-Cuyuna mining stock; $1.50 
per share; must sell at once. Ad- 
dress X. B.. Herald^_2 

FOR SALE — 100 OR 50 SHARES 
Mutual Iron mining stock. Address 
A 358. Herald. 



FOR RENT — STORE. 309 WEST Su- 
perior street; will include rooms on 
second floor. J. D. Howard & Co., 
I'rovidence building. 



FOR RENT — OFFICES, $10, $15. $17.50 
per month; also room for light 
manufacturing. Apply Christie 

building, fireproof. 



Remodeling, 

A. S. I'age, 

Work done neatly. 
First St. ken I in 



new work and repairing. 
l.,in. Ib6-D. lJi5i1ma1.es tree. 



PLUMBING." 



THE 
W. 



SANITARY PLI-MBING 
First St.. plumbing and 



CO, 

heati 



34 

"g. 



REAL ESTATE. 



O. Pearson, 207 W. 
1271-X, or PttrK 9.. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

l.\1 ERSTATE CxiKPl::^!' CLls..<i.iM.SG CU. 
L Sinotte, Prop., compres.sed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers, 
laze W e.si Alu tugaii .-M. Ijuin ■pnonv^ 



Carpet and rug cleaning; napuLuu prut- 
e«.s. :6enill: j>ye nou.^c. i uoiics. ioSa. 



CIVIL ENGtNEERlNU. 

Duluth Engineering Co.. W. B Ration, 
Mgr., 613 J'aiiadio bldg. Specifications 
piepared uia consuuciiou superln- 
lenacd lor vMUcrworK.-.. bewcrutc 



elc. 



CLAIKVOYANI-HAIR SPtClALISf. 



L. A 



LARSEN CO., 213 Provldenoe Bld^ 
City property, lands, loans, fire Ins! 



flowing parlors, grows 
hair or no ^ay. IS-A LaK-- 



Cos aair- 

a head <>» 

t'v. Mel. ill- 



Department 
filed Nov. 24, 



of. Banking 
1^13. 

KELSEY S. 
Superintendent 



received and 

CHASE, 
of Banks. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, DEPART- 

ment of State. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record In this 
office on the 28th day of November, 
\. D.. 1913. at 10 o'clock a. m., and was 
duly recorded in Book X-3 of Incorpor- 
ations, on page 624. „^„ . ,,„, 
JULIUS A. SCHAMHL, 

Secretary of State. 



TIMBERJ-AI^ 

TIMBER AND CUT-OVER L-A.NDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby, 305 Palladlo building. 



buy standing timber; 
lands. Geo. Rupley, 612 



also cut-over 
Lyceum Bldg. 



J/yWTEDJO^RROW^ 

WANTED TO BORROW— $900 OR 
$1,000 for three years on or before 
on house and lot; first mortgage; no 
agents. Address K 550, Herald. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEED.S. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Louis. — S3. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument "was filed in this office for 
record Nov. 20, 1913, at 8:30 a. m., and 
was duly recorded In Book 17 of Misc.. 
page 60. 

CHAS. CALLIGAN, 

Register of Deeds. 
By S. L. PIERCE. 

Deputy. 
D. H., Dec. 1 and 2, 1913. 



Let the OTHER 

advertiserTAKE 
ALL the chances 
— put your ad in 
The HERALD 



Bl .SI NESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
General store short distance from 
Duluth; buildings, fixture and 
grounds, a chance for right party; 
stock will invoice about $1,000. J. B. 
28, Herald. 

FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN— RES- 
taurant and hotel at New Duluth; 
selling on account of poor health. 
Write O. Sorenson, 320 Common- 
wealth avenue. New Duluth. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR RI.NT" 
or sale, rettaurant and hotel; newly 
furnished; everything up-to-date; 
steam heated, 307 North Central ave- 
nue. 

BUSINfc:.SS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
first-class rooming house, alway.'? 
filled; best location; must sell at 
once. 222 West Second street. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE — 
First-class sawmill; capacity 10.(00 
feet. Address Mrs. I. M. Himebau^h. 
French River, Minn. 



CHWIINET SWEcPtR. 



STOVES-HEATERS. 



STOVES' 
STOVES I 



STOVES! 

Our special model. 
No. 14, 14-inch fire- 
pot, full bjvse burner, 
price only $24.5(i. 

This is without 
question the ba.st 
heating stove buy In 
the city. Full nickel 
trimmed, beaut i f u 1 
appearing stove, con- 
structed to raui.vie 
htat. See this and 
other larger modcla 
if the same make. 
R. R. Foiward & Co. 
Second avenue e;ist 
and .Superior street. 




SWEDISH MASSAGE. 



Ed .MC At 
cleaner. 



Ill,, ( iinuuey i,vvuei), turnace 
Call Park 39-Y; L'kside 4()-L.. 



f-himney sweeper and furnace cleuner. 
Chimney sw . ^'^^^^^^^^^arters. Phonc^i 46 



• GRADUATE MASSEUSE, 305 EAST 
1 First street. Phone, Grand. 1215-X. 



Knudsen. fire 



CIVIL ENUlMttR AND SURVEYORS. 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENED. 



i^lCrtOLt) 



Ac. 



.\ , . 1 ; 11 n-; 



III . i.,.tiii-'ei iiiK 



CARD ENtiKAViNG AND STAMPS. 



Consoiiated 
r.arKi-r i'. 



;ila:iii> »ii 
I 'rr. I'i'oos. 



i'liiiling Co., 
U 4in .-ive. VV 



NOTICE— DON'T FAIo TO SEE US IF 
you want to buy or sell a place of 
business. Duluth Business Exchange, 
609 Torrey Bldg. 

BUSINESS C H ANCES — FOR SALE 
cheap, confectionary store; good bus- 
iness. Address 644, Herald. 



DA^CIN6 ACADEMY. 



COFFIN — i.ii J^i 
'phone. Ui>eti 



lK<. avenue 
ai terno<jn 



north. Either 
atid eveniiitj 



i^ynn Panel life 
18.\ Lake u v 



a-v-aUcuy. laay in^iructor, 
N. Hall lor retit. Mel. 1 1.4;< 



TlORISV AND NURSERYMEN. 



flower.^ 



IM.'UCO., V.IiOleialc, leiail cut 
funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



Safety razor blades fU kinds .sharpened 
and put in first-class condition, 30o 
per dozen. Lake Hardware Co. 



TYPEWRITERS FOR SALE. 



VISIBLE TYPEWRITERS RENTEDI 




Three months for $S. 
Rental applied as part 
payment. All makes of 
slightly used machines 
at big discounts. Send 
for list. 



DULUTH TYPEWRITER CO., 
319 West First street. 



TAXIDERMIST. 



UPHOLSTERING^ 

Fvrniture, Automobiles, Carriages; rea- 
sonable price**. E. Utt, 112 let Av. W. 



I 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 



Let 
334 



Forsell do your UI'llOLSTERlN(J. 
e' Si tperior street. Both 'phones. 



% 



GAME HEAD.S, 
small animals, 
to life. I'rices 
FRYBERG & 



BIRDS AND 
mounted tru« 
reasonable. 
DE YONK. 



Taxidermists. 

2826 West Michigan street. 

Phone, Lincoln 137-X. 



HATS CLEANED. 



329 



ATTENTION, SPOR'ISMEN! 

I AM NO AMATEITR. 
AL ARNSON, Taxidermist, 
Fourth Ave. West. Melrose 6751. 



Old hats m ide like new. Panamas, 60c 
to 75c; ftlt and derby, 60c; straw, 25o. 
Work Kue.ranteed, 210 W. Superior St. 



^ADVERTISE II THE HERALD 





"-r 



' V 



i 



1 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERAIiD 



December 1, 1913. 



Sf 




Picture 
Yourself 

SELECTING YOUR 
CHRISTMAS (ilFTS 
IN THE AWFUL 

Christmas 
Rush 



"H 



One Cent a Wonl Each Insortlon. 
X«» Advrrtiseuioiit Ix'ss Thai. 15 Cents. 



AND YOU WILL BEGIN 
NOW TO 




* WANTED AT ONCE. H- 

* EXPERIEXCKD MILLINERY * 

* MAKER. ;V- 
■>& ^ 

* J. M. GIDDING & CO. -.¥• 

* * 



One Cent a Word Kacli Insertion. 
Xo .XdvertLsenient l^€*s Than 15 Cents. 

liDDitioiirwTNTs 

FOR RENT-ROOMS. 



WANTED— GIRL OR WOMA.N DE.SIR- 
Ing good home and high wages in 
return for faithful service In small 
nodern house; night school advan- 
tages; excellent home for friendless 
girl. Address M, Herald. 

Wanted — Girls to attend dressmaking 
school; make garments for your.syl? 
or others while learning. Quick i.nd 
easy patterns drafted, any style. 
Miss Gray, 3rd floor. Geo. A. Gray Co. 

WANTED — STRONG WOMAN OR 
girl for general housework In fam- 
ily of two adults; wages |5 l>er 
week. Mrs. L. J. Lalonde, Littlefork. 
Minn. 



ALVAR.VDO 

HOTEL. 

210-212 W. Sua. St. 

J. A. BRACKETT. 

Proprietor. 



40 outside rooms, 
■with hot and cold 
running water; rtn- 
ter of business 
district, wltnln four 
blocks of all depots. 
Rates: Per day. EOc 
and up; per week. 
}2.50 and up. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xo Advertisement Less Than 16 Cents. 

One 6-room flat, modern in every i^ 
way except heat; In first-class Tjf 
condition; Twenty-eighth ave- >^- 
nue west and Third street; rent 
cheap. 



i6^ 

a- 



FOR RENT. 






One Cent a Word i:ach Insertion. 
Xo Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

"fOFTrENT— HOUSES. 



FOR RINT. 

Second strttet. seven rooms, 

furnace hest. $30 per month. 

Superior street "'"^-e i;'"";/; 

hot wate- heat, $A5 per 



One 3-room flat, modern in every 
way except heat; Twenty-eighth 
avenue west and Third street; 
rent cheap. 



BLANCHET HOTEL. 
Large comfortable steam-heated rooms, 
with first-class table board, every- , 
thing cheery and home-like; special '^ 
rates for the winter, 620-522 Lake 
avenue south. 



at 123 
unfur- 



WANTED— YOU.NG GIRL OR WOMAN 
to assist in housework; good home 
for the right one. 2123 Sussex ave- 
nue, Kenilworth park, Hunter's Park. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xo Ad\e^tl^onMIll Le.ss Than 15 Cents. 

telephonedIrectory 

OF 

BUSINESS 

HOUSES. 

Below you will find a 
.ondenstd list of reliable 
bu.'^lness lirms. This is de- 
signed for the convenience 
of busy people. A telephone 
order to any one of thorn 
will receive the same care- 
ful attention as would be 
Kivcn an order placed In 
person. You can safely (le- 
nd upon the reliability 




One Cent a Word Eaoli Insertion. 
Xo .\ti\ertisement Les^s Than 15 Cents. 

Wa.\TED — FOR UNITED STATES 
army, able-bodied unmarried men 
between aajes of 18 and 35; citizens 
of United States, of good character 
and temperate habits, who can speak, 
rebd and write the English language. 
P'or information apply to recruiting 
office 217 Torrey building, Duluth, 
Minn. 



WANTED — INTELLIGENT. CON- 
sclentious woman of good business 
ability; no cinvassing. Apply after- 
noons, 17 Phoeni x block. 

WANTED— NURSE GIRL TO ASSIST 
with baby 10 months old; vio house- 
work. Mrs. Frank Nixon, £542 Lon- 
don road; Me lrose 4033. 

WANTED — BINDERY GIRL; ONE 
with experience feeding ruling ma- 
chine preferred; at once. Room 1, 
212 West First street. 



WA.NTED— YOUNG GIRL TO TAKE 
care of children and do light house- 
keeping; must go home nights. 323 

■^ East First .street. 



of any one 



Edille Jironlnius, 
DE^■1"1STS — ^ T^ o 

Dr. F. H. l>urnett,D.D.S 

IJiVM>KlKS— 

Peerless Laundry .... 

Yale Laundry 

Lut'S Laundry 

Home Laundry Co.... 

Model Laundry 

Troy Laundry 



of these 

Old 
•J'hoae. 
rh.G.l234 



11 mis. 
New 
'Phone. 
1072 



4608 

428 
47» 
447 
478 
274'J 
257 



909-X 

428 
479 
447 

478 

1302 
267 



RKAL ESTATE, FIRE 

IX.SURAXCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



J. 

L. 



F. 

A. 



McNaughton. 2022 ^^'- SuPer'<?r,^„ 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence Lldg. 
Fleld-Frey Co.. 203 Exchange Beg. 
William C. Sargent, 102 Prov. Bdg. 
Getty-Smith Co.. 306 Palladio Bldg 
A A Flder Co.. 3(.«» 1st N. Bank Bldg. 
The Home Realty i^».. 200 Alworth Bldg. 



WA.NTED— A MACHINIST ftlNOTYPE 
operator for a country town print- 
ing office; must thorouglily under- 
stand the work; must also play 
some Instrument in band. Apply 
with reference, stating salary it 
William Scandrett, Fort Frances, 
Ont., Canada. 

WANTED— FIVE HUNDRED MEN TO 

sf e our unredeemed goods; 10 rli'e.s, 
75 shotguns, 100 revolvers, 200 mer.'s 
suits, overcoats and fur coats, 7(j 
men's rings, ladies' furs; now is the 
time to buy. Keystone Loan cora- 
pany, 22 West Superior street. 

FIREMEN AND BRAKEMEN FOR 
all railroads entering Duluth, wages 
$100; railroad recruiting headfjuar- 
ters. Po.sitlons assured competent In- 
experienced men. Send age, stamp. 
Railway As.^oclatlon, Dept. 127, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WA.NTED — COMPETENT SECO.ND 
maid, must furnish references. Ap- 
ply to Mrs. A. B. Wolvin, 1103 East 
Superior street. 

WANTF:D— AT O.VCE, GOOD GIRL 
for general housework; small family, 
good wages. 216 Fourteenth avenue 
east, flat C. 



WANTED — THOROUGHLY COMPE- 
tent maid for general housework. 
Apply Mr.s. Andrew Nelson, 2Cil East 
Third street. 



REAL ESTATE LOANS^ 



s 

I 






CON.SULT WITH F. L SALTER 
COMPANY, 
303 Lonsdale Building, 
If you are thinking of borrowing 
money on real estate security. They 
are always In funds, and grant 
every courtesy to their clients. 
Building Loans 



Wanted — Young men f<>r the stage im- 
mediately; troupe being formed now; 
experience unnecessary. We place 
ycu, write acts and coach you. Chas. 
Ellison, room 6, over Happy Hour 
theater. Big New York connections. 

Learn barber trade; always In demand, 
big wages, easy v.-ork ; few weeks 
completes; tools given; dlplorn.'is 
granted. Moler Barber college, 27 IJ. 
>:ic. Ave.. Minneapolis. Est ab. 18C3. 

LEARN telegraphy! 
Short hours; big salary; great demand; 
railroad wires and expert lni?tructcrfi. 
Free catalogue. Barry's Telegraph 
~ institute, Minneapolis, Minn. 



wanted —APPRENTICE GIRL 
splendid chance for advancement. 
Apply Miss Horrlgan, Oak Hall 
building^ 

WANTED— EXPERIENCED CASHIER 
for retail store; must know how to 
\ise cash register. Address H 651, 
Herald. 



WANTED -a- MIDDLE-AGED W« MAN 
for housework and care of children; 
no cooking; $5 per week. Call Cole 
282-D. 



FOR RENT— THE FREDERIC HOTEL, 
corner of First avenue west and First 
street. Is now making special rates 
for the winter. Hot and cold running 
water and the most homelike place in 
city. Rates by the week, <2.50 to $6. 

ELGI.V HOTEL 
321 West First Street. 
Have ttfteen outside i.iodern rooms, 
steam heat, electric lights, free b.itns, 
telephone, etc. $2.50 per A'eek and 
up. Melrose 6336; Grand 268. 

FOR RENT — ONE. TWO OR THREE 
pleasant, nicely furnished rooms In 
a strictly new modern liome in the 
East end; use of piano If desired; 
no other roomers and family of only 
two. Address G 568, Her ald. 

K<»K KENT — WARM, COMFORTABLE 
and homelike room with running 
water, suitable for two; also one not 
Very large but very convenient room 
for housekeeping. The Verona, 310 
West Third street. 

THE NEW ALEXANDRIA. 
Furnished apartments and single rooms 
with bath or without; private tele- 
phone in all rooms; dining room In 
connection. 322 We st Second street. 

FOR RE.VT— DOUBLE AND SINGLE 
nicely furnished rooms for light 
housekeeping or rooming; also nice 
front room for gentleman; steam 
heat. 117 West Fourth street. 

FOR RE.N'I— NEWLY FURNISH LCD 
rooms; also can be used for light 
housekeeping; reasonable rentals. 
Cosmopolitan hotel, 3:»7 North Cen- 
tral avenue. 

FOR RENT— COMFORTABLY FUR- 
nlshed room, all conveniences, suit- 
able for one or two, gentlemen pre- 
ferred. 810 East Second street. Mel- 
rose 1508. _^^_^____ 

FOR RENT — LIGHT HOUSEKEEP- 
Ing rooms, use of electric light and 
water; also bedroom; ladies pre- 
ferred, 314 Fifty-fourth avenue 
west. 



Fine steam-heated rooms 
West Superior street; 
nlshed; suitable for bachelor 
quarters or light hou.iekeeping; 
in fine condition; bath in build- 
ing. 



THE ZENITH REALTY CO.. 

104 East Superior Street. 

'Phone, Grand 2166. 



a- 

* 



1214 East 

modern, 

1614 East 

modern, 

month. , _ , ,,via 

214 Fourth avenue R'est, six rooms, 
furnace, $30 per month. 

LITTLE & NCLTE CO., 

Exchange Bldg. ' 



FOR RENT— THE UPPER PARI OF 
house at 413 Fourtl, avenue east, si.x 
rooms and bath, ntwly papered and 
painted throughout, hot water heat- 
ing plant. Willlani C. Sargent, 10- 
Providence building. 




SECRET^OCIETIES^ 

PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 79, 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at 
7:30 o'clock. Next meeting, 
special. Saturday, Nov. 29, 
Work — Examination of candl- 
Hugh L. Joyce, W. M. ; H. Nea- 
secretary. 



"^^^ RENT — DEC. 1, VERY DE- 
sirable first floor apartment in the 
St. Elmo, 721 East First street; best 
apartments In the city; janitor serv- 
ice, hot and cold water, gas range 
and refrigerator furnished; seven 
rooms; rent $57. John A. Stephenson 
& Co., 232 West First street. 



FOR RENT — A VliRY DESIR.\BLE 
10-room house on East .Second street, 
completely furnlshei in an attractive 
manner. For rent antil May 1, lltl4. 
William C. Sargen-. 102 Providence 
building. 

FOR RENT — DURING WINTER 
months, six -room furnished house; 
all conveniences e::cept heat. *^®',! 
Grand 66, between ' and 8 p. m., 8-- 
Ninth avenue east. 



lONiC IX)DGE, NO. 186, A. F. 
& A. M — Regular meetings 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 
. :30 o'clock. Next meeting, 
special. Wednesday, Dec. 3, 
1913. Work— Third degree. I'arl E. 
Lonegren, W. M.; Burr Porter, secre- 
tary. 

KEYSTO-NE CHAPTER, NO. 
"i^^, R. A. M. — Stated convo- 
cations, second and fourth 
AVednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
Dec. 10, 1913. Work— Regular 
P. M. and M. E. M. dcgree.i. 
G. Mead, H. P.; Alfred Le 
secretary. 




meeting, 
business, 
Charles 
Richeux, 



ROOMS AND 
heat; centrally 



FOR RENT — FOUR 

bath; modern except 

located; $13. 
Four rooms and toilet; modern except 

h:at; centrally located; $12. 
A. A. FIDER COMPANY, 

300 Fir st National Bank bulldln!<. 

FOR RE.NT — FOUR ROOMS AND 
bath, modern except heat, $13; jour 
rooms and toilet, modern except heat, 
$12; eight-room house and bath. 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOU-SE IN 
West end; city wattr; one block from 
car line; In good condition; $16 per 
month. J D. How ird & Co.. Provi- 
dence building. 



modern except 
company, 300 
building. 



heat. $25. A. A. Fider 
First National Bank 



FOR RENT — EIGHT ROOMS AND 
bath; modern except heat; $25; at 
210 East Seventh s;reet. A. A. Fider 
compa.ny, 300 First National bank. 

FOR RENT — S I X - R O O M HOUSE; 
stove heat; all modern conveniences; 
$20. Massachusetts Real Estate 
company, 18 Phoen ix block, city. 

FOR RE.NT— SlX-R<JOM HOUSE, 312 
West Fifth street, modern, except 
heat. Inquire, Renval Dept., Brldge- 
man-Russell Co. 



^^LummmA 




FOR RENT — SIX ROOMS; PART- 
ly furnished or unfurnished. Apply 
at premises, 614 East Second street, 
or at office. 301 Torrey building. 
Melrose 1368. Grand 810. 



WANTED — CLERK, O.NE A<"CUS- 
tomed to .selling toilet articles. Ap- 
ply Miss Horrlgan, Oak Hall build- 
ing. 

WA.VTED— NEAT, COMPETENT <'rIRL 
for general housework; small family. 
12 North Nineteenth avenue east. 

FOR GENERAL 
In family; best 
avenue south. 



WANTED— GIRL 
housework; four 
•wages. 2737 Lake 



a Specialty 
w M. prTndlb & CO.. 

3 LONSDALE BLDG. 



MEL. 



2400— PHONES— OR \ND 
WE ALWAYS HAVE 
MONEY ON HAND TO 
LOAN AT 6V4 AND 6 PER 
ON REAL ESTATE 

W. M. PRINDLE & CO 



230. 



CENT 
SECURITY. 



WANTED— IF YOU WRITE PLAIN 
English you may earn steady Income 
writing for newspapers; experienc^^ 
not required. Capital Press Syndi- 
cate, WoBhlngton. D. C. 

WANTED — GOVER.NMENT Posi- 
tions are easy to get. My free book- 
let Y 302 tells how. Write today — 
now. Earl Hopkins, Washington, 
P. C. 

WANTED— WE HAVE SEVERAL UN- 
tulied for suits and overcoats at 
your price. Dundee Woolen Mills, 
'32S AVest Superior street. 



WANTED— GIRL GuING TO SCHOOL 
to a..-slst with light housework for 
room and board. Melrose 5207. 

W.\NTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
housework; no kitchen or dining 
room work. 1126 London road. 



WANTED- COMPETENT 
gemral housework; 
2727 East Seventh 



M.\1D FOR 
best wages, 
street. 



W.^NTED — ASSISTANT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1819 East Sec- 
ond street; Melrose 7080. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 3015 East Superior 

street. Grand 184 0-A. 

LAUNDRESS 
Arnold; Mel- 



W ANTED— COMPETENT 
for Monday. Mrs. L. B. 
rose 1011, Grand 855. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR 

housework. Inquire at 
Phone Cole 208-A. 



GENERAL 

Boston store. 



FOR RENT- ONE LARGE, SUNNY 
room with alcove, all modern con- 
veniences with use of telephone. 222 
Fifth avenue east, Ashtubula terrace. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED STEAM 
heated rooms for light housekeeping, 
all modern conveniences, rent rea- 
sonable. 16 East Superior street. 

THE DE AN(iELTERR HOTEL. 
310 E. Sup. St., hot and cold running 
water, steam heat: light, airy rooms, 
from 60 cents to $2.00. 

FOR RENT — THREE FUR.VISHED 
rooms; two for light houseekeeping; 
bath and phone, 2819 West Superior 
street. Lincoln 92-A. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM: 
hot water heat, use of 'phone and 
bath. 814 Vi East First street; 
Grand 1786- X. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping; all conven- 
iences; reasonable r«ut. 230 Fourth 
avenue west. 



FOR REN'r — WARM, FOUR-ROOM 
flat with gas, bath, hardwood floors; 
$13 per month for winter. 217 West 
Fifth street. 'Phone owner. Broad 
386-K. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT; HOT 
water heat, newly painted and var- 
nished; on car line. Call Raymond 
Bros., 3821 Oneota street. 



FOR RENT — CENTRAL SIX-UOOM 
house, modern except heat, rental 
$25. J. D. Howard & Co.. Providence 
building. 

HAVE US MOVE ^'OU WITH OUR 
large van and expi?rlenced men. Eu- 
luth Van Co., 18 Fcurth avenue v\cst. 



FOR RE.NT— EIGH1-ROO.M MODERN 
house at 1318 East Sc-ond street. 
Inquire 1320 East Second street^ 



PADDED VANS for movlnjT furniture. 
West Duluth & Duiuth Transfer Co. 



F«»it RENT — FINE FOUR -ROOM 
flat, all conveniences except he;it, 
618 East Seventh street. Call F. A. 
Thorwall. Both p hones. 

FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS; GAS, 
water, electric lights; $11 per month., 
411 West Fifth street. Inquire i.07 
Fourth avenue west. | 

ALSO 
four- 
West 






DULUTH COU.VrjL,, NO. 6, 
ri. & S. M. — stated convoca- 
tions, first and third Friday 
of each month at 7:30 p. m. 
.Next meeting, Dec. 6, 1918. 
A\ ork — Annual meeting, election of 
officers. Herman L. Dresser, T. I. M.; 
Alfred Le Richeux, secretary. 

DULUTH COMMANDERY. NO.' 
IS, K. T. — Stated conclave, 
first Tuesday of jeach month 
at 7:30 o'clock. Next meet- 
ing, Dec. 2, 1913. Work- 
Regular business. John Cox. E. C; 
Alfred Le Richeu x, recorder. 

SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR 
meetings every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting, Dec. 4, 1913. Woi « 
_ — Twenty-seventh degree. 

Din ner, 6:30. Henry .Wsbitt, seer tm ry. 

ZENITH CHAPTER, NO. 2f', 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meetings second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next mo«iting, Nov. 28, 1913. Work — 
Regular business. Modelle Brunson, 
W. M.; Ella F. Gea rhart, secretary. 

EUCLID LODGE, NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting. 
.Nov. 29, 1913. Work-Third 

degree. W. B. Getv.hell, W. M.; A. 

Dunleavy. secretary. 




1^' 




FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 
five-room furnished flat and 
room cottage. Inquire 1127 
Michigan street. 



LET US MOVE YOU TO YOUR In^V 
home. Duluth Van & Storage Co. 18 
Fourth avenue west. J ust phone 4!)2. 

JF[ni RENT— THREE- ROOM FLAT, 
centrally located; cheap rent for 
the winter. Grand 1030-X. 

FOR RENT— ATTRACTIVE SEVEN- 
room completely furnished flat; 180'J 
Jefferson street. Flat B. 



FOR RENT — NICE FIVE-ROOM 
brick flat. Inquire 424 Ninth avenue 
east. ^ 

FLAT; 
avenue 



FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM 
all conveniences. 225 Sixth 
west. 



FOR RENT— NEWLY FURNISHED 
large front room ^\ ith all conven- 
iences. Call Melrose 6896; 423 East 
First street. 



FOR RENT-*N1CE„ 
room, with use of 



LARGE. FRO.NT 
whole house, to 



FOR RENT— FLAT. PARTLY 
nished. Call Melrose 1717. 



FUR- i 



a- 

a- 

a- 

a- 
a- 



ih- 



-# 



B.\RGnINS 

IN 

USED I'ANOS. 



two girls, for 
met 80-M. 



$5 a month. Call Calu- 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. Apply 1603 East 
Superior street. 



FOR RENT 
room and 
preferred, 
rose 5674. 



— FURNISHED FRONT i 
bedroom, two gentlemen 
458 Mesaba avenue. Mel- 



MORTGAGE LOANS. 
We are In position to place your 
loan on most advantageous terms, at 

*° RICHARDSON. DAY & CHEADLB. 

Exchange ^uUding^ 

' STEEL PLANT SUBURBS. 



Money to loan in Gary and New Du- 
luth; repay loan monthly. 

C. A. KNIPPENBERG. 
Commercial Bldg. Phones 697. 



WANTED — COATMAKER; STEADY 
work for competent man; cheapest 
coats. $10.65. S. Lekve, 214 Second 
avenue, Hlbbing. Minn. 

WANTED— TWO FIRST-CLASS AD- 
vertising solicitors. Call Hotel Mc- 
Kay, Mr. Clement; call between 6:30 
and 8 p. m. 

Wanted — Cash paid for diamonds; 
watches repaired, $1. 6 S. 6t'h A v. W. 

VIOLIN LESSONS given at your home 
by competent teacher. Cole 327-X. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR 
housework; good wages. 
Third street. 



GENE 
2102 



RAL 
East 



WANTED— WAITRESS 
St. Paul restaurant, 
perlor street. 



AT ONCE, 
623 West Su- 



W ANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 427 North Fifty-third 
avenue west. 



WANTED — YOU.NQ MAN FOR ROOM 
mate, modern house, central loca- 
tion. Office clerk desired. Call Mel- 
rose 4613. 



FOR RENT— LARGE, MODERN ROOM 
with alcove, one parlor bedroom; 
also smaller rooms. 213 West Third 
street. 



WANTED — EXPERIE.NCED WAIT- j 
ress. Ormond hotel. 221-223 Lake! 
avenue south. 



FOR RENT— LIGHT HOUSEKEEPING 
rooms; use of gas; electric light, 
phones and heat. 20 West Superior 
street. 



HJO RSESJ/EH ICLES,ETC. 

LOGGING HORSES. 
DRAFT HORSES. 

Our offerings Include several car- 
loads of the best horses ever brought 
to any market. They are guaranteed 
to be strictly as represented and are 
priced lower than horses of equal 
quality can be bought elsewhere. Lum- 
ber men should see our big logging 
horses at once. Part time given if de- 
sired, 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 

Board of Trade Livery. 

408 West First Street. 

Duluth, Minn. 



1*^ 



HENNING, EBONY CASE, 
$95.00. 

chicki:ring, 
ebony case, 

$1(0. 

VOSE & SONS, 

WAL.N'L'T CASE. 

$135. 

KRANICII & BACH, 

GOOD AS NEW, 

$286. 




DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 69, 
R. A. M: — Meets at West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 7:30 
p. m. Next meeting, Dec. 3, 
1913. Work— Election of cffi- 
Mason M. Forbes, H. P.; A. Dun- 
secretary. 



KRANICH & BAl 
FANCY MAH( (JANY 

$3<tO. 



'H, 

CASE, 



HOWARD. F\RWELL & 
COMPA.NY'. 

18-20 SECOND AVENUE 

REX THE-Vi'ER BLDG. 



a- 



1^13. 

Hoar, 

tary. 



EUCLID CHAPTER. .NO. 66, 

Order of the Eastern Star 

Meets at West Duluth Ma;^on- 
ic temple the first and third 
Tuetday.s of each month at 8 
o'clock. .Next meeting, Dec. 2, 
Work — Regular busin.s.«. Sophia 
W. M.; Pearl E. Boerner. secre- 



ZE.VITH COUNCIL. N«.). 161, 
Ro\ al It.Tgue, meets the sec- 
ond and fourth rhur.^dava of 
the month at 8 p. m.. K.of P. 
hall. 118 West Superior street. 
Shandoss Hoad. Kelley-How- 

fhomson. archon; collector. H. A. 

18 East First street. 




Hall. 



DULUTK LODGE, NO. 28. I. O. O. F 

•Metis evtij FrkUj e\et;l.)j! »t b oclock. 
HI (»dd >i.ii„».«- liaii. IS K,.ke menu* 
!!• rih. Neil niwtiiie I'lliUy, r»*v 8. 

Wrrk- Third dtgnt-. J. A. llralT. \ «; • w' A. 

I'itlincer, Itcc. Sec.; A. H. Paui, Fin. .*<«.' 



a- 



* 



FOR RENT — ROOMS. FUR-NISHED 
complete for light housekeeping; all 
conveniences. 119 West Second street. 



WA.NTED— BOY. 
billiard rooms. 



ST. LOUIS HOTEL 



CASH ON HAND TO LOAN ON CJTY 
and farm property, any amount, low- 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title t 
Co.. 613 First National B ank Bld g. ^ 

MONEY^TO LOAN— ON FIRST MORT- ! 
gage; immediate answer given. See 
us. J. D. Howard & Co.. Providence 
building. 

City and village loans In Minnesota. Re- 
pay loan monthly; easy terms. Knlp- 
penberg. Commercial Bldg. Phone 6!<7. 

FIDER OFFERS TO LOAN ANY 
amount on city property and acres. 
A. A. Flder Co.. 300 First Natl Bank. 

Money at lowest rates. 

Any amount, no delay. 

&, Nolte Co., Exchange 



WANTED 
Kay. 



— BELLBOY. HOTEL Mc- 



WHITNEY WALL CO. 

Will trade a fine Improved farm near 
Duluth for home in Duluth; farm has 
excellent buildings, best soli, plenty of 
stock and machinery. Here's a bar- 
gain. (F 11) 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
hoi'sework in small family. 826 West 
Third street^ 

FOR 
Call 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL 
family of three; easy terms. 
Lakeside, 139. 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS. .\LL CON- 
venlences; $10. 9>/2 East Third 
street. Call 11 East Third street. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED FRONT 
room, suitable for two; board If de- 
sired. 319 West Third street. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework, at 1417 East Sec- 
ond street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 14 North Nineteenth ave- 
nue east. 



WANTED— C0MPETF:NT MAID FOR 
general housework. 1105 East First 
street. 



Little 



Bldg. 



RE.^L e.«;t.\te and loans. 

R. B. KxNO.X & COMPANY. 
No. 1 Exchange building. 



MG-NEY T(3 LOA.N— LOANS MADT^ ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 



—FOR CHEAP MO.NEY <iUlCii- 
— See L. A. Larson company — 
— 214 Providence building — 



Unimproved farm lands 12 miles 
from Duluth at $6 to $16 per acre. 

^52-14) 
WHITNEY WALL CO.. 
Torrey Building. 



WANTED— WAITRESS, WEST ST. 
Paul restaurant. 623 West Superior 
street. 

GENERAL 
First street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR 
housework at 1914 East 



FOR PALE— 1,300 ACRES AT $3.50 
per acre; good soil; no mineral re- 
servations; land in same township 
held at $9 to $15 per acre. If you 
are looking for a safe Investment 
with a certainty of being able to 
make a quick turn at a good profit 
see me on this. William C. Sargent. 
102 Providence building. 



WANTED— DINING 
Palmer House. 108 



ROOM 
West First 



GIRL, 
street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GE.NERAL 
housework. 1817 East Second street. 



FOR RENT— NEATLY FURNISHED 
room; use of piano and phone; $1.50 
per week 440 Mesaba avenue. 

FOR RENT— TWO LARGE ROOMS; 
all conveniences except heat. In- 
quire 109 West Fifth street. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOM IN 
modern house. 28 North Twenty-fifth 
avenue west. Melrose 5456. 

FOR RENT — TWO OR THREE FUR- 
nlshed rooms for light housekeeping. 
2609 West Huron street. 

FOR RENT— NlCELY^ FURNISHED 
room with board. Wahldorf annex, 
228 First avenue west. 

FOkt RE.NT— FOUR 
ment; city water; 
West First street. 



WANTED — DI.NING ROOM GIRLS. 
Ohio cafe. 617 West Superior street. 

WA.NTED — GIRL 
housework. 1116 



TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE. 
Sargent. 102 Providence Bldg. 



MONEY 

^w. a 

We handle 6 and 7 per cent 
loans. Wheeler Agency. 808 



building 
Alworth. 



Money to loan; any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underbill. 209 Exchan ge. 

For city and farm loans ace W. B. 
Roc. 412 Providence P.ldK^ 



LOST^^OUim__ 

LOST— LADY'S POCKETBOOK CON- 
tainlng jewelry and money; rings 
are valu« d dearly by owner.; at 
Happy Hour theater. Sunday. Find- 
er will be liberaly rewarded for re- 
turning same to 101 Mesaba avenue. 
Melrose 4800. 



FARM LANDS — THE BALDWIN 
Colony association; real estate; 
lands bought and sold; government 
homesteads. Office with Berg & 
Sanders. 407 Columbia building. Du- 
luth. Minn., and Canton. S. D.. Bert 
L. V.'ilklns. office manager. 

FOR SALE — ONE. TWO AND THREE- 
acre tracts with beautiful river 
frontage; close to Duluth. at $150 
per acre; $50 cash; balance monthly; 
fare 25 cents to property. Fay- 
Schau company, 106, 107 and 108 
Providence building. 



FOR GENERAL 
East Third street. 

WANTED — COMPETENT .NURSE 
maid. Call 2130 East Third street. 



ROOMS IN BASE- 
$6 per month. 1016 



FOR RENT — NICELY 
room for one or two 
West Third street. 



FURNISHED 
gentlemen. 18 



FOR SALE— HAVE ON HAND THIR- 
ty-flve horses, which we have used 
in the coal, wood and Ice business 
all summer, and do not need In the 
winter. They are for sale at the 
right price; are good, young, sound 
horses, some weighing 1.700 pounds. 
Write or wire today. Healy-Brown 
compan y. "\% ausau. Wis . 

FOR SALE— JUST RECEIVED. FORTY 
head of logging horses. Call and see 
them; get prices before purchasing 
elsewhere: satisfaction guaranteed. 
We live here winter and summer and 
are here to stay. 26 and 28 East 
First street. Western Sales Stab'es 
company. 

WAGONS! wagons: WAGONS! 
A complete line of Studebaker and 
other makes always on hand. Includ- 
ing dump, farm, dray, light and 
heavy delivery wagons; bargains In 
slightly used vehicles. Write for 
catalogue. L. Hammel Co.. D uluth. 

FOR SALE— JU.ST ARRIVED CAR OF 
heavy draft and logging horses; also 
good farm mares, acclimated, guar- 
anteed aJ represented; part time 
given if necessary. Mike Willett, 
608 North Fifty-sixth avenue west; 
Cole 301. 

FOR SALE— ONE BAY MARE, 7 
years old, weighs 1,200; sound and 
safe; two wagons, one buggy, one 
sled, two harnesses, etc, price $250. 
Call 6021 Tioga street; phone Park 
110-X. 

FOR SALE — TEN PAIRS OF HEAVY 
draft horses, .lust off our wagons 
and ready for hard work; fifty head 
to pick from. For prices and terms 
see Duluth Ice company. 



FOR SALE — TALKING MACHINES i 
and records, all makes in special 
combination outf ts on easy pay- 
ments; double-faced records from 
66 cents up. The only exclusive 
talking machine store in Duluth. 
Edmont's, 18 Third av enue west. 

FOR SALE— ELEGj'..NT GOLDEN OAK 
genuine leather i pholstered daven- 
port; best make; nearly new. Too 
large for my use; will sell cheap; act 
quick; terms. 22^ West Third street. 
PMat K. 

FOR SALE— TWO EDISON BUSI.NE.SS 
phonographs, no: having use for 
same we offer them at one-half cost. 
The Duluth Strce: Railway company. 
2631 West Suoerl^r street.-^ 




.MAJE.STIC HEBEKAH LODGiiJ 
N'o. 6<'. Regular meetings first 
and third 'I'hursday of each 
month, at 1. O. O. F. hall, 18 
Lake avenue north. Next 
ineeting, Thursday evening, 
i>ec. 4, 1S13. Regular busi- 
•less and drill. Mabel Brown, 
-N'elile Botsford. secretary. 



Gcliiieau. 
u. tu 1 p. 



K. O. T. M. 
nVLVTH TK.Vr, .NO. 1. KNIGHTS OF 
the .Ma<val,t*s of tlie Wurld. meets first 
ai;(t third .Mrjiidays of each moutb at 
.Mai'iabee tiall. 2\ Lake ateni:e tiortb, 
Charles <i. Fuller, c< ajm^iider. C2S 
Nirt'i Kifi} seMi.lh avenue »«»(; J. B. 
record keo, cr, ofttce in hall, lioura, iO ^ 
m. dallf. Z«nltb 'piioue. Grand fllO-X 



w 



FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS. ELEC- 
trlc light, gas; rent $12 month. 914 
East Fifth street. 



HORSES— GOOD— HORSES. 
Large selection to choose from; buy 
from a reliable firm; fair treatment. 
Zenith Sale & Boarding stable, 624 
West First street. 



FOR SALE— KRANICH & BACH USED 
piano in fine condition; easy terms; a 
bargain at $75. New piano, fancy 
case. $160. Howard, Farwell & Co., 
18-20 Second avenue west. 

FOR SALE Ql ICK— HOUSEHOLD 
furniture. Including gas range; must 
dispose of at once, leaving city. 
Grand 1190-X. :il5 Seventh avenue 
east. 

FOR SALE — FIRST CLA.SS SOLID 
Cuba mahogany inlaid sideboard; 
English Sheraton style with top part. 
Apply R. Clement, 2623 Helm street 
west. 

FOR SALE — Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Much. Co. 

"hand 

cheap; 
rooms. 



DULUTH LODGE, NO. 606. 
Loya' (Jrder of Moose, meets 
ever> Monday evening at 8 
o'clock, Morse hall, 22 4 West 
lirst street. Work — Third 
degree. Carl Schau, secre- 
tary, 14 Third avenue east. 

nii.iTH noMi:sT£.\n. no! siii 

Urotherhood tf Anicilc-a Yeiiiiien meets 
first i>.iid tl.lrd Monday e\eiiiiigs of each 
iiif.jitli, at Wo> dmaji liall, r»eiity-Brst 
iitenue \<n>t aiid Kin>t street. J. J. 
JhiBhes. f( reman, cfflre 20L'2 West .Su- 
perior street, buth 'pliciies; Mrs. J. X. Killmrur, cor- 
respuiidciit. oifloe -Ii22 West Siiperlci tlreet, old 
'phone :!338 Melrr>i^. ^rultli 'phone, 521-D Liocola; 
rt'>ideiiie .No. 1 Exeter street. ZeiUtli phoce Sit-O 
l.im'ulii. 

M. W. A 
IMPKniAL «AMP, 2206— MKKTS AT 
Forester hail. Fourth avenue west aiid 
Fi^^l si reel, second and fourth Ta(£<Mi'» 
of each luotith. I). C. Kagles, cotiSUi: 
«.•. 1*. Karl, ilerh. P. O. b. x 411. 






FOR SALE — THP EE SECOND 
hot water heat ng boilers, 
will heat from five to twenty 
314 West First street. 



FOR SALE — «;<»OD HARD COAL 
heater and Cole hot blast heater; 
also gas range, 336 East Superior 
street. 



W;»NTED — <iIRL FOR GENERAL 
hou.^ework. 22 Sixth avenue east. 



WANTED — MAID FOR SECOND 
work. 1931 East Second street. 



WANTED — GIRL, SWEDISH PRE- 
ferred. 120 (Jarfleld avenue. 



WANTED — GIRL AT 
Fourth street. 



127 WEST 



LOST— RED FOX FUR BETWEE.N 
Second and Fourth streets on Fifth 
avenue east .Sunday morning, be- 
tween 1 and 2 o'clock. Return to 
B12>s East Fourth street. Reward. 

LOST— A PAIR OF GLASSES ON 
Lake avenue between Fifth and 
Blxth streets, Sunday afternoon. 
Finder please leave at 509 Lake ave- 
nue north for reward. 

LOST— $20 BILL SATURDAY EVE- 
nlng on East Fourth Street car, be- 
tween Forty-first and Twenty-first: 
avenues west. Return to 4232 West 
Third street; reward. 



FOR SALE— WISCONSLN, THE BEST 
dairy and general crop state in the 
Union: settlers wanted; will sacrifice 
land prices to get them; ask for 
booklet about Wisconsin Central land 
grant. Address Land Dept.. Soo Line. 
Minneapolis. Minn. 

FOR SALE — CABLN WITH FIVE 
acres land near French river, big 
timber, cabin furnished complete, 
including kitchen utensils, stove, etc. 
Terms. $25 cash; $10 a month; price 
$500. Fay-Schau Co., 106 Providence 
building. 



LOST — ON FIFTH AVENUE WEST, 
brown pocketbook, Saturday night, 
with $9 or $10 in silver. Return to 
Herald office. 

FOUND— A .32 WINCHESTER RIFLli 
at Highland, post 39. Inquire 2006 
Webt Superior street. 



FOR .SAI-E OR TRADE — WELL-IM- 
proved 30-acre farm near Duluth; 
easiest terms. Whitney Wall com- 
pany, Torrey building. (P 2) 

FO^ SALE — SOME FINE BARGAINS 
In lanis near the Mesaba range 
towns. John Q. A. Crosby. 305 Pal- 
ladio building, city. 



mOJ^JWOTORCYCLES. 

FOR^'SALE— 5-P.\SSENGER OLDSMO- 
blle, $650; 30-horse power Ford, 
$160; Model 10, 4-passenger Bulck, 
$276- Thomas-Detroit touring, $400; 
Hudson 6-passenger, $400; Stude- 
baker Garford 6-pasBenger, $600, 
two 6-passenger iJiZ Bulcks, $6bu; 
one 1913 Bulck Roadster, */50. 
KLEYN AUTO CO., 
527 East Superior street 



FOR RE.NT— HEATED ROOM, FUH- 
nlshed: two meals a day if desired. 
Call Melrose 1779. 



FOR RENT— WARM, NICELY' FUR- 
nlshed room with all conveniences. 
Melrose 4251. 



FOR RENT- COMFORTABLE ROOM 
in modern flat; central; flrst-class. 
Melrose 6492. 



FOR RENT— BIG FRONT ROOM FOR 
light housekeeping. 628 West Second 
street. 



FOR SALE— JU.ST .^RRIV.'^D, CAR .)F 
heavv draft and logving horses. 
Country bought. Guaranteed as rep- 
resented. Carlton Hor:e Market. 
Car lton, Minn. 

FOR S.'VLE — Just received, logging, 
draft and general purpose horses; 
each sold with a guarantee. Twin 
Ports Horse market, 18 First Ave. W. 



FOR 7^ ENT— FURNISHED ROOM FOR 
light housekeeping. 9 West Second 
street. 



FOR SALE— ONE SECOND - HAND 
Ford touring car; cheap if taken at 
once. Superior Motor and Machine 
works, Superior, Wis. 



FOR SALE — EIGHTY'-ACRE FARM, 
near Proctor; will sell reasonable for 
cash. 2718 West Michigan street. 

Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building. 



Automobile and carriage upholstering; 
best work; reasonable prices; work 
guara nteed. .M. Usen, 128 E. Mich. St. 

FOR RENT— GARAGE FOR AUTOMO- 
bile and two horses. 117 West Fourth 
stre et. 

BOARD & ROOM offered! 



FOR RENT — TWO ROOMS FOR 
light housekeeping. 134 Mesaba ave- 
nue. 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS. 
First avenue east. 



CALL 420 



BOARD AND 
rates, home 
ond street. 



ROOM- 
cooklng. 



-REASONABLE 
707 West Sec- 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM COTTAGE; 
barn and garden; electric light and 
water. 504 East Fourteenth street. 
Melrose, 6449. 



FOR SALE— TEN HORSES. INQUIRE 
Zenith City Bottling works. 1922 
West First street or 1523 West 
Michiga n street. 

FOR SALE— HEAVY DRAFT HORSES, 
Just off our wagons, at barn, 2118 
Water street. East End Ice com- 
pany. 

TEAM. 
Call 914 



FOR SALE — Must have the cash. Will 
sell a $500 Chioke ing piano; fine con- 
dition, cheap. Adflress A 3 S 6. Heral d. 

FOR SALE— STILL HAVE 114 GOOD 
heating stoves :it low prices. Joe 
Popkln, 229-31 l ast Supe-nor : treet. 

F(^R SALE— A $5"tO EVERET PIANO 
and pianola, almost new; must have 
the cash; a snap A 362, Herald. 



ILA.N STKWAUT. NO. iO, O. S. C— 
Meets first and inltd WedM>da; each 
ini ntii, 8 p. m., at L'. O. F. hall, ouniei 
Fourth Hvenue west and First street. 
.Ne\l reiruifar intvtliig !>*«■. 3. Kleo- 
ijon (if cMicere. Aiexainler ,\iidersotv 

L'hiel , John l>. MuL'Arthur, gerreiarj ; John liuriietb 

ilnancial setretary, ;na Torrey buliding. 

PIA-MONP I.OIMJK, NO. 4.-!, K. OF P. 
— Mteta every Monday evening In Sloan'* 
hall, comer Tweniiah a^ei.ue v*<si and 
SuperUir street. Boyd Vtrsen, ('. C, 
2T2(i Weal Fi.st fcliecl. S. L. Pierce. K. 
. f K. and S. 





FOR SALE— RANGE, SEX i'HAIR.S, 
rug, bed, spi.ne and mattress. In- 
quire 18 Twentieth avenue west. 

^^ SALE— LAEY'S OTTER FUR 
coat; size 38: a bargain. 16 West 
First street; Hat 1. 



FOR SALE— AIRDALB PUPS, BORN 
Oct. 6. Phone I'roctor 193. Postof- 
flce Box 58. 



K. OF P. 
NOKTH STAK LOHOE. NO. 35, K. OF 
P.- .Meets every Tiiej-day 7:30 p. in. at 
Castle hall. Ii8 West Superior stre«t. 
KJri-,1, n of officers, flub supper. C p. lu. 
e;e< rge vV. Keiert. t". C, '.112 i:*.*! Fifth 
street. S. A. Heani. 28 NoHli ■l^^euU- 
eiglilh avenue nr«t, K. of )t. and S. 

aTo. u. w. 

FIllKI.in' LUlKiK. NO. 1(15 — >rEET3 
at Maccabee hail, il l^ake a%enue north, 
every 1 lnjr.-uay at 8 p.' m. Visiting tutm- 
t*r8 weloorae. S. L. Piene, M. W.; A. 
K Pierlng. recorder: O. J. Miirrold. 
financier. ilT Fast Fifth street. 




MOllKHN SA.MAltITA.NS. 
ALPHA «OtN<'n., NO 1— TAKE 
tice- That Beneficent degree meets 
ond and fourth Thurseiay? and 
arllan degiee the llr>l and 
davs at L- «». K. hall, ccni,r 
a>pnue west and Fir»l street. J 
O 8 • Wallace P. Wallbanks, scribe. K. A 
F. S.' First -National bank bulldnig. 
l-ady U. S. 




XO- 
»ee- 

ihe Sam- 

h.rd Thur»- 

Fourth 

KeUy. 

Nbbleu 

Finoia Mabaa. 



FOR SALE— ONE BLACK 
weigh 2,800; 6 years old. 
East Fifth street. 



FOR SALE— HORSE: .SUITABLE FOR 
driving or light delivery. Inquire 
Totman livery. 



FOR RENT— BARN. 
East Third street. 



INQUIRE 720 



FOR RENT — 
tago. Inquire 
street. 



FOUR- 
1027 



ROOM 
West 



COT- 

First 



FORr^ALE'^^^^^^"2r^rTr"wrL^^ 

hens and cockerel to mate; Wycoff 
striin; $1 each; ready for laying. 
Lb J. Gelger, Pioctor, Minn, Box 356. 



FO^SAL£-^OWS^^ 

FOR SALE— MR. LEVINE WILL AR- 
rlve with a carload of fresh milch 
cows Monday, Dec. 1. 821 Fourt?» 
avenue east; Grand 1708-D, Melrose 
4702. 

FOR SALE— FRESH GUEH.NSEV COW. 
Call 302 North Fifty-fourth avenue 
west. 

FoTt SALE — JERSEY COW. FRANK 
Coulter, at Arnold. 



For Sale — Edison I idestructible records 
by m.ill, 60c. Boston Music Co.. Duluth. 

FORJaLE^REAL ESTATE 

FOR^ALE^^^^T26 CASH AND $10 PER 
month buys fine garden tract three- 
quarters of milt from end of Wood- 
land car on Arrold road; cleared or 
uncleared; fine for summer homes, 
at $200 to $250 i)er acre. W. B. Roe, 
412 Providence Dullding. 




FOR SALE— HOU;>ES, I LA TS, LOTS 
and land by thi L. A Larsen com- 
213-14-16 Providence building. 




BOYAL ARCANUM. DULUTH COI.-N- 
cll. No. 14S:— Meets sei-ond and fourth 
Tuesday evenings at Maccabee hall, 21 
Lake avri'.ue north. Clinton Brooks, tec- 
retary. 401 Columbia building. 

.JHHKK OF OWUS nULUTH 
Ne>t, No. 1200— Meetings are held 
every Wediie-day evening at Kaglea 
hail, •lis Wet-t superior serc«t. 
Jos-pli K. Peaks, tecretary. 21 
Kait Superior street. 



pany. 



WANTED TO SELL — LOTS ON 
First street at one-half value 
J. M. Corcoran^ Ity. 

For Sale— 2 '/4 -aero 
Woodland $200. 



A\- EST 
Write 



A. O. U. W.— Duluth Lodge. No. 10.— 
Meets every aecoiul and fourth Tu«bday 
night at I. O. O. K. hall. 18 I.aiie ave- 
nue north. Neil uieetlng, No». 25, 9 
i) in. shani. Iiilliation. Athletics. 
TliPinas A. Jolnison. M. W. ; George & 

Lindberg, recorder ; T. J. St. Ucrm-ln, financier. 

We.t First street. 



it 



wooded 
Whitney 



lot, 
Wall 



DRJESS MAKING^ 

WANTED— TO GO OUT SEWLN<; BY 
day or at home. Melrose 308-L, 
Lakeside, 

^EW DRESSMAKING PARL<3RS. 
Prices reasonakle. Melrose 4551. 




DULUTH TEMPLE NO. 186. 
Camels of the U orld. meets 
every Wednesday evening at 
Odd Fellows' hall. 18 Lak« 
avenue north. Martin John- 
son, secretary. Initiation 
Wednesday evening. 



STOVE REPAIRS. 

^^^"caRRy"1n"sTOCK REPAlRsToR 
10 000 different .'-toves and ranges. C. 
F.' Wlggerts &. Sons, 410 ML Sup. St. 



nr "fcia i — 



4- 



9 



BiM 



• A 



---'- ' 1 






1 


1 




1 

i 


1 
i 

1 



1 



^ 




-^!m 



^'mm 



•^m 



'- '■ 



- - 



L 



1ST EPm 



THE DULUTH HERAL 




VOLUME XXXI— NO. 204. 



TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 2, 1913. 



TWO CENTS. 



SWEEPING CHANGES 
ARE URGED BY CITY'S 
USINESS DOCTOR 



MEXICO CITY WILL BE ipouCY OF WAITING 



ATTACKED BY REBELS 
INSIDE OF A MONTH 



NOT TO BE ALTERED 



Dr. B. M. Rastall Submits I cOMPLtTES HIS 



His Efficiency Report 
to Commissioner. 



m 



EFFICIENCY SURVEY 



Siiows Where Loose Meth- 
ods Have Cost City Thou- 
sands of Dollars. 



Would Weed Out Inefficient 

Patrolmen and Part Time 

Employes. 



Sweeping: change?, involving 
the whole city aclministraiion, are 
recommended by Dr. B. M. Ras- 
tall, the "business doctor" who 
recently completed an efficiency! 
survey of the local municipal 
government, in a lengthy report 
submitted to Finance Commis- 
sioner Fred J. Voss. 

First taking the city in its en- 
tirety and then section by section, 
Dr. 'Rastall throws light upon 
looseness, carelessness and illog- 
ical methods which have been 
costing the city thousands of dol- 
lars, dissipating its energies and 
leaving its officers and the public 
in the dark as to its operations 
and actual status. 

Dr. Rastall would revolutionize 
the existing conditions, completely 
reorganizing many departments, 
combining ;.nd shifting the duties 
of division.^, trarisfefring and re- 
arranging sub heads and combin- 
ing tile whole to a business-like 
and efficient working machine, 
with responsibilities definitely 
centralized and one part fitting in 
smoothly with another. lie would 
eliminate needless and wasteful 
duplication of work, establish a 
modern accounting system and. 
introduce up- to-date methods 

(C'ontlnued on page 14. fifth column.) 

ELLIOTT SEEKS TO 
AVERT FEDERAL SUIT 

Confers With McReynolds 

on Plans for New Haven 

System. 

Wa.slilngtnn. Dec. 2.— Howard nUott. 
chairman of the board of directors of 
the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
railway, had a conference today with 
Attorney General McReynolds. Such 
plans for the voluntary reorganization 
of the New Haven as its directors have 
been able to make were laid before the 
attorney general, T. W'. (Jregory. and 
Jesse C. Adkins, the assistant who In- 
vctigated the railroad with a view to 
prosecutinK it under the anti-trust act. 

Unless the proposals made by Mr. 
Elliott are looked upon as sufficient to 
Insure a reorganization meeting tlie 
approval of Attorney «;eneral McRey- 
nold." negotiations probably will bo 
abandoned, and the department will act 
upon the recommendations of its in- 
vestigators. , , J ^ *„ 

The department had no comment to 
make on Mr. Elliott's visit, but Mr. 
McReviiolds announced weeks ago that 
he liad no desire to rush into court to 
accomplish a reorganization of the 
system if its management could con- 
vince him that such an end could be 
brought about by voluntary action. 

creekWod 
killsjleven 

Sudden Rise Sweeps Away 
Fifty Houses in Bel- 
ton, Tex. 




SUFFRAGISTS 
AREJVIDED 

Proposal to Change So- 
ciety's Constitution May 
Bring Clash. 



Villa's Troops Go to Chi- 
huahua, Whicli Federals 
Abandoned,. 



Gen. Meroado Reported 

Fleeing to the United 

States. 



ROVAl NAHtS m. LINKED BY GOSSIPS l |PR[S|DENT 

REITERATES 
HIS POSITION 



i Financial Affairs Are Basis 
of Proposed Amend- 
ment. 



Gen. Bliss Teils of Troubles 

of Troops Along 

Border. 



DR. B. M. RASTALL. 



CRAIGBEGINS 



Will 




Claim That Dr. Helen 
Knabe Committed 
Suicide. 



Defendant Is Charged With 

Getting Rid of 

Witnesses. 



Washington. Dec. 2.— Chief Interest 
in the second day's session of the con- 
vention of the National American 
I Woman Suffrage association was In 
' the discussion of a new constitution 
for the organization. 

The purpose of a change In the con- 
stitution, it was explained, was to 
place the association on a basis with a 
budget system. Money for carrying on 
the work hitherto has been raised on 
a subscription plan. 

Reports of credentials, ways and 
means, church work, congressional 
and other committees, took up the 
morning session. The committee which 
drew up the new constitution also was 
ready to report. 

While tliere was some opposition to 
the proposed change, leaders declared 
that when 'ts full meaning was ex- 
plained much of the objection would 
disappear. Tiie executive committee 
has approved the vital section of the 
constitution, dealing with the method 
of raising the budget. That, it was 
felt, paved the way for removal of 
much opposition. 

Despite the optlnil.st«c views of the 
leaders there was talk of opposition 
when the suffragists got down to 
work. Some of those most radically 
opposed to the new plan were urging 
()th»-r delegates to Join in concerted 
opposition to it. Tliose favoring the 
plan, however, were confident all dif« 
ferences would be smoothed out and 
that all forces would finally be united 
to work In harmony for the cause. 



Woman and Four Children 
and Another Whole Fam- 
ily Drown. 



Ten persons 

perished in a 

came without 

creek before 

runs through 

Fifty houses 



Belton. Tex.. Dec. 2 
were reported to have 
80-foot wave which 
warning down Nolan 
daybreak. The creek 
the center of this city 
along the creek's banks were swept 

away. 

In the heart of the town Mrs. TV. C. 
Polk and her four children wercr 
caught a«leep in their home and 
drowned. Mr. Polk, carrying the 
fifth child, an infant, escaped to high 
ground. , , ,. , 

Five fatalities— a man. liis wife and 
three . l.ildren— were reported in un- 
other family, that of a camper. His 
name was not known here. 

When the Main street bridge In Tem- 
ple Texas, was demolished by the 
wave an unidentified man was on the 
structure. He was seen to go nto 
the water. It is believed he per- 
ished. ^. IX * « 

The creek's rise was the result of a 
downpour of four hours' duration. 



Shelbyville. Ind.. Dec. 2.— Dr. Will- 
lam B. Oraig, accused of murdering Dr. 
Helen Knabe, was portrayed as an In- 
nocent man who was being unfairly 
prosecuted by the state. In the opening 
statement of the defense made by 
Henry N. Spaan today. Mr. Spaan de- 
nied that there was any greater Inti- 
macy than that of good friendship be- 
tween Dr. Craig and Dr. Knabe. He 
said there was never any promise of 
marriage or any talk of marriage be- 
tween the two. 

"Dr Knabe was a mannish woman, 
a fighter but she was not successful, i 
said Mr.'spaan. 'She borrowed money; 
from her friends frequently because ; 
she was unable to make a living at the \ 
practice of medicine, and at the time 
of her death she was preparing to 
train herself for physical culture 

work." _. . 

Wan Denpondent. 

He asserted that her cousin. Dr. Au- 
gusta Knabe, knew that she was 
despondent because of her failure in 
life and had told a friend, who v.'ould 
be 'produced as a witness, that she 
was afraid Dr. Knabe would commit 

suicide. ^ <^ , 1. J 

The a ccusation that Dr. Craig had 

(Continued on page 3, fifth column.) 

WOMAtTRAIL^DEN; 
SIX WOMEN ACCUSED 

All Are on Trial in Wau- 

kegan— Man Not Yet 
I Arrested. 

I Waukegan. HI., Dec. 2.— Six women 
i and a man, charged with having ridden 
Mrs. John Richardson on a rail, are 
put on trial here. The women were in 
court during the examination of jurors. 
Edward Krepel the only man in the 
partv, which carried Mrs. Richardson 
through town, has not been arrested. 
The state is demanding that jurors 
pledge they will punish the women the 
same as if they were men. 

NEGRO iSlCILLED IN 
HOOSIER STRIKE RIOT 

Three Other Men Wounded 

and One of Them 

May Die. 

Indianapoll.s, Ind., Dec. 2.— Claud 
Lewis, a negro, aged 19. was killed and 
three men were wounded, one probably 
fatally, this afternoon, when six spe- 
cial police riding on an Ice wagon shot 
Into a crowd which tried to stop the 
wagon in Indiana avenue. The special 
officers were taken to the police sta- 
tion but it was said they would be re- 
leased as soon as they made a state- 
Mayor Wallace ordered the police to- 
day to disperse a parade which was 
proposed by the teamsters and chauf- 
feurs who are on strike. The police 
kept the crowd about labor headquar- 
ters moving and did not give the men 
a chance to start a demonstration. 

As an additional help to the police In 
preventing the parade, one of the fire 
department's large automobiles was 
loaded with policemen armed with not 

^"a'^' committee composed of repre- 
sentatives of all crafts affiliated 
with the Central Labor union 
today began efforts to end the 
strike of the teamsters and chauf- 
feurs At the close of the committee 
meeting William V.. Beatty, president 
of the Central Labor union and chair- 
man of the committee, announced that 
no decision as to the plan of pro- 
cedure had been reached. 

The status of the strike early today- 
remained unchanged. 



THREE ENTOMBED 
IN COLORADO MINE 

Two Others Are Rescued 

Alive From Adjoining 

Properties. 

Cripple Creek. Colo.. Dec. 2.— Fight- 
ing against tons of rock and dirt, 
hundreds of miners working in shifts 
of twenty-five minutes each struggled 
today to reach three men still en- 
tombed In the ijolden Cycle mine here, 
the property of J. T. Milliken of St. 
Louis, in which four men were en- 
tombed late yesterday afternoon by a 
cave-in and from which one miner 
has been rescued alive. A flftli miner 
was entombed in the Christmas mine 
adjoining, and rescued late last night. 

«irave fears for the safety of the 
men, Frank M. Woods, Patrick Kevany 
and Samuel Sorenson. were express-^H 
this morring by rescuers who are 
working from the main shaft, which 
Is nearly clear. 



Juarez, Mex.. Dec. 2.— Hasty prepa- 
rations were under way today In the 
rebel ranks for the occupation of Chi- 
huahua, the capital of Chihuahua state, 
which is reported to have been evacu- 
ated by the Federals because of threat- 
ened starvation of Ita 35,000 population. 

Pointing out that of the Important 
Federal strongholds In the north only 
Monterey and (Juaymas renjained. cen. 
Francisco Villa, tbo rebel leader, said 
Chihuahua would be made the base of 
augressive activities southward. 

When forces will be sent to pursue 
Gen. Salvador Mercado. Huertas mili- 
tary governor, who is reported to bo 
HecinK to the United Stales border at 
Ojinaga with 2,000 famished soldiers 
and CJencrals Orozco and Salazar. sa d 
to have taken to the mountains. Villa 
declined to say definitely, but said that 
the rebel advance toward Mexico City 
would continue briskly. 

At Capital By January. 

"We will be shooting at the ram- 
parts of Mexico City within a nionth 
said Villa. "We are confident that 
when the people In the capital realize 
that we have capt\M-ed almost an /"^ 
North and are In Sisrht of the city s 
gates, they will voice their feelings, 
which they ar e now afraid to do. and 
"(Continued on page 3, fourth column.) 

highwaMnYills 
railway official 

Southern Pacific Man Shot 

Trying to risarm 

Bancy*. 

Los Angeles, Cal.. Dec. 2— H. E. 
Montagu, traveling passenger agent of 
the Southern Pacific, was shot and 
killed last night wh^-n trying to dis- 
arm a highwayman who was holding 
up the passengers in a Southern Pa- 
cific westbound overland train. The 
highwayman boarded the train at Po- 
mona thirty miles east of here, and 
Jumped off at El Monte, sixteen miles 
out. 




Tells Congress Mexico Is 

Only Cloud on Our 

Horizon. 



Urges Concentration By 
Senate on Pending Cur- 
rency Bill. 



PRINCESS HILDEGARDE. KING FREDERICK OF SAXONY. 

London Dec 2 —King Frederick Augustus of Sax any. it is said wants to 
marr'V°"a^ga"i•nf'lnd'pr^nce^ss Hildegarde daugM^^^^ irmttrl- 

reported to be the chosen bride. .I^'^^ Fredei ck AJgusius "^»j„ '^^j^j^ p ^ 

"'trSfce'?,' fflSltarae ,,3= years oM |yd,,'» -| ,?//.'>;, "JL tuTn't'J" :;"' 
rud. Helmtrud and Gondelinde. All of the bix are \ ery reiitious. 

HWirimliY 



Promises Later Address 

Dealing With Needed 

Trust Legislation. 



AN EXPLOSION OF 



LIFER ESCAPES FROM 
PRISON AT JOLIET 

Viol; ♦es Liberties as Trusty 

—May Be Hidden in 

Chicago. 

Jollct, 111., Dec. 2.— Jerry O'Connor, 
serving a life sentence in the peniten- 
tiary here, escaped early today and is 
believed to have taken refuge In Chl- 

r^fn' making his escape O'Connor vlo- 
lated liberties which he %^\°y%^J^^ 
trusty. He was sentenced In Septem- 
ber. 1912. 




Emil Johnson and Wife 

Miraculously Escape 

Serious Injury. 



Walls Blown From Founda- 
tions— Fire Follows the 
Eixplosion. 



An explosion of gas In the home cf 
Emll Johnson. 626 Eighth avenue east, 
completely destroyed the structure 
about 11 o'clock this morning, causing 
slight injurlfs to Mr. Johnson. Mrs. 
Johnson, whc wfts up.«talrs in a closet 
at the time of the explosion, was un- ^ 
Injured, although she Is reported to be | 
in a very n( rvous state and Is being 
cared for at the home of neighbors. 

The miracilous feature of the cx- 



cates 



VOTE IN FOURTEEN , ^ 

BA Y STAT E CITIES. I fqrMER CAPTAIN 

Boston, Mass., Dec. 2 —Fourteen of QP PQLICE INDICTED. 

the thirty-three cities In Massachusetts ^' _______ 

held municipal elections today. Be- ^ j.—A former police 

sides contests for various city offices I >f^ T\!^r>', i ,Ti^k Rpillv was Indicted 
hot campaigns had been waged in sev- captain I^^">^'"^^.*'hvtl4 grand jury In 
eral of thf cities between the advo- j for bribery toJa>b^ the |ran^^^^ ^^ ^j^,^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ Johnson nor 

and opponents of licensing the | connect 101^^% it^n^ii^i^ „nrl%vire tapping his wife was seriously injured. Mr. 

Johnson's face and hands were slightly 
burned and lis hair a' ^ '" ' ' 

off. He was also stru... _- — 

by a falling piece of debris, but Mrs. 
Johnson escaped unscathed. 

Mr. Johnson came home about 11 
o'clock this nornlng, an d upon his ar- 

(Continued en page 3, fourth column.) 

ANOTHEADAYOF 
NIGiHT IN CHICAGO 



■SVH.«:h1ngton, Dec. 2. — President 'Wil- 
Bon read his first annual mes.=age to 
congress today at a Joint session of 
both branches at 1 o'clock In tlie l.ouso 
chamber. The message, among the 
briefest of documents of its kind from 
any president, and .«ome 3,000 words 
long, required less than thirty minutes 
for reading, though it treated on a va- 
riety of EUbjects. 

The Mexican situation was discussed 
by Presiue-nt AVll.son with brief com- 
ment, reiterating the sentiments he ex- 
I pressed in a special address to con- 
gress on the same subject some time 
ago, and exprosEing the belief that the 
Huerta government was slowly crum- 
bling and that the I'nited States prob- 
ably would not be obliged to alter its 
policy of waiting. 

.Tru.«t LegKlatlon. 
No program for trust legislation was 
presented, further than the mention of 
the desirability of an early amendment 
to the Sherman law "to prevent pri- 
vate monopoly more effectually than it 
has yet been prevented." and an an- 

(Continued on page 14. first column.) 

GALLERIES' 
AREJACKED 

Brilliant Company of Offi- 
cials and Families Greet 
President. 



8airof''intoircYtlnRTlquor"foV-the°com: i between the police and wire tapping 
Ing year. Improved business methods j swindlers. , accepting fl.OOO 

in the conduct of municipal affairs ^^'1'^ *^ ,^ " r-intine -^-- ..,.i.,-«i^,.o 
formed the slogan of many of the can- »" ^.^-^t"^," .JlVion 
1 dldates for mayor. 1 PoUce protection. 



the swindlers 




.V,^„sr.'i"'Jffi His Appearance Is Signal 

uck on the body ' ' 

for Deafening Roar of 
Applause. 



TYING A CAN TO IT. 




Fog, Smoke and Lack of 

Breeze Cause Darkness; 

Cars Collide. 



Washington. Dec. 2. — President 'U'll- 
son arrived at the capitol just before 
1 o'clock today to read In person his 
first annual message to a Joint session 
I of congress. He went to Speaker 
Clark's room where he was met by a 
committee of the house and senate and 
escorted Into the house chamber to the 

rostrum. ^ , . .. 

The beginning of the Joint session 
and the reading of the message did not 
begin promptly at 1 o'clock as had been 
provided, because of the failure of the 
senate to recess in time to get over to 
the house chamber. It was within one 
minute of 1 before the senators were 



tne .semoiance 01 nigni mmui^ "» * ~;- — ;, , ' ~ . j„ „« ,v,„ „o^i 

^, , , X .. *i- 1 filine over to the other side of the capi- 

i.y Chicagoans late to their , """^.y^i, ^^e president waited in 
• as .street car.s <^»fvated Joh M|«'\,j j..^ ^ffi^g chatting with 
in trains were compelled to . ; PfSKe . committee and a few 



Chicago. I'ec. 2. — A dense fog which 
with a later admixture of smoke deep- 
ened into the .semblance of night 
brought mai 
tasks today 

and suburban irains were coiupeiieu 10 . ;---_,, 
proceed slov'ly j ^^^ reception 

This ^yas the third dark day In a I congressmen ^^^ ^^^^ ^ brilliant 
fortnight dus to fog and smoke and the ! ^^au^'^ies i ^^^.^ families 

absence of air cj^urrents. Street lamp.« : compan> or o. however, when 

were lightec and work was carried t'" ; f,r!*^i?-.Tnt session finally got down to 
under artifi ial light as at night. L*'® J°i"* aU nre^ent rose to the^r feet. 

Eight persons were bruised or cut business. All present rose to tneir^^^^^^^^ 
by flying g ass when a West Chicago and ^ deafening roar of applause sv^ep^ 
avenue street car crashed Into a car i the chamber ^s Mr. Wilson took ills 

-^:ri\%v,'oJ^.i^''' '-^"^ "^' ^'^ '°^i?;rd^ arv.^ot ^;^op\ \}i »ei| 

were re.pon.ioie. \re3.^ easily and clearly In his usual 

'pleasing tone which carried his words 
' to the doors of the chamber. 

» » »» »» )! ( »>iH|6J!(»-»^- »)K)K) i C»»»» »^HMf I Mc'xican A'lewa Applauded. 

^ ^ The solemn quiet which attended 

1 THE DAY IN CONGRESS t\t:,..^TiZ\i^lT'':Ll:X.y:'^^^[. 

m If ; views on the Mexican situation In the 

emphatic words. "There can be no cer- 
tain prospect of peace in America un- 
til Oen. Huerta has surrendered his 
usurped authority in Mexico.'* 

As the president concluded his ref- 
erences to Mexico and announced that 
the Inlted States v.ould adhere to Its 
"waiting policy." the applause was 
louder. . , . 

Another outburst of applause greet- 
ed the president's declaration that the 
Sherman anti-trust law should be 
strengthened. More applause greeted 
the declaration in favor of the direct 
nomination of presidential candidates. 
Nearly every sentence of his comment 
on that subject was punctuate-d by 
handolapping. Secretary Bryan in the 
diplomatic gallery smiled broadly. 

In another burst of applause the 
president finished reading at 1:35 
o'clock, the joint session dissolved and 
the president returned to the White 

Mrs Wilson and her daughters. 
Eleanor and Margaret, occupied places 
In a private gallery. 

Secretary Tumulty and all the mem- 
bers of the cabinet had places on the 
floor. 



SEXATE. ^ 

Met at 11 a. m. # I 

KefuMod to agree to vote on ^ 

the adisilnldtratlon currency bill ^ 

on Dec. 2 0. ^ 

ReccNKcd to Join the hounc to ^ 

hear Prritidcnt Wilson road his ^ 

annual message. ^ 

-JS 

HOUSE. 41 

* 



Wi^^/i^i^^^^^ - ^ 



fMrt at noon 
President Wllnon rend IiIh an- 

^ nuul mcKKnge to a Joint tiecitlon 

-jjt at 1 o'clock. 

^ ChalrniHn Clayton called a 

^ meeting tt the Judiciary corumit- 
teif for tcniorroiv to consider anti- 
trust blll.t. 

RcpreKi'ntativc Padgett's bill to 
equip natal militia for tlic Fed- 
eral service ordered favorably rc- 

-)!; ported. 

^ Representative McKcllar intro- 
duced bills for Jury reform and 
for a sii rvey of Memphis* har- 
bor. 

Represi'ntotlve I.Ioyd introduced ^ 
n bill t« authorise the Missouri. ^ 
Kansas * Texas railroad to * 
bridge the Mississippi at llanni- -){( 

bal. ^ 

The Iliiycs bill to authorise the ^ 

president to organUe voluntary ^ 
^ military 'orees on a nat • nal basis %t 
^ was fav<rably reported. ^ 



* 
* 



% 



I 



British Xavy Aviator Killed. 

East Church. Kent, Eng.. Dec. _.— 

Capt. Gilbert V. Wlldman-Lushington. 

commander of the British naval tlylng 

^ . corps, was killed today at the naval 

r^ »»»»»»»»»» ' flying grounds here. 




I DEFECTIVE PAGE 

^ R 1 r 



t:Sii 





Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



WKATHER — Partly cloudy weather 
toniffht and Wednesday; colder. 




WISE 
MEN 

ARE TAK- 
ING AD- 
VANTAGE 



OF THIS 

SALE OF 

WINTER 

Overcoats 

Kiipixnlioimrr and Strouse & 
Bros. O^rrtoats— Broken linfS of 
our most popular coats; sizes for 
all among the 7 5 Overcoats — 

$2S,$20,$I8 $ 
and $14.45 
IfftlUES— YOUR 
CHOiCEAT 




$18, $15 and $13 
WINTER OVERCOATS 



Kvery one a bargain A ■■ 
at the oriKiJial l'ri<^"t;i*_- if J[^ 



W«- will close out 40 
coats at, choice 




SPIRIT OF 
THEJOLIDAY 

Is Already Being Evidenced 

in the City's Shopping 

District. 



Colder Weather and Snow 

Eagerly Awaited By Du- 

luth Merchants, 



ALL BOYS' OVERCOATS 
HALF PRICE 

(Except Chinchillas.; Ages 3 to 17. 

liuy sensible Christinas presents 

this year — give something to wear. 




Ouk Hull Uuikliiij;. 



Handsome 

Caracases 

AT KLEIN'S-IN 

Sterling Silver... .$6.00 to $30 

.All liutid engraved. 

Uernian Silver $3.50 to $6 




G. A. Klein 

—Jeweler— 
aZS West Superior Street 



SENATE REFUSES TO 
FIX DATE FOR VOTE 



Washington, Dt-c. 2. — Efforts to get 
mi asToeniont tn vote in the bonate on 
the currency bill on Saturday, Dec. 20, 
failed today, but the senate Democrats 
began an energetic proRram which 
they expert will force early action. 
Senator Williams of Mississippi an- 
nounetd that it was the intention of 
the Democrats to "exliau.st the senate" 
and force an early vote. Senator Bris- 
tow Vehemently protested against the 
Democratic plan. 

Senator l^ristow declared the Demo- 
rrata prop<).«ted to pa.ss a bill by "pliy- 
elcal exhaustion" Instead of fair and 
free d>bate. 

SiiizjureKtrd Pris^ ItinK. 

"This ban l>e( n a body for intellect- 
ual discussion, a place where informa- 
tion wa.>< at a par, and physical endur- 
ance not a premium," he cried. "The 
place to test phy.tlcal endurance is in 
the prize rinjc, not in the senate." 

Senators Owen and Shafroth retort- 
ed that Senator Bristow and the other 
liepiiblieans already had delayed the 
currency bill by demanding hearings 
and prolonKins" debate. 

Republican senators at a conference 
decided to protest formally against 
the long ses.sions proposed by the 
Democrats, but to enter upon no or- 
ganized opposition. 



Christmas is only twenty-two days 
off. I 

The spirit of the holiday season Is j 
beginning to find expression in the i 
shopping districts of Duluth and peo- I 
pie are beginning to make out lists of 
gifts for their friends and relatives. 
Pedestrians on the down-town streets 
are already Inspecting the attractive- 
ly decorated shop windows. 

Holiday goods of every description 
may be seen at the stores and shops, 
and the displays are being made with 
special view to attracting the Chrl.st- 
mas .shopper's attention. Duluth mer- 
chants look for one of the biggest 
holiday seasons in the history of the 
city this year. So far the weather has 
bten so mild that a larse number of 
people have neglected to lay In a sup- 
ply of winter goods. A "white" Christ- 
m&a would delight merchants more 
than anything elue, and a snowfall 
would bring a big boom in retail 
trade. 

The Retail Mt rchant."?' association 
has decided that all department stores, 
clothing stores, and all stores, in fact, 
that cater to the Christmas shopper, 
will be kept open nicrht.s for one week 
before Christmas. Christmas comes on 
Thursday, Dec. 2.0, and the stores will 
begin opening at night on Thursday. 
Dec. 18. Some of the merchants deal- 
ing In f!pecialties have expressed their 
desire to keep open for only three 
nights before Chri.stmaa. They may 
of course do as they wish in this re- 
gard. 

Special help Is already being taken 
on at the stores that goods may be at- 
tractively displajt d and the early 
shopper accommodated. The state law 
regulating the hours of employes is be- 
ing considered, and all the stores that 
keep open extra hours will arrange 
for shifts of clerks. Fifty-four hours i 
of service a week Is the maximum al- | 
lowed by the state law. Merchants ' 
favoring night openings for a week [ 
pay that this does not cause any spe- ■ 
cial hardship on the clerks as their | 
hours are so arranged that their day 
is of the usual length. Shifts are gen- 
erally arranged for forenoons and aft- 
ernoons or afternoons and evenings. 

Many of the down-town stores are 
being decorated with much taste. 
Christmas trees laden with toys and 
lighted with candles are displayed. 
Good Old Saint Nicholas Is conspicu- 
ously 8ht)wn In many windows. 

thoma sThe raton, 

A Genius Who Was Neglected By His 
Contemporaries. 

Thomas Chatterton was one of Eng- 
land's greatest poetic geniuses. Thom- 
as Sheraton was another English 
genius who, though he has left no 
masterplces that came from his pen, has 
bequeathed a pathetic slmllprlty in 
the careers of these two Thomases. 
Chatterton went to I..ondon to meet 
neglect, to face starvation, and, final- 
ly to take his own life. Sheraton did 
not commit suicide but neglect and 
hardship were his lot. From his birth- 
place at Stockton-on-Tees he went 
to London in his early manhood. For 
some years he earned a precarious 
living by writing, teaching and paint- 
ing. Finding at last that it would 
be necessary for him to do something 
■else or starve, he became a designer 
of furniture, and came under the In- 
fluence of Robert and James Adam, 
two of the notable figures In the fur- 
niture world during the latter part of 
the eighteenth century. 

Bv their close adherence to clas.dc 
I traditions and through their success in 
! Inte.rpreting classic details the Adam 
i brothers made themselves dominant as 
. teachers of the architectural and dec- 
I oratlve arts. Sheraton, under their In- 
t fluence and tutelage, developed a de- 
gree of artistic skill that entitles him 
; to rank with, if not above, them. But, 
I like many another genius, he was 
' compelled to leave It to posterity to 
I discover his greatness. He lived in 
! poverty and died neglected. 
1 Sheraton's wonderful cleverness 
i manifested Itself most forcibly in his 
decorative schemes. He is known as 
a color poet, owing to the ability he 
possessed to use highly colored woods 
as a painter uses pigments. Marquetry 
and Inlay were chosen as the chief 
mediums of his decorative fancies, al- 
though he occasionally chose a carved 
wreath. 

In Sheraton furniture there is a 
charm and refinement which cause one 
to wonder how the people of his own 
time happened to overlook his im- 
portance and leave it to later gen- 
erations to accord to him the honor- 
able place he occupies In furniture 
historv. 

The "Berkey & Gay Week" exhibi- 
tion at French & Bassett contpany's 
presents an excellent opportunity to 
study Sheraton at his best. Berkey & 
flay reproductions of Sheraton as well 
as of Chippendale, Louis XV Louis 
XVI. Empire, Italian Renaissance, 
Flemish, Colonial and other period 
furniture have all the classic beauty 
and elegance of the original pieces. 
The exhibition is really an artistic 
treat. It Is well worth a visit by any 
one who desires to be informed re- 
garding furniture as an expression of 
artistic development. 





ColdinHead 
and Catarrh 

Pour a teaspoonful of Omega Oil 
into a cupful of boiling water and in- 
hale the steam, which carries the heal- 
ing properties of this wonderful oil 
into the passages of the nose and 
throat. It usually gives relief. Trial 
bottle loc; large bottles 25c and 50c 



STATE IS IN 
TH[ FIGHT 



Governor Urges Aid in Bat- 
tle Against White 
Plague. 



STATEMENT OF THE CIRCULATION OF 

THE DULUTH HERALD 
FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 1913 

■ - -^- ~ 

THE HERALD HAS A LARGER CIRCULATION 
THAN ANY OTHER PAPER IN THE WORLD 
PUBLISHED IN A CITY THE SIZE OF DULUTH 



Data 



Copies 

1 30,583 

2 Sunday 

3 28 J35 

4 28,687 

5 28,790 

6 28,793 

7 28,486 

8 30,560 

9 Sunday 

10 28,586 

11 28,685 

12 28,894 

13 28,853 

14 28,640 

15 30,747 



Date 



Coplea 



16 Sunday 

17 28,873 

18 28,865 

19 28,761 

20 28,760 

21 28,918 

22 30,726 

23 Sunday 

24 28.657 

25 28,960 

26 28,777 

27 27,487 

28 28,727 

29 30,224 

30 Sunday 



Total for the Month . . .726,774 



Average Daily Circulation. . . . 
Average Saturday Circulation 



29,071 
30,568 



Tlie alK>vo is a true and corrt't't record of Uie actual paid circulaitlon 
of The DulutJi Ilorahl for tho month of Xovember, 1913. 

\VM. F. HKN'RY, Itu.siiies;i and Advcrtlhing Munaser. 
Subscribed and swora to before lue Uiis l.st day of December, 1913. 

F. X. AIJ.KX, 
(Seal.) Notary Public, St. Louis County, Minnesota. 

My commission <»xplres April 1, 1915, 



OPEN AND HONEST 

ATTKXTIOX — Every man employed in every depart- 
ment of The Duhith Herald Is hereby authorized to give 
to all inquirers the fidlest information he iM>sse!5seei 
a>>out Uio circulation of this newspaper. The men 
employed in the press room know the niunl)er of copi«vs 
printed ca<h day. and they can tell It to anybody. The 
Herald docs not tvaut tlieui to res:Jirtl It as "confidential 
Information." It l.s Information for all the people. Tho 
men In the circulation department know the number of pnpt'rs sent out 
every day. and that number they can tell about when they are a-sked. The 
bookkeepers have Information concerning circulation, so have the men 
In the advertising department; and tliey are each and all ()f them author- 
ized to give out nil tliey know concerning circulation all the time. More 
than thiU, The Herald will thank any advertiser or any subscriber who 
asks for such Uiformatiou, and does not get it readily, If ho will advlsa 
this oflico. 




FUGITIVES 
ARRAIGNED 

Harry Carleton Bound Over 

on the Charge of 

Forgery. 

His Partner, Myrtle Hanni- 
gan, Sent Up for Break- 
ing Her Parole. 



Harry E. C.irleton and Myrtle Han- 
nigan, who were arrested by the St. 
Paul police yesterday morning, were 
arraigrned in police court here this 
morning, the former on a charge of 
forgery and th^' latter on a charge of 
violating her parole. 

Carleton was accused by the police 
of having forged a check for $29.40, 
signing the name of Julius Paul and 
making the check payable to himself. 
He had the check cashed by Phillip 
Acker, :J10 East Second street, with 
whom Carleton and the woman had 
been rooming for about two weeks. 
Carleton told Acker to take out $6.50 
for rent and to give him back the bal- 
ance of $22.90. 

Acker cashed the check and a few 
hour.^ later, when he ^aw both Carle- 
ton and Mrs. Hannlgan leave together, 
he suspected that something was wrong 
and notilled the police. Chief Troyer 
learned late Sunday tliat they had been 
planning to gu to St. Paul and he im- 
mediately notified the authorities there. 
Carleton and his companion were tak- 
en into custody just as they stepped off 
the train in the St. Paul union station. 
They were brought back last evening 
by Detective Schulte. 

Carlton waived examination when 
arraigned before Judge v'utting and he 
was bound over to the grand jury. Mrs. 
Hannlgan was found guilty of hav- 
ing violated her parole and she was 
sentenced to serve thirty days in the 
county jail. She was arrested on July 
13 la.^t on a charge of being a comnjon 
prostitute and was then sentenced to 
pay a fine of $40 and costs or thirty 
days. She was taken to jail, where 
several lo'-al charity workers Inter- 
fered In her behalf and obtained her 
releaf^e. She was then placed on pa- 
role for six months. 

The woman has quite a history In 
Duluth and is very well known to the 
police. About three years ago she came 
to this city from Fargo and at that 
time asked Chief Troyer to help her 
find her husband, Thomas J. Hannlgan, 
who had left her in the North Dakota 
city. Shortly afterward she gave birth 
to a child and was taken In charge by 
the humane officer.s. 

\Vhen she was arrested last July the 
child, which is now 18 months old, was 
taken away from her and placed in the 
state home at (^watonna. The young 
woman, only 22 years old. told the 
covirt that she left her parents on a 
Xorth Dakot.a farm when she was but 
18 years old and married in Fargo 
shortly after. 
I Carleton gives his age as 38 years. 
When arrested In St. Paul yester- 
day Mrs. Hannlgan gave her name as 
Mrs. C. Whitfield. 



Paris NeiJ York Washington Cincinnati 

"Correct Dress for Women 



Duluth 





and Girls 



paign In the cause. The health de- , 
partment Is to conduct the sale of 
Ked Cross seals, which will begin Dec. | 
8 The stamps will be sold Ut prac- 
tically all the important downtown 
places of business. Young wonien 
throughout the city will aid In carry- 
ing out the sale. The governors 
proclamation follows: 

Uovornor's Proclamation. 
"Minnesota has assumed a position 
of leadership In the warfare against 
the plague of tuberculosis Having 
attained this position of leadership in 
oni> of the noblest causes that can 
engaee and interest human endeavor, 
our state must not fall behind. 

•'Sunday, Dec. 7, has been set aside 
bv the National Association for the 
Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis 
as national Tuberculosis day. The pur- 
pose in view Is to attract nation-wide 
and state-wide attention to the ef- 
forts that are being made to stamp 
out the ravages of this dread disease 
through observance In churches, 
lodges, organizations and so forth. 
The cause Is one that should appeal 
to every human heart. A vigorous 
fight waged year after year will over- 
come the Incursions of this disease. 

MlniioMuta Healthy .State. 
"Minnesota is one of the healthiest 
states in the ITnlon, but here as else- 
where we find evidences of the rav- 
ages of tuberculosis. There are few 
of us who have not had our atten- 
tion called to the sufferings of one 
or more victims. I wish to supplement 
a recommendation, which I made to 
the legislature of 1911. "that the 
agencies now in operation must be 
materiallv augmented." Eternal vigi- 
lance in this warfare is the price of 

"Therefore, I. Adolph O. Eberhart, 
governor of Minnesota, hereby desig- 
nate Sunday, Dec. 7, 1913, as state 
Tuberculosis day, when especial atten- 
tion .should be devoted to this vitally 
important subject. 

"Civen under my hand and the 
great seal of the state this seven- 
teenth day of November, A. D. 1913. 
"ADOLiPH O. EBERHART. 



100. Iowa was second with e'glity- 
eight, and North Dakota and South Da- 
kota ranked next In order. 

From forelg^^o^*'^^^**^^ Canada was 
represented by i* Peru. 4; Norvvay, 4; 
Hawaii, 1; Africa, 1; India, 1; MeKico, 
1; Japan, 3; Russia, 2; Sweden. 2; Si- 
beria, 1; Switzerland, 1, and Syria, 2. 

Clearwater was the only cou'ity In 
Minnesota not represented by a stu- 
dent. 



CONTRACTORS TELL 
OF BEING SANDBASGED 



ADDITIONAL SPORTS | 



heads Beloit Team. j 

Belolt, Wis.. Dec. 2. — Don Tracy of ; 
Merrill, Wis., was today elected cap- ' 
tain of the Belolt college football team 
for the season of 1914. Tracy has been | 
playing Intercollegiate football for 1 
three years and is given the position of' 
all-state and all-I.ittle Five conference 
center by all critics. 

.^ 

League Turned Dcwn. 

Auburn, N. Y., Dec. 2. — Secretary 
John H. Farrell of the National Asso- 
ciation of Professional Baseball 
Leagues today anp^unced that the ap- 
plication of the Wtstern Canada league 
for classification ip class "C" had been 
disallowed. < 



A state-wide fight is being made 
against the white plague through the 
Minnesc>ta Association for the Study 
and Prevention of Tuberculosis. Pub- 
licity Is being given to this campaign 
and the people prepared for the sale 
of Red Cross seals, which will be 
begun Immediately after Tuberculosis 
Sunday, which falls on Dec. 7. Discus- 
sions and sermons will feature this 
occasion in all parts of the state. 
j More than 1,500,000 seals have been 
distributed in the state and more are 
to be sent out later. 

Dnluth Prepared. 
I Robinson Bosworth, executive secre- 
1 tary of the state society and Red 
Cross seal agent, has written a letter 
to The Herald In which he sends a 
' c»)py of the proclamation issued by 
{ Covernor A. O. Eberhart. In which the 
I .state executive urges the people of 
; the state to aid in the fight against 
the dread disease. Minnesota is 
I pointed out as the leader In the anti- 
tuberculosis movement. 
Duluth Is preparing for a big cam- 



GAS FAILS TO DRIVE 
LOPEZ FROM MINE 



Bingham. Utah, Dec. 2. — The fate of 
Ralph Lopez, slayer of six men, re- 
mained a question early today which it 
appeared that only the removal of the 
bulkheads and a search of the Utah- 
Apex mine, where he took refuge, 
would answer. All night long smudges 
poured their deadly gases into the tun- 
nels. A dozen deputies watched each 
exit to shoot the desperado on sight, 
but the expected dash for liberty did 
not occur. 

Today fumes from wet gunpowder 
were directed into the underground 
corridors. These fumes are heavy and 
hang clo-se to the ground beneath the 
strata of lighter gases that have been 
pouring into the mine since yesterday 
morning. It was expected the powder 
fumes would settle into several blind 
stopes not yet penetrated by the gases 
of less density. 

Because Lopez has not attempted a 
dash from the mine some believe that 
perhaps the resourceful Mexican had 
found a secure retreat. 



IN PROBATE COURT. 

Letters of Administration Granted 
and Petitions for Others Received. 

Martin Chachlja yesterday peti- 
tioned probate court for letters of ad- 
ministration en the estate of Ivan 
Peinch, 33, vfho was accidentally killed 
on Sept. 9 last, while in the employ 
of the Canadian Northern Railroad 
company. The principal asset of the 
estate Is a probable cause of action 
for wrongful death. Peinch was un- 
married and left a mother in the old 
country. 

Probate Judge Gilpin yesterday 
granted letters^ of administration in 
the following estates: Carl H. Rusch, 
Margaret Turrlsh, Erlck Carlson and 
John Mutic. The will of Mary Whalen 
was admitted to piobate and hearing 
on final accounts were heard with 
reference to the estates of James L. 
Porter, Herman Worlund and Jennie 
B. Johnson. 

NATIONAL BANK IN 

KAN SAS IS CLOSED. 

Yates Center, Kan., Dec. 2. — The 
Yates Center National bank was closed 
today by order of Bank Examiner A. C. 
Cutlec. Failure to realize on securi- 
ties was the cause assigned. 

The bank was one of the oldest In 
the county and had been regarded as 
one of the strongest. Its liabilities are 
said to be nearly $300,000 and lt.<< as- 
sets, if realized upon, in excess of that 
amount. C. C. Ricker, president of the 
bank, said he believed the depositors 
would be paid In full. 



New York, Dec. 2. — Madison R. Al- 
drich, a Poughkeepsie contractor, tes- 
tirted at District Attorney Whitman's 
John Doe inquiry that he had been 

forced to give up $1,500 as a condition 
to getting his pay from the state high- 
way department for a road which he 
completed during the administration 
of Highway Commissioner C. Gordon 
Heel. 

He paid the money In cash in New 
York city on March 31, 1912, he said, 
to Thomas Hassett, secretary to John 
A. Bensel, then state engineer. Has- 
sett, whom the district attorney is 
anxiou.^ to question, has disappeared. 
Mr. Whitman has Information that he 
sailed for San Domingo at about the 
same time that James K. McGulre, for- 
mer mayor of Syracuse, now under In- 
dictment, also sailed south. 

Aldrlch, who is president of the 
Bridgeport Construction company, said 
he had given the money on Hassett's 
representation that Charles R. Foley, 
deputy highway commissioner, de- 
manded It. Pay on his contract had 
been at that time, he said, held up four 
months. 

Con»aa1u.<i a Collector. 
John E. Consaulus. an Albany con- 
tractor, testified that he was a col- 
lector of Democratic campaign con- 
tributions from contractors. Consau- 
lus, who agreed to waive immunity 
before he took the stand, developed a ' 
poor memory when qtiestioned con- 
cerning his relations with Aldrich and 
I Hassett. However, he furnished the 
I district attorney further evidence as 
I to the activities of Everett P. Fowler, 
; the alleged Tammany "bagman," now 1 
' awaiting trial for extortion. 
! Matthew Van Alstyn, another con- 
tractor and the defeated candidate for ; 
mayor of Albany on the Democratic ' 
ticket at the last election, testified i 
' that his concern, the Shaughnessy j 
' Construction company, a corporation, 
had at the solicitation of Fowler and ! 
William H. Kelly. Democratic leader] 
of Syracuse, contributed $1,000 to the i 
I Democratic state committee in 1912. i 
This contribution, the district attorney I 
found was unreported. 



Christmas Furs 

At 15% to 40% Discount 

The Husband who indulges in Fine 
Furs for his wife's Christmas— The 
Son who pays this tribute to his 
mother— The Father or Brother who 

gladdens the Young Girl's heart with 
so lovely a present is certainly giving a gift 
that expresses the acme of Good Taste and 
Good Sense. 

Our entire 5;tock of Fur Coats, Fur Sets and Separate 
Pieces at Reductions of 15 to 40 per cent. 

CONTINUE THEIR 

Readjustment Sales 

— OF- 

Women's cind Misses' Suits, Coats, Gowns, 
Dresses, Furs, Blouses, Millinery and Juniors* 
and Children's Wear at Savings of V4, Vi 
and V2 their regular values. 

Millinery — V2 

(Formerly $7.50 to $45.) 

\>lvets, Plushes, Peau de Peche and other materials, 
for street, afternoon and evening wear. 

(jowns and Dresses 

$ 1 25 to $ I 50 Evening Gowns $85 

$65 to $75 Evening Gowns $50 

$39.50 to $49.50 Afternoon Dresses . . $35 

Important Coat Sale 

$45 to $55 High-Class Coats $35 

$35 to $42.50 High-Class Coats. . . .$18 
$29.50 to $45 High-Class Coats ... $1 5 

IMPOPTANT CLEARANCE OF 
GIRLS' WEAR 

Entire Stock of Girls* Coats at Vs, V2 and Less 

This includes our entire stock of Plain Tailored and 
Novelty Coats; sizes 2 to 6 and 7 to 14 years. Mate- 
rials of Chinchilla, \'elvet, Corduroy, Zibeline, Cheviot 
and novelty fabrics. 

Entire Stock of Girls' Wool Dresses at V^ Off 

Serges, W'Drsteds, Cheviots, Corduroys and X'elvets. 

Entire Stock of Children's Head wear Vs Off 



ed by Judge Riner until argrument on ; supreme court when the Rovernment 
the motion for new trial is heard. and counsel for the Southern raciJlc 

railroad came in with additional briefs 



ZELAYA AGREES TO 
GO BACK TO SPAIN 



Super ior { 



Washlngrton. Dec. 2. — At the state 
department today the Zelaya case was 
considered closed and the former dic- 
tator's release in ^ew York was ex- 
pected by nightfall, with the agree- 
ment that he would return to liar- 
celona, Spain. Zelaja will not be re- 
leased, however, until the formal rati- 
fication of the arrangement is re- 
ceived from Nicaragua and the former 
president will be under observation 
until he sails for Spain, Dec. 11. 



arguing whether oil Is a mineral. The 
government has a suit to cancel 
grants to the Southern Pacific on the 
ground tliat it was not Intended that 
mineral lands should pass to tu 



ST. LOUIS COUNH IS 
THIRD IN UNIVERSITY 



St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Twenty-eight states and 
thirteen foreign countries sent stu- 
dents to the University of Minnesota 
during the year which closed Aug. 1, 
according to figures completed today 
by Registrar E. B. Pierce. 

In Minnesota, Ramsey county Bent 
the second largest delegation, 502 stu- 
dents, to the various colleges of ~tho 
institution. Hennepin county wag lirat 
with 1,586, and St. Louis county third. 

Most of the students outside of Min- 
nesota came from neighboring state.^. 
Wisconsin sent the largest number, 



EX-CONGRESSMAN 
ATTEMPTS SUICIDE 



Harrisburg, Pa., Dec. 2. — Rowland B. 
Mahany, former congressman from 
F.ufEalo, N. Y., and formt^r minister to 
Ecuador, attempted suicide here today. 
He admitted his identity to physicians 
at the Harrfaburgr hospital. He said 
that he had come from Huffalo, but de- 
clined to give any reasons for his at- 
tempts at self-destruction. The doc- 
tors say he will recover. 

♦ 

FIraf Drc<Mnbpr Rain. 

Aberdeen, S. D., Dec. 2— With the 
thermometer registering 40 deg. above 
zero, the first Dec^ember rain recorded 
In more than thirty years, fell over the 
entire northern part of South Dakota 
Monday. The rain extended from Mo- 
brldge, S. D., to Montevideo. Minn. The 
air was balmy aud springlike. 



Working the County? 

County Clerk Leader is of the opin- 
ion that some hunters aro trying to ' 
"work" the county for bounty. A 
I hide was brought to the office yoster- , 
' dav wliich looked .'auspicious to Mr. ] 
Leader. He called in other experts of ; 
. wolf pelts but they were unable to 
decide whether it was that of a wild , 
bea.^t or of a common mongrel cur. • 
The hide was sent to Madison in order 
that judgment might be passed on it. 

Lad Loses Leg. 

Vincent Miller, the 9-year-old son 
of John Miller, an employe at the 
Great Lakes dock, was run down by 
an engine of the (Jreat Northern rail- 
road and liad his right leg cut off just 
below the knee. The boy was return- 
ing home after having carried a din- 
ner pail to his father. Tlie lad was 
taken to St. Mary's hospital, where it 
is believed he will recover. 

Withhold Prisoners' Names. 

Six g.amblers taken in a raid Satur- 
day night at 1217 Tower avenue, whose 
names the police would not divulge, 
failed to appear in police court yes- 
terday. The men had each put up $1B 
for bail. This was declared forfeited. 

BOND ACCEPTED IN 

WHITE SLAVE CASE. 



REDFIELD AND DAVIES 
TALK WIITH WILSON 



Washington, Dec. 
field of the depart 
and Joseph Davles 
corporations, confe 
with President Wil 

trust question. Mr 
making inquiries Inl 
Mr. lledfield, throui 
reaus of his depart) 
much Information, 
was in the nature 
facts upon which 
tion might be basei 



2. — Secretary Red- 
nent of commerce 
, commissioner of 
•red for an hour 
son today on the 
, Davles has been 
o the problem, and ' 
rh the various bu- 1 
nent, has gathered ' 
Today's conference ' 
it a survey of the 
corrective legisla- 
i. 



BILL PROVIDES FOR 

A NAVAL HOLIDAY. 

Washington, Dec. 2. — Representatlre 
Cray of Indiana introduced a oill 
wliich would provide for an interna- 
tional conference here next fall for 
the purpose of agreeing to a plan of 
dl.sarmament and suspension of naval 
construction programs. The bill 
would authorize an appropriation of 
$500,000, the LTnlted States to entertain 
the delegates from foreign powers. 

GROSSCUmjfTER 
DRAWS COURrS WRATH 



Cheyenne, Wyo., Dec. 
gomery. Democratic 
from Campbell county, 
victed of white slavery 
States district court 
been released on $5,000 
citizens pending argu 
trial Saturday. Sentenc 



2. — Roy Mont- 
committeeman 
who was con- 
in the United 
yesterday, has 
bond signed by 
ment for new 
e was suspend- 



GOVERNMENT AFTER 
"QUACK DOCTORS" 



Chicago, Dec. 2. — Investigation of the 
business and professional methods of j 
so-called advertising "quack doctors" j 
was started by the Federal grand jury 
here today. Postal i lapectors presented 
evidence in connection with tlie oper-^ 
ations of the medical firms which 
promise to cure cancer and other 
scourges. 



Chicago, Dec. 2. — Former Federal 
Judge Peter S. Grosscup was sharply 
criticized today by Judge Adelor J. 
Petit of the circuit court for writing 
a letter to the court in reference to 
litigation over the $2,000,000 estate of 
W. T. Baker, former vice president of 
the Chicago board of trade. 

Judge I'etlt read the letter to at- 
torneys in his chambers and then 
place^ it in evidence. 

"It "is absolutely unjustifiable for 
Mr. Grosscup to write a letter to a 
Judge in connection with a suit before 
him. The letter would not have any 
effect in this court if it were writ- 
ten by ten Judge Grosscups," said 
Judge Petit. 

Mr. CJrosscup is not of record as 
counsel in the case, which Is an an- 
peal by Charles Baker, one of the late 
Mr. Baker's sons, from a ruling of th-^ 
probate court. 



$700,000,080 HANGS 
UPON WIHAT OIL IS 



Washington, Dec. 2. — The contest 
over $700,000,000 ts orth of oil lands, 
part of grants to the Pacific rallroadd, 
took an unusual turn today before the 



GAS ASSOCIATION 

PI CKS M ILL CITY. 

Philadelphia, Dec. 2. — The ninth an- 
nual convention of the National Com- 
mercial Gas association witli nearly 
3,000 delegates in attend."nce, was 
opened here today to continue until 
Saturday. An exhlbiti<m of inod-irn 
gas appliances is a side feature of the 
convention. Minneapolis was selected 
as the meeting place for December, 
1914. 

The association went on record as 
opposed at present to amalgamating 
1 with the National Uas Institute. 



T 



I 



JS^h, 



.,.,.. ■ . ri - 



^ 




■ . I« 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



r*" 





I 












' 






[ 
























1 












I 






1 




— 1 


I 




J 


»•- 











Fine Tailored 
Suits and Coats 
Greatlu Reduced 



III perfect tailored models, made up In 
Mannish and Storm Series, Cheviots, 
FponKC-S Wool Poplins, Diagonals and 
Novelties with absolutely guaranteed 
llnlnffs and workmanship throughout, 
costing $24.50, $27.50 and $29.50— our 
lleductlon Sale price — 




TWIN CITIES' "ROCK (If i 



GIBRALTAR" DEMjDLISHED 



New Tariffs the Final Blow 

to Unfair Rate 

Structure. 



Opens Wide Territory to Du- 

luth Jobbers and Man- • 

ufacturers. 



of 



The Twin Cities' "Rock of Glbral 
tar" is blown into the sea. 

W. P. Trlckett, traffic commi.''sloner 
for Minneapolis, called the 16-cenl dif- 
ferential between Duluth and Minne- 
apolis, "The rock of Gibraltar in the 
freight structure of the Northwest." 

The derision in the la!:c and rail 
case gave the rock a Jolt which shat- 
tered It, when the differential on flr.st- 
class freight was increased to 21 cents, 
and now the new freight tariffs pub- 
lished under this order, which not only 
decrease the Duluth rate.s but raise \ have 
the Twin City rates in addition, have 
completely demolished the rocl<. 

The seas of open competition are 
sweeping over the place where the 
rock lies submerged. 

The Importance of the new develop- 
ments in the lake and rail rate deci- 
sion of the interstate commerce com- 
mission and the conscQuent action of 
the lake lines In the readjustment of 
rates cannot be fully realized by Pu- 
luthlans as yet, for they have not had 
time to Quite absorb what has hap- 
pened. 

Oprim Xew Territory- 
Duluth traffic men and particularly 
those connected with the traffic com- 
mission of the Duluth Commercial club, 
realize that the fact that the lines are 
doing more in the way of readjusting 
differentials than was asked of them 
means that Duluth is coming into Its 
own and It is to be put on a basis 
which win permit her wholesale mer- 
chants and manufacturers to carry 
the fight for business right into the 
territory heretofore controlled abso- 
lutely by the Twin City houses, and at 
the same time giving the Duluth 
hou.«5es absolute control of her own ter- 
ritory unless the Twin City houses p»it 
in branches here to permit competi- 
tion in this territory. 

When the news was received yester- 
day that the Mutual Transit company 
had i.^sued a schedule of rates for lake 
and rail traffic which not only 
the order of the Interstate 



by cheap power here. This victory 
marks the end of railroad rate dis- 
crimination against Duluth, which has 
been the bane of :.tha tlty's existence 
for twenty years. It IS' the one thing 
which has held ttfe city back. Now 
that Is removed, aq«l we«can look ahead 
to rapid and substantftil development 
as a great trade center." 

Mr. Hall declared that in talking the 
matter over with one of the leading 
wholesale men of the city, when the 
latter began to see what the rates 
would mean, he exclaimed: 

"Why, that puts us In a position 
where we can compete with anybody 
clear into Iowa, Nebraska and South 
Dakota. 1 had no idea of the scope of 
the case. That is remarkable, and it Is 
just what we need. We must have 
more room for development, and this 
gives it to us." 

That Is the way It will affect every 
wholesaler and manufacturer at the 
Head of the Lakes. It gives Duluth 
the whip hand so to speak and other 
trade centers will have to reckon with 
her and reckon closely. The additional 
territory is large in itself, but lis 
density of population is the Important 
thing. 

The following tables shows the new 

schedule of spread, that ordered by the 

commission, and the spread that now 

prevails; also the gains that would 

been given 



way Into Mexico. If the necessity 
protecting the consul had arisen. j 

The necessity of keeping a consid- ; 
erable proportion of the United States 
army on the border for an indefinite 
period Is forecasted in the report. Gen. j 
Bliss, who has been on the line ever 
since the beginning of the Madero i 
revolution, called attention to the ful- | 
fillment of his prediction that the I 
breaking up of Orozco's army last year ; 
Into small bands would not restore j 
peace because the large lawless ele- i 
ment among the troops would not con- ^ 
sent to return to ordinary vocations, j 
R«voItM Upon Revolt*. | 

"This attitude." says the report, "es- i 
peclally characterized the leaders and , 
forces In the state of Chihuahua. These 
are the forces that have always been ; 
popularly known as 'red llaggers. i 
Their leaders preach the distribution ] 
of land and of wealth generally, and 
apparently have small concern which 
faction wins. 

"A consideration of these facts," Gen. 
Bliss adds, "is of Interest, as they sug- 
gest another forecasting of the future. 
The conditions across the border which 
lead to one successful revolution un- 
fortunately seem always to point the 
way to a counter revolution. If this 
be the case, the first reasonable hope 
of continued peace will come when an 
established government proves strong 
enough to crush the counter revolu- 
tion." 



Silbersteln& 



Company 




Ribtons! Ritbons! 



Never In the history of the S. & B. Co. have we stocked such ^^^"^^ 
Ribbons— th( novelty kind that people like so ^•«; ""T ^ ^'^^"^^ ^{i'-^'^'Vl'^fr' 
Brocaded Sal ins— Warp Prints— Plain Satins— in all the new rich bhadea, 

Roman strip ;s, plaids, checks. 

All these and lots of others are ready to be made into vests and P5rf'^« 
for Christmas gift.s. Prices from 25c a yard for warp prmt to $o.oo 
a yard of tho gold interwoven sort. 



„, under the ordered 

[ .spread and Uiat to be enjoyed under 
! the voluntary one: 
I Classes — 1 



3 

18 

13 

9 



4 

13 
8 
6 



8 



3 

G 

126 



150 



New 28 24 

Ordered 21 18 

Old 15 13 

Gain required by 

order 6 6 

Gain given by 

lines 13 11 

Percentage of 

gain 87 8B 100 160 

Percentage of 

gain under 

order 40 38 44 60 75 67 

Credit for the victory is due to G. 
Roy Hall. Francis W. Sullivan, attorney 
for the commission; JullUs 11. Barnes, 
the chairman, and to tUl of the other 
members. Including C. F. Macdonald, t\ 
F. Howe, F. O. Davison, W. N. Hart. 
R. A. Horr, George W. Welles, J. O. 
Lennlng, A. M. Marshall, F. A. Patrick, 
(ieorge R. Reed. l^. A. Rlsdon and 
Bruce Ter Bush. 



IndlefmentM DlnmlRned. 

Phoenix, Ariz., Dec. 2. — All indict- 
ments pending in the United States 
dL-^trict court here against firms and 
individuals of El Paso, Texas, and 
Tucson, and Douglas, Ariz., on charges 
of smuggling arms to the Mexican 
revolutionists were dismissed today by 
.Judge William Sawtelle, who sus- 
tained demurrers. 

There remain, however, several 
dictments charging conspiracy 
smuggle war munitions across the 
ternatiunal border. 



Tke World's Best Gloves Here ! 



Olove 



In- 
to 
In- 



Xever in he history of the Silberstein & Bondy Co. has our 
department been so complete. New, fresh stocks of short and long gloves 
—not only in black, white, tan and gray, but a full line of colors. lownes. 
Reynier's; l"?rrin's, in glace and suedes and "Elite" Cape Gloves, pair, 
from $1.00 up to $4.50. 

In Her Hand SKe Carries a Mesli Bag 

A Mesh Bag of German silver, in different sizes and styles, $1.50 to 

With Me.si Bags probably there is one of the new Vanity 
German .sllv :r, $1.00, $1.50 to $7.75. -« . «« ixex 

Or a Puff Box, 50c, 75<- and $1; Coin Bur.<;cs, oOr to $2.00 
Or a Card Case and I'urse combined, $2.7.). $3. «.j and 5S4..>». 
And new imlts and frocks seem to demand new aeeessorie!*. 






Cai'os in 



HanJkercliiefs for >A' i 



CRAIG BEGINS 

HIS DEFENSE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



> 
I 




Delicious 
Layer Csike 

will be uniformly even in texture, 
velvety consistency that makes 
your mouth, if Rumford Baking 
used. 

_ makes all calces so digestible, light 
urishing that it makes perfect cake. 





THE 



. VS^HOLESOMC 

BAKING POW DER 

Does Not Contain Alum 




meets 
commerce 



HOUSE IS WRECKED BY 
AN EXPLOSION OF GAS 

%— 

(Continued from page 1.) 



rival In the hou.s© was told by Mrs. 
Johnson that she had smelled gas all 
morning. Johnson began Investlg.it- 
Ing and went down Into the cellar, 
where he .shut off the gas. In going 
Into the cellar he left the cellar door 
open, and the escaping gas entero.l 
the kitchen and was Ignited by tin- 
cook stove fire. This is the only ex- 
planation that Johnson Is able to glvt- 
for the explosion. 

The explo.«ion occurred while John- 
son was in the cellar And while Mrs 
Johnson was in a closet upstairs. Mi 
Johnson Immediately rushed up.stalr 
and was met by a sheet of flame. H< 
was burned about the head and liands 
WallN Blov%v Out. 

The explosion blew the walls awa.\ 
from the foundation altogetlicr. 'i'luy 
are now gaping so thiat it Is possibU 
for a person to walk Into the building: 
from the sidewnlk, without using the 
door. Th« interior is completely dc- 
molLshed and some of the glass in the 
windows was blown across the street. 
Assi.stant Fire Chief Wilson places tlio 
damage at above $4,000, as It will be 
necessary to build a new house on the 
foundation. Tlie fl~e which followed 



commls.slon to lncre:iso the spread be- 
tween Duluth and the Twin cities, but 
has also acted on tlie suggestion of 
th-it comml.«aion to Increase tiie Iwin 
City rate still further, for the reason, 
as the cominl.«.^lon pointed out In its 
order, that the latter rate wa.s too low 
it came as a complete surprise to all 
except a few of the traffic commission 
of the Commercial club, who have been 
urging this action with the lines i» 
view of the fact that the interstate 
commerce commjsslon left the way op.u 
for it. It Is a long time since Duiuth 
has obtained more than .«he l»as asked 
for. hence the surprise. The af-tlon of 
the Mutual Transit company Is taken 
as indicating that the other lines will 

follow suit. 

An Bxnmple. 

Just as an example of the unex- 
pected generosity: In the matter of 
flrst-cla^s rates the lines were or- 
dered to give a^40 Y^\^iv JnX^'^lnt^l 

spread; tey ga .-ent Increase was I tlie explosion cauftcd but little loss. 

^'^S r^ aifrt R5 was given. A spread I Patrolman Wanwlck was sent dowi. 
ordered and 85 ^as^gi^^ In the third to the scene of the explosion Inime- 
'VoI«^ns ordered and 100 per cent diately after it happened and brought 
^ a e^ivon The fourth class. It was I Johnson back to headquarters, when 
was gi\ -Hrtiild be elven an Increased he was given temporary medical 
required snoumuc^B ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^ treatment. He was later able to go 



"engaged in a sy.stem of wronging 
women" brought forth a charge of un- 
professional conduct against Kphralin 
Inman of counsel for the state late 
yesterday. 

Mr. Spaan protested to the court 
tliat Mr. Inman was exeeeding the 
bounds of propriety. The Jury was cx- 
eiuded while Mr. Inman explained to 
Judge Blair that It was necessary to 
show Craig's alleged relations with 
other women in order to establish a 
motive for the murder of Dr. Knabe. 
rhe court ruled that counsel should 
not indulge In a general denunciation 
if the defendant. 

WKneMseM Beyond Reach. 
Thus restrained, when the jury was 
recalled Mr. Inman asserted that the 
prosecution would show that two 
witnesses of vital importance to the 
.state's case had been placed beyond 
the courts through tlie influence of 
Mie accu.sed man. Mr. Inman spoke for 
liiree hours. 

Dr. Craig sat unmoved, gazing at hl.i 
accuser with unfaltering eyes, while 
the prosecutor pictured him as the 
perpetrator of the "foulest crime ever 
committed in the city of Indianapolis." 
Cquallv unperturbed was Dr. Cralg'.-^ 
M-vear-old daughter. Marion, wlio sat 
It his side through the ordeal. 



Irisli Linen Ilandkerchiets tor w omen 

All one-corner embroidered and all the work is hand done. De-'^igns 
are new and quite different from others, and all In all, the collection is 

'"woSTr"egular size Handkerchiefs are 25<-, 50c, 75f, $1.00 and $1.50 
apiece. Glove Handkerchiefs are 25c and oOe. 

Higk Class Coats $15.00 

Former prices up to SJiO.SO. 

OrouDcd !n one lot to effect a quick clearance. Ones and twos of some 
of our most desirable lines; all sizes; black, navy. Copenhagen, gray and 
ui. yui iii« — Secontl 1 ioor. 

brown. 



cents 
were 



Mutual. In the 



.spread __ - 

was allowed by the ..._-^- _^ 
fifth cli«3 the order called for an In- 
crease of 75 per cent but the line gives 
l^lper cent.^ In the sixth class, where 
67 per cent Increase 
line gave 250 per cent 

U Is likely, as C. 

the traffic commission 

Cities learn 



He Is now staying witli 



Wi"th .such generosity on the part of 



the lines to Duluth, 



F. Macdonald of 

said, that when the Twin 

the full importance of this s<^"«^"'*-: 

me luii ^^ crepe hanging on ever> 



GiRL AND MAN BOTH 
GUILTY OF KILLING 



Manslaughter and First De- 
gree Murder Verdicts in 
Louisiana. 



t duced two witnesses who said they 

' saw James Duvall fire the shotgun, 

and It was proved this charge killed 

Delhaye. 

SEVEN YOUNGCROOKS 
CAUGHT IN CHICAGO 



job- 
than 
hoped. 



Crowley 
years old, 
slaughter 



there will 

business house there. 

That the new rates will result In the 
m.iking of Duluth a far greater 
blng and manufacturing center 
«hA most sanguine have 
tSere is no doubt in the m»nds of those 
who have studied the question Thr 
new rates place Diiluth In a most com 
mandlng position. As an e 

During the hearing or^the^rates^be 

«-« I * I » r« n r r\ 1 1 i\ i>'*i>i ii > ill 9^ . ^, . 

declared 



to his home 
neighbors. 

Chief Troyer haa placed ' Officer 

Wanwlck on guard at the Jdhnson 

was ordered, the j home to protect It. there having been 

curious crowds of onlookers gathering 

there all day. 

Johnson, who is 44 years old, has 
been a resident of Duluth for the past 
twenty-two years. He Is a laborer and 
of late has been employed with tli<' 
city department of public works. Thl.'^ 
morning he did a little work on a side- 
walk at Thirteenth .= *,'^et and Tenth 
avenue west and after finishing it. 
had gone home about 10:45 o'clock. 

The residence belongs to Johnson, 
who said after the acclxlent that it is 
Insured. 



g SPECIAL PRICES 
on DRY CLEANING 

$1.00 

• • • • • * 

$1.50 
$1.00 



Ladies' Coats 

for 

Ladies' Suits 

for 

Men'h Suits or 

Overcoats 

Call us up, either phone, 4! 
Our wagons will call. 
Dry Cleaning Department 



i 
1 

I PEERLESS LAUNDRY 



MILWAUKEE ATTACKS 
THE RATES ON GRAIN 



Ages of Holdup Gang Range '^f,%^,i 



La., Dec. 2. — Dora Murff. 18 
was found guilty of man- 
and her stepfather, J. d. 
Duvall, was convicted of first degree 
murder here today. They were charged 
with killing J. M. Delhaye. Miss Murft's 
Bweetheart. Allie Duvall, the girls 
half-brother, was acquitted. 

When the verdict was announced 
the slender, nervous Murff girl, who i 
had sought to take all responsibility 
for the killing, broke down. 

Delhaye was killed by a charge from 
a shotgun as he walked on the street 
here Nearby was a carriage In which 
Miss Murff and the two Duvalls were 
riding. The girl leaped to the dying 
Delhave's side, shot him twice with a j 
plstol'and asserted she had killed him. j 
It was on this statement that she : 
Bought to shield her kinsmen from | 
blame and hoped to be 
"unwritten law" plea. 

The prosecution, however, 



From 19 to 23 
Years. 

Chicago, Dec. 2. — Arrested on sus- 
picion of being a holdup man, Lenox 
Shovin, aged 22. told the police this 
morning that he was one of a gang 
of seven youthful thieves. He Informed 
detectives where his companions could 
be found In the basement of a building, 
and they were arrested. A revolver 
was found In Shovln's possession, and 
he admitted planning to hold up pedes- 
trians. The ages of those arrested 
ranged from 19 to 23 years. 



As an example: 
■ates 1 
fo^e" the" Interstate commerce commls- 

a certain manufacturer 
Twin Cities, while testifying ^iBa'"«t 
niT Tncrease of the spread, declared 
that with much of an increase It wou d 
make his business almost impossible in 
?^rtaln territory should competition 
from Duluth have to be met. He was 
asked If. should the increase 
granted, would he have to move 
granieu, ^^^^ ^.^ere he would move, 
that there was no question 
a., to where he would niove— Indlcat- ... 
Ine that Duluth would naturally be the w 
r.oint where he would locate. ^ , ^^ h. 
poini «''^' ,. „j,.„ntno-». to Duluth I r> 



be 
and 



MEXICO CITY WILL BE 
ATTACKED BY REBELS 
INS IDEOF AMOMTH 

(Continued from page 1.) 

will clamor for the downfall of the 
usurper. A mob In the capital can oust 
Huerta in a day." 

With 3,500 rebeJs an! si-tteen field 
pieces advanced as far as Carizal, 
ninety miles south of Juarez on the 

ay to Chihuahua, Villa will remain 



There 



ere until ho communicates v.ith Gen. 
Is everv advantage to Duluth i Carranza before he personally pro- 
iinrtpr the new fates, as pointed out to ceeds south. 
The Herald bv O. Roy Hall, traffic At Chihuahua he expects to join Cen. 
r-.^mmlssioner of the Duluth Commer* : Chao and other rebel leaders. and 
clal club and to whose persistence. | with a combined force of 8.000 pro- 
unnwledee of transportation matters \ ceed toward Zacatecas, the first impor 
Knowi M6 ^ ^j ^y^^ cTO'dit ; tant city south of Torrcon. Other 



and untiring energy muo 



Mr. Hall 



Duluth ♦he 



freed on the 



Intro- 




PINDELL'S NAME IS 
SENT BACK TO SENATE 






ON YOUR AUTO 
PAIHTIHG 

It will pay you to get our 
prices. 

Duluth Auto 
Painting Co. 

213-215 EAST FIRST ST. 

Auto, Carriage, Sign Painting. 

The Largest and Best Equipped 
ShJp at the H^'ad of the Lakes. 



Whitlock, Williams and 

Denison Also Nominated 

By Wilson. 



for the victory Is due. 
points out that it gives ^^^^,^.,„_ 
orivnntaee in two ways — of receiving 
cheaply in earload lots, and distribut- 
hig to advantage In small lots This 
competition must be met somehow by 
Twin City houses, and it is generally 
believed that the only way they can 
do it is to establish houses here. 
Knd of DlBorlmlnatlon. 
"There seems to me." said Mr. Hall, 
"no question but that Is what they 
will have to do: and when they come 
to realize It. that Is what they will do. 
It will Sje the same way with manu- 
facturers. They will be attracted also 



Washington. Dec. 2.— Henry M. 
dell, the Peoria, 111., publisher, 
renominated today by President 
son for ambassador to Russia, 
dell's nomination failed in the 
session after It became a 



Pin- 
was 
Wll- 
Pln- 
extra 
center of at- 




tention because of publication of cer- 
tain alleged correspondence with Sen- 
ator Le Vlr. ^ rr, , , 

Brand Whitlock of Toledo was 
nominated for minister to Belgium 
and George Fred AVilliams of Boston 
was nominated for minister to Greece 
and Montenegro. , ^, ^ , 

Wlnfred T. Denison of New York was 
renominated for secretary of the inter- 
ior of the Philippines. 

2,000 YOUNGSTERS 

ARE ON PR IZE TRIP. 

Pittsburg. Pa., Dec. 2.— Six special 
trains carrying Governor James M. Cox 
and approximately 2,000 boys and girls 
from the cornfields of Ohio, arnveJ 
hero this morning on their way to 
Washington and Philadelphia. They 
are the prize winning corn growers of 
the Buckeye state and have been given 
the trip by the commonwealth be- 
cause of the records made In growing 
corn last season. They were the guests 
of the Pittsburg Commercial club. 



lood 

Humors 

Caus« all sorts of trouble with tho 
bodily organs — boils, pimples, 
sores and other eruptions, scaleSf 
scabs, etc. — all of which are re- 
lieved, as thousands testify, by 
HOOD'S SARSAPARILLA. 



Even when serious Scrofulous 
Sores, Eczema, Ulcer? on the Legs 
and Arms and such aliments appear, 
this premier blood medicine, faith- 
fully taken, will in reasonable time 
expel the germs and give the blood 
the richness and purity of health. 



Thousands of people in all condi- 
tions of life testify to the value of 
Hood's Sarsaparilla for the blood, 
and also to give strength, create an 
appetite, tone the stomach, and lift 
up the health tone generally. 

If your blood is bad, get a bottle 
today. Sold everywhere. 



reliel 
forces. Villa said, are to pn^ceed up 
the West coast toward Guadalaiai.n. 
Citlceim' Korccd TiVaruatinn. 

According to late reports which Villa 
said he received by couriers who trav- 
eled overland 130 miles to Villa Ahu- 
mada. where the telegraph line has 
been connected with Juraz. tho deser- 
tion of Chihuahua by the Fcc'dala was 
brought about by the c'tl::ens. The 
people. It was said, protested that If 
the Federal garrison resi.-^tcd. the 
fighting would result in the wholesale 
killing of non-combatants; th.it the 
poor were half starved and that the 
wealthy residents could not expect 
mercy at the hands of the liivadors. 

<;;en. Mercado is said to h.ive decided 
on night to the American border so 
that he could communicate with Pro- 
visional President Huerto. Communi- 
cation between Chihuahua and M-j.xico 
City has been impossible for week.s. 

Embargo Hard to Enforce. 

Washington. Dec. 2. — How the Amer- 
ican border patrol has found it well 
nigh impossible to enforce the embargo 
against the shipment of arms and am- 
munition into Mexico, is described In 
a report from Brig. Gen. Bliss, com- 
manding the forces on the border, 
made public at the war department. 

Practically the entire population 
along the International line, the re- 
pr.rt says. Is In sympathy with the 
Mexican rebels, and as a result largo 
quantities of war munitions have been 
smuggled across In spite of the vigi- 
lance of the troopers. 

Gen. Bliss complains of the vague- 
ness of the law. declaring that the in- 
I slructlons to the army are so general 
that too much of a task was Imposed 
upon the troopers and Junior officers. 
He retfimmpnds that two. of the pest 
equipped oftlcers of the government s 
■ leg.-il force be sent down to travel 
' along the line and decide questions of 
doubtful rights and powers. 
On Vera:* o* War. 
Tn this connection, tho general re- 
fers to instructions sent him last June 
to hold tho troops In readiness to go 
to the aid of threatened American 
consular representatives at Pledra.s 
Negras For several days, the general 
points out. the <uifsti'>n of possible 
peace or war rested entirely upon the 
discretion of this consul, as It was a 
foresrone conclusion tha^ American sol- 
diers would have had to fight their 



Complains Minneapolis Is 

Given an Unfair 

Advantage. 

Washington. Dec. 2.— Freight rates 
on grain, grain products and flaxseed 
from Western and Northwestern 
points to Milwaukee, Wis., when the 
L-hipments are intended for the East- 
ern markets and for export, were at- 
tacked today before tho interstate 
commerce commission by the Milwau- 
kee Chamber of Commerce. Tho peti- 
tion alleges that the rates, compared 
with those to Minneapolis for the 
Kast, are excessive, discriminatory 
and unlawful, and a reduction is de- 
manded. 

orahgesTorTceht 
each in pittsburg 

Detroit Housewives' League 
Joins in Egg Boy- 
" . cott. 

Pitl-sburg, Pa., Dec. 2.— The high cost 
if living was Jolted here today when 
commission merchants in the produce 
yards sold twenty-five carloads of 
Florida oranges at 90 cents a crate, 
about 1 cent for each of the 1.500.000 
oranges. The yards were fairly choked 
with fruit and it was necessary to dis- 
pose of the oranges to prevent them 
from spoiling. 

In the same market and at the sputj 
time tho first Florida strawberries were 
selling at 75 cents a quart. 

. — .^ 

TiKK Boycott in Detroit. 

Detroit. Mich.. Dec. 2.— The Ilouse- 



sourl and Nebraska who have agreed 
to furnish strictly fresh ^^g^ JlY^.""^' 
Iv to consumers here for 30 cents a 
dozen plus -2 cents for the express 
charges and .he cost of the contain- 

ers " 

Storage egps sold today at 40 
a dozen. Strictly fresh eggs 
quoted at 43 cants a dozen. 

HOUSE [lYNAMITED 
IN COPPER COUNTRY 

Strikers Fief use to Abandon 
Demand for Union i 
Recognition. I 

Calumet. Mi.h.. Dec. -.^(Special to, 
The Herald.)— Strike sympathizers this | 
i morning' dynamited the home of a 
non-union man at the Qulncy mine. 
A bomb witl: two sticks of dynamite 
was exploded at the door of the 
kitchen and the back portion of the 
riouie was torn off. but no one was 
inlured, all occupants being m tnc 
front room. This is the fifth dyna- , 
miting attempt In connection with the | 
strike durln« the last month. 

No other t cts of violence through 
out the district were reported. In- 
creasing numbers of the men aie re- 
turning to w jrk, drawn by promises of 
the mining companies of an opportun- 
itv to earn increased wages and the 
piitting Into effect of the eight-hour 

"^"strong for.es of deputies were sent 
today to Nor" h Kearsarge, Allouez and 
Copper City in Keweenaw , county 
wiicre fresh Importations of strike 
breakers were expected. 

.Striking c ipper miners at a mass 
meeting yes'.erday ratified a resolu- 
tion to hold 3ut for recognition of the 
Western Fedsratlon of Miners, tho re- 
maining issue in the strike. 

The strikers said they would con- 
tinue to adhere to the principles of 
organized labor, but stated their will- 
ingness to ;o-opcrate with the em- 
plSyers In adjusting the dispute 
through con:'erence 



fore he Is ready to go. If congress re- 
mains In session without a holiday re- 
cess the president probably will take 
no vacation at all. 



Duluth Concern rands Contract. 

Little Falls, Minn., Dec. 2.— Repre- 
sentatives of the Twin City Sconio 
company and the Lyceum Scenic studio 
of Duluth were hero Friday to bid 
for a contract to furnish the Milo 
theater with new scenery. A contract 
for $280 worth of new scenery was 
awarded to the Duluth company. 



SALE OF ARTS 
AND HGVELTiES 

—AT THE SHOP OF— 

THE N. Y. ORIENTAL 
IMPORTINS CO. 

414 WcHt Superior Str«-ot — r.:3 Man- 
Iiattnu Uullding. 



or arbitration. 



WILSON POPULAR 

AS HOLIDA Y GUEST. 

Washington, Dec. 2.— President Wil- 
son has under consideration Invitations 
to spend his Christmas vacation in Co- 
lumbia. S. C, Augusta, (Ja., or a Place 
near Corpus Christl. Tex. He will not 
decide which to accept until just be- 



UeJ^s^^O'^mp^ 



QJ^ anu '.'0 



West Superior aSV., 
Duluth 



Those who know uk will he here 
tomorrow for hargnlnN rare. lho<»e 
who <lo not are c'or«ll«l!> ln\ltfd to 
partake of the Mprclaln here lifted! 

Ikrl @lh)|©©lts 

An extremely bciutlful collection 
of Imported art objects, such as 
work boxes, work baskets, work 
bags, pin cusliions, opera bags, 
jewelry boxes, card cases, hand 
painted dinner cards. They are so 
beautiful that It is almost Impossi- 
ble to describe them. 

A few items follow: 

The designs and colors arc ex- 
tremely varied. 

Crepe de Chine Card Ca«e«, lined 
with leather and hand painted and 
hand embroidered — JR«> 

value J1.50 '*^^ 

Pin CuMhIoiiM of crepe de chine — 
hand painted; value 45c, I n« 

at ■ "** 

Work HoxeM, built In tho style of 
Shanghai houses; value 

$2.50 

Small Crepe de Chine PurMen OQa 

— see them hero at tww 

.rnpanexe Hand Painted Dlniirr 
cSmlK — a wide variety, a 20c 

Crepe de Chine Xcektie Kackn CQ|, 

— a. big value at 

Japanese Dolls, with crepe de chine 
kimonos — a rare bargain 20*5 

at ''*' 

Jewelery Boxen and Pin Cn»«hIon»i 
combined — beautiful colors 
and design:-; value $1.50, at 
Ueantifui JnpaneMe Lar^e 

Handkerehlef lloxes, at 

La rge Japanewe Hand BagN, 
crope de chine embro!<lcr'd. . 



75c 



37c 
$L00 
$1.39 




wives' league'of this city has officially 
started an egg boycott. The retail 
nrlces here have been as high as 47 



Insist 



cents a" dozen and the women 

it should not be more than 30 cents. 

— ^ — 

EKKH At 32 Centn. 

Kansas City. Mo.. D*?<^- 2 -^-^oniple- 
tlon of a plan whereby Kansas City 
consumers may get eggs at a saving 
of 11 cents a dozen was announced 
today by Mrs. Wlllard Q. Church, 
president of the Kansas City House- 
wives' league. 

"An express company," said Mrs. 
Church, "has given ine a list of about 
300 country mtrchants in Kansas. Mis- 



/y 



For Colds 
Coughs 

You could not please us better 
than to ask your doctor about 
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral for 
coughs, colds, croup, bronchitis. 
Thousands of families always 
keep it in the house 



i 



Special 
Christmas Silk 
Petticoats $1.69 

We urge early buying by of- 
fering 1,000 Silk Messaline I'et- 
tlcoat.s, regular $3.00 quality at 
$1.69. Ten latest styles in wide 
range ot colors, Emerald green, 
cerise, ICing's blue, black, plum, 
purple, brown, navy, Copen- 
hagen. Order at once the color 
and sizj you want and save 
money. 




J. C. AjerCo 

lAiwell. Mu 



. 



THE. PALM ROOM 

AT THE SPALDING 

MOST EELIQHTFUL AND LUX- 
URIOUS RESTAURANT IN 
DULUTH. 



Chri$inia$ 
icwelrv 



Jewelry makes the ni«^st 
appreciable Christmas gift 
for it will last a lifetime: can 
be appropriately engraved 
and has a certain intrinsic 
value that no other gift can 
have. 

This is particularly true 
when the gift comes from 
our store for the recipient 
then knows that it is of the 
best quality. 

Our jewelry for the holi- 
days is the largest and best 
selected we have ever shown 
and contains many very rea- 
sonably priced gifts. 

This enables you to choose 
from a very wide and varied 
stock at moderate prices. 

If you are in doubt as to 
what to give, come in and 
get our expert suggestions. 




H 



ENRICKSEN 



JEWLLRY CO. 
332 West Superior Street 








-.»■ 



— r 



> 



I 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



A Watch ior His 
Christinas 






THIN MODEL 



/ 7 Jewels^ 



21 Jewels- 



$ 



12 



$ 



20 



/ 7 Jeweled Geneve movement 
in a 20-ycar <ro Id filled case, 
made special with Barley & 
Co. 's guarantee— $12, 



2 1 Jeweled Geneve movement 
in a 20-year gold filled case, 
also made special and entitled 
to our indorsement— $20, 



Our prices will be found no higher than those charged 
for commonplace and less worthy watches, 

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION 



Bagiey fe? Company 

Duluth 's Oldest Reliable Jewelry House 
315 West Superior Street Established 1885, 



RECORD LESS 
THA£HOPED 

Ore Shipments for Season 

Fall Short of General 

Expectations. 



With complete figures In, it is found 
that the ore shipments from the Head 
of the Lakes — Two Harbors and Ash- 
land included — while breaking the rec- 
ord, do not come up to the expectations 
of shippers and vessel men expressed 
at the beginning of the season. It was 
believed that there would be an in- 
crease of more than 2,000,000 tons, but 
the actual increase falls short of that 
by almost 400,000 tons. The total in- 
crease amounts to 1,639,787 tons. 

November storms, it Is said, caused 
severe curtailmint of the ore ship- 
ments, many docks falling away below 
their schedule for that month. Other 
parts of the season proved adverse to 
shipmeiits, and even with the increase, 
the season's result is not what was 
expected. 

For the season as a whole, the in- 
creases siiown are: Duluth &. Iron 
Range, 705,748 tons; Missabe. I,835.;t40 
tons; Soo dock at ouperior, 391.22:! 
tons; and Northern Pacific (new), 31,- 
l',»4 ton."?. The decreases: Great North- 
ern, 864,791 tons; Soo at Ashland, 186,- 
095 tons; Northwestern at Ashland. 
272,776 tons. 

The shipments, by docks, compared 
with the former year, follow: 

191.3. 1912. 

Great Northern. .. .1.*?. 060,811 13.925,602 

Missabe 12,331,126 10,495,186 

Duluth & Iron ^ ^ 

Range 10,075,718 9.370,970 

N. \V. (Ashland).. 3,505,838 3,778.614 

Soo (Ashland) 832.392 1,018.487 

Roo (Superior) 696.334 305,112 

Northern Pacillc... 31.194 

Totals 40,533,758 38.893,971 

DiVER INSPECTS 

THE G. S. PRICE 




1879 

OI<!tit bank In Dolotk 



Those Christmas Gifts to Your Children 

Real love Includes thoughtfulness, and the best kind of a gift 
Is one thnt affords benefit as well as pleasure. 

Such a Kift would be a yavings Account in this strong bank. 
To have a real bank account is a keen pleasure to a child, and 
adding to it is an event. The benefit is twofold — the actual money 
and the forming of a habit that will make life's struggle vastly 
ea.slor. 

You can open accounts in the names of your children and put 
the pass books In their Thristmas stockings. You can do it now, 
and reli»'ve by that much the strojuious Christmas demands on 
your purse and the strenuous mental effort required to settle the 
gift question. 

We open Savings Accounts with One Dollar or over and pay 3 
Per Cent interest. 

AMERICAM EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

Saving Department open every Saturday nighl from 6 to 8 o'clock. 




WAS SUSPECTED OF 
BEING DYNASaiTER 



Because May Carr, police matron at 
the Soo line station, found what she 
believed to be a bottle of nltro-grlycer- 
Ine at the depot on Oct. 9 last and had 
Otto H. Haehnke arrested on a sus- 
picion that he miprht bo a dynamiter, 
Haehnke today started suit In district 
court a.ifainst the Minneapolis, St. Paul 
& Sault Ste. Mario railroad company 
In which he asks for $1,999 damages 
for false arrest. 

The police matron. It is claimed, sus- 
pected Haehnke because she had seen 
him around the station more than 
once. Shi- jrot Into communication 
•with the police and (Officer Brouillctte, 
plnce di.-icharged, was directed to make 
the arre.st. Haehnke was taken to 
police headquarters in a patrol wagon 



I and after explaining his real mission 
at the station he was released. 

[ Haehnke claims that he went to the 
station to meet members of his family 
whom he expected to arrive on an in- 

j coming train. P. M. Goldberg and J. 
A. P. Neal are attornej-s for Haehnke. 

J. L BEmNrvvILL ~ 

HE AD MA CCABEES. 

At a meeting of Tent. .\'o. 1, K. O. T. 
M.. last night, J. I^. Berlnl was elected 
commander to succeed C. G. Futter. 
Mr. Futter was elected trustee to serve 

I three years. .Joseph Wilde was elected 
lieutenant commander. Other officers 
were filled as follows: 

Finance keeper. Joseph Oelncr; rec- 

; ord keeper. J. B. Gellneau; chaplain, 

'. Adolph Martina; sergeant. A. J. Peter- 
son; master at arms, A. E. Hraun; first 

I master of guard, C. A. Neusetet; soc- 

' ond master of guard, John Wadley. 

, sentinel, Albert I^a Point; picket, L. 

1 Burehe. 



|liilllililllllll!lllllll!!llllllllllllllllllll!!lilllllilll!llllllllllllllllinilllllilllllllill^ 

I Twelve Through Cars | 

i EACH WEEK 1 

I To Cahfornia 1 

I GhiGag,09!!^NorthWestern Line | 

= FROM MINNEAPOLIS AND ST. PAUL S 

^S Daily to Los Angeles via Omaha atid Union =S 

as p,^ g^. Pacific Los Angeles Limited — compart- ^5 

^S rirSt VjlaSS ments, drawing-room and open sections. ^S 



Port Huron, Mich., Dec. 2.— Samuel 
Hogarth of Sault Ste. Marie. well 
known diver, who has been in this city 
for the past 10 days on board the tug 
Michigan waiting for favorable oppor- 
tunity to inspect the wreck of the 
steamer Charles S. Price, descended 
Saturday morning, but strictest of se- 
crecy was maintained until yester- 
day. 

Diver Hogarth went down 70 feet. 
Although ho was down but a few 
minutes he experienced considerable 
diffii ulty and stated when he came to 
the surface that he would not make 
another attempt witnout a second 
diver to accotnpany him, as It would 
be taking his life In his hands. Ho- 
garth made his report to Joseph Ryan 
of Detroit, rt presenting the under- 
writers, and it is evident that infor- 
mation was satisfactory, as Ryan 
stated that the boat would be aban- 
doned by the underwriters. 

An examination of the stern of the 
ship showed that .«he had crushed her 
bulwarks and it was Impossible to get 
at the raised letters. Hogarth then 
went to the bow of the ship, where 
he got the name. The bottom and sides 
of the ship are not damaged, so far as 
the diver was able to make out. The 
depth of the water and the rough- 
ness of the lake make a more thor- 
ough examination impossible. 

It is believed that there are bodies 
in the boat and relatives are now 
trying to Induce Hogarth and another 
diver to go down to search for them. 
Chances are against such a venture, a.n 
the men do not f^are to attempt the 
dangerous performance again. 

drownedIen had 
relatives here 



The little town of CoUingwood, Ont., 
on the Georgian bay, suffered, perhaps, 
a heavier loss of life through the re- 
cent marine disaster — in proportion at 
least — than any other town or city on 
the Great Lakes and those lost are re- 
lated to many Duluthians. It is 
thought that over thirty of her sailor 
citizens are victims of the storm. It 
is kno'wn that twenty-two perished. 
CoUingwood has 7,000 population and 
there is scarcely a family in it that is 
not mourning the loss of a relative or 
friend. 

This Is of particular Interest to many 
people in Duluth, for this city numbers 
among It citizens many former resi- 
dents of CoUingwood and vicinity; and 
many Duluthians counted among the 
lost, relatives of their own. Joseph 
Sampson, who was drowned on the 
steamer James Carruthers. was a 
nephew of Mrs. John Mclnnls, of 6.30 
Wc.= t Fourth street, and formerly lived 
in Duluth. Thomas Bowie, assistant en- 
gineer of the Leafleld. ^whlch disap- 
peared In Lake Superior, was a brother 
of William S. Bowie, cashier of the 
Stacy-Merrill Fruit company. There 
are many others In Duluth to whom 



THE SECRET OF SUCCESS 



Daily to Los Angeles via Omaha and Union 
Pacific Los Angeles Limited — compart- 
ments, drawing-room and open sections. 

Wednesdays and Saturdays \ia Kansas 
City and Santa Fe California Limited. 

Wednesdays via Omaha and Union Pa- 
cific Limited. 

Every Wednesday via Omaha-Union Pa- 
cific, Salt Lake Route to Los Angeles. 

Every Saturday, via Kansas City and 
Santa Fe to Los Angeles. 




First Glass 
Sleeping Cars 

Tourist 
Sleeping Cars 

Interesting tours of the West, Southwest, California — Puget S 

Sound. Round trip ticket on sale daily. S 

FLORIDA, GULF COAST AND SOUTHWEST g 

Winter tourist tickets on sale daily during winter months. S 

Liberal stopovers — choice of routes. S 

For Travel Information Call Upon or Address: '~^ 

E. J. GARLAND S 

General Aftent Passenger Department SS 

302 W. Superior St.. Duluth, Minn. S 

J. D. MAHON = 

IGcncral Agent SSm 

910 Tower Avenue, Superior, Wis. 55B 

S C;. H. MacRAE, General Passenger Agent, ST. PAUL, MINN. S 

iliillillt!l!lllllll!llllllllllllllllllilllilill!lllllll!!lililli!lllllllii!l!!llllll||||ij!||!lli 




Genuine Merit Required to Win 
tlie People's Confidence. 



Have yon ever stopped to reason 
why It is that so many produces that 
' are extensively advei'tised, all at once 
I drop out of r ig-ht and are soon for- 
1 gotten? The reason is plain — the ar- 
I ticle did not fulfil the promises of the 
manufacturer. This applies more par- 
ticularly to a medicine. A medicinal 
preparation that has real curative 
value almost sells Itself, as like an 
endless chain system the remedy is 
recommended by those who have been 
benefited, to those who are in need 
of it. 

A prominent drusj^ist says "Take for 
example Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root, a 
preparation I have sold for many years 
and never hesitate to recommend, for 
in almost every case it shows excel- 
lent results, as many of my customers 
testify. No other 'kidney remedy il:at 
I know of has so large a sale." 

Accordinpr to sworn statements and 
verified testimony of thousands who 
have used the preparation, the success 
of Dr. Kilmer's Swamp-Root is due 
to the fact that It fulfils almost every 
wish in overcoming kidney, liver and 
bladder diseases, corrects urinary trou- 
bles and neutralizes the uric acid 
which causes rheumatism. 

You may receive a sample bnttl*» of 
Swamp- Root by Parcels Post. Address 
Dr. Kilmer & Co., Binghamton, X. Y., 
and enclose ten cents; also mention 
the Duluth Daily Herald. 



r T 



Lounging Robes 

Japanese Quilted Lounging Robes, 
in bUcIc, blue and brown ; all linea 
throughout with Jap silk; a fine 
comfott garment, 
special at , 



$8.75 




&^m 



The Center of Economy for Thrifty People 

We Give and Redeem Security Vouchers 



Jumbo Sweaters 

25 Heavy Sweaters in oxford and 
garnet; $7..50 values. Come early 
if you want first choice as these are 
a great bargain (^ CT Of 



A Continuation of OJfl G^ ^^^t Qoat S^le 

The Best Values of the Season Are Here. 



$25 Coats 



at 





New nobby coats, the kind 
you want with new kimono 
sleeves, made of rich, warm 
materials in practical colors, 
brown, blue, taupe and black; 
25.00 coats for $15.00. 




Coatsto$45 

Values, at 

$ rh F^.oo 




Qlearance gale 

Qdds&Etids 

J^ackinaw C2£^ 

50 Fancy Mackinaw Coats, with shawl 
collar and belt, in plaids and fancies; a 
large range of colors, gray, garnet, tan, 
red, plaids with harmonij^ing colors — 

$8.75 
Value 




Qreat C learance 
Sjale of fruits 

Values to $25.00, at $12.75 

100 High-class Tailored Suits, including 
the Printzess Suits, made of fine all-wcol 
materials, DiagonaLs, Cheviots and Serg«;s; 

all lined with guaranteed linings, plain a id 
draped skirts, in brown, taupe, wine, ma- 
hogany, Copenhagen, navy and black; values 
to $25.00 for only — 




A Splendid assorted lot of High- 
class Coats in black, blue, brown and 
taupe ; also some fancies ; new set-in 
kimono sleeves, smart cutaway mod- 
els ; all lined in self colors and con- 
trasting shades of rich Peau dc 
Cygne; values to $45.00 for $25.00. 



S pecial gale 
gilfc P etticoat s 

250 fine extra quality Messaline and 
Peau de Cygne Silk Petticoats, in new 
shades of emerald, green. American Beau- 
ty, Nell rose, blue, black, brown and others 

Values to $5.00 at 




some of these men were related. The 
known dead from CoUingwood are: 

Steamer We.xford — Capt. Bruce 
Cameron, Second Mate Archibald 
Brooks. Chief Engineer James Scott. 
Assistant Engineer Rit^kard Lougheed. 
Watchmen Orrin Gordon and Ceorge 
Peere. Steward George Wilmott. and 
Stewardness Mrs. lleorge Wilmott. 

Steamer Regina — Leo Doyle. 

Steamer James Carruthers — Joseph 
Sampson and W. Buckley. 

Steamer Lf-afleld — Capt. Charles Ba- 
ker, Mate Alfred Northcote, Mate Fred 
BegUv. Chief Engineer Andrew Kerr, 
Assistant Engineer Thomas Bowie. 
Wheelsman Jack Barrett, Robert 
Whitelaw, Firemen Robert Sheffield, 
Lome Sheffield and John Munro. 



Mr. Lannen says he will make an at- 
tempt to raise the barge next spring. 
Her coal cargo Is valued at $3,000. 



WRECKS OCCURRED 
ABOUT MiBNIGHT 



Identifies Two Sons. 

Port Huron, Mich.. Dec. 2. — A pa- i 
thetic escene was enacted at Kincardine, | 
Ont., when Dickson Christy of Marine I 
City, identified the bodies of his two ; 
sons, Kernol and Leslie Christy, wno j 
went to death when the steamer Hy- i 
drus .'sank beneath the waves. Both 
boys had been on the Hydrus all 
season. Kemot, who was 24 years oTdr 
was an oiler, and Leslie, 21 years old, 
a fireman. Their bodies have been 
shipped to Marine City for burial. 



Sault Passages. 



Reports coming In from lower lake 
ports are to the effect that most of 
the steamers that foundered during 
the storm which sent so many ships 
to the botton> recently, went down just 
before midnight on Sunday or just 
afterwards in the fir.«t few minutes of 
Monday morning. This is indicated by 
the watches found on the bodies of 
some of the officers and men that 
have been washed ashore. 

The watch found on the body of 
Chief Engineer O'Dell of the James 
Carruthers had stopped at 1:15 and 
watches found on the bodies of two 
of the men frono the McGean had 
stopped at 1:25 and 1:30. The watch 
found on the body of Capt. Wright of 
the Carruthers had stopped at 11:53. 

This would Indicate that the fury 
of the gale reached Its hetpht during 
the last few minutes of Sunday and 
the first few minutes of Monday. 

TO attempt' RELEASE 
OF STRA NDED STEAMER. 

Alpena. Mich., Dec. 2. — Capt. Thomas 
Reld of Port Huron arrived here to 
direct operations for the release of the 
steamer I. "W. Nichols, ashor» at North 
Point. Thunder bay. 

The tugs Reid and Sarnia City and 
the wrecker Manlstlque are here and 
every effort wMl be made to release 
the steamer by Saturday night. Unless 
she is released quickly it is thought 
here that she will be a total loss. The 
Nicholas is In an exposed position and 
a southeast wind would cause much 
damage. She Is out eighteen Inches 
forward and her tank No.. 2 la leaking. 
Much of her cargo of fiax will have to 
be lightered or jettisoned. 

No effort has yet been made to re- 
lease the steamer Williarp A, Ha.zzaid, 
owned by C. S. McLouth of Marine 
City, which Is aground at the channel 
at Rockport, near here, with a cargo 
of 32,000 sacks of cement. On account 
of the shallow water and narrow chan- 
nel, the work of fioating her will b4 
difficult. 

Capt. John Persons of the Thunder 
Bay Island life-saving station was 
gainfully injured on the steamer Nicho- 
las Thursday night. He lost his footing 
nnl fell, striking on his head, cutting a 
large gash. 

Think Son Was Drowned. 

The parents of Carl Grandell, 20 
years old, of Arbold, believe that their 
son was drowned in the recent storm 
on the Great Lakes. After much cor- 
respondence and Inquiry they have 
learned that the young man was on 
t ither the Price or Carruthers, both of 
which were lost. The boy has not 
been heard from for several 1%-eeks. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., Dec. 2. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Up: Cotus, 1:30 
I p. m. Monday; Wisconsin, 8 a. m. Tues- 
day. 

I Down: Turret Court, Atikokan, 
12:30 p. m. Monday; AlgonQuln, Crowe, 
1 2:30; Senator, Tionesta, 3; steel, Brad- 
I ley, 4; Harvey Brown, 7:30; Holmes, 
;8:30; Octorara, 9:30; Gilbert, 10:30; 
I Empress Midland, North Wind, Pent- 
Hand, Berry, 10:30 a. m. Tuesday; Byers, 
Wainwright, 11:30; Peter Relss, noon. 



barge Barium. 8:10; 
a. ni. Tuesday; Jo 
Northern Light, 1 
11:40. 

Down: Merlda, 11 
Taurus, 12:20; Vulr 
French, 12:45; Have 
12:50; L. C. Hanna, 
1:05; Ca.stalia, 1:10; J 
mark, 1:20; Wolf (s 
berry, 3:25; .*'. L. K 
day; J. P. Reiss, no< 



Binghamton, 9:50 
hn Harper, 11:20; 
1:30; Minneapolis, 

:15 p. m. Monday; 
an, arrived 12:40; 
y, Thomas Adams, 
FLsher, 1; Craig, 
ieatty, 11:15; Den- i 
teel), 3:20; Colfin 
ing, 11 a. m. Tues 
)n. 



26, head brui.ced, 
$6 weekly during 



Port of duluth. 

Arrivals — Schoonmaker, ConRdon. 
Cuyler Adams, Bi3;by, Steinbrenner, 
Carnegie, Albright, H. B. Nye, C. P. 
Miller, J. P. Kopp, coal. 

Departures — Superior, package 
freight. 



Detroit Passages. 



Detroit, Mich.. Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Up: Republic, 1:10 p. 
m. Monday; Mohawk, 2:25; Reed, 2:35; 
Mullen, 3; Amasa Stone, Mauch Chunk, 
3:50: Annie Laura, 4:30; AV. D. Rees, 6; 
J. E. Davidson, 6:10; Isabel, Joyce. 



PERSONAL INJURY 
CASES ARE SETTLED 



of Matt Erickson, 
Camp No. 5. Oct. 22, 
disability. 

Oliver Iron Mining companj' in favor 
of the following: 

Mike Sliapyou, 38. cut flng-er, Genoa 
open pit, Oct. 6, $7.80. 

John Melvich, 22, right 
sprained. Fayal mine, Eveleth, 
$15. 

John Pogachnick, 25, sllprht 
Fayal mine, Oct. 9, five days' 
$7.50 per week. 

John Kaprivltz, 35. strain to chest, 
nock and back muscles. Oct. 22, Pio- 
neer mine, Ely, seventeen days' time 
at $8.40 per week. 

John Kristjan, 43, contusion of left 
ankle. Pioneer mine, Ely, one day's 
time at $7.20 per week. 



ankla 
Oct. 15, 

Injury, 
time at 



Settlement of pers 

under the terms of 
compensation act \ 
day by judges of th 
the following cases: 

Pittsburg Iron Ore 
the Aetna Life Insu 
favor of Adolph H 
left eye, Oct. 20, M< 
■weekly durinpr disab 

Scott-Graff Lumbe 



onal injury claims ' 

the ■workingmen's 
,'ere approved to- 
e district court in 

company, through 
ranee company. In 
anson, 21, burned 
)untaln Iron, $7.80 
ility. 
• company In favor ! 



WOULD RECOVER ON 
LONG STAMP ING !\!0TEJ 

The first jury case in the re;srular 
December calendar called in municipal 
court this morning Is that of John C. 
McGreevy against John Helmer, C F. 
Alford and Reiner Horh. McGreevey 

claims that he loaned $150 to the de- 
fendants to enable them to compl "t-i a 
certain organization. 1 hey promised 
to pay it back shortly after, the plain- 
tiff alleges, but it Is now over three 
years .since the money whs loaned. 
He asks for a judgment in his favor, 
together with the interest on $150 
from Aug. 15, 1909. 















Lumber Found Afloat. 

Dunkirk, hj. T., Dec. 1. — Quantitiea 
of .=:hinKle and lumber have been 
floating along the«t)each off Van Buren 
point. The djacovtery was made by the 
crows of the Iochi fishing- Heet, and it | 
is thought a lumber barge may have 
foiindcrcd off this port. 

Telephone mes.«!agcs from lake port 
towns between Dunkirk and Erie to- 
night say that so far ns it is known 
no barge has sunk In this vicinity. 

Thomas Larinen of Port Colbome, 
owner of the Canadian coal barge An- 
nnbel Wilsorf, which foundered off 
Dunkirk last July, wa.s here today to 
remove the masts of the sunken boat. 





''Santa Claus Banks Here'' 



CHRISTMAS 

Three Weeks Away 

THE "deciding days" of December are here again. 
The merchants of Duluth have anticipated your 
wants — their stocks are bigger, better, brighter 
than ever before. 

In choosing appropriate gifts this year follow the rule: — "Buy 
modestly within your means, buy sensibly — if you would give the 
greatest pleasure to those whom you cherish as true friends." 

Be generous — that is the true Christmas spirit. But remember 
— extravagance is waste, not generosity. 

Your CHECK ACCOUNT with this bank will be useful be- 
fore Christmas — the week after and every day of the year ahead. 
Begin your Christmas shopping right by making arrangements to 
pay for all purchases with checks on this bank. 

ly orthern R ational Qank 

Capital and Surplus $335,000.00 
DULUTM, MINN. 











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Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH vJERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



7^ 



X . JJ 



THE STORE FOR SERVICE 
113, 115, 117, 119 West Superior St., Dululh, Minn. 




The Store of the 
Christmas Spirit Is 
Splendidly Ready 

The Christmas spirit is catching-— look in the show 
windows— pass through the arcade — and you'll get a 
vision of the Christniasy display throughout the store. 

See how happy the -children are— bring 
some little folks with you if you can! 
We're helping Santa Claus by splendid displays of 

gift things to please everybody— all so arranged that 

vou can ahiiost do vour own shopping. 

A Return to Rich Handsome 
Broadcloths for Gowns, Coats 

and Suits 

The demand for this fabric dur- 
ing the last two years has not been 
very strong — consequently many 
stores are not featuring them now. 

Particular dressers, however, 

have taken them up this sea- 
son quite extensively and this 

is accounted for by the unusual 

demand for goods having this 

particular style of finish. 

We have had an unusual season 
in them and arc in a position to 
show the new and very desirable 
colorings. 

Thcv are so woven that draped 
effects' work out splendidly with 
them. A little touch of Tapestry or 
Printed Crepe will add to the gen- 
eral effect of these fabrics when 
made up. 

You want something that has quiet elegance about 
it. Why not a Broadcloth? They will be in great 
demand'next fall — buy now and be a style-leader. 

Prices Range $1.50, $2.50, $3.50 and $4 per Yd. 

Clearance Prices 
on Coatings 

Practically Our Entire Line 
of Coatings Go Into This Sale 

All of them are 54 to 56 inches 
wide. All of them splendid quality. 
Good, warm comfortable coats are 
possible with their use. Most every 
desirable color represented in the 

$1.49 

Qualities selling from $2.50 to 
$4.00 a yard in one lot at $1.49. 




Qualities selling from $1.50 to 
$2.50 the yard will sell at choice for 
l)8c. ' „^___ 




WEST 



HERALD BRANCH OFVICEIl 
A. Jenmtn, 5S0 Nortfc Wtl» Av#. W, f J, Moru, eWH No»tli Ceiitr«l Are. 

Horald'i Weft Duluth r«P2ri«r my U *'/»chf4 after 
hour of goin» to pre ta t^t Calumet 178-M ang Lole ^i7. 
•. : r.i.,»i.. . - 



z 



ac 



=cs 



3=z: 



5 



Plan on Using Zenobia 
Sateen for Your 
Christmas Work 

More and more are the uses being found 
for this splendid fabric. While more of 
them are sold for linings and petticoats — 
many people have found them excellent 
fabrics for Pajamas, Night Shirts, Laun- 
dry and Work Bags, ^ |^ X/ J 
Box Linings, Maids' ^ J^ T Cl» 
Dresses, etc. They are r , • 

fully mercerized which accounts for their 
splendid finish even after they have been 
laundered. 36 inches wide and about 80 
shades to choose from, including black and 
white. 35c a yard. 



RECONSIDERS 
HISJPINION 

City Attorney to Grant the 

Commercial Club's 

Request. 

Will Determine If City Can 

Collect for Fire Hall 

Damage. 



See the "1914" Styles in Wooltex 
Coats on Sale at $16.50 to $30.00 

None such elsewhc-fe now! Very special. 




The city council yesterday afternoon 
passed a resolution requesting City 
Attorney Harvey S. Clapp to review 
his opinion to the effect that no dam- 
aercs can be recovered from the Cana- 
dian Northern railroad becaiise of In- 
jury by the road to the West Duluth 
nre hall. 

Committee Prenent* Cane. 

A committee from the West Duluth 
Commercial club, consisting of A. G. 
Macauley. J. J. Frey. Tnomas Olafson 
and David Bang, appeared before tne 
commissioners to urge that a de- 
termined effort be made to recover 
damages for the city, as has been done 
by private property owners whose 
property was damaged by the rail- 
road, whether the road whose prop- 
erty was damaged by the railroad, 
whether the road actually touched 
their holdings or not. They submitted 
the opinion rendered by Attorney 
John Jenswold, Jr.. to the effect that 
this can be done. He expressed the be- 
lief that tlie city can win out because 
of damage through noise, smoke, cin- 
ders, etc. , , , i. » *t,^ 

A. O. Macauley declared that the 
club had obtained the opinion from 



society of the Merritt Memorial M. E. 
church at her home tomorrow after- 
noon at «:30 o'clock. Reports will be 
given of the work of the various com- 
mittees planning the supper and pale 
to be held by the society in the church 
parlors Friday evening. ,< 

TIGERS "SORE"lRT 

PHOENIX KICK 



Members of the Irving Tigers foot- [ 
ball team, the junior organization of ; 
West Duluth which has a clean series I 
of victories for the season, are 
Indignant ever an alleged protest of i 
Manag*;r McDonoll of the Phoenix | 
football team. In which the latter Is 
claimed to have stated that he would | 

Srotefct the game played last f>un- 
ay. The game is credited to the Tig- 
era by a score of 6 to 0. 

Manager Clarence Fo< of the Tiger 
aggregation claims that the victory 
was clearly theirs. He stated that the 
score was made during the first half 
of the period of play by an 80-yard 
run hy Method for a touclidown. At 
the end of this half, which was ref- 
ereed by Ted Stahl of West Duluth, i 
both sides, said Fox. had agreed that I 
the referee had been very fair, and 
that during the second half the game 
had been handled by McKonzle, a 
sympathizer of the Phoenix. 

"I don't know what they are 'holler- 
ing* about," eald Fox this morning. "It 
is the second time we have won from 



Attorney Jenswold after the dtv at- 
torney had held that he did not think 
the city had a cause of action against 



the railroad. He asserted that If the 
city did not go further with the mat- 
ter the club would flght it through 
the courts. If necessary, at Its own ex- 
pense, as the members considered the 
issue one of great Importance to the 
whole city as well as to West Duluth. 
Would Change Opinion. 
City Attorney Clapp said that he 
would be very willing to reconsider 
his opinlun and to carry it as far as 
possible If the city has any chance to 
prevail. He stated that he may have 
been wrong and that If such were the 
case ho would not hesitate to admit It. 

FIRST GOAfPUT 
ON BERWIND DOCK 



them, the first score being 54 to 0. If 
the objection Is to their umpire then 
they have themselves to blame, not , 
the Tigers. We are willing to play | 
them another game If necessary." 

The Tigers have played 10 games 
this fall, winning all of the games. 
ICot one of the opposing teams has | 
scored on the locals. i 

» I 1 

Honor Visiting Guests. 

Mrs. B. Lind of 63ia f^lierbomo street 
entertained last evening at a turkey 
dinner In honor of .several out-of-town 
guests. Covers were laid for fourteen. 
The decorations were in green and 
white. The guests were: Mr. and Mrs. 
M. Lind of Deer River, Minn., Mr. and 
Mrs. F. Thompson of Eslelllne, S. D.. 
Miss Gladys Lind of Deer Park. Mifs 
Inga Lind of New York Mills. Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Johnson. Mr. ahd Mrs. N. ISig- 
ner, Mr. and Mrs. J. Isaacson, Miss 
Mildred Keksie and Miss Mabel Isaac- 
son. 



the (Sim Block Store 

''The Shopping Center of Duluth" 

Tomorrow We Place on Sale 

100 Women's Suits 

I 

That regularly 
sold up to $29 > 75 
at the low price 
of only 



Surprised By Friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Murray. 620 North 
Fifty-seventh avenue west. were 
pleasintiv surprised last night In 
honor of Mrs. Murray's birthday. The 
party spent the evening in dancing and 
music. Those present were: Messrs. nnd 
Mesdames J. Bourgoln, W. Oettel. A. 
Oettel. H. Moody. O. Poser, H. Holm- 
wood, M. Perrault. B. Collins, Mrs. 
Rose Goosllln. Misses Margaret Mcln- 
nl8, Frances Mclnnis, Cella Anderson, 
Marie Chamberlain. Mildred Murray. 
Myrtle Murray, G. Bellett, Isabello Per- 
rault. Mabel Plows, and Messrs. H. 
Bennett, Thomas Bennett, John McTn- 
rl9, Kenneth McTnnIs, Charles Murray, 
Thomas McCoUin. EmeBt Goosllln, 
Louis Gloshen, Edward Anderson and 
Leonard Murray. 

Entertains Bible Class. 

Mr.o. George Bennlson. 008 Garfield 
ler Adam'* The 7.UUU ion cargo cat- avenue, will be hostess Friday evening 
r^ed bv the steamer Is being unloaded for the members of the Allen Adult 
hv' the new carr er bridge which was Bible Class of the Grace Methodist 
completed Just before Thanksgiving ' church. Following thebusiness meet- 



The first boat load of coal to be re- 
ceived at the new Berwlnd coal dock 
arrived yesterday on the steamer Cuy- 
ler Adams. The 7.000 ton cargo car; 




"i-hls cargo of coal will probably be 
the only one unloaded at this docli this 
year. The dock Is still far from being 
completed. Work on the second bridge 
is being rapidly pushed and will prob- 
ably be finished within the next three 
AV do 

This l3 the final trip of the Adams. 

MEN WI UfBr COOKS, 

Grace M. E. Church to Be Scene of 
Novel Entertainment. 



Ing a social eession will be held. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

Mrs. K. A. For.sell and three chil- 
dren, who have been visiting relatives 
In West Duluth, left yesterday for the 
Forsell farm near Lake Denham. Rev, 
Mr. Foi-sell Is conducting a school at 
the Johnsonian institute, located near 
that place. 

Alexander Rose of Sixty-first avenue 
west and Highland street left yc^'ler- 
day for a few days' visit with relatives 
at Isanti. Minn. , . 

Mrs. John Mulligan; of St. Paul is a 
guest at the home of her sister. Mrs. 
In order to show the women that John McDonald. 319 North Fifty-eighth 
they know not only how to prepare a avenue west. 

meal but also to serve it, the men of i Ernest Munson and Emll Carlson 
the Grace Methodist church. Twenty- returned yesterday from a few days 
second avenue west and Third street hunting trip near Burnett, Minn. Each 
have planned to give an oyster supper | brouglit a deer with lilm. 
to members of the church next Monday Euclid Chapter No. 66, O. 
evening. The stew will be served un- ^-'-^ •*- ---■■-i ^^^^*i^n r.f , 



der the auspices of the church trus- 

John Moir will be general supervisor 
of the affair. James W. Preston will 
be the head waiter. R. R. Forward is 
scheduled for the Job of head cook and 
has promised that he will "railroad 
the stew out in the very best style. 

Among the assistant cooks, dish- 
washers and waiters' will be Rev. , 
George E. Silloway. Joseph W. Cum- 
mlng.=i. Dr. L. Q. Greeley, Ralph H. 
Wellington, Alexander Kennedy and a , 
number of other prominent citizens i 
of this end of the city. 

Friends of the members will be ex- I 
tended an invitation to the supper. A 
musical program will follow. The 
preparation of the musical has been 
taken out of the hands of the men for 
fear that they might not use good 
judgment In its selection. Mrs. David 
Adams will have charge of this work. 
The supper will be served from 7:30 
to 8:30 o'clock. 

•- 

Mrs. Merritt Entertains. 

Mrs. Ruth Merritt, 4603 Oneota 
street, will entertain the Ladles' Aid 



._..„„ --, _. E. S., will 

hold Its annual election of officers this 
evening at the Masonic hall, 615 North 
Central avenue. 

The Lndie-s' Aid Society of the Mer- 
ritt Memorial M. E. church. Forty- 
sixth avenue west and Halifax street, 
will hold its annual supper and sale In 
the church parlors Friday evening. 
Watch repairing. Hurst, W. Duluth. Adv 



DAN CUPID HAD 

A BUSY MONTH 



November was a popular month for ] 
Duluth brides, according to the mar- 
riage license records at the courthouse. 

Dan Cupid, the wily matchmaker, led 
123 couples to the altar of matrimony 
and fell but one short of equaling his 
November record for 1912. 

November was the most popular 
month of the year with the exception 
of June, when 132 wedding p.^rniiis 
were taken out. 



- LOCOMOTIVE CAB 

TRIED SEVEN 

DOCTORS 

My Life Saved by Pe-ru-na. 



IN COURTROOM 




.^«J 



Mr. S. S. 
Johnson, 
St. Elmo, 
111., writes: 

"I was for 

five years 

troubled 

with ca- 
tarrh. Two 

years ago I 
had one foot 
in the grave. 
I had tried 
seven doc- 
tors and al- 
so went to 
a cat a r r h 
specialist In 
St. Louis, 
and took 
several 
kinds of 
medicine a day. I could not walk more 
than a hundred yards without resting. 

"My friends told me to take Peruna, 
and I did so. I now feci that Peruna 
has saved my life. It is the best medi- 
cine on earth, and I would not be 
without it." . 

Tlioso who ohjert to liquid niedl- 
ilnes can now procure Peruna Tab- 
lets. 

Ask Your Druggist for Free Peruna 
Lucky Day A Imanac for 191 4, 



A fac.«;lmile of a locomotive cab has 
been set up in Judge Cant's room In 
district court, where William F. Kirf- 
man, engineer. Is suing his former 
employers the Duluth, Mlssabe & 

. , Northern railroad company for |84,0C0 

\ ' damages 




It is the best offering of the kind we have had the 
privilege to make this season. $11.95 seems a wonder- 
fully small price for such suits. 

Picture the smartest suits seen this J.eason at $29.7o 
and better suits of individuality in st>le of beautitul 
materials of admirable workmanship. Suits suitable to 
wear for any occasion; strictly tailored and scmi-dressy 
affairs. 

It's a clean-up of all the ones, and twos from 
our own good stock. The collection mcludes 
plain tailored and semi-dressy suii:s m all the 
fashionable materials and wanted colors. 
Positive values up to $29.75, special toirorrow at $11.95. 




Christmas China and Cut Glass 



A<; n Christmas gift Cut Glas5S. Dinnerware or 
.ome.hln''r'ircWn\"«l» romMn for jenemuons u» 

A token of vour esteem. But to serve sucnenus 
ft mult be well bought. We have a splendid line 
of this nature. 

DINNKRW.VRK — In open stock pattern.". 
Fr7nch English. German and Havilund china- 
price, per set, $6.75 to $225.00. 

One lot Dret,den China, Gold Hrc,n/4> ^■»«^^^a''<;; 
hlSi-class BrIc-a-Brao An\Pj.\"r- -^^^' -^"''"^»"» 
and French patterns at UAI.l- 1 KltL. 

Largo assortment of Jardinieres and Fern 
Dishes, new Moral designs, 25o up to $6.00. 
Iland-palntcd China Bread Plates at 48c. 
Monogram Peppers and Salts, gold Initial, at $1. 




Four Special Table Lots at Wonderfully Low Prices 



Included in this assortment arc all sorts of China suitable for Chri:.tmas gift 
through this section will reveal many holiday suggestions. 



A visit 



Contains cups 
and saucers, 
creamers, 
sugars, toothpick holders, salts and peppers, spoon 
trays, tea trays and many other useful pieces and 
wonderfully good values at 25c. 

Presents a 
most wonder- 
ful collection 
of tea pots, chocolate pots, whip cream sets, fern 
dishes, celery trays, cups and saucers, hand paint«rd 
plates, hair receivers, hat pin holders, etc. 



The 25c Table 



The 98c Table 



Inchuled are 
rtlates, sugars 
and creamers, 

tea pots, bread and milk sets, hand painted plates. 

tea strainers, napkin holders, tea tiles, button boxes, 

etc. Excellent values at 48c. 

Includes a 
most beautiful 
collection of 
pretty whip cream sets, bowls, bonbon dishes, spoon 
trays, 10-inch hand painted plate?, syrup jars, cups 
and saucers, etc. Special values at 75c. 



The 48c Table 



The 75c Table 





$1.48 

Casseroles 

at $1.19 



Japanese Tea 
Sets at $1.19 

.Special lot — 21 - piece 
Japanese Tea Sets, con- 
sisting of 6 cups ard 6 
saucers, 6 plates, 1 sugar 
and creamer, 1 teapot, in 
three neat decorations; 
selling regularly at $1.48, 
$1.76 and ^1 -I Q 
$1.98, perset.Jpl.li/ 

Cut Star Waiter 

Goblets 
Special 9c Each 



7-inth extra quality Cas- 
eeroles, with Guernsey 
dish and heavy nickel 
plated holder; a wonderful 
value at $1.19. 



Cut Star Water Goblets 
and Footed Ice (Jream 
Di-shPs stalling regularly at 
$1.75 per dozen, special at, 
each, 9c. 



Free Lessons in Knit- 
ting and Crocheting! 

We have an expert in our Art Needlework 
department, Third Floor, to teach y..m some- 
thing you wish to know about knitting and 
crocheting. Ample provision has been made 
for your comfort and convenience and you arc 
cordially invited to attend the classes as often 
as you wish. This will be the most important 
event of its kind thi.s season, and is of interest 
to every woman. For in addition to the classes 
there will be 

A Notable Exhibition of Garments 
Made of the 

Fleisher Yarns 

showing the very newest models in Sweaters, Shawls, 
Afghans. Blankets, etc. See these novelties by all 
means. Join the classes if you wish. We can as- 
sure you a pleasant and profitable visit. 



Mr. S. 8* Johnson. 



Klrfman claims that on the evening 

of July 1, 1911, he was obliged to take 

out a defective engine on an all night 

run between Proctor and the ore docks. 

He claims that steam which esr-aped 

I from a leaky valve In the drifting 

I throttle pipe caused a permanent im- 

' palrment of his nervous and muscular 

system. . , ,, 

The facsimile which has been built 

in the court room is constructed of 

canvass around a wooden frame and is 

of the same size as the cab used on a 

I Mallard type of locomotive. It Is par- 

i tlally equipped with machinery. The 

plaintiff will attempt to show the Jury 

1 in what manner the mechanism w^as 

defective. 

The railroad company denies any lia- 
bility for the alleged damages and 
declares that If Klrfman was Injured, 
It wag due to his own negligence. John 
Jenswold, Jr., is attorney for Klrfman 
and the defendant oompahy is repre- 
sented in court by Howard T. Abbott. 



kee for about a year. ----- , 

daughters. She formerly lived in 
?I^olfghton. Mich, where she was so- 
licitor for the Good Will farm, an 
orphanage Institution. «he rcf^^^^ 
this Dosltlon when she thought sne 
wal to be married to Mr. Kinney, ac- 
cording to Henry F. Coohems. her 

^*^^* ^'promUed to Deed Property. 

It Is alleged by Mrs. McNabb that 
Mr Kinney asked her to_ marry^hlm 



Sl^ has three bx.t still vlgo-ous," ?aldMr.^OK;hen^ ■ ready GO per ceru^ 



"Us'royaltTerare derived from iron ; knd suit has be.n instituted again.st 
mines n'earSlambaugh.- I stockholders for the value of their 

holdings. 

Sanger County Inntltnten. 

Couderay, Wis., Dec. 2. — (Sperial to 
The Herald.) — A farmers' Ini-tituta 
conducted by the department of agri- 
culture of the University of Wiscon- 
sin will be hold at Hayward. Dec. 5 



JOHN SHARP FAILS 

TO AVOID TRIAL 



St. Paul. M nn.. Dec. 2. — (Special to 



r^d ag^eed^ tT'Varlous things, among ...^ Herald.)-John Sharp, president of | -<1 ,Y'e "only 'faVrrl'^n^stSu'ter h^ld 
them that she s^ou d leceue a ueca , ^^^ defunct ttate Bank of Commerce ; in Sawyer county this year. E. <\ 
fn i\e^ Kmn"ey^ni^A Pr°P^^^^^^^^^ Winnebago, Minn., will be placed on | Jacobs wiU have charge of both the 



mil ions from which Mr. Kinney re- 
?l\ves large royalties, according to 

%t?ac'hed"1o the complaint is a copy ^ 

of an alleged contract of n^ajHage ^^^^^^ j^ ih2 by Harry Parker, the 
draw up at p*•^"J^''^ rvf./'^"^^^ 1 cashier, who now is in the Stillwater 
'^cl.oVdi'n'i^NrlJ.e^ ^romVafnt" X I Penitentiary. 



trial in. the district court at Blue | me etings. ^ 

Earth tomorrow on the charge of fal- , ■_■ ■ 

slfying a rep irt to the state superln- L .a,_iuirji.AifcA*AAAii[ Aifc**********^ 
tendent of banks. The _bank was j %^Mt******<|^*JU WWW ^**¥ ww.^^^jf.^ 



TOOTHACHE, NEURALGIA 



# 

t 



•it 

li. Or >1» ^^f 

■ ^ ^ Ifl -T* 



toothache, dip a piece of cotton 




Mrs. McNabb has lived In Milwau- 






I 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



1. 1 




-"W 



I 

I 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



■•■ 



December 2, 1913. 



I 



MAKING CHANGE ON STREET CARS 

Conductors Required to Be Accommodating 

When Possible. 

We desire to respectfully call the attention of our patrons to 
the necessity of providing tnein selves with change before board- 
ing cars. 

Conductors are required to be prepared to furnish change up 
to the amount of $2. 

Some persons appear to have the idea that the offering of any 
piece of 'good money" on a street car is "legal tender" and that 
upon making such tender they have the right to be carried 
whetiier the conductor is able to make change for it or not. This 
Idea i% erroneous, as the courts have held that the tender of a 
$5 bill in payment of a 6 cent fare upon a street car is unreason- 
able and thtrefore not a legal tender. It will therefore be seen 
that a person who gets aboard a street car with nothing less than 
a $5 bill is in the same position as if he had no money at all, so 
far as paying his fare is concerned, and that in such cases it is 
not as unreasonable as it may at first appear for ^he conductor to 
politely ask him to step off the car, procure change and take the 
next car. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO CONDUCTORS 

But while conductors are not required to furnish change for 
any sum in excess of $2, they are instructed by the company to 
do so as an accommodation to passengers when possible. A con- 
ductor is required to have $10 in change when first starting out, 
and it can easily be seen that the changing of $5 bills from two 
passengers would exhaust this supply. If he accepted two such 
bills he would be compelled to stop the car and seek change him- 
self while all his passengers waited. 

fVIISTAKES IN CHANGE 

When a conductor takes a piece of money from you from 
which you expect change, and passes on without returning 
change or audibly calling ou the denomination of the money, 
you should not rely upon his having correctly read it and upon 
his returning your change to you later, but should call him back 
at once. 

In order to prevent mistakes in change, misunderstandings 
and short change complaints, our conductors have been instruct- 
ed to call out audibly the moment they receive a piece of money 
from a passenger, the denomination of the coin or bill, the num- 
ber of fares which they understand are to be taken from it, and the 
chaii>2e to be given in return, and to at once count out the change 
audibly as they hand it to the passenger. Co-operation of our 
patrons in insisting upon our conductors observing this rule will 
be greatly appreciated and will greatly assist us in preventing 
mistakes regarding change. 

THE DULUTH STREET RAILWAY CO. 




PLEASING EFFECTS PROMPT SERVICE 




^^B|^« * J ..^ A rLB-AMM. Kfrtuia I'K'JMri stK\ iue. 




pfilKTBUfi 'VTJVTfJB^S > 



lo.uence BlQj.,4lb Ave. V<. ani .ui<eriur si. 




D. H., l-'-J-l-JlS. 

"That Place Is Doubling 
Its Business" 

*'A1I due to electric light I suppose," 
*'Xo doubt about it — last year they 
hardly paid expenses — they had no 
night-trade — electric signs were too 
expensive and they had nothing to 
attract the evening crowds.*' 

*'But, the new electric siiins — 



t 



Edison Mazda Signs 




have enabled them to win out. These 
signs are three times as brilliant as the 
ordinary electric signs, and cost about 
one-third to operate. That's the pria- 
cipal reason for their success." 

< Come and see us and wo 

— ^ ■"••' «Hve you the deUils. 

Duluf h-Edison Electric Co. 

2iS West First Street. 



AHRACTED 
TOCUYUNA 

Entrance of Jones & Laugh- 

lin Company Is Considered 

Significant. 



Is Believed That Other Big 

Furnace Interests Will 

Follow, 



J 



Th9 entrance of the Jones & Laiiffh- 
Un company into the Cuyuna rang* 
through the obtaining of an option 
from the Northern Pacitlc railroad on 
the four Fefgh forties adjoining the 
Pennlnprton mine on the west and 
southwt-3t. Is regarded as most import- 
ant. 

Taken in conjunction with the fact 
that the Pittsburgh Steel company, as 
the leasee of Rowe mine, and the In- 
land Steel company are now operating 
extensively ou that range. It is thought 
to indicate that the attention of the 
large furnace companies Is being di- 
rected more and more to the new 
.source of iron ore supplies. To that 
i.s attributed the recent extension in 
drilling operations on the Cuyuna 
range as evidon«-ed In the Increased 
number of crews reported to have 
-•started work on both the north and 
south ranges. 

Regarding the property Just taken 
under option by the Jones & Laughlln 
company, it is estimated from the re- 
.lults of the drill holes put down that It 
contains a tonnage of 3.250,000 tons, of 
which 1.750,000 tons can be taken out 
by open pit mining after stripping 
3,125,000 cubic yard.s of overburden. 
SiukinK ShMft. 

The Cuyuna-Duluth Iron company U 
procei-ding with the sinking of Its shaft 
down to 300 feet at which a second 
level will be opened up. A depth of 
235 feet has now been reached. Mining 
and stockpiling Is to be pushed with 
a full crew during the winter months, 
and It is expected that an output of 
:;00,000 tons of ore will be attained 
next season. The company has just 
completed drilling on lot S. section 30. 
adjoining the Kennedy mine. Forty- 
two holes were put down disclosing 
two dl-stlnct lodges, one a hematite and 
the other a manganlferous ore. The 
question of sinking a shaft at the prop- 
erty and mining will be taken up later. 

The t'uyuna-Mille Lacs Iron company 
l^ sinking another shaft to be u.^ed for 
the handling of timber and the ingress 
and egress of miner.-*. This will enable 
the u5«e of the large three-compartment 
shaft entirely for the hoisting of ore. 
An output of 230,000 tons Is con- 
templated In 1?14. Inchidlng shipments 
to go out all-rail during the winter 
under contract with the Lake Superior 
Iron & Chemical company. 

The Cuyuna-Sultana Iron company is 
announced to be still bottomed in ore 
in its third hole. The grade is said to 
be average high and to be holding up 

well. . , 

The Duluth-Brainerd Iron company 
was advised to be down to 49 feet yes- 
terday in the sinking of its three-com- 
partment shaft, and tests showed the 
.solid ledge to be only 4 \i feet distant. 
It Is expected that It will be reached 
within ten days, thus setting a record 
for the range In the sinking of a shaft 
of that size within two months' time. 

The Iron Mountain Mining company's 
directors are counting upon letting the 
contract for their complete equipment 
in about ten days. As previously inti- 
mated, the boilers were ordered last 
week. The laying of a concrete founda- 
tion for the plant will be started 
shortly. 

RAW WOOL ON The 

FRE E LIST AT LAST. 

Washington. Dec. 2 — Rafv wool went 
to the free list yesterday under the 
provisions of the new tariff act. Fig- 
ures on wool that has been held In 
bonded warehouses waiting admission 
free of duty, are not available here, 
but it is estimated that probably 
$1,000,000 worth was in bond In New 
York alone. 

At Providence. R. I.. 1.300,000 pounds 
of wool was withdrawn from bond by 
mill men who had been waiting for 
the new free list on wool to go into 
effect, and Philadelphia manufacturers 
withdrew more than 8.000,000 pounds 
of raw wool from bonded warehouses 
there. Before the withdrawals. It was 
stated that the warehouses contained 
about 10.000,000 pounds. 

Medal for Dr. Brll. 

London, Dec. ::. — The Royal society 
has awarded the Hughes medal to Dr. 
Alexander Graham Bell of W.ashlngton 
for his investigations Into technical 
electricity. The society elected Sir 
William Crookes president for the en- 
suing year. 



LANE 



PRINTING CO. 



The Best of Everything in Printing 
i^LdtUo (30 and 132 West Michigan St. 



t 



OVER 24,000 PATIENTS 



SUBSTANTIAL PROOF OF 
SATISFACTORY SERVICE 



\ 




TheM p«op|t tr» frvm y»ur best Md 

moat highly rewect»d famlKe* — poovle 

»ho know and demand tli* 

best «f Mrviec, and are 

not attracted by tow 

pne«» g»ie4y. W« plaasa 

by our attractive offloot 

— painlaM service — low, 

honest prlcM and high 

irado worlt. Invettlgats 

•ur Financial Standing. 

li^AamlnuUon Free — lO-liear Uaarantee — Xote thene prlcesi 



GOLD CROWMSr'"^^' 



'22-carat 
No better at any price. 

that for weight, 

beauty 
and quality has never 
be«n excelled 



BRIOBE WORK 



$3.00 

>r weight, 

$3.00 



SILVER FILLIHflS^°" '■^' 



er at any nllft 

I price in the city or elsewhere. ^^^ 

I WHALEBONE PLATES a^ aa 

! $15.00 and 125.00 values, XQ-OD 
at fS.OO and ^v^vw 



UNION PAINLESS DENTISTS 

Dr. rraisklln Or**r & Co. Own«rs. S17 W«st Superior St.. Ouluth 

Open from 8ta9 a. aa. to 7 p. aa.; Soadays, lO to 1. 



Stop 
That Cough 

At this season of the year 
when throat and lung troubles 
are prevalent, you should take 
particular care to stop coughing 
as soon as a tendency to do so 
appears, for a neglected cough 
will all too quickly develop into 
dreaded pneumonia or consunip- 
tion. 

Duffy's Pure 

Malt Whiskey 

will arlve the lystem power to ttirow 
off and roslst coucha, colds, srrlp. 
catarrh, bronchitis, asthtca and all 
luar troubles. It tt a wonderful 
remedy in the prevention of con- 
samption. pneoraonia, malar!*, low 
fevers and all wieakenint: acd wnst- 
Ins coaditiont, If takes as directed. 
You need Duffy's in your home. 
At Rioet druvvista, irocero, 
d**l«r«, $1 .00 a larr« bottla. 

Tha Duffr M»It WUeker Co.. 
lUchMtar. N. Y. 



L-5s1 






This is Guaranteed to 
Stop y^ur Cough 



ivfakn thla Fninllj' Supply of 

C'ouifH Syrti)> ul Mouse 

;a«a ^uv« %2. 



Thiq plan Tnaktis a pint of hettor 
cough 8yiui> tlian you oouM buy ready 
nia<ie for $2.50. A few dowes usually 
conquer an' (Bnl'mary rough — relieves 
even whooping coiigli quickly. Simple 
eiB it is, no better remedy can be had 
at any price. 

Mix one pint of prnnulated snjrar with 
^j pint of warm water, and stir for 2 
minutes. Put 2^4 ounces of Pinei (fifty 
cents' worths in a pint bottle; then 
add the Sugar Syrup. It has a pleasant 
taste and lasts a family a long time. 
Take a teaspoon ful every one, two or 
three hours. 

You can feel this take hold of a cough 
in a way that means buaincsa. Has ft 
l^ood tonic effect, hraces up the appetite, 
and is slightly la.xative, too. which is 
helpful. A handy remedy for hoarse- 
ness B])a«niodie croup, bronehitis, bron- 
chial a^ithma and whooping cough. 

The effect of pine on the membranes 
is well known. Pinex is a most valu- 
able concentrated compound of Norwe- 
gian white pine extract, and Is rich in 
f^iaiacol and other natural ^ healing 
pine elements. Other preparations will 
not work in this combmation. 

This Pinex and Sugar Syrup rerap<ly 
has often been imitated, though never 
Buccessfully. It is now used in more 
homes than any other cough remedy. 

A guaranty of absolute satisfaction, or 
money promptly refunded, goes with this 
preparation. Vour druggist has Pinex, 
or will get it for you. if not, send to 
The Pinex Oo., Ft. \Nayne, Ind. 



MINE WORKERS 
AREJNDICTED 

Monopoly of Labor Charged 

By Federal Grand 

Jury. 



M&thods of Union in Col- 
orado Strike Severely 
Condemned. 



EVEN RIVER 
WILL BE DRY 



Supreme Court Hands 

Down Important Decision 

Affecting Harbor. 



Liquor Selling Steamers 

Must Conform to Rules of 

Municipality. 



No more will Dulutiilans be able to 
quench their Sunday thirsts in summer 
by taking^ a trip on one of the excur- 
sion steAmeri, if the United States 
supreme court deciaion handed down 
yesterday with retjard to a New Or- 
leans case is applied to the harbor 
cities of the country. 

In its decision the supreme court 

holds that "floatiner bar rooms In 

navigable waters within harbor limits 

of cities, nuifit comply with city liquor 
regulation*." Tiie court so decided In 
the case of William Rabb, owner of 
a New Orleaiis excursion boat, who 
contended that the New Orleans reg- 
ulations did not extend to an excur- 
sion steamer on Interstate waters. 

It is believed that the deci.«lon by 
tlie supreme court will affect every 
harbor city in tiie United .States. Of- 
ficials at tlie local United States en- 
gineering office said tills morning that 
the liarbor limits of Duluth include 
the bay and St. Louis river. 

With the Duluth lid down tight, 
Duluthians who were unable to ob- 
tain a drinlt on Sunday, took ad- 
vantage of the excursion boats. The 
sale of drinks would start when the 
boat got away from the dock. 

GOURfDEGiDET 

FOR MRS. BUELL 



Pueblo, Colo., I^ec. 2. — Twenty-five 
indictments against national and state 
officers and members of the United 
Mine Workers were returned by the 
Federal grand Jury late yesterday ae 
the result of the Colorado coal strilte. 
An attempt to secure a monopoly of 
labor is charged In indictments against 
J. P. White, president; Frank J. 
Hayes, vice president, and William 
Green, secretary and treasurer, all in- 
ternational officers of the United 
Mine Workers of America. 

Charged with maintaining a mon- 
opoly of labor, these national officers 
of the United Mine Workers were in- 
dicted: 

John P. White, president; Frank "". 
Hayes, vice president; William W 
Green, treasurer. 

Indictments charging conspiracy in 
restraint of trade in Interfering witli 
Interstate traffic In coal were returned 
against John R. Lawson, Adolph Ger- 
mer, Robert Uhlrlch, A. B. McGary, 
Charles Batey and James Morgan, 
strike leaders and organizers of the 
United Mine Workers of America, and 
Edward Wallace, editor of a labor 
paper at Trinidad. 

Jar>- Recontmendatlons. 

The Jury recommended that the min- 
ing laws be more diligently enforced, 
that the governor should be empowered 
to regulate or suspend the .sale of am- 
munition and explosives during strike 
troubles, that In cases of dispute both 
parties siiould be required by law to 
operate tlie mines pending settlement. 
Financial interest of coal companies in 
saloons is denounced as reprehensi- 
ble. 

Methods of the United Mine Workers 
are severely condemned, the report 
saying: 

"The methods pursued by the T nlted 
Mine Workers of America in their en- 
deavor to force recognition of their 
union by the coal mine operators in 
this state are an Insult to conservative 
and law-abiding labor. They have 
brought experienced strike agitators 
and have armed hundreds of irresponsi- 
ble aliens who have become a menace 
to the peace and prosperity and even 
the lives of our citizens. 

"Evidently no qualiflCRtlon is neces- 
sary for membership In the United 
Mine Workers of America, otlier than 
a promise to pay dues, which are ap- 
parently used to support insurrection 
and lawlessness." 





Heiress a Chance to Save 
Some Extra Dollars 
For Clirlstmas Gilts 



£ 
A 
N 

I 
N 

G 



D 
B 
Y 



Ladies' Suits $1.50 

Ladies' Long Coats.. $1 
Gentlemen's Suits. . .$1 
Gentlemen's Over- 
coats $1 



Send your coat or suit today and if you are not 
more ihan pleased with your venture, don't pay 
us a cent. 

Our Dry Cleaning and Pressing is guaranteed to 
be as irood as that obtained anywhere In America. 






P 

B 

I 

£ 
S 



Laundry 

French Dry Cleaning Dept. 




Payment 

Check Is 
Convenient 



saves time, guards 
against errors, tur- 

Bv Cficck Is ^'^'^'^? ^ §^^^^ '■^^- 

•^ ord of your transac- 

tions and is useful 
when payment is 
disputed. CA bank account of an individual is a val- 
uable record of his income and expenditure. CKeep 
yOUR Batik Account at 



The City National Bank 

DULUTH, MIMIM. 



Rules That She and Not 
0. J. Larson Is Sam Bel- 
ford's Attorney. 

Judffe Dancer In district court yes- 
terday, in denying a motion to vacate 
an order, held that Mrs. I. C. Buell, an 
attorney of this city, had been em- 
ployed in good faith by Sam Belford 
to represent him In a damaiare suit 
agrainst Whitney Brothers, notwith- 
standing: the claims of Attorney O. J. 
Larson to the contrary. 

After the suit had been brought by 
Mrs. Buell, Helford consented to a 
dismissal and without notifying- his 
attorney the case wa.s so recorded. On 
Nov. 1 lost, Mrs. Buell obtained an 
order setting a.-^ide the dismissal on the 
ground that she wss the legal repre- 
sentative of the plaintiff and had a 
claim against Belford for her fees. 

Attorney O. J. Larson represented 
Felford in court after the latter had 
disclaimed that he had ever employed 
Mrs. Buell as his attorney. Attorney 
Larson moved the court to set aside 
its former order vacating the dismissal 
but this was denied by Judge Dancer. 

COOPERATIVE IMPLEMENT CO. 



statement by Cireen. 

Coshocton, Ohio. Dec. 2. — State Sena- 
tor Oreen, secretarj' treasurer of the 
United Mine Workers of America, 
against whom a Federal Indictment 
was returned yesterday at Pueblo, Bai<l 
that the only a<t!on the national offi- 
cers of the United Mlno Woriters had 
taken in the Colorado strike was to 
order the payment of strikers' bene- 
fits. , ,, 

"I believe the antl -trust law applies 
only to monopolies of commodities," 
Mr Green continued. "The indictments 
were returned simply to emharass the 
miners in the Colorado strike, and 1 
feel confident that the operator.s_ them- 
selves do not expect conviction." 

WILL PRAY AMONG 

NE W YEAR REVELS. 

Chicago, Dec. 2. — Three hundred min- 
isters of the gospel will pray at the 
most pronjlnent places whore New 
Year's celebrants gather, according to 
announcement made at the weekly 
meeting of Baptist mlnister.s by Rev. 
Ernest Bell of the Mldnlsht mission. 
Mayor Harrison has forbidden blow- 
ing of horns and the use of •"ticklers" 
on New Year's eve. 



DULUTH BUILDERS SUPPLY CO. 

Oi^ce — 18 North Third Avenue West. 
Both Phones. Two Warehouses. Representing oxrlushely TWIN' CITY 
BRICK CO., ST. PAUL; UMOX FIBRL: CO.. WINOXA, MINN. 

>'lione us your orders. We make deliveries. 



GIRL OF 13 FOUND 

GUIL TY OF MURDER. 

Prince Albert, Sask., Dec. 2. — Cath- 
leen Oka Simmon, aged 13 years, was 
convicted yesterday of murdering her 
9-year-old playmate, Julia Jenex, on 



the afternoon of 
Jury was out only 
returned the verdic 

The little girl, w 
down her cheeks, t( 
crime. She said thi 
of the murder slie 
left home to gather 
me<iical purposes. \V 
a field, she said, th 
up a dead prairie 
her across the face 
the accused girl ar 
her playmate to 
Quarrel continued 
testimony, when th 
control of her temp 
with a shovel, ki 
after which she b< 
pulp. 

The girl has not 



rune 21 last. The 
one hour when It 
t. 

ith tears streaming 
>ld the court of her 
It on the afternoon 
and her companion 
dry roots used for 
hile wallting across 
i Jenex girl picked 
:hicken and strurli 
with it. This made 
gry and she threw 
the ground. The 
according to the 
e Simmon girl lost 
ar and hit the other 
locking her down, 
at her face into a 

yet been sentenced. 



CUSTOMS RECEIPTS 

SHOW DECREASES. 



Wasliington, De< 
ceipts of the govei 
ber fell off about 
with November, 191 
monthly treasury j 
ber ■was the first fi 
tion for the new 
month w^as a fair 
re venue -producing 
return from this » 
more than $50,000 

The ordinary dlsl 



2. — Customs re- 
nment for Novem- 
14.500,000 compared 
2, according to the 
tatement. Novem- 
ill month of opera- 
tariff, and if the 
test of the bill's 
power.s, the annual 
ource will decline 
000. 
)ursement3 for No- 



! vember exceeded the ordinary receipts 
I bv $2,718,732, compared to an excess 
of receipts for the same month last 
I year of $4,834,529. 

' For the fiscal year to date, the dla- 
; bursements have exceeded the receipts 
i by $8,746,100, compared to an excess 
; of receipts last year of $1,817,337. The 
I receipts for November were $36,515.- 
I 132. The net balance in the general 
I fund at the close of business Sat- 
, urday was $118,466,111 and the grand 
I total assets in tlvd treasury $2,016.- 
I 827,201. 

IVOODOOISM AMONG 

NE GROES OF CUBA. 

Havana, Dec. 2. — A sensation has 

been caused here by the discovery of 

an alleged extensive organization 
among the negroes of Cuba for the 
practice of witchcraft, of "voodooism." 

The revelation was a sequel to the 
recent murder of a white girl 6 years 
old. The child's blood was said to havd 
been used in a myaierious method to 
cure a sick woman. 

It is generally reported that the 
"voodoolsts" liave relations wllii poli- 
ticians who protect them against pun- 
ishment. 

Several crimes of a similar nature to 
the one which led to the discovery of 
the "voodooism" have been committed 
recently. 





Iron Junction Men Form Company for 
Mutual Aid. 

The Farmers' Co-operative Imple- 
ment company, organized to engage In 
agricultural work such as plowing, 
harrowing, threshing, sawing lumber, 
etc., filed articles of incorporation yes- 
terday with the register of deeds. The 
capital stock of the company is $4,000 
with shares at $10 each and no mem- 
ber Is allowed to own more than 
twenty shares, all of which must be 
paid for before a certificate la Issued.' 
The headquarters of the company will 
be at Clinton In township 67-18 and 
19. 

The first officers are Binar Sep- 
panen. president: Martin Ajiderson, 
vice president; Andrew Mattson, sec- 
retary; Matt Hautala, treastirer. The 
officers and the following are the In- 
corporators: Eli Hautala, Thomas 
Hautala, Ell Hendrlckson. John Ander- 
son and Mattl Tusa. Ail are residents 
of Iron Junction. 



BURTON CALLS FOR 

CENTR AL BANK. 

Wnshington, Dec. 2. — Senator Burton 
has introduced a bill for a central 
bank, to be owned by the public and 
operated by the government, with 
twelve branches. Its power would be 
similar to thdae \5psted in the regional 
banks by tho,adii9nistratlon bill. 

CASHIER SENT tT 

MI CHIGA N PRISON. 

radlllac, Mich., Dec. 2. — C. J. Mo- 
Hugh, defaulting cashier of the Ca- 
dillac ^>i.ate bank, was sentenced to 
serve from seven to twenty yeara in 
Jackson prison. McHugh's shortage 
was estimated at |45.00tt. 






A Royal Train 

Daily through sted Pullman drawing room sleeping caia, 
compartment obacnration car, free reclining chair cais, 
Chicago to Jackaonville. 

A Royal Route 

•nm>tigh the Blue Grass region of Kentucky with dayliglit 
arrlyai at Chattanooga, affording a splendid view of histoiic 
Lookout Moimtain. 

A Royal Winter Resort 

Florida, the land of sunshine and flowers, stately palms aiid 
entrancing vistas, bracing sea breetea and balmy climate. 

Leaves Chicago - - 10:15 p. m. dciily 

Sleeping cars open to receive psMengers at 9:15 p. m. 
Arrives Chattanooga 5:00 p. m. 
Arrives Atlanta 955 p. m. 

Arrives Jacksonville • 7:40 a. m. S^ 

AH mnak in dioiag car, aervica a la carte 



BIG FOUR ROUTE 

Queen & Crescent Route— Southern Railway 

Stop-over privileges ©n tonrlat tickets at Chattanootfa, (]:.ookout 
Mountain), Atlanta, Macon and aU other important cities tn route 

Direct connections In Union Sution at Jacksonville 

for all points in Florida. Nassau and Cuba. 
Attractiva variable roote fares indnding the "Land of the Sky." 

Apply to your local agent for tickets, or for full Information and 
sleeping car reaerratlons. call on or write 

T. J. RANDALL, Traveling Passeneer Agent 

Nmw York Cmntral Linma 

501 Union Trust -Buading. Winnipeg, Man. 

A. J. Lyd^ North. Paaa. Agt. R. H. Graham. Travollotf ?•■•. As ent 

Sii««n i Cratetnt Root* „ South»rm Kailwoy 

W. Adama St. Chicago. UL 116-118 Endicott Arcade, St Paul. Ml 




n •» n T 



ilUL 




DEFECTIVE PAGE 



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Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2. 1913. 



I 

I 



-4- 



*i <> 



— — ♦- 



T 




JroTO the 
training: 



The trustees of the Duluth Deacon- 
ess Home of the Mfthodiet Episcopal 
church have planned a financial cam- 
palg-n for this week for the purpose 
of raieinp the balance of indebtedneps 
on the home, located at 40E East Third 
•treet. The amount ie f6,0(i0. 

A pv-up of -wrorktrf Interested In 
the Th.if.zts of thifi Fiir.j will be bury 
all week soliciting for the funds and 
for the benefit of those ■who do not 
know the history of the deaconess 
inovtment. run by the Mtthodlst Epis- 
copal church, the following: statement 
has been prepared by one of the wom- 
en of the city interested In the work: 
"The experiment of real deaconess 
work was undertaken in the summer 
of 1687 in Chicago when eigrht young 
wcmtn itibored for the poor of that 
city; and immt-diately af:erwards the 
first deaconess home was opened with 
four ct these j-oungr women as resi- 
dent cieaconesses. and with Isabella 
Thoburn as tempo rarj- superintendent. 
In If-isfc the general conference In- 
dors'. d the movement. In 1669 a 
dt:i..v:ts£ home was opened In De- 
tri.li and fcllowing this the next year 
hc-nifS wtre reported in Buflalo, P'hil- 
adtiphla. Washinfiton, Fitttturff and 
Syra.( ute. 

"Now there are about Fixty deacon- 
ess homes extending from the Atlantic 
to the Pacific. and approximately 
about l.OCfto deacones-ses and probation- 
ers. 

«»e«»pe •* ^'orlt. 
•TCow. as ii: ts<r i>: g'.v.uiue. the ig-ncr- 
ant, the suffering, the sorrowing, the 
Binning pet pie of our cities are being 
vit-ited find watched over and helped 
by these women of the church; in ad- 
dlt.on to this, scattered all over our 
country and belonging to this move- 
ment art- schools, rangir.g 
kli.dergarien to the national 
sci. als, there are boFrltais. frt^sh air 
hemes, old people's hemes, industrial 
ht-nies, wi>rking girls" homes, and 
emergency hc-mes; there are neighbor- 
bc>(-d hcuses, settlement houses, sani- 
tariums, orphanages, open door mls- 
eions. immigrant stations, and Immi- 
grant homes, all f(r the benefit of the 
peoj.it of our country ■W'ho ri«-ed help, 
and for those who are conalng to us , 
day by day. j 

"The deaconess home In Duluth and 
the work of the deaconesses here con- ; 
stitute a link in this endless chain I 
of Christian activity as the rrport for 
last year will certify: €.6(*5 calls were 
made: 1.84 Utters were -written in the 
Interest of the w(.rk: 3.122 pieces of 
literature, in-ludlng Bibles and testa- 
ments were distributed: 156 bouquet.*^ 
riven to the sick and shut-ins: 231 
perst.ns given material relief; 604 
brc ught into church services; 117 intc 
Sundav sfhool; 61 enrolled in the 
•cradle roll:' 2.194 taught in Sunday 
Bchc>o]; 160 in girls' prayer meeting; 7" 
in F:b:r classes: 1.662 in sloyd work 
and sewing classes: S('3 meetings con- 
ducted or addressed, and positions se- 
curr-d for twenty-seven persons. 

"The special Ww!k being done in Du- 
luth a~..ng the Finns continues with 
Increased interest. The deaconess who 
has thi.« m charge started a Sunday i 
9f h-.ol last January with thirteen '. 
rri« !;hfrs and no^w reports a member- 
eh.p of seventy. She has a ladit-s" aid : 
•o'-ir'tv: a sewing class for girls; a . 
Jur.'f'r league with fifteen members. 
and conducts evangelistic meetings i 
everv Sunday evening which are well ; 
atteridt-d. Another deaconess ts con- \ 
ducting spc' ;al mission work at Gar- ■ 
field avenue, under the direction of the I 
new pastor. Rev. J. "VT. Liilico. 

"Those -who are w^atching the work 
from month to month are thankful for 
all these things, hut the opportunities 
for increastd usefulness are so great 
t^ ':t we should have more deacor^esses 
ar a we must have more money. 

"TLe deaconesses give themselves 
"Without any financial remuneration 
whf:ttver excepting an allowance of 
$12 a month, and a home. This, to- 
gether with our sympathy and co-(.p- 
et'itir-n. Is our obligation to them. "We 
o-« e to oursel-res as Duluth Methodists 
ar d friends of the cause, the entire 
cariCcllation of this amount of $fi.('f'0 
th'.s week. 

"It can be done if we will." 
Tor "Ways and Means Corr mittee. 

L. M. L." 



MATINEE MUSICALE PROGRAM OF 

MORE THAN USUAL INTEREST 



Several rurr.btrt cf rpe-.-lal Interest 
made the program givtn at the regular 
meeting of the Matinee Musicale yes- 
terday at the Endion M. E. church of 
unuiiual merit. 

Kenneth E. Runkel, a musician new 
to I>uluth, opened the program ■with an 
organ group which iras most satisfy- 
ing. His plaj'ing of the F-ac h "Tocca- 
ta in C," Jonnstons "Autumn." Puc- 
cini's finale of Act II. from "Madame 
Butterfly" and Ton's "Toccata" was of 
such varied nature to amply display 
the versatility of Mr. Runkel as an 
artist. He met the dem.ands of each 
piece adequately. His work -was char- 
acterized with a masterly Interpreta- 
tion c.f the works of the writers and 
an e"^ ident understandir;g cf his In- 
strument and he brought out the color 
and expression delightfully. 

Another musician who ■was heard for 
the first time before this club was Miss 
Florence Gill, a pupil of Mrs. Grace 
Senior Brearley who pla>ed the 
Moszkowskl "Concert Etude, Op. 24. 
No. 1." a very difficult cc.mpositlon, 
with marvelous ease and understand- 
ing. A sound technical equipment, 
earnestness of purpose and a mature 
understanding are features of Miss 
Gills work and there was a beauty of 
expression and a warm tone coloring 
especially to be praised. She plays 
■with more repose than is usually felt 
In the work of a young pianiste and 
the brilliancy of her playing yesterday 
won for her tremendous applause 
which broke forth spontaneously be 
fore she had hardly finished her num- 
ber. The work reflected great credit 
on Mrs. Brearley who ha= been her j 
c>n]y teacher giving her all the musical 
training she has had. 

Another number which -was of spe- 
cial interest with a vocal solo by Miss 
Marie Clarke who has not been heard 
in Duluth for some time. She sang 
"Elsa's Dr*-am from "VTagners "Lohen- 
grin" -with exquisite shading and 
phrasing and her clear soj.rano voice 
was displayed to good advantage in 
She was given hearty 




as an Infirmary for atttng children, a 
hospital for eJck infants and other 
children under 1* rea»6. a detention 
ward for children during the first ten 
days of residence, ••parw.e quarters ftr 
Infants and children under 6 years, « 
kindergarten room, an operating room 
for surgical cases, not less than a 
dozen private rooms for t)atients too ill 
to be safely kept in a ward, sun par- 
lors for Infants and children not strong 
enough to play out. ct doors, balconies 
for outdoor sleeping Quarters, a central 
heating plant, new laundry quartera 
additional dining and play rooms." 

students" recital. 

Program Will Be Given at Supe- 
rior. 

Members of the Duluth and Superior 
classes of the Flaaten Conservatory of 
Music and Expre.'JEion will give a re- 
cital Friday evening of this week at 
the auditorium of the Supt-rlor high 
school at Superior. The following pro- 
gram will be given: 

Piano — "Butterfly" 

Deborah Foley. 

Voice — 

(,a> -Tour-Leaf Clover" 

Charles 
Garden" . . 
Catherine 
Edwin A, Hurst. 

Prelude" Kachmaninoff 

Zella Burrell. 
Voice- 
la) "Mv Mother Bids Me Bind My 

Hair" Haydn 

"The Lass With the Delicate 

Air" -A-rne 

Gertrude Lofan. 



(b) "A Little Dutch 



.Mtrkel 

Villeby 
" i&ead 



Pian< 



(b) 



Plant 



(b) 



the nun-iber. 
applause. 
Mrs. Fred G 



Bradbury who Is always 



Past Imperial 

Christie. 



Good Samaritan John 



_ANNL AL— 

CHRISTMAS SALE! 

B^ ladle* of Endion M. E. rbnrcU. 
Thnri-diiy. Dee. 4. from J«» «• "»• 
I>oineKti<- and fane? artiele*; 
home- made rar.d?. 



MISS FLORENCE GILL. 



artistic in accompaniaments played for 
Miss Clarke's number. 

The program closed ■with the cantata. 
"The Princess of Ts," by Henry Hadley 

given under the directic>n of Miss Ruth ] 
Rogers with Mrs. J. N. McKindley as 
accompanist. The cantata was an In- ' 
teresting one given with precision and 
good tone blending. Miss Faith Rog- 
ers and Miss Florence Hyland arranged 
the program for the afternoon. 



members will be admitted free. 

Prof. Dickinson will also give a lec- 
ture Thursday afternoon at 2:80 
o'clock at the spme place on "l^laeter- 
linck." which will also be open to 
non-members cf the league, as single 
tickets for that lecture will be sold. 



LECTURE AND TEA. 

of Century 



December 



FIRST 

Modern 



ANNUAL 

Samaritans 



MEETING. 
Elect Offi- 



Social 

Club. ■ i 

Dr. William Forney Hovis, pastor of j 
the Endion M. E. church, will talk ' 
on "The Holy Grail In Literature" to- 
morrow afternoon at the December so- 
cial afternoon of the Twentieth Cen- ' 
tun- club, which will be held at the 
guild hall of Trinity pro-cathedral. 
This lecture will be the first of a 
series of three which this speaker 
will vi'^e before this club, his other 
subjects bt ing. "The Minister in Flc- 
i tion ' and "The Short Stor^-." 
' A musici.1 program will precede the 
lecture, with Mrs. O. J. Larson sing- 
ing Gounod's "Ave Maria,' with Mrs. 
Louis Dvrorshak at the piano and a 
viulin trio by Mollenhauer. which will 
be plaved by Misses EmUy Smith, 
Eleanor Kraft and Lawrence Trediau. 
Following the lecture there will be 
the monthly social hour -with the fol- 
lowing women acting as hostespes: 
Mrs J B. Richards, general social 
' chairman; Mrs. C. H. Merritt Mrs. E. 
.1 F.ardwell, Mrs. Gustav Flaaten and 
Mrs Fred Re>-nolds. Presiding at the 
tea taMes will be Mrs. T. T. Hudson 
' and Mrs. H. J. Atwood, assisted by 
Misses Annabelle McLeod, Grace .Sheri- 
dan, Helen Harbison and Leila Sparks. 



WOMAN'S COUNCIL. 

Mrs. W. S. Woodbridge Will 
Preside at First Meeting. 

The regular meeting of the Woman's 
Council will be held Friday morning 
fit the library clubroom at 10 o'clock 
Mrs. W. S. Woodbridge. who was 

t elected president of the council at 
the last meeting, will preside, and 

I plans of work to be taken up by the 

; council during the coming year will 

• be discussed. 



"From an Indian Lodge" 

MacDowell 

'•'Polonaise," A major Chopin 

Le Carda Eliason. 

Reading — Selected 

Mrs. Walters. 
Piano Duo — "March Triumphale" .Goria 
Zella Burrell. Mayme Boynton. | 

Voice "Alfio's Entrance Song" from | 

Cavalleria Rusticana i Mascagni i 

Dwight W. Helstand. I 

Violin Trio — "Largo," from the Con- | 

certo in E Mollenhauer ; 

Emily Sm.ith. Eleanor Kraft. Lawrence I 
Trades u. I 

Piano "Sparks" Moszkowskl i 

Gertrude McCuen. , 

Voice — "Cry of Rachel" ' 

Mary Turner Salter 

Nina Osborne Batson. 

Piano — "Tocatelle" Dupont 

Alyda Flaattn. 
Reading — "The Soft Sftot in E 606".. 

A. H. Donnell 

Dorothy Ekstrom. 
Voice — „ .^ , 

(a) "Morning Hymn" Henchel 

(b) "Banjo Song" Homer 

Elizabeth Lswrence. 

Piano "Prelude and Toccata" Lachner 

Clarence McDonald. 
VioUn — "Bohemla'n Dances" No. 2 . . 

Randagger 

Eleanor Kraft. 

Voice— 'Xullaby" Godard 

Margaret Llnehan. 
Piano Quartette — "Airs de ballet" 

from Feramors Rubinstein 

Piano 1 — Laufey Bt-rgson, Gertrude 

McCuen. 
Piano 2 — Le Carda Eliason, Laura 

Elberson. 
Voire — ,, _^ 

(a) "Vedral. carino" Mo«art 

(b) "The "Woodpecker" Nevin 

Helen Rankin. 
Piano — ^^ 

"Fantasia Impromptu" Chopin 

"Br'er Rabbit" MacDowell 

Rubv May Krause. 
Voice Trlcj — "Break. Break. Break" 

(Tennyson) Frederic H. Pease 

Soprano," Margaret Llnehan; Contralto, 
Myrtle Harding; Baritone, Joseph Be- 
rendt. 
AccomTsnists — Mrs. Gustav Flaaten. 
Donna Riblette Flaaten. Ruby May 
Krause. 




The Third Day of 

"BERKEY & GAY Week" 



T 



This Important Exhibit 
Grows in Interest 

HE third day of ''Berkey & Gay Week 



will be 
one of unusual importance. We are having a 
special exhibition of some of Berkey & Gay s 
choicest pieces of period furniture. By PERIOD 
FURNITURE we mean those sets and pieces which 
are representative of the classic epochs in fur- 
niture-making. 

In our displav of PERIOD FURNITURE you will find 
artistic reproductions of Louis X\ . Louis X\ I. Empire, 
Flemish Renaissance, William and Mary, Mieraton, Chip- 
pendale, Flanders and Colonial pieces. 

Berkev & Gay 'Tlandcrs*' furniture represents oak at ihe llighe^t 
point of'arti<.tic development. The other perked styles are shown 
lareelv in Mahogany, Circassian Walnut and some particularly 
beautiful ones in Enamel, both hand decorated and plam. 

have called this a ''Week of Counefy"' throughout the entire 
We feel sure a visit oi inspection will well repay you. 

Come in tomorrow withcat any thought of present purchases 
and enjoy the artistic treat we have provided for you. 



I'l' 



We 

store. 



P 



Firs: Street and Third Tive. West 




FOR MRS. HARDIN 

W. 



C. A. 



ANNUAL INSPECTION, 



Sons of Veterans' Auxiliary Will 
Meet. 

The annual inspection of the Sons 
of Veterans' Auxiliary -will be ><aJ to- 
morroTv evening at the regrular moet- 
Ing of that orpranlzatlon -which will be 
held at 8 o'clock at Memorial hall. 
Mrs. Bently of Minneapolis, division 
Inspector -will conduct the meeting and 
a social hour "will follow the business 
session, with Mrs. John Harrison. Miss 
M. Budden and Miiis Ella Bates in 
charg-e. 

Mrs. Bently -will be the g-uest of Mrs. 
"William Beaton, president of the local 
auxiliary at her home. 4201 McCuiloch 
street during her stay in Duluth. 



Farewell Affairs for Y 
Matron. 

Mrs. "W. C. Apnew. honorary presi- 
dent of the Tounc Women's riiristian 
association, will entertain the mem- 
bers of the board of dirertc>rs and the 
secretaries of the assc>ciation at an 
afternoon tea at her home, Iff^B East 
First street Thursday afternoon in 
compliment to Mrs. Ethel P. Hnrdin. 
who has been matron at the T. W, 
C. A. since the new building: was 
opened and who leaves this month 
to spend the winter in St. Faul. 

The secretaries of the association 

entertsined at a dinner party at the 

Glass Biool: tea rooms last Saturday 

! evening for Mrs. Hardin, at which 

! co.ers were laid for 10. 




soon for a year's stay abroaa. .lapanese 
place cards were used and the oihtr 
tuests were Misses riorenc-e Gill. Pa- 
perior: Pansey Miller. fuP.?^*^: ^ae 
MrA.lpine, San Dieec, «-8l.: ^^^u-h Har- 
rison Superior; Edna Harris and Isa 
Botten. 



Linnaea Branch. 

The regular meeting of the Linnaea 

- ■ held fit the home of 

South Klne- 

evenlng (•* 



branch will 



r>uluth 
xnarltans. 



cers. 

Council, No. S. Modern Sa- I 
held its first annual meeting j 
sad election of officers last evening 
«t thf Krlchts of Pythias hall. Two 
hundred members -were present and ; 
before the election a class of fifteen i 
candidates was initiated by the Sa- 
maritan degree team of the council. 

A. G. McKrlght. the retiring good 
Samaritan, presided. Following the 
election of {.fficers a turkey supper 
■was ."served by the women of the 
Beneficent degree, the committee In 
charce of the supper being Mrs. Dan- 
iel Murphy. Mrs. W. r. Spornitz. Mrs. 
Laura Merritt. Mrs Alma Voct and 
Mrs. W. A. MfWatty. They were as- 
sisted by a comm.ittee of the Samari- 
tan degree consisting of 'Zf^rge Fair- 
ley. W. T. Atherton. J. A. McLaughlin 
atid L. T'. Young. , ^ ^ 

The following officers were elected 
bv the Samaritan degree: A. G. Mc- 
Knlght. past good .Samaritan: Richard 
Jones, good Samaritan: W'. A. Mc- 
■Wat+y vice goc>d sannaritan; "V* . A. 
Atherton, high priest: Colin Thomp- 
son treasurer: L. I'. Toung. scribe: 
J A. McLauchlln, levite: Edward Nei- 
aenf*ur, chief messenger; Daniel 
Murvl.v, junior messenger; C. Q. 
Flroved. centurion; .Toseph Cuskey, 
watchman, and John G. Ross, trustee 
for three years. 

The officers elected by the Benefi- 
rent degree were, lady good SRmal^- 
tan Mrs. Lucv Purdy; lady vice good 
eaniaritrin. Mrs. Laura Merritt: lady 
levite Mrs C. G. Firoved; high 
nrlestess. Mrs. Alma Vogt: lady chief 
tDes«?enger. Mrs. Daniel Murphy: lady 
Junior messenger. Mrs. Grace Toung; 
lady centurion. Mrs. Joseph Cuskey, 
and pianist. Mrs. Mary Ryan. 

Duluth council. N'o. S, meets every 
Monday evening at the Knlchts of 
Pythias' hall. 118 'SSest Superior 
str*-tt. and the business meetings are 
alwavs followed by a social prograrn. 

On" D^c. 8. a French proerram under 
the leadership of Dr. V. E. Gauthler 
will be given, and on Dec. 15. the regu- 
lar monthly dance will be held be- 
tween 9 and 12. . , ... 
Ttie officers who were elected last 
Bight will be installed on Jan. I. by 



TWO LECTURES. 

Prof. Dickinson Will Finish 
Course. 

"Twentieth Century Drama" will be 
the subject of the lecture which Prof. 
Thom^as Dickinson of the University 
of Wisconsin will give tomorrow eve- 
ning before the members of the Du- 
luth branch of the Drama league at 
the sun parlor of the Spalding hotel. 
This is the third of a series of four 
lectures which Mr. Dickinson was en- 
gaged to give before the club this 
wi'-.ter. his other two having dealt 
with "The New Technique of the 
Drama" and "A Defense of Realism." 
The hour for the lecture Is 8 o'clock 
and Is open to all Interested. League 



GIFT FOR HOME. 

Unknown Donor Sends Ch^ck 
for $5,000. 

A check for {E.OOO from an un- \ 
known giver was received yesterday 
by Mrs. G. Herbert Jones, president tf 
ti e board of directors of the Children's 
home of this city to be used for the 
benefit of that Institution. The check. 
Mrs. Jones said, came through a New 
Tork equity company and there v ere 
no restrictions made as to the man- 
ner in which the monej- shall be used. 
It was attached to a clipping from The 
Herald telling of the needs of the 
; home. 

Mrs. Jones said that she hoped that 
it might be set aside for a building 
fund to be u.«<ed to add a sick ward 
and sun parlors both needed. The 
: matter will be considered fully Dec. 12 
' by the board. Amony the needs men- 
tioned in the annual report for 1811 
' were: 

"A sustaining fund of J2.f.00 for the 

year; 1.000 associate members; an ad- 

1 ditional building to provide for <mme- 

' diate needs. These needs are quoted 



Je-wish Chairtaqua. 

The regular meeting of the Jevlsh 
Chautauqua will be heW tomorrow 
•.fternoon at S o'clock at the Llbriiry 
club room. "The Heirs of Yesterday," 
by Emma "Wolf will be the subject for 
the afternoon. 



be 

Miss Anna Nelson, 
t teenth Rvenue east, 
! tills week. 



101 
Friday 





By PEOG Y FEABOD Y 






Will Sing at St. Paul. 

Miss Senta Erd of this city will be 
the soloist next Sunday at the sym- 
phony concert to be given by the St. 
Paul Svmphony orchestra In St. I'aul. 
She will sing the aria from the Wagnet 
"Freischutz" which she gave here at 
her recital, and which met with tre- 
mendous applause. The placing of 
Miss Erd on the Sym.phony progr&m 
is an honor, and other artists who 
have api>eared with the orchestra this 
season are Putnam Grlswold and M^s- 
gie Teyte. 

• — 

At Dcaconesfc Home. 

Mrs. Benjamin Longley of St. Paul. : 
s«='cretary of the Northern Bureau of 
Deac-mess Work, arrived last evening 
and Is a guest at the Deaconess' Home, 
408 East Third street, lor the week. 

Chinese Tea. 

Mrs. E. Frank T.url.t.T of Tw-enty- 
fourth street. Park Point, was hostess 
at a te% at the Mandarin cafe yes- 
terday afternoon in compliment to 
Mrs. Henry K. Brearley. who left today 
for Boston to m.ake her home there. 
' and Mrs. O. A. Orodson. who leaves 



Ninth 
There 
home 



I Lodge Notes. 

I The Luther League ^^ Trinity Eng- 
lish Lutheran church will ^^"^^^^^'H 
evening at the home of Mrs. tiugo 

I Swenson, 1910 West St-cond street. 

T>»*> T Bdies' AJd Society of the First 

iBaptfst cSurch will be held aU day to- 
morrow at the church parlors, 
avenue enst and First street. 
will be plain and fancy sewing, 
cooking, candy and novelties. 
• • • 

I The Missionary Societies of the 
First M. E. church will meet tomorrow 
afternoon at the parlors of the churchy 
The Home society at 2:80 o clock whtn 
Mrs. Benjamin Longley of St. Paul will 
speak and the foreign society at 
when Mrs. A. vV. Bradley 

' Kan., formerly of Duluth 

\ A social hour will follow 
en Interested In the 

1 meeting 

• vited to 



SO, 

of Topeka. 

will speak. 

and all wom- 

meetings or In 

the speakers are cordially In- 

be present. 

• • * 

The Ladies' Aid Society of St. John's 
English Lutheran church will meet to- 
morrow afternoon at £ o'clock at the 
home of Mrs. J. O. Lennlng. 1604 East 
Suptrlor street. 

m ' 

Church Meetings. 

The Womnns Alliance of the Unl- 
Urian church will meet in all-d»y ses- 
sion tomorrow at the church. Lunch- 
eon will be served at 
members are requested 



donations for the Christ mss s:Je. rf 
arrangements wlil be oompitted ft>r , 
that event at this meeting. 

• • * 

The mem.beTB of Zenith lodge No. P?, 
Degree of Hcnor, w":il hold their an- 
nual election cf officers this evening at . 
Mac-abee hall, 21 Lake avenue north. 

• * * 

The women of the First Christian 
church will meet tomorrow afternoon 
at the church parlors at 2 o'clock to 
make final preparations for thtir 

Christmas sale. 

• • • 

The Home and Foreign Missionary 
POf-ieties of 'iie <.4race M. E. church 
will meet w th Mrs. J. W. PreEton, 
2509 West S'jcond street tomorrow 
afternoon at 2 SO o'clock. All Inter- 
ested are coniially m-.ted to be pres- 
ent. 

Pen.onal Mention. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Kenny of 114 
South Sixteerth avenue east have re- 
turned from 1. short visit with the let- 
ters parents, Mr. and la.rs. James 
Shiely. at St. Paul. 

Mrs H. C. Beler of 171? East Fifth 
street left Sunday for a visit at 

Crookston. 

• • » 

Miss Selma '-asmir of 412 East Fifth 
street has returned from a two months 

Eastern visit. 

• • • 

Mrs. Victoi rilan of ITC East Third 
street has returned from a short visit 

with her ptrtr.tf at F!--' 



n*rT f^.sttr, 
turned with 



M.jsf Bessie Arnoid, r»» 
her for a short visit htre. 

• « • 

R. H. Brunner. R A. Lrwd and An- 
ton El'ingson have returned f:um * 
week's hunting trip en the tioni: shcr^ 

• • • 

A. H. Knight and family returned to 
Negaunee, Mich., Sunday evening: alter 
a visit with Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Johns- 
ton, ti(. 1*. East Fifth strett. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Gerlach cf C211 Wa- 
der.a street have as their guests their 
dauphters. Mrs A. H. Sinatfer and 
*on Lyle of Fergus FkHs. Mii.n., and 
M:k. Sam Sutter of Carlton. 

• • • 

Mrs. B. F. Howard, formerly cf Du- 
luth but now <f Howardvillt, Man.. 
Can.. Is visiting Mrs. Ernest E.i.ghaan 
of 4326 Gilliat street, Lakeside. 

• • • 

Miss Mae McAJpine left th:F after- 
no :>n for her Lome at fean D'.cgo, Cal.. 
after a seTtral weeks' ViSit htre witb 
friends. 

George Bailey of Camden, N. J., who 
has been the guest cf Dr. J. H. Andres 
ani Misf= Andres of Park Point for 
ten cays, has gone to Chicago and 
from there he "n-ill go to his home. Mr. 
Bailey Is head of the Cooy^T hot^pltal 
at Camden. 



'VI'oodf'Bian'^ Robber ^Bte»eed. 

Ashiand. W.<- . T^ic. 2_lie^aln« 
guilty to the charge of rc-tbir.g a 
woodsman of \Zl> in 



an East end sa* 



thf 



William Kers 
Wau- 



noon and the 
to take their 



A Sk in of Beauty- b • Joy Forever. 

R. T. FELIX QOURAUD'S 
Oriental Cream or 
Magical Beftutifier« 

Removes T«n, P ro;;leB, Frrck 
its Mcjtfc Patclics 

Skin piseuo* 




Rash aad 

an 1 everj' \ 
ci ^i«ftun , tnJ dc- j 
- Men It h«t stoo„ 
■••64 ■«*» Mid 1* St : 

.^ ess ve t3B:e it tclx 

tuTt : is prjrtrly made At 
cejitm Louctrrtel: oif 9:mlla. 
i.ame Dr L A. Saj-re «ai< 
tr a iady of th« hauttuD ': . 
latlaDti: •jUyou-wUol w:i ' 
uae ttiam. I recsaeinend 
•-.OURAID'S CRtAM a-i 
i f leaat harmhi'. of al. tbej 
^i;m ;T«;.aTa;ianv' Fui Mitt 
Dy »11 d^'uprisw »l'' Fancy 
C<»<1> iMAic* ic th* I nttrd 
StatoK. Canada and Fumpe. 



St. New Tork 



Teach Children to Save Pennies. 

Judging from what we see of the ex- 
travagance and of the living up to 
every cent, there is a consuming need 
of impressing habits pX thrift on the 
rising genera 1 1 o n 
and those to come. 
Like all other hab- 
its, those acquired 
In youth are tht 
most lasting ; there- 
fore It behooves the 
parent of the small 
boy and girl to de- 
vise a plan by 
which the pennie.- 
that frequently fine; 
their way Into littU 
hands shall b 
dropped into a 
bank, there to ac- 
cumulate Into the 
dollars which later 
in a real bank. 

One thing parents wiU do well to 
remember— and that is to keep the 
children's banks Intact. I have seen 
so many mothers break into l^e tiny 
banks of babies when in need 
small amount of change. I have 
too, of many cases where 
peculations were never 
whole, though the 
enough. 

Of course 1 do not doubt that strin- 
gent necessity has often been the rea- 
son that these little repositories were 
broken into. On the other hand, re- 




on can be deposited 



of a 

known. 

these small 

refunded In 

intention was good 



moving nickels and ciirrus fur car rides, 
Ice creams and other little luxuries is 
not fair to the child, who may be de- 
nying himself much to achieve the 
saving of a few cents, and to whom 
there is no more serious setback to his 
Interest and disposition to save than 
comes from finding his little store of 
money depl*^ted from time to time. 

The average human being of any 
strength of character whatever re- 
quires only a little encouragement 
after he has once started on a plan of 
saving. Let him acquire a bank ac- 
count of a few dollars and be begins 
to feel like a man of means. The will 
to increase the amount becomes more 
flrm.ly entrenched with every dollar de- 
posited. Self-denial, in Itself a good 
training, becomes an easier matter and 
: y great need In another direction 
prevents sums from being added to it 
at regular Intervals or occasions the 
subtraction of any amount. 

It may be necessary to guard against 
a tendency to niggardliness in some 
quarters. It has been known to crop 
out at a verj- earlj- age. However, It 
iB so rare in these days of spending 
all one earns and more, that It need 
only be touched upon here. The point 
is that children should be taught to 
set apart a portion of their earnings 
for some emergency that may arise in 
th« future. We do not want to set 
children to money grubbing and saving 
with that idea in mind, but rather to 
being forehanded so that when they 
reach maturity they will be a dollar 
ahead, instead of a dollar behind. 









Friday, Dec 5 at 8:15 P. M. 



This pleasing opera will be given 
on tiie Pianola and Victor Victrola. 
The most important concert of our 
winter series. 



Smith & Allen Co. 

309 and 311 West First Slrccl. 

No Admission Charged. 




I 

t 



*l DEFECTIVE PAGE 

W^ r 1 r 






4 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

ruhlKhfd every evening except Sua- 

<la} by The llt-rald Company. 

Both Telephones — liuslness Office. 324; 
Editorial Rooms, 1126. 



K-rterf.l as swond-rlaaa matter at the Duluth post- 
offloe under the act of ci>ngres8 of March 3, 1870. 

OFFICIAL PAPER, CITY OF DlllTH 

feinscIlHTION RATKS — By mall, pay- 
able in advance, one month. 35 cents; 
thrte months. $1; six months. $2; 
one year, $4; Saturday Herald, $1 per 
year; Weekly Herald, $1 per year. 

Dally by carrier, city and suburbs, 10 
cents a week, 45 cents a month. 
Sulw rlbirs will confer • favor to making known 

•ay complaint of Ber\ice. 

When (hanglun the adJioa^ of your paper. It la 

lmp<jrtaijt to ul»e Ixjth old and new addresaes- 



The Duluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising contracts with the distinct guar- 
unty that It has the largest circulation 
in Minnesota outside the Twin Cities. 

DULUTH'S RATE VICTORY DOUBLED 

JJid you ever dream that you had 
iallcn heir to a inillion dollars, and 
then wake up and find it was all a 
mistake— that it was TWO MIL- 
LIONS? 

rroI>ably not; hut something very 
like that has happened to Duluth in 
the latest development in the rate sit- 
uation. 

The heart of the rate problem when 
it was attacked by Duluth through 
the splendid initiative and enterprise 
of the traffic commission of the Com- 
mercial club a few years ago is illus- 
trated by this: that through favorit- 
ism, helped by Duhith's neglect and 
by Duluth's too confident reliance on 
the "manifest destiny" of its strategic 
position, through rates by lake and 
rail from the Hast to the Twin Cities 
were so little greater than similar 
rates to Duluth that, in effect, the 
lleail of the Lakes and Duluth's ad- 
vantage of position had been taken 
up bodily and transplanted to the 
Twin Cities, a hundred and fifty miles 
away. 

It was against this throttling dis- 
crimination that Duluth took up anus, 
and it was in the breaking down of 
this discrimination that its splendid 
victory lay when the interstate com- 
merce commission decided in its 
favor. 

The effect of this decision Is illus- 
trated by the change it made in the 
spread on first class rates. The old 
spread between Duluth and the Twin 
Ciies on through traffic from the 
Kast was fifteen cents a hundred 
pounds, a figure that did not begin to 
pay the rail cost of transportation 
from Duluth to the Twin Cities. The 
order of the interstate commerce com- 
mission, by reducing the Duluth rat?, 
increased this spread to twenty-one 
cents; which brought the Head of tl;e 
Lakes pretty nearly back to Duluth — 
but not quite. 

But though it did not feel inclined 
to increase rates — the interstate com- 
merce commission had not yet real- 
ized that to produce exact justice it 
may often be necessary for it to in- 
crease unfairly low rates — the com- 
mission said that the rate to the Tv,in 
Cities ought to be higher than it is. 

And there's where the other half 
of the inheritance comes in. 

The lake lines, taking a hint from 
the commission's opinion of the Tvvi.n 
City rate, has raised that rate so that 
the spread on first class freight will 
be TWENTY-EIGHT CENTS in- 
stead of twenty-one cents as ordered 
by the commission, and instead of the 
old FIFTEEN CENTS. This, in- 
deed and in truth, BRINGS THE 
HEAD OF NAVIGATION BACK 
WHERE IT BELONGS— TO DU- 
LUTH. 

But the comparison on first class 
rates does not begin to tell the story. 
On second class traffic the increase 
in the spread is from thirteen cents 
to twenty-four cents; on third class 
traffic it is from nine cents to eigh- 
teen; on fourth class from five certs 
to thirteen; on fifth class from four 
to nine; and on sixth class from two 
to seven. 

This gloriously good news came a 
little late to be reckoned with the 
blessings catalogued on Thanksgiving 
day; but that is no reason why Duluth 
should not be thankful, nor why it 
should not give, full praise to the Com- 
mercial club and its traffic commis- 
sion for this very substantial victory 
in an epoch-making contest. 

Not the least significant thing 
about it is that in thus voluntarily in- 
creasing the Twin City rate as a 
measure of justice to Duluth, the lake 
lines are recognizing that Duluth is 
on the commercial map and must be 
considered. 

The interstate commerce commis- 
sion struck the shackles off one hand; 
the lake lines struck them off the 
other: Duluth now is free to reap the 
destiny that Providence designed for 
her. 



If you're real keen about Christmas 
giving, try giving the clerks an easy 
Christmas week by doing your shop- 
ping early. 



LIMIT THE KILL TO ANTLERED 
DEER. 

After surveying tiie statistics of the 
hunting season, The Herald feels pret- 
ty thoroughly converted to the cause 
of those who would have the game 
laws amended to limit the kill to two 
antlered deer. 

It is true that there are those who 
hold that it is no protection to pro- 



hibit the killing of female deer. We 
have not been able to experience con- 
viction from their arguments; but that 
point need not be pressed. 

It i5n't necessary to put this pro- 
posed game law on the ground of pro- 
tection to the game supply. 

It is reason enough for it if it is 
put on the ground of protection to 
human life and limb. 

Men may look like deer if they are 
careless in their apparel, and so get 
shot by careless hunters. 

BUT MEN DON'T WEAR ANT- 
LERS, and if very severe penalties 
are provided for those who shoot 
other than antlered deer, we have a 
notion that the number of fatalities 
next hunting season will be smaller. 



TjCss than threa weeks now before 
the days begin to lengthen again. It 
docs beat all how times keeps a-mov- 
Ing. 



THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS. 

President Wilson's address at the 
opening of the new session of con- 
gress when, in accordance with the 
Constitution, it is his duty to "give 
the congress information on the state 
of the Union," is refreshing and new 
and unconventional in several strik- 
ing ways: 

Instead of being solemnly sent by 
messenger and read by proxy while 
congress in joint session twiddles its 
thumbs or writes letters or otherwise 
discloses its inattention, it was given 
by the president in person and was 
listened to by every senator and rep- 
resentative present. 

Instead of being of interminable 
length and involved by muddy thought 
and muddy language and made com- 
plex by the repetition of half a dozen 
departmental reports, the address is 
crisp, pointed, succinct, clear as crys- 
tal and phrased in the simple, forceful 
language of a master of English; and 
the departmental report* are presented 
by themselves and the attention of 
congress called to them. 

Instead of an attempt to cover the 
whole ground — and the earth as well 
— in one voluminous, prolix and un- 
readable and unbearable message, the 
president considers only the points 
now calling for consideration, and an- 
nounced his intent to consider other 
points when their consideration is 
timely. 

The address — it is now called an 
"address" instead of a "message" — is 
a model of expression and a model of 
statesmanship. 

After noting with heartfelt sym- 
pathy and approval the growing 
tendency of civilized nations to resort 
to discussion and arbitration instead 
of war, the president passes rapidly 
on to the one little cloud in the na- 
tion's sky — Mexico. And of Mexico 
he speaks frankly and confidently: 
"Mexico has no government. The at- 
tempt to maintain one at the City of 
Mexico has broken down, and a mere- 
ly military despotism has been set up 
which has hardly more than the sem- 
blance of national authority." Huerta, 
the bloodstained, "has not succeeded. 
He has forfeited the respect and the 
moral support even of those who were 
at one time willing to see him suc- 
ceed. Little by little he has been com- 
pletely isolated. By a little everj' day 
his power and prestige are crumbling 
and the collapse is not far away. WE 
SHALL NOT, I BELIEVE, BE 
OBLIGED TO ALTER OUR POL- 
ICY OF WATCHFUL WAITING. 
And then, when the end comes, we 
shall hope to see constitutional order 
restored in distressed Mexico by the 
concert and energy of such of her 
leaders as prefer the liberty of their 
people to their own ambitions." 

He begs the senate to pass the cur- 
rency bill, "which the country waits 
with impatience," as speedily as pos- 
sible; yet he feels that the request is 
not needed. 

He directs the attention of congress 
to the need of a system of rural 
credits — financial legislation for the 
farmers which "will make their own 
abundant and substantial credit re- 
sources available as a foundation for 
joint, concerted local action in their 
own behalf in getting the capital they 
must use." 

The trust question is one of those 
that he promises to take up more in 
detail later on, but he submits that 
"the immeuiate service which we owe 
the country is to prevent private mo- 
nopoly more effectually than it has 
yet been prevented." The Sherman 
law should stand, "with its debatable 
ground around it," but this debatable 
ground should be reduced by further 
and more explicit legislation and by 
legislation which will clarify the Sher- 
man law and make it fairer to all con- 
cerned, as well as facilitate its ad- 
ministration. 

"It is of capital importance," he 
adds, "that the business men of this 
country should be relieved of all un- 
certainties of law with regard to their 
enterprise and investments, and a 
clear path indicated by which they 
can travel without anxiety." 

Congress is urged to provide a na- 

nal system of primary nomination 
of presidential candidates. 

Action toward the Philippines 
should be taken while holding stead- 
ily in view their ultimate indepen- 
dence, toward which we must move 
"as steadily as the way can be cleared 



aivl the foundations thoughtfully and 
permanently laid." 

For Alaska, better government and 
a government railroad to unlock its 
resources are urged. A wise and far- 
seeing view is disclosed as to con- 
servation: Resources must be used, 
not locked up. They must be used, 
"but not destroyed or wasted; used, 
but not monopolized upon any narrow 
idea of individual rights as against 
the abiding interests of communities." 

But read it. If you have fallen out 
of the good habit of reading presi- 
dent's messages, it is not surprising. 
This is a good time to get into it 
again, for these messages are easy to 
read, easy to understand, easy to sym- 
pathize with. They uisclose the "state 
of the Union" as few writers could 
disclose it. 



Speaker Rlnes Is out for the auditor- 
ship. Must be he thinks he'd prefer a 
job that lasts longer than just dur- 
ing the session. 



THE SCHOOL BUILDINGS AND THE 
PEOPLE. 

In at least one Duluth school where 
a social center has been established, 
it is planned to have a good old-fash- 
ioned New Year's watch night meet- 
ing on New Year's eve. The folks of 
the neighborhood will gather at the 
schoolhouse and enjoy themselves till 
the old year dies and the new year 
is born. 

That's a splendid idea. It is par- 
ticularly fine because it exemplifies 
the purposes and the possibilities of 
the schoolhouse social center, and be- 
cause it illustrates something that 
ought to be brought home to every 
citizen and every public servant: the 
fact that THE PEOPLE OWN THE 
SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

The idea is new to some, and may- 
be they will have a little difficulty in 
adjusting themselves to it. But it is 
the fact, and a very important fact. 

It isn't the school board that owns 
the school buildings. 

It isn't the teachers, or the prin- 
cipals, that own them. 

Not even the janitors own them. 

But THE PEOPLE OWN THEM, 
and this social center idea is a plan 
to give the owners of the school- 
houses a larger use of them than they 
have when they are closed and idle 
and useless all but seven hours every 
day, all but five days every week, and 
all but nine months every year. 

It is not a good business proposi- 
tion for the people to have so much 
capital tied up in a plant which is in 
use only during the small percentage 
of the time that constitutes "school 
hours." 

So the social center idea is being 
worked out so that the people may 
realize larger dividends on their in- 
vestment in the school plant; and it 
is possible because the people, and 
not the school board or the teachers 
or the janitors, own the buildings. 

Probably there is some slight in- 
convenience to some of these because 
the people are seeing fit to use their 
school buildings when they are not in 
use for school purposes. That is tr> 
be expected, and OF COURSE the 
school board and the principals and 
the teachers and the janitors will bear 
this inconvenience cheerfully, because 
they are the SERVANTS of the 
OWNERS of the buildings— the peo- 
ple. 

School social center work in Duluth 
is progressing splendidly, with an in- 
creasing participation in it on the part 
of the people. Many more are par- 
ticipating in a week now than took 
part during many weeks at first. 

Thus the people are showing an 
appreciation of the plan of getting 
larger dividends out of their property, 
the schoolhouses, and are getting used 
to a sense of proprietorship in these 
buildings. They ought to overlook 
no opportunit}' to show this appre- 
ciation, or to insist upon that pro- 
prietorship. 

The schoolhouses belong to the peo- 
ple, and it means a lot more than we 
can say that they are using that pro- 
prietorship wisely and are getting 
good out of it. 

It can never be said, so long as the 
school social centers are working, 
that there is no place for recreation 
or amusement in Duluth except the 
saloons, the dance halls and the 
streets. 



The next White House union that 
will attract widespread attention will 
be that of the Wilson signature and 
the currency bill. 



THE OPEN COURT 

(Readers of Thj Herald are Invited to make free 
use (.f this coluiun to express Uielr Ideas about the 
topics of geneml Interest, liut dlscusslma of sectarian 
rcllgloiia ditrertncee are barred. I^etters must not 
exceed 300 words— the shorter the lietter. Tliey must 
bo written on one side of the paper only, and they 
must be accompanied In every case by the name and 
address of the writer, though these need not be pub- 
lished. A slsued letter is always mure effective, liuw- 
eier. ) 



AN OPENING FOR A 

DEBATING SOCIETY. 



To the Editor of The Heralds 

What is the greatest invention? A 
says the electric light. B says wire- 
less telegraphy. C will have It as the 
airship. D. A. B. 

Duluth, Dec. 1. 



We hesitate. One month ago we 
would have said without pausing 
"blueberry pie." There Is no question 
in the mind of the editor of the hap- 
piness the invention of blueberry pie 
has brought to the human race, but 
with the approach of winter, and the 



Increasing burden of early rising, we 
hesitate, and lean toward the thermo- 
stat with the alarm clock attachment. 
When we lie In bed and feel the effects 
of this humble little Invention spread- 
ing genially through the house in the 
cold »ray d4wn jbt a winter morning, 
the delights of blueberry pie fade into 
the backgroand. Maybe some of The 
Herald readers have some ideas on this 
subject. If they have It's a case of 
"you may flfe when you are ready, 
Gridley." — The i-altor. 



ADVICE FOR THE NEVVLYWEDS. 



To the Editor of The -Herald: 

In your Open Court Saturday eve- 
ning was a communication from one 
Mr. Riley Jones and wife, being newly 
married, and out on their wedding trip, 
and figuring on Duluth as one of their 
stops. But having heard that two mar- 
ried couples got arrested, they were 
frightened and did not dare come to 
Duluth unless afforded protection. 

Now, Mr. Jones, you turned your 
proposition to the wrong paper. It is 
the News Tribune that Is trying to 
scare people with It» Jesse James 
stories about the police of Duluth. But 
cheer up. young man. The News Trib- 
une Is the one who scared you. and it 
is up to the News Tribune to protect 
you. Tou come to Duluth, and go to 
the Elgin hotel, and from there call 
up the News Tribune for protection, 
and you will get some reporter to keep 
himself In readiness if something 
should happen, and If you can get up a 
big story about the police trying to 
get you at the depot, on the street or 
some other place, you will sure have a 
chance to read about It on the front 
page of the News Tribune the mornln;? 
after, and probably see your picture 
there, too. You. Mr. Jones, will all at 
once leap into prominence. If j'ou are 
not already dead from the scare, you 
have a good chante to be a widely 
known man. C. F. WIDEN. 

West Duluth, Dec. 1. 



Experience in Congress 



(By Si'.voyard.) 



Washington, Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — As I have frequently 
souglit to say, the weakness of our 
parliamentary system in this great 
and glorious republic is the depend- 
ence of each, member of either house 
of congress on the supi>ort of a sin- 
gle constituency. It is true that any 
citizen eligible to a seat in the house 
of representatives may be chosen to 
that distinction from any district of 
the state of which he Is an Inhabitant. 
For example. "Old Den" Butler did not 
live In the district that repeatedly 
sent him to congress as a member 
from Massachusetts. Perhaps it would 
be too much to expect from people 
who knew him to send such a man 
to congress. 

In New York city representatives in 
congress are often chosen by constit- 
uencies among whom they do not re- 
side. There is a story that Amos Cum- 
mlngs offrred to bet Eourke Cockran 
a dinner that he could not ttnd his 
district after a day's search. 

• • • 

A groat Frenchman, about the head 
of his race as a man of letters, wrote: 
"Every profession has its hair-shirt 
and its tomahawk." And perhaps it 
Is truer of none more than politics, 
but there Is a fascination about It like 
that the candlife' has for the moth, like 
the dice for the gamrster. 

This winter and next spring and 
summer you are goMig to hear a heap 
about "rotation in oflClce." You will be 
told that Thomas Jefferson w-as the 
father of the idea. Now, Jefferson fa- 
vored frequent elections, but you will 
nowhere find that he was of opinion 
that a capable member of congress 
should give way for a succe.ssor sim- 
ply because he had served long. What 
would you think of a man who. want- 
ing to have a house built, would re- 
fuse the Job to an txrellent carpenter 
because ho had built enough houses 
and it was time for him to cease 
building houses and glvo another man. 
who had never built a house, a chance? 
Rotation in offce is as absurd as ro- 
tation in material Indu.stry or In the 
learned professions. Would you "ro- 
tate" a clergyman out of the pulpit 
with no rea-^on except the whim of the 
moment? How about a physician or 
a lawyer — would you discharge him 
solely In order to try a new man? 

• * « 

One of the leading men in con- 
gress today Is Mr. l^ordell Hull. He is 
a modest, retiring gentleman, very 
popular In the esteem of his fellow- 
flolons from every section. I do not 
suppose Mr. Hull has opposition for 
the renominallon by his party for a 
seat In the Sixty-fourth congress. But 
stranger things have happened, as 
when "Old Bill" Morrison, chairman of 
tlie w^ays and means commltee of the 
Forty-ninth congress, was deprived of 
his seat In the Fiftieth. 

And there Is Mitchell Palmer, who 
may succeed Oscar Underwood as 
leader of the . house. It would be In 
the nature of a crime If this man were 
made the victim of a "rotation." In 
Intellectual capacity, Swagar Sherley 
of Kentucky has no superior In the 
house of represetnativcs; as a debater 
he Is a match for any of them. He 
carries In his head a great reform, 
for we may give him credit for being 
the father of the movement for a 
"budget." the lack of which would 
have made bankrupt this people scores 
of times had not ours been the most 
productive country In the world. His 
speech on the subject of the budget 
stamped him as one of the profound- 
est thinkers now In public life. Is the 
nation to lose this man from the na- 
tional council because of a piece of 
cant called "rotation In office?" 

• * • 

This session of congress Henry 
Clayton will have In charge the meas- 
ure that will prove the most Impor- 
tant legislation — the regulation of the 
trusts. Mr. Clayton Is the chairman of 
the judiciary committee, In which po- 
sition he has not only shown a pro- 
found acquaintance with our jurispru- 
dence, especially the constitutional 
phase of it, but he Is also an able and 
adroit parlinmentary leader. If Clay- 
ton goes out It will be some time ere 
Alabama again gets the Judiciary com- 
mittee. 

I am Just speculating, trying to give 
warning. I do not suppose any one of 
the leaders I name has opposition for 
the party nomination. 

• • * 

Of course If you have a Calhoun, or 
a Webster., a Carlisle or a Ben Hill, 
a Thurman or a Vest, a Bryan or a 
Proctor Knott — wHy send him here. It 
is the place for him; but In my time 
T have known many a great man come 
here to this tc(wn with his mouth wide 
open w-ithout setting the Potomac 
af!re. Maybe the old stream is inflam- 
mable. 

Experience In public life Is a great 
\ U asset when possessed by a capa- 
ble representative In congress. 

: « 

Fi<fnnl SutTrage. 

Kansas Cit^ Journal: Equal suf- 
frage prevails In Mexico to a large 
extent. The women are not permitted 
to vote and the men are afraid to. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kelljr. 
H 

Washington, Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — When Ollie James, the 
world's largest United States senator. 
was a youngster down in Kentucky, 
he went one summer to visit some 
relatives on a farm. 

On the morning after his arrival, 
little Ollie was awakened by a rudo 
pounding on the door of one of the 
boys in the family. It was the father, 
and he made a remark that startled 
and totally unnerved Oilie. 

"Git up." said the father. "You've 
overslept yourself. It's almost 4 
o'clock." That afternoon he made 
some excuse to return home. 

* • • 

William Schley Howard, a crafty 
young congressman from down in 
Georgia, had a postmastership to fill, 
and there were. oh. a great many ap- 
plicants. Nearly every applicant rep- 
resented and was backed by a differ- 
ent political faction, and William 
Schley Howard saw that no matter 
whom he appointed he would succeed 
In making a lot of people mad at him. 
They they would go about trying for 
the hammer-throwing record, making 
fun of the way he walked, criticising 
his clothes, his views on baseball, and 
In every way possible making things 
unpleasant for the representative. 

About that time a fortunate thing 
happened. A woman applied for the 
Job. There is Juet a trace of suspicion 
that William Schley Howard hunted 
up the woman and coaxed her to seek 
the place, but that may be nothing 
more than Idle talk. At any rate she 
put In her application for the post- 
office, and the representative at once 
called a meeting of the other candi- 
dates. Said he: 

"Gentlemen. I had about decided on 
one of you — no need for me to say 
which one, for everybody knows which 
one of you is best fitted for the duties 
of the place — to be the postmaster. In- 
asmuch as I couldn't appoint you all, 
the logical thing to do seemed to be 
to name the man whose abilities tow- 
ered above all the others. (At which 
remark each and every one smiled 
pleasantly at the compliment.) But 
now an unexpected condition has 
arisen. A woman has applied for the 
place, a woman who Is capable and 
who says she needs the money. Nat- 
urally. I would not insult the chiv- 
alry of any one of you by even sug- 
gesting that a man here would be a 
party to barring a woman from a 
place that she wants. So I did the 
thing that T knew you would all want 
me to do. I recommended the appoint- 
ment of the woman. Isn't It a per- 
fectly lovely day?" 

And what could they do but agree 
that it was Indeed a pretty day? 

* * * 

One of the professional guides that 
abound In Washington saw Admiral 
Peary walking down the street the 
other day and he felt that he would 
burst If he didn't point him out to 
somebody. 

The nearest pedestrian happened to 
ho Jerry Mathews, of the New York 
Sun staff, and the guide rushed up to 
Jerry. 

"Sec that big husky man yonder?" 
says he, pointing: "that's the fellow 
that discovered the north pole." 

"Well, well," commented Jerry, who 
is a bit of a kiddcr, "and so that's old 
Doc Cook, eh?" 

The guide gave a snort of disgust 
and hastened on. 

* • • 

If Albert Sidney Burleson, the post- 
master general, is seen leaning back 
In his cliair. with corrugated brow 
and an expression of deep perplexity 
as he looks off Into space for a dis- 
tance of eight or nine miles, it does 
not necessarily follow that he Is con- 
centrating his thoughts on the prob- 
lems of the postoffice department. It 
Is just possible that he Is merely try- 
ing to make up ills mind what moving 
picture shows to attend that evening. 
For Burleson Is the most consistent 
movie-fan In official Washington. 

About the only fun the postmaster 
general has any more Is making the 
rounds of the picture shows. After the 
shades of night have fallen he starts 
out and goes from one to another of 
those gilded halls of the film. He 
stays only for the choicest part of the 
bill of fare at one place and then 
glides on to the next, applying much 
the same system as a man working a 
free lunch route. The moving pictures 
comprise Burleson's one major vice 
end he revels in it. Baseball he cares 
nothing about at all. and has never 
been to a big league game. The sight 
of strong men standing Idly In front 
of a scoreboard stirs his Ire until he 
almost desires to fight; yet he will go 
to a picture show an^ laugh cruelly at 
the misfortunes of a poor, weak- 
''villed W^lsh rabbit fiend in the throes 
of a nifrhtnare. 

All of which goes to show that If 
man escapes one form of vice only to 
become the victim of another, it avails 
him almost nothing. 

* • • 

Nearly every time the newspaper 
correspondents get an audience with 
the president, they are rewarded by 
hearing him spring offhand at least 
one good joke. 

The other day some one asked the 
president If he were contemplating a 
trip to the Panama canal. 

"No." he said. "It had been planned 
that I should see it before the water 
went Into It. But now that the canal 
Is full (pause) It probably is not a fit 
thing to associate with." 

It must have been extemporaneous, 
for how could the man have known 
anybody was going to ask about the 
canal? 
(Copyright. 1913, by Fred C. Kelly. All rlghu reserTed.) 



Elect a Legislature 

Pledged to Action 



TIio State Press on the 1 
zatlon for Kconom 



ssue of State Ueorganl- 
i and Efflelency. 



Twenty Years Ago 

ftom The Herald of this date, ISM, 



Tainted News 



Kansas City Star: A European news 
agency, which supplies foreign news- 
papers with telegraphic^ news, recently 

established a financial publicity depart- 
ment. Then It Issued a circular in 
which It said that It was able to get 
for Its clients extended editorial men- 
tion In newspapers. This meant that it 
would undertake to get advertising 
matter published as straight news. 

The announcement was a virtual no- 
tification that its news was tainted. 
The London newspapers protested, and 
a statement was given out that the cir- 
cular was "unauthorized." 

The episode has led to the discovery 
that the most important foreign news 
agencies have advertising connections 
from which they derive an important 
share of the revenue. These connec- 
tions menace the Independence of their 
news service. 

In the United States the great news 
organizations have been absolutely 
free from any suspicion of this sort of 
taint. The Associated Press, for In- 
stance, would not tolerate for a mo- 
ment an employe who was suspected 
of trying to "boost" somebody's game. 
Its news Is above suspicion. 

The only danger of tainted news to 
American readers comes from Indi- 
vidual newspapers w^hlch happen to be 
controlled by moneyed interests or by 
unscrupulous owners. 



irs \%'ork, Not Itm So 

Roseau Region: 1 
mission appointed b 
hart to devise w^aj 
conducting the state 
financial basis was n 
ed by those in oppc 
ernor. While the oj 
that something mus 
the growing tax ra 
arisen to the comm 
appears to a man ui 
the opposition dev« 
cause the governor 
ment. The leglslatu 
slon prevented the li 
state's expenditures 
proposing a reorgar 
terests of econom 
Since the session se 
Influential papers of 
pally among which 
Herald, suggested t 
the leading issue in 
paign. 



urcr. Should Count. 

Evidently the com- 
y Governor Eber- 
s and means for 
on A safe and sane 
Dt what was want- 
sitlon to the gov- 
linion was general 
t be done to curb 
te, opposition has 
ssion plan and It 

a tree as though 
loped simply be- 
made the appolnt- 
re at the last ses- 
ivestlgation of the 

with a view to 
Izatlon in the In- 
r and efficiency, 
veral of the most 

the state, prlncl- 

was The Duluth 
hat this be made 

the coming cam- 



•**Capt, Wolvln was the fin-^t one to 
discover the fire at the Listman mill at 
Superior yesterday. He heard a dull 
sort of concussion as he was passing 
the mill and started to give the alarno, 
but before anyone got to the scene of 
the flre, the automatic sprinklers had 
got in their work and the whole place 
was deluged with water. All the wheat 
In the elevator was damaged by smolte 
and water. 



This From II 

Mora Times: Th< 
In endeavoring to p 
blllty for extravaj 
upon Governor Eberl 
ernor "should be 
ager" of the state, 
plans for good gove 
no brief for Governo 
do not believe it 
against him that he 
time to urge upon 
the departments or 
proper economies, 
speeches will show 
any other governor 
by butting Into th 
other officials, elect* 
Is by tho vote of tl 
lematlcal. We belle 
offices where, if 
would be politely ii 
own business. — St. F 

Naturally, the go^ 
no business "buttinj 
of other elective s 
there are many stat 
heads of whicii wen 
governor. It certair 
and his duty as wei 
departments are run 
Ically. It Is a slngi 
the appointive offl 
been the most pers! 
mands for Increast 
their departments, t 
legislature will testi 



(Miry nines. 

( liuffalo Journal, 
lace the responsl- 
rant expenditures 
lart, says the gov- 
the general man- 

and a leader In 
rnment. We hold 
r Eberhart, but we 

can be charged 

has failed at any 
the legislature or 

in other places 
His messages and 
that. What he or 

could accomplish 
e departments of 
a as the governor 
e people. Is prob- 
ve we could name 
ne tried that, he 
ivited to mind his 
aul Times, 
'ernor would have 
r" into the affairs 
tate officials, but 
9 departments, the 
> appointed by the 
ly is his privilege 
1 to see that such 

well and econom- 
ilar fact that It Is 
cials which have 
stent in their de- 
d allowances for 
s members of the 

ry. 



•♦•A Sault Ste. Marie dispatch say* 
there is continued cold and the ice in 
Mud lake is two and a half inches 
thick. There are thirty boats in L.ake 
Superior yet to come down. 



•••Selleck. the drug man. ha? leased 
the Clarendon hotel at the corner of 
Garfield avenue and Superior street, 
and will fit it up as a tenement house, 
for which the building is well adapted. 



•••The new hotel at Virginia, re- 
cently built by P. H. McGarry. w^lll be 
ready for opening by Jan. 1 next. 



•••Ben Richards, who is employed at 
the incline power house, was injtired 
yesterday by falling from a scaffold, a 
heavy tackle blcclc dropping on his 
leg. 



•••R. C. Heydlnuff of A.shland, for- 
merly a Dulutli newspaper man. Is at 
the Merchants. 



•••M. C. .Scully. James Maloney. Jo- 
seph Fay and John Maloney, a jolly 
quartet from Marquette, who have 
been making the Merchants their head- 
quarters, returned home last night. 



•••At yesterday's meeting of the di- 
rectors of the chamber of commerce. 
Secretary S. A. Thompson's resigna- 
tion was received and accepted to take 
effect Dec. 5. J. C. Mi.'^chler wa.s ap- 
pointed secretary pro tem. 



L,et»« Have Efllclenpy Anyrray. 

Cambridge Independent-Press: State- 
wide public utilities will be an issue In 
the next campaign. Efficiency and 
statewide public utilities law go hand 
in hand. 



That's True of »Io»t Counties — If Not 
AD. 

Breckenrldge Telegram: Under Eber- 
hart's administration it Is costing the 
county of Wilkin more money for the 
support of the state than it does to run 
the affairs of the cojnty. 



Undoubtedly the Bent Boost. 

Albert Lee Tribure: Boosting Min- 
nesota Is all right. But really the best 
boost that could b? given the state 
would be an efficle it and economical 
state government. 



Tliey Are In 

Cambridge Indepe 
trenchment In state 
and Is bound to co 
two sources of state 
cannot be lessened, 
and good road funds 
pered with. No mai 
ment is made along > 
payer will stand fc 
funds for the Improv 
ways and the ma 
schools. 



no Danger. 

ndent-Prcss: Re- 
taxes Is all right 
■ne. but there are 
tax expense that 
The public school 
must not be tam- 
ter how retrench- 
)ther lines, no tax- 
r diminishing the 
ement of our hlgh- 
Intenance of our 



•••President A. G. Lane and Secre- 
tarj' Irwin Shephard of the National 
Educational association arrived in Du- 
luth yesterd.ay to confer with those 
back of the movement to get the next 
convention of the association for Du- 
luth and to get a bettor idea of what 
this city can and will do. They held a 
conference at Supt. Denfeld's office 
with President Spencer of the city 
council. Secretary Buchanan of th© 
Jobbers' ui.lon, .'ohn Par. ton. W. A. 
Pryor, E. J. Luther and others. 



•••J. J. Murphy of St. Paul, the well- 
known representative of P. H. Kelly, is 
at the Spalding. 



It Is to Be H< 

Greenbush Tribun 
to be something doli 
slon of the leglslatui 
reforming the state 
to do away with m 
missions and employ 
ernment costs a pi 
while a large part c 
Is used wisely, still 
that much could be i 
slon of "Efficiency i 
produce results. 



>ped It Will. 

e: There is likely 
ig at the next ses- 
•e on the matter of 

government so as 
any needless com- 
es. Our state gov- 
le of money, and 
f the money spent 

there is no doubt 
;aved. Tlie discus- 
.nd Economy" wUi 



■HV Are Cictting Brtt«^r. 

Christian Herald: Morality is always 
a generation or two ahead of legality. 

The number of offenses against 
the moral and legal codes is increas- 
ing constantly. 

Moral principle never cut so large 
a figure in the affairs of this American 
people as it does today. 

We have twenty moral qualms 
where our godly ancestors had 
one. 

It never occurred to them that 
a lottery was wrong, or that it was 
wicked to drink whisJky, or to whip 
a child or a wife, or to enslave tlie 
black man or cheat the red man. 

Nine out of ten of the little con- 
scientious niceties of life are dis- 
coveries of the last fifty years. 

More societies to do all sorts of 
good and work all kinds of reforms 
have been created in the last two 
generations than had been formed or 
thought of before from the bcgiunlng 
of the world. 

We are getting better. No doubt 
about it. 

But there is still plenty of room for 
improvement. 



Xothlng For Them. 

Kansas City Star: "There Is noth- 
ing in this reform business." say the 
politicians. There is nothing in it for 
them. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



A Good "Overshi 

St. Peter Herald: 
affairs Is to be the 
sue of the next can 
was raised by The I 
that paper Is to be < 
stand it took. 



idoiving Issine.** 

Economy In state 
overshadowing Is- 
ipaign. The issue 
)uluth Herald, and 
ommended for the 



Mrs. L.oft-. 

Mrs. Lofty keeps a ' 

So do I; 
She has dapple graj 

None ha 
She's no prouder wi' 

Than an 
With my blue -eyed, 

Trundlin 
I hide his face lest 
The cherub boy and 



r and I. 

carriage. 



s to draw it, 

ve I; 

h her coachman 

1 I 

laughing baby, 

g by; 

she should see 

envy me. 



Her fine husband has white fingers. 

Mine has not; 
He could give his bride a palace — • 

Mine a cot; 
Hers comes home beneath the starlight, 

• Ne'er cares she; 

Mine comes in the purple twilight. 

Kisses nie. 
And prays that He who turns life's 

sands 
Will hold His loved ones In His hands. 

Mrs. Lofty has her jewels. 

So have [; 
She wears hor.s upor her bosom — 

Inside I; 
She will leave hers at Death' =» portal. 

By and by; 
I shall bear my treasures with me 

When I die; 
For I have love and she has gold: 
She courts her wea! th — mine can't be 
told. 

She has those who love her station. 

None ha^'e I; 
But I've one true htart beside me — 

Glad am I; 
I'd not change it for a kingdom. 

No, not I; 
God will weigh it In His balance. 

By and by; 
And the difference define 
'Twixt Mrs. Lofty's xrealth and mine. 
— .Author unknown. 



What Fath 

Life: The propos 
make a "Father's D 
day seems only fair 
a holiday for the mc 
urged. — Hartford Co 

The great difflci 
father oft for a da 
value of an experlr 
give him no mental 
er really needs, is 
physical change as i 
needs his bills paid 
the children kept 
square meals wlthoi 
plications. If evi 
grocers, landlords, 
would let up on fa 
that would be the 
"Father's Day." 



er Needs. 

al In congress to 
ay" national holl- 
If they make such 
thers, as has been 
urant. 

Ity with letting 
y is the doubtful 
lent which would 

rest. What fath- 

not so much a 
I mental one. He 
, and mother and 

quiet, and three 
t any mental com- 
jrybody — butchers, 

milliners, etc. — 
ther for one day, 

right kind of a 



LYCEUM I 



Last Time 
Tonight 



OXIS SKINNER 



— IX — 



"KISM 




Prices, 60c to $2.00. 



\^'ed., 1 to 11 p. m., Maude Fraly 
In a Photoplay of Oui d a'a "Motha." 

TharMday, Friday and Saturday — 
Charlotte Walker In "The Trail of 
the Lenesome Pine." 

Sunday, Matinee and Night, 
Li. Kantor l*reMent« 

Prleen 25e to 91.00. Sentn melllng. 



NEW 



Both Phones 2416 




TB EATER 

Second Ave. E. and Superior St. 
A l.L. THIS l^KEK. 

PAUL CONCHAS. 

Kenney-Nobody and I'latt. 

The Four Original IVrex. 

Alma Youlln. 

WilllaniR, Thompiion .-ind Copelaiid. 

UanderM and Millliss. 

loleen Ststerx. 

FxcIumItc moving: pictures, "Sophie'* 

Hero." 

Matinee Daily — BeKt SeatM, 25c: 
Nights, 10c, 25e, 50o and 75e. 



EMPRESS noDAY 



and WED. 



VAUDEVIM.E. 



RKIFF BROS, and MISS MURRAY 
In Songs and Dances. 



WOODWARD. 



ROSE and SEVERNS. 

The Great Four 
RICHARD YAXOSS TROUPE. 

Coming Tlinrnday — •■THE HEART- 
BREAKERS," with Curtis Cook- 
mey. SeutM selling. 



THE REX 



TODAY 



H 



LADY BABBIE 

In three reels, 

FeatnrlnK Barbara Tennant. 

ADMISSION 10c. 



99 



— - — .- 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 

5 



i 



Wlm 



.>; 



, 



■I 



- r«- 



\ 




-* 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



9 



BURNS' LAST 
POEiHIS FOUND 



John Gribbel of Philadelphia 1 1 
Has Manuscript 
Volumes. 



Will Restore Them to Scot- 
land By Deed of 
Trust. 





ilt ,TtJ 



Y OIL II Do Better at Kelly s! 



5 tore 



1 



OU will find this Big New Store brimful of Practical 
Christmas Gifts; the kind that will give actual service 
and be a lasting reminder of the giver. 



iV 



Philn.Mphia. Dec. 2— Mystery con- 
cerning the whereabouts of the Glen- 
rlddoll manuscripts of the poet Burns, 
which were sold by the Athenaeum 
library of Liverpool last summer and 
for which a committee of Scots in 
England and Scotland have been 
searching, was cleared up here last 
niKht when John Mribbtl. vice presi- 
dent of the I'hllndelphia I'ublic Ledger 
and HPsorlated in the Courtis Tubiish- 
Ing < onipany, announced tiiat the two 
volumes were In his possession. 

Mr »;ribbel made the announcement 
at a dinner of the St. Andrew society. 
He said he had purchased the manu- 
Bcripts from a dealer, and that ho 
would restore thtm to Scotland, for- 
ever protected by a deed of trust, as a 
pift to the people who gave Robert 
Hums to the world, ^^ . 

As he finished speaking, the two 
quarto volumes, bound In old polished 
calf, were removed from a steel and 
fireproof box and laid before the 

guests. 

Manascrlpt Volnme*. 

Mr Gribbel recounted how Burns, 
between 1788 and 179^ prepared a 
manuscript volume containing his se- 
lected poems, finished as he wanted 
them known to posterity, and also a 
volume containing his manuscript let- 
ters. He also told of Burns* presenting 
them to his friend, Riddell. or <ilen- 
rlddfll. Riddell dl'd in 1794 and his 
widow returned them to Burns. In 
1863 the volumes came Into the pos- 
session of the Liverpool Athenaeum 
library, where they remained for sixty 
years. 

Continuing, Mr. Gribbel said: 

"During the past summer the Eng- 
lish-reading world was shocked to 
read in the public press that the au- 
thorities of the Liverpool Athenaeum 
had sold these priceless treasures. Ef- 
forts were made to stop the transfer of 
the volumes, but the delivery had been 
made, and In the excitement they dis- 
appeared with the unidentified buyer : 
unhin.clcred. Two weeks after I was 
k'stonl.-Ahed by having a dealer come | 
to Philadelphia and submit ,to me for . 
Bale the missing mal^u"scrlp^. I re- 
fused to consider them as any posses- 
sion of my own, priceless though they 
are. But gentlemen, here they are, i 
sold as m^-rchandlse in the market 
place, and in my possession, but witli 
a purpose which I am sure you will 
approve. 

Belonged to Bonnie Jean. 

"These manuscripts, after the death 
of Burns, were the property of Bonnie 
Jenn. She lent them to Dr. Gurrle 
(who wrote a life of the poet) and 
those who came after him had no 
stronger title to them. To whom then | ■ 
do they now belong by right but tho ' 
Scotland, whose chief possession mnv 
Is tlie glory of her Immortal son? 

Mr. Gribbel explained that he has 
not yet decided to which institution in 
Scotland the manuscripts should bo 
presented, but that he had communi- 
cated Avith Lord Roseberry, who had 
been active last summer on the com- 
hilttee of Scots who were attempting to | 
prevent the sale of the volumes. 



^^^xr You need not spend a lot of money for practical gifts— we have a large assortment ranging 
^^in price from one dollar upwards. If you haven't the ready cash, use our credit department. 
You will find it a great help at this time. We'll arrange terms to suit you. 

Telephone S tands Smokers' S tands Toulaud Ilivites LUtlC FolUs 

Vn,.th»^r nrartical eift. Phone Smokers' Stands in fumcd, golden, _ JJ _ ^ _ ,.,,_... .,„i._ -„.i.:„_ .u„:,o ..f.i^. 



Kelly's 3'Room 
Outfit 

Terms— $1.50 Per Week 



$ 



• • • • • 



69 




Breakfast 
Tables 

A drop leaf table in oak or ma- 
hogany, has a great many uses. 
They arc used as a dining room 
table in small quarters or com- 
bination library and dining 
table. They also make excel- 
lent card tables as they take up 
but little room when not in use. 
We have them at all prices 
ranging iii)vvards from 

$6.50 to $60 



Another practical gift. Phone 
Stands complete with separate 
scat which fits under stand form- 
ing part of it when not in use. 
They come in fumed oak, ma- 
hogany and early English finishes. 

'^:i'/!.!'.'::'l!'. $4.85 



Smokers' stands in fumed, golden, 
early English and mahogany fin- 
ishes. A large assortment of de- 
signs to select from; some with 
till lined compartments for cigars 
and others plain. We have 
them as low ^t 70 



A complete stock of toys, children's desks, rocking chairs, tables, 
sleds, dolls and dolls' furniture, games, etc., are very complete. Buy 
early while the S'.dections are good.— Elevator, Third Moor. 



Doll Carts Rocking Chairs 




Writing Desks 

Practical Writing Desks, all 
Avoods and finishes in the sea- 
son's newest patterns. A large 
stock to select from. 

Special for this week's sell- 
ing — A number of desks in oak, 
mahogany and bird's-eye maple 
finishes. Special designs ; worth 
from $11 to $12.50— Kelly's 
price for this week — 



Security Voucher 

\/ oting C^ pntest 

A€k Beautiful Bisque JSJC^ 
HriJ HeadDressedDolls^ZF 

o Be Given Away as a Christmas Gift 




We have a 
large line of 
perambulators 
an«l collapsible 
doll carts, and 
are offering a 
nice little cart 
with hood and 
rubber tires 

^t, QQn 

each. .^iJ\^ 




LILAC BUSHES 

ARE BUDDING 

Signs of Spring Seen in 

Duluth-Old-TimersSay 

''Warmest Ever." 



wm% 



mmm 



mm 



Globe Wernicke 
Book Cases 

Since everyone prefers to receive practical 
things, and since everyone reads, why not 
deliglit somebody with a beautiful Globe 
Wernicke Sectional Book Case this Christ- 
mas? Ideal for home and office alike. See 
our special Globe Wernicke Book Case 
consisting of three units, a^op and Jia.sc 
as shown here 
for 



Forty-nine little girls to be made happy at Christmas time by each 
receiving one of the 49 Beautiful Bisque Head Dressed Dolls offeied 
In this contest. 

How to Secure One of the Beautiful Dolls 

Any slrl from babyhood to 15 years of affo can cnt*^ tho oontost. 

Each Security Voucher now in possession of collectors no matter 
from whom received and each Security Voucher received by collectors 
up to and IneludlnK December 20th entitles the holder to tv^o (2) 
votes for each voucher. 

Voting Contest Closes Dec. 20th, 1913 

Thfl cirl receiving the greatest number of votes will receive an 
ex?ra large and pr<ftty drcLed doll 33 inches in size The 48 gl r Is 
who receive the next largest number of votes will each receive a tine 
dressed doll 20 inches In size. _ _^ ^ ^ c,^ ^ 

These dolls are on exhiblton at Froimuth's Department Store. 

How and Where to Cast Your Vote 

For convenience of tho public a voting booth h^;^s been established 
at Frcimuth's Department Store, where all votes will be cast. 

All you have to do Is bring your Security Vouchers to Freimuth-s 
where your vouchers will be counted, then you east your vote and your 
vouchers are immediately returned to you. As you receive more 
vouchers from time to time, regardless of whom the merchant is you 
deceive tiiem from, bring them Into Freimuth's to vote when it .stilts 
your convenience. But be sure to have all your vouchers voted by 
December 20th, as that is the date the contest closes. 

The name and address of girl voted for and also the name and ad- 
drS of Tarty voting will be written on the ballot and the same de- 
uress oi p ^^gj^^jj ,^ ^ sealed box which will not be 
opened until the contest is over, when the bal- 
lots will be counted by a committee to bo an- 
nounced later on. 




If you have 
a little tot in 
the house you 
can make it 
happy with 
one of these 
little red 
Rockers, bent 
wood back and 
arm, three 
spindle back. 
A Holiday 
bargain 

each. .^■■J/C' 




Mechanical 
Trains 

The toy that pleases all 
of the children, circular 
track, made in four sec- 
tions; train consists of 
engine, tender and pas- 
senger coach, nici'ly deco- 
rated and stripec, in col- 
ors. A regular 75c value. 
Holiday special, /iCkg* 
complete ttJ/C^ 



Carron Boards 



Tlic game board that gives 
pleasure to every member of the 
family, buy these early, as the 

iiiand for these goods will be 
heavy. Prices range from $2.50 
and upwards. 





These Dolls Are on Exhibition 
at Freimuth's Dept. Store 




While the ppople 'n cltUs Last and , 
South are said to be getting out the . ] 
summer clothes and ^^^^^^l^^^l'^^J^,}}^ 
luthlana have ju.st as much to be proud 
of I'eavts «.n the lUac bushes are 
budding and other signs of spring ure 
In evidence In the city. 

The old pioneers of the city, who 
have s^en many a hard winter, say 
that the weather which has prevailed 
J« T.nluth for the last few weeks have 
neAr been eQualled In thl.. part of the 
country In fact, ."ome of them say 
?lmt the weather this fa 1 has been 
«.«..r.->.si. tunn ever before in tnis tii>. 
Tuh Deiomber sLrtlnK in there ls.Vt 
r trace of snow to be found, and the 
ttir Is warm and balmy. 
* Duh.Th has long been "oted as a 
Kumnur r-surt. but many are begln- 
K to see that the falls are just as 
delightful as the summers. 



Leather Rockers 

A big comfortable Rocker covered 
with. genuine leather is a gift appreciated 
by all. We have them here in all the 
new styles and in the various colors of 
leather. 

SPECIAL— See the rockers in genuine 
Spanish leather, large size; oil tem- 
pered springs, broad arms and comfort- 
able back; worth $35.ai Kelly's price— 

$24.75 



$11.75 Morris Chairs 

Arts and Crafts Morris 
Chairs. Massive frames of 
solid oak in the genuine fumed 
finish. They have broad arms 
and comfortable backs. Loose 
cushions that can be reversed. 
Covered with Boston brown 
Spanish leather, made plain 
without tufting. They will not 
sag or get out of shape. See 
these wonderful values at Kel- 
Icy's price of 




$21.50 




Music Cabinets 

A gift that will be appreciated by- 
music lovers. A large assurtment in 
all woods and finishes. 

This week we are offering a hand- 
some design in mahogany or oak 
finishes; has four shelves and sep- 
arate drawer. There is a large 
panel door fitted w-ith bronze catch. 
See these beautiful pieces, worth 
$9.25, Kelly's price — 



$6.95 



Your Credit Is Good 



Fancy Table Covers 

Table Covers and Runnora, In French Velours. tapes.triep .nnd embroid- 
ered silks In beautiful colorings at special prices from $2.00 to Jji'J.OO each. 

Leather Goods Fancy PUiow Top 



Fancy Hand I'lnlshod Goat Skin 
Table Covers, In red. green, brown 
and tans, Bpecial, $2.50 each. 

Two-tone effects and Spanish fin- 
ish bides at $3.09 each. 



Imported French Velour and 
Tapestry S<iuaros, suitable for ta- 
ble covers and pillow top.s, special 
at $1.50 and $1.75 each. 

Fancy Imported French Silk Pil- 
low Covor.s very decorative, spe- 
cial at $2.00 to $3.50 each. 



Stewart Heaters & Ranges 

Come in and select your Stewart Heater or R;^"f ^"^ 
we'll deliver it at once. Terms, $1.0() down and ?1.U0 
per week and we'll take your old stove as part payment. 




*jii mw 



===^^j2^M^iMmm^M 



y -.i.i. i -- 



Elwell Kitchen Cabinets 

A kitchen cabinet makes an ideal gift for the 
lady of the house. They save time and money 
and range in price from $15.00 upwards. 




Six-Seasons' 
Successjul 

Tailoring 

is the record of " Shark- Craft 
quality ' ' shop. 

Each season showing an in- 
crease over the preceding one 
and NOT ONE PART 
OF THAT BUSINESS 
GAINED BY "REDUC- 
TION PRICE SALES"- 
biit irained by givin^ Honest, 
Dependable Merchandise at a 
price you can afford to pay. 
ORDER FROM A TAILOR 
WHO IS A TAILOR- 

We do not believe in Re- 
duction Price" Sales because 
we know that when the price 
of a Suit or Overcoat is re- 
duced the garment was not 
worth the original asked price. 
Therefore— when you have a Suit 
or Overcoat Tailored to your indi- 
vidual order in the "Shark- Craft 
Quality" shop-made by the 
''Shark Craft Quality" methods 
you get a garment that is Honestly 
Tailored in every respect. 
$30 to $50 Full Dress and Tuxedo. 
$50 to $ 75 No Better Clothes Tail- 
ored at Higher Prices. 

"Knowing" dressers wear "Shark- 
Craft Quality" Clothes made in the 

Shark-Craft 
Quality Shop 

by H. A. Shark, Prop. 
328 West First Street. 






ARE GUESTS OF 

THE ROTARY MEN 

Soo Line and Western Ex- 
press Officials Attend 
Meeting. 

Officials of the Soo Line railroad and 
the Western Kxpress company were 
guests of honor and speakers at the 
weekly meeting of the Puluth Rotary 
club, which was held last evening at 
the Soo Line station. 

At 6 30 o'clock dinner was served 
on the' second floor of the handsome 
new station at which covers were laid 
for 105. The banquet was furn shed 
and served by the Soo Line's dlnmg 

'■"ra^nk'^'E. Randall, president of the 
RotLry club, surrend^.red his favel to 
' George A. Sherwood, general agent 
for the Soo Line in Duluth and the 
latter acted as toastmaster for the oc- 
casion. „.„„„ T -p 

Among the speakers were J. I^ 
Oehrev city passenger agent for tne 
Soo Lfne. Robert Chubb, agent for the 
Western Exprtss company in Duluth 
^d a number of other visiting rail- 
road and express company officials. 

Among the visiting officials were 
vr M Lewis, assistant general passen- 
!;;r ncent for the Soo Line with head- 
^ Ltfrs at St Paul: P. E. McDonald. 
^Wcaio gcnfral s^upermtendent of the 
^iTt^^'n Express company; S. A^ Davis 

flr/%f' pTuT"^ S^agent'^an'^- W. 'h. 
^^"ntfsh.'^'MarQuette. Mich.. route 

^^Dur'ing the evening the Rotarlans 
were delighted with a musical pro- 
gram rendered by the Scottish RIU^ 
Quartette, assisted by Prof. A. F. M. 

Gustance. 

-♦ 

Fargo N. D.. Dec. 2.— (Special to The 
1 neraId.)-From now until March 1 no 

realty transfers can be filed unless the 
1 [axes"^ are paid. Under the old riUe 

deeds could be recorded up till the time 
\ the taxes became dellnciuent. March }■ 
1 Under the new law they must be paid 



from Sept. 1. the date upon which they 
become due! This will compel early 
tax payments on all lands sold for the 
next three months.^ 

expec Tbusy year. 

North Dakota Building Contractors 
Look for I^Huch Activity in 1 914. 

Grand Forks, N. D.. Doc. 2.— (Special 
to Tho Herald.) — North Dakota con- 
tractors expect to see the 191i build- 
ing season one of the most active in 
recent years, and already preparations 
are being mado with that obJ»ct In 
view. Several big building jobs have 



How to Cure Rheumatism 

Prominent Doctor'n Bent Prescrip- 
tion Knslly Mixed at Home. 



already been announced, and contrac- 
tors say more are In store. Good crop 
conditions this year, tho building up 
of new commercial centers, couplea 
with the constant increase In ine 
state's population, are features that 
will contribute towards making ine 
1U14 season decidedly active. 

One of the biggest l>ull^*"?J°^^.,°' 
the year is being carried out this win- 
ter, at Hebron, where the Hebron 
Pressed Brick company is construct- 
ing a big plant, expecting to establish 
an Industry that will employ about 

Telephone and electrical construc- 
tion work include the efta^.^*?*^'"'!.^"^ 
of a telephone line out of M nto. one 
out of Douglas, one out of Elgin and 
one out of Stanley. New electrical 
plants are proposed at *?^(J^"' 
Tagus. Drake. La Moure and Lisbon. 
Practically all the electrical installa- 
tion work will be done next y^a^- .„,, 

The campaign for raising a J50.000 
fund for the construction of a hospital 
in Mlnot is moving ahead rapidly. 



C. Thompson, Blackduck- J. C. Dade 
Blackduck; Bf. L. Oberg Blackduck; J 
M. Reed, Blackduck; Charles Hayden, 
Blackduck; Charles Trondson, Black- 
duck; Judge C. W Stanton I\ S^Ly- 
can. E. H. Denu. A. P- ^^'t/hle. W. B. 
Stewart. F. A. Wilson. T- J. Curke T. 
A. McCann. H. C. Baer and A. P. White, 

all of Bemidjl. 

• — 

FarKO Cai»c Settled. 

Fargo. N. D.. Dec. 2. — (Special to The 
Herald.)-.Suing for $730, W. a John- 
son settled with Former Sheriff Boyle 
for half that sum before the case canie 
up for trial. During the time Boyle 
was sheriff. Johnson was Jailer. He 
stated ho worked for his board ana 
that the sheriff drew ?30 per month for 

the work he did. 

— . * 

Woman Fatally Burned. 

Redwood Falls. Minn., Dec. 2.— Strik- 
ing a match in a room where a girl 
was cleaning clothes with gasoline re- 
sulted in the death of Mrs. S. A. John- 
son of Vesta. 60 years old, and serious 
burns to her husband and two chll- 



Dade. I dren. Tho husband sustained terrible 
' burns about ;he head and hands and is 
in a serious condition. It Is believed 
the children will recover. Neighbors 
prevented tho fire from destroying the 
residence. 



This simple and harmless formula 
has worked wonders for all who have 
tried It. quickly relieving chronic and 
acute rheumatism and backache. "From 
your druggist get one ounce of Torls 
compound (in original sealed package) 
and one ounce of syrup of Sarsaparilla 
compound. Take these two Ingredi- 
ents home and put them in a half pint 
of good whisky. Shake the bottle and 
take a tablespoonful before each meal 
and at bed-time." Good results come 
after the first few doses. If your drug- 
gist does not have Torls compound in 
stock he will get it for you in a few 
hours from his wholesale house. Don't 
be Influenced to take a patent medi- 
cine Instead of this. Insist on having 
the genuine Torls compound in the 
orlg'nal. one-ounce, sealed, yellow 
package. This was published here last 
winter and hundreds of the worst 
cases were cured by It in a short time. 
Published by the Globe Pharmaceutical 
laboratories of Chicago^ 

Stop Foot Torture 

Corns, Calloases, Boniong, 
rro«t-bltcB, Achlnsr and Sweaty 
Feet. A spoonful of CALOCIDB I 
In a warm foot-batli gives In- 
stant relief. If used freQuently 
brine" permanent cure. Get A 
S6o box »( tkixf drug «toxe. 



DIRIECTORY 
CLOSES 



DEC. 5th, 
1913 




NAMES MINOT MAN. 

C. A. Grow Is Appointed By Governor 
on State Higtiway Commission. 

Fargo. N. D.. Dec. 2.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— At the meeting of the state 
highway association it was announced 
that Governor Hanna has named C. A. 
Grow of Minot as a member of the 
state highway commission. The otner 
two members are the governor and the 
state engineer ex-ofllclo. Mr «row Is 
widely known as an advocate of good 
roads. 

BEMIDJ I ALL READY. 

Beltrami County Seat Prepared to 
Entertain the N. M. D. A. 

BemldJl. Minn.. Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Preparations are about 
completed for entertaining the North- 
ern Minnesota Development association 
here Thursday and Friday. It Is ex- 
pected that all of the counties Jn the 
terrttory will be well represented. Bel- 
trami delegates have been selected as 
follows: J. U. Williams. Baudette; O. 
E ?:rlckson. Spooner; Willlan Lennon. 
Kel-ilier; William Bource, Kelliher; J. 



Get This for Colds 

PreMcrlptton for Poniti^e KeKUltii 
Von't Kxpcrlment. 



Subscribe now and get your name 
in the book. CALL GRAND No. 
J FOR ANY CHANGE. 

ilium TELEPHONE CO. 



II! 



"From your druggist get two ounces 
of Glycerine and half an ounce of 
Globe Pine Compound (Concentrated 
Pine). Take these two Ingredients 
home and put them into a half pint of 
good whisky. Shake well. Take one 
to two teaspoonfuls after each meal 
and at bed time. Smaller doses to 
children according to age." This is 
said to be the quickest cough and cold 
cure known to the medical profession. 
Be sure to get only the genuine Globe 
Pine Compound (Concentrated Pine). 
Each half ounce bottle comes in a tin 
screw-top sealed case. If your drug- 
gist Is out of stock he will quickly get 
it from his wholesale house. Don't 
fool with uncertain mixtures. It Is 
risky. For the past six years this has 
had a wonderful demand. 

For Indljce«<lon — Mix one ounce Cat- 
andlr Compound; two ounces Essence 
of Pepsin; three ounces Syrup of ';in- 
ger Tajte one to two teaspoonfuls 
after meals. This is said to have no 
equal Catandlr is that new compound, 
anv druggist has it or will get it. Pub- 
lished by the Globe Pharmaceutical 
laboratories of Chicago. 



PALESTINE LODGE 
ELECTS OFFICERS 

H. E. Grdiser Chosen Wor- 
shipful Master of Masonic 
Organization. 

H. E. Grelser was elected worship- 
ful master of Palestine lodge No. 79, 
A F & A. M. at Its forty-fourth 
annual conv-ocallon held last evening 
at the Majionic temple following an 
informal hrnquet and a half-day ses- 
sion at which 22 candidates received 
the Master Mason's degree. 

Phil M. Hanft was elected to the 
chair of fcnlor warden and C. G. 
Townsend was selected as Junior war- 
den The ether officers chosen were: 
J p JohTison. reelected treasurer: 
Henry Nesbltt. reelected secretary, and 
Bernard Sl.bcrstein was chosen trus- 
tee for three years. Mr. Johnson has 
been treasurer of the lodge for 25 



years and Mr. Nesbltt has filled tho 
secretary's station for 20 year?. 

Hugh L. Joyce, retiring wort^hlpful 
master, read an annual report In 
which It was shown that tho lodge 
had made considerable progress along 
all lines of endeavor during tlie past 
year. About 250 Masons attended tho 
informal dinner. 

Ionic lodge No. 186. A. F. & A. M. 
will hold its annual election next 
Monday evening. A special meeting 
of the lodge will be held tomorrow 
evening at which the third degree 
will be conferred on a class of can- 
didates. 

• 

PaliNsdc Phone Company. 

Palisade. Minn.. Dec. 2. — Tho Paliaado 
Rural Telephone company has been in- 
corporated for 15,000 by the following: 
H. E. Hansel, William J. Weber, 
Thomas Thompson, J. H. Tolvstad. 
Lydia Hansel. Dr. J. O. Werntz imd H. 

1 B. Meyers, all residents of Palisad«s 
and the first officers are Dr. J. <). 
Werntz. president; William Weber, 
vice president; H. E. Meyers, secretary 

' and treasurer. 

■ — • 

Ishpomlnx F'tn-men Eleet. 
Tshpeming. Mich.. Dec. 2— The Ish- 
pemlng fire department at the annual 
election those tho following officers: 
Chief, John Lacey; first as.slf»tant 
chief. William H. Trembath; second as- 
sistant chief. Charles T. Kruse; secre- 
tary. WiUirun Malloney; treasurer, 
James F. Mulllns. 



Quick Way to Make 

Ugly Hairs Vanish 



(The Mof'ern Beauty) 
Here is a quick and very effective 
treatment for bani.shing objection- 
able hairs or fuzz: Mix a stiff pasto 
with a little powdered delatone and 
water and apply to the hairy surface 
for about 2 or 3 minutes, then rub 
off and with it will come every trace 
of hair. Washing the skin to remove 
the remaining paste leaves it firm and 
free from blemish. Rarely is more 
than one application required, but re- 
sults are more positive when the dela- 
tone is purchased in an original pack- 
age. — Advertisement. 



^ DEFECTIVE PAGE 



ITT' 








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10 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



••■ 




DOlViV and 

PER IVEEK 

Pufs a Phonograph 
in Your Home 



A FINE VICTOR $ 

machine and two dozen 
records of your own 
selection 

Wt bave (hem eh^ayer If ytn want one. 

A FINE EDISON $ 

machine and two dozen 
records of your own 
selection 



24 
37 



.00 



Tl)eDoCTQR'S HeLPS 




.'«> i.: 



By DONALD McC ASKEY, M. D. ytCl 



MMnbcr •! Staff. G«a«ral Ho*ptttt, 
i.«BCMtar. P».: r«llow of th« N«« 'f ^^ r: 



I A '|i 




REMEMBER, WE CARRY LARGEST LINE 
OF PHONOGRAPHIC GOODS IN THE CITY 



COMPLETE HOUSEFURNISHERS 





Can You Live 



on your savings when you rcarh the time of 
life when you outjht to retire from active 
work? 

Do you realize what you must do now to 
be able, later on to live 

on Your Capital ? 

For the average man the only way to 
reach that happy state is to save systemat- 
ically a portion of his income week by week 
or month by month. 

The First National Bank Is here for the 
express purpose of helping people save and 
take care of their money. 



I 



First National Bank 

of Dtilutb. 
Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 







H 



"^ 



YOUR HAIR! IF FALLING OUT 

OR DANDRUFF -25 CENT DANDERINE. 



Ladies! Men! Here's the Quickest, 

Surest Dandruff Cure 

Known. 



Thin, brittle colorless and scraggy 
Jiair is mute evidence of a neglected 
Bcalp; of dandruff — that awful scurf. 

Thf-ro is nothing so destructive to 
the hair as dandruff. It robs the hair 
of its lustre, its strength and Its very 
life; eventually producing a feverish- 
noss and itching of the scalp, which 
If not remedied cau.ses the hair roots 
to shrink, loosen and die — then the 



hair falls out fast. A little Danderine 
tonight — now — anytime — will surely 
save your hair. 

Get a 25 cent bottle of Knowlton's 
Danderine from any drug store or 
toilet counter, and after the first ap- 
plication your hair will take on that 
life, lustre and luxuriance which Is so 
beautiful. It will become wavy and 
fluffy and have the appearance of 
abundance; an Incomparable gloss and 
softness, but what will please you most 
will be after just a few weeks' use. 
when you will actually see a lot 
of fine, downy hair — new hair — grow- 
ing all over the scalp. 



NO CHARITY BALL 
OWING TO TANGO BAN deserts offspring. 



to abandon the project because of the 
"Impossibility of getting our patrons 
to give up the new dances." 



Kansas City Society People 

Will Not Give Up New 

Dance. 

Kansas City, Mo., Dec. 2. — Oppo- 
Bition from the board of public wel- 
fare to the dancing of the "tango" 
and other so-called "new" dances has 
caused the abandonment of the annual 
Charity ball, an event participated in 
by the lesdlng society folk of Kansas 
City. Mi. So Mary Karnes. In charge of 
the ball, said the society had decided 



North Dakota Woman Leaves Chil- 
dren to Marry Montana Man. 

Omemee, N. D., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Leaving her children 
with an indigent grandmother while 
she went to Montana to remarry 
proved unfortunate for the two chil- 
dren of Mrs. Liege here. The grand- 
mother was unable to provide for them 
and was forced to appeal to the au- 
thorities for assistance. The children 
will be sent to the North Dakota 
Children's home In Fargo and cared 
for by the county until some one can 
be found to adopt them. 



The Mind Expands 

As Health Returns 



Quick Improvement Is Notice- 
able When Proper Aid to 
Nutrition Is Given. 

A low state of the general health Is 
flow the accepted cause of backward- 
ness In children. So in the case of a 
bacltward child it is best to look to- 
wards building up its health. It will 
usually be found that the main trouble 
Is in the food, in lack of assimilation 
and digestion. Hence care should be 
taken in the kind of food given to the 
child. This, with plenty of air and ex- 
ercise, should bring about a change for 
the better. 

Watch the condition of the bowels, 
to note whether the waste Is being 

fiassed off or not, or whether It is be- 
ng passed too freely. If either condi- 
tion prevails give a small dose of that 
gentlest of all laxative - tonics. Dr. 
Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin. Thousands 
of mothers will testify to the wonders 
It has wrought in the lives of their 
own children, and for that reason le- 
gions of families like those of Mrs. 
Daisy McKroom, Hillsboro, Ind., are 
never without It In the house. Kbe Is 
the mother of Luclle and has been us- 
ing Dr. Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin for 
Lucile since she was two. Mrs. Mc- 
iJroom says it saved Luclle's life. It 
is the standard family medicine In the 
McBroom home. 

It is pleasant to the taste and so 
perfectly safe that it is given to in- 
fant.'', and yet is equally effective for 
grown people. All druggists sell it 
ftnd the price Is only fifty cents and 
oae dollar a bottle, the latter fur fatul- 




LVCILE SleBROOM. 

lies who need It regularly. 

Dr. Caldwell's Syrup Pepsin has no 
equal as a cure fof constipation, in- 
digestion, biliousness, headaches, sour 
stomach, gas on the stomach, liver 
trouble and kindred complaints. It has 
so many advantages that those who 
once use it forever after discard ca- 
thatlcs, salts, pills and other coarse 
remedies, for they are seldom advis- 
able and should never be given to chil- 
dren. 

Families wishing to try a free sam- 
ple bottle can obtain It postpaid by ad- 
dres.slng Dr. W. B. Caldwell, 419 Wash- 
ington St., Montlcello, 111. A postal 
card with your name and address on 
it wUl d<k 



ITCHING SKIN HAS MANY CAUSES 



A reader has Inquired for a remedy "to cure an itching skin." The letter 
further states "the sensation seems to be as though something is crawling on 
my skin. Often small hard lumps appear and sometimes a number of them. 
They soon disappear. They resemble small bubbles with water In them during 
real warm weather. I am of a very nervous temperament, and If much noise 
occurs It Irritates me so that I can hardly keep from crying." 

Have your urine carefully analyzed for indican and urea and other waste 
products. You need not have anything the matter with your kidneys. There 
might not be even a trace of albumen in the urine. Your kidneys might be 
strictly healthy. But there evidently is filtering through your kidneys poison- 
ous accumulations, which you need to have detected and eradicated. Further- 
more, you should have your diet arranged so that once your system regains 
Its poise It will keep Its healthy balance. Take a twenty-four-hour specimen 
of your urine to your physician, pouring a four-ounce bottle full of the twenty- 
four-hour collection after the latter has been permitted to settle. Pour the 
settlings Into the small bottle for microscopical examination. All the salves 
and lotions to your skin will be but of fleeting value to you until the exact 
cause of your trouble, WHICH INCLUDES YOUR NERVOUSNESS Is properly 
located and treated. You need an ELIMINATION COURSE OF TREATMENT. 
Procure the former Doctor's Helps article, "WHAT TO DO FOR HIVES." 
PROSTATIC MASSAGE MIGHT HELP YOUR CONDITION AWHILE. 

A Brooklyn Inquirer writes: 

"I have an enlarged prostatic gland. I am nervous and melancholy. I 
have been told by a hospital doctor that I must be operated upon. I am 41 
years old and would like to know If there is not some kind of medicine which 
I could take that would cure me." 

No medicine taken by mouth can cure an enlarged prostate gland. From 
your letter, with Its very brief account, I cannot tell whether, at your age, an 
operation would be absolutely necessary. Oftentimes an enlarged prostate 
gland can be very quickly reduced by the proper application of skilled massage. 
There Is danger In this latter unless it Is carefully done. Very often a previous 
attack of gonorrhea leaves some of its bad effects in the prostate gland, and 
your letter says nothing about your habits. 

Go to the best genito-urinary doctor you can find. Have him examine you. 
Take this counsel with you and have him read it. He is on the ground. His 
examination might reveal the importance of treating your condition by means 
of the cold sound or by means of high Injections of nitrate of silver along the 
prostatic portion of your uretha. Don't guess about yourself. Find out just 
what Is what. Then get yourself straightened out right. 

FOR A PRONOUNCED REDNESS OF THE NOSE. 

A writer a.^ks: 

"What can I do for an excessive redness of my nose? For many, many 
years I have been taking medicine for this condition without relief. I drink 
probably three glasses of beer a week. My stomach Is all right, although my 
breath is very bad. My bowels are regular. The use of mediclneS has so dis- 
couraged me that of late I have stopped everything. In you I place my last 
hope." 

Thank you for the confidence expressed in the last sentence. You will 
have to "cheer up." Consult the best X-ray doctor in your vicinity. Abide 
by his advice. Your cure will depend upon the degree of your perseverance 
and the skill of your physician. 'f •* 



CHANGES IN 
CITHJGHTS 

Council Starts Carrying Out 

Recommendations of 

the Inspector. 

Saloon of Metropole to Open; 

Physicians Want Quacks 

Shut Out. 



The first action relative toward 

carrying out the recommendations of 

Electrical Inspector J. W. Schneider 

to save the city over $3,000 a year on 

its street lighting bill. was taken 

yesterday afternoon when the city 

council passed a resolution offered by 

Leonidas Morrltt discontinuing 11 arc 

lamps and 16 bunches of incaudescents 

and ordering the installation of eight 

bunches of incandescents and five ga^ 
lamps. 

Many Changes Favored. 

In some instances arc lighls are re- 
placed by incandeacents or gas lamps 
and in others the lights will be aban- 
doned altogether. Commissioner Mer- 
ritt declares that the policy which 
will hereafter be followed will be to 
obtain the best possible result for the 
money expended and that the former 
system of ordering in lights to fur- 
ther political ends will not be smiled 
upon in the future. He agrees with 
Insxiector Schneider that lights are 
Intended for the general public and 
not for favored individuals. 

Commissioner Merritt and the In- 
spector expect that the announcements 
of the locations, particularly where 
lights are eliminated entirely, will 
cause floods of complaints, but It is 
said that the probability is that they 
will be unavailing. Unless good rea- 
sons can be shown for altering the 
program which has been outlined the 
recommendations of the Inspector will 
be carried out. 

Places of Change. 

The arc lights ordered discontinued 
yesterday are located as follows: Gar- 
field avenue viaduct and Northern Pa- 
cific roundliouse; St. Croix alley, mid- 
way between Satphln and Railroad 
streets; Twenty-seventh avenue west 
and Michigan street; Grand avenue 
and Eighty-second avenue west, being 
the west end of the fill; Grand ave- 
nue and Spring street, or Ironton 
bridge; Morse street and Northern Pa- 
cific tracks on city dock; Twentieth 
avenue west and Second street; Thirty- 
ninth avenue west and Third street; 
Forty-first avenue west and Third 
street; Forty-sixth avenue west and 
Third street, and Fifty-fifth avenue 
west between Raleigh and Polk 
streets. 

The following Incande.scent bunches 
were ordered discontinued: Twenty- 
eighth avenue west and Courtland 
street; Flty-seventh alley west, ap- 
proximately 75 feet south of Raleigh 
street; Mill avenue, midway between 
Arthur avenue and Imperial mill; 
Tenth avenue west and foot bridge, 
north and south ends; Seventh and one- 
half avenue west between Second and 
Third streets; In alley between Sev- 
enth and one-half avenue and Seventh 
avenue west betwen Second and Third 
streets; Second alley between Sixth 
and Seventh avenues west; St. Croix 
alley, approximately 400 feet south of 
Sutphln street; Sutphln street and N. 
P. tracks; Mesaba avenue and Elev- 
enth street; Ninth street and Twelfth 
avenue east, south side; Ebony ave- 
nue and Myrtle street; Lake avenue, 
east side of viaduct and Railrond 
street, at stairs; Eighteenth avenue 
east and Jefferson street, and Fifty- 
ninth avenue east and alley north of 
London road. 

(•as I>anipn Ordered. 

Gas lamps were ordered Installed at 
Irving Place and Allen avenue; Twen- 
ty-fifth, Twenty-sixth, Twenty-sev- 
enth and Twenty-eighth avenues east 
and Seventh street. 

Incandescents were ordered at Fifty- 
fourth avenue east and Avondale 
street; Fifty-third avenue east and 
Glendale street; Linden street and 
Maple avenue at Intersection of the 
Pike lake road; Seventh avenue west 
between Third and Fourth streets, east 
Sixth street, and Fourth avenue east 
and Ninth street. 

Official action was instituted to ac- 
quire a right of way for the sewer 
which is planned for Duluth Heights 
next season. The award of damages 
will be made by the building line com- 
mission. A committee from the Helghta 



appeared before the council recently 
and urged early action, ns-scrting that 
the sewer is a crying necessity. They 
said that they would be willing to 
pay an advance assessment if that 
would hasten operations. 

E. L. Weitzel was granted a li- 
cense to condtict a saloon at 101 Lake 
avenue south. In the old Metropole 
hotel building, which will be re-opened 
by him. The council has assurrances 
from Weitzel that the place will be 
properly conducted. The license for- 
merly held at that location was re- 
voked by the pre.'icnt commission. 
Vacate Vrrralllon Road. 

A resolution was passed vacating the 
f'ld Verr.iiUcn road lying between For- 
est Hill and Park Hill cemeteries. The 
property owners will add to their hold- 
ings and in return for the present 
road will deed the city another and 
stralghter route, on which performance 
the resolution Is predicated. 

Safety Commissioner Hlcken was 
authorized to purchase 4,000 feet of 
hose from the United States Globe and 
Rubber Maniifacturing company, pay- 
ment to be made under the ordinance 
passed Nov. 16. Tfiis ordinance car- 
ries an appropriation of $18,000. from 
which the two combination chemical, 
hose and gasoline pumper outfits will 
be paid. "The commissioner expects to 
save the city about $750 on the price 
as compared -with prices which have 
been paid in the past. 

The utilities division was authorized 
to lay a gas connection to the plant 
of the Duluth Steam laundrv. Fifty- 
seventh avenue west and Main street, 
by day labor. The revenue will be con- 
siderably above the 8 per cent guar- 
antee and the work is deemed an ex- 
pedient business move. The job will 
cost about $230. 

Peer Lo^t Bidder. 

J. G. Futter, secretary of the works 
division, reported that W. R. Peer was 
low bidder on the sanitary sewer in 
East Eighth street between Nineteenth 
and Eighteenth avenues east. His 
price was $1,996.20. The contract will 
be awarded to him next week. Being 
over $1,000 it must lay over a week 
before it can be approved by the coun- 
cil, this being a charter requirement. 

The council acted favorably upon the 
recommendation of Commissioner Mer- 
ritt that the pay of K. A. Durham of 
the water and light department be 
raised from $40 to $50 per month. 

The pay roll, through which the city 
will disburse $50,000 to $60,000. was 
approved. This Ip that check which 
the efnployes will have Xo rely upon 
to carry them through the holiday 
se.ason unless they have other re- 
sources. 

A settlement of $150 for damage 
done to D. Adams' property at Twen- 
ty-seventh avenue west and Third 
street, which was Injured by an ease- 
ment ordered by the city, was author- 
ized. 

The ordinance appropriating $300 for 
the purchase of a comptometer for the 
assessor's office was given its third 
reading and pas.^ed. 

Shut Oat Qanrks. 

The ordinance asked by a committee 
of the .'^it. Louis County Medical asso- 
ciation, based upon the state law and 
designed to make It easier for the local 
officials to prevent quacks from prac- 
ticing In Duluth, was Introduced by 
Commissioner Hicken. 

A petition for paving Fifth avenue 
west to a width of sixteen feet from 
Fifth to Sixth streets, was received. 



THREE RAILROAD 

LAWS PROPOSED 



Adamson Introduces Trio 

of Bills in the 

House. 

Washington, Dec. 2. — A trio of bills 
to regulate Interstate railroads and 
other corporations were Introduced by 
Chairman Adamson of the house in- 
terstate commerce committee. The 
bills strike at monopoly and suppres- 
sion of competition by combinations of 
capital. Mr. Adamson explained that 
his measures were in line with the 
idea of defining rights and duties and 
prescribing remedies and penalties to 
prevent discrimination and unfair deal- 
ing, rather than with the theory that 
to regulate commerce the government 
must take charge of and operate It. 

The first bill would require railroads 
to publish their schedules in every 
county through which they run, and 
authorize them, after contracting at 
regular rates for advertising, to ac- 
cept the receipts for freight and pas- 
senger fares. 

Another would authorize more com- 

Eletely the regulation and supervision 
y the Interstate commerce commis- 
sion of Issues of stocks and bonds, the 
disposition of the money obtained from 
them and the prevention of Interlock- 
ing directorates. 

The third would »irovlde for a com- 
mercial directory, to be published by 
the secretary of commerce, by which 
an individual -partnership or corpora- 
tion Qualified to do buainess In Its 



Pure Beer 

an aid to sleep 




Hops are tonical and sop- 
orific. A bottle of pure 
beer at bedtime will ben- 
efit yon greatly. But be 
sure it's pure. 





chlitz 




■•i^^>~~-- 






D 



rown 




ottles 



Schlitz IS brewed in the dark, cooled in 
filtered air.everybottle sterilized, aged 
for months to prevent biliousness. 

The windows of our bottling plant 
are of brown glass. 

Schlitz is made pure and the Brown 
Bottle keeps it pure until it is 
poured into your glass. 



W • > •>! T 



See thai crown crcork 
is branded ''Schlitz,'* 




Phones I, ^,fj''»»*«» 

J Grand 358 

Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. 
351 St. Croix St., Duluth 



The Beer 
That Made Milwaukee f^mou 




own state, territory or district might 
do so everywliere without additional 
license or registration or restriction, 
except In compliance with police reg- 
ulations. 

MURPHY SENTllP 

FOR FORGERY 




Indorsed Pay Check He 

Found and Spent Part 

of Money. 

Patrick Murphy, 47 years old, was 
sentenced to the state penitentiary at 
Stillwater by Judge Ensign in district 
court late yesterday afternoon after he 
had pleaded guilty to a charge of forg- 
ery In the second degree. 

Murphy found a payroll check for 

$50.53, ls.sued by the Duluth, Missabe 
& Northern Railroad company. Ho 
forged a signature and cashed the pa- 
per at Sam Bernard's store. 

About half of the money went for 
liquor and the balance was stolen from 
him by three men who recently plead- 
ed guilty in police court and were sen- 
tenced to ninety days each in the coun- 
ty jail. 

Murphy told Judge Ensign that he 
had never been arrested before for 
anything more serious than drunken- 
ness. The sentence is on the indeter- 
minate plan. 

• * • 

Charles La Tour, 20, who was caught 
red-handed while breaking into a store 
at 403 East Fourth street on Nov. 14 
last, pleaded guilty before Judge En- 
sign yesterday to a charge of bur- 
glary in the third degree and was sen- 



E 



BREAKS A COLD IN 
A FEW HOUBS-PAPE'S 

First Dose of Rape's Cold Compound 

Relieves All Grippe 

Misery. 



Don't stay stulTed-up! 

Quit blowing and snuffling! A dose 
of "Pape's Cold Compound" taken 
every two hours until three doses are 
taken will end grippe misery and 
break up a severe cold either in the 
head, chest, body or llmb.s. 

It promptly opens clogged-up nos- 
trils and air passages; stops nasty 
discharge or nose running; relieves 
sick headache, dullness, feverishness, 
sore throat, sneezing, soreness and 
stiffness. 

"Pape's Cold Compound" Is the 
quickest, surest relief known and costs 
only 25 cents at drug stores. It acts 
without assistance, tastes nice, and 
causes no inconvenience. Don't accept 
a substitute. 



VERY fire horse now in the • 
service in New York will live I 
well in hU old age, according 
to a plan put before Fire 
Commissioner Joseph John- 
son by Charles Samson, exe- 
cutive secretary of the board 
of inebriety, recently. The horses who 
have spent their strength and short- 
ened their lives In the service of the 
fire department hav' hitherto been dis- 
posed of, when they could no longer 
draw the heavy-fir ?-fightlng vehicles 
with their old-time dash, to peddlers, 
hucksters, or any one else who made 
the highest bid. Mr. Samson has de- 
cided to offer an hcnorable retirement 
for them. He wrot<! to Commissioner 
Johnson that the fid fire horses, or 
most of them, could be cared for on ' 
the 800-acre farm of the board of j 
Inebriety at Warwick, N. Y. Mr. Sam- 1 
son added that thei e would be ample 1 



forage for the horses and that over 
the stall each a plate would be set 
bearing the horse's name and record 
of service. Not one of these horses, 
Mr. Samson wrote, would be used for 
work. Fire Commissioner Johnson ac- 
cepted the proposal eagerly and three 
or four old horses will soon be put in 
retirement on the farm. 



Duluth officials would not object to 
seeing the fire horses retire to an easy 
life after they become unfit for de- 
partment use, but financi.a.1 considera- 
tion override tlie sentimental. Th« 
horses unfit for service are sold and 
each year the revenue thus derived, 
while not large. Is considered worth 
while, p.articularly In the city's pres- 
ent financially-embarrassed condition. 
The horses are sold for the best price 
which can be obtained and are bought 
for various kinds of light work. 



tenced to the St. Cloud reformatory on day. He visited the lower apartmenti^ 

the indeterminate plan. " " 

Young La Tour was sent to Red 
Wing in 1910 after having been before 
the juvenile court a number of times. 



COURT WIU, NOT 

OPEN JUDGMENT 



where he saw a picture of his distin- 
guished ancestor, and a special en- 
gagement was arranged so he could 

iihake hands with President Wilson 
Thursday. 



J. W. Reynolds' Petition for 

Relief in Case of Mider 

Refused. 



In district court 
Dancer filed an orde: 
tion of J. W. Reync 
ment for $1,146.25 ei 
on Oct. 29 last In fa 
be set aside on the { 
not been given timt 
to prepare a defens 
preme court revers 
the judgment agains 
stand. 

Mider claimed ths 
sented a large numl 

in Pine county in sul 
ages for the flooding 
and that the attorne 
secure evidence in 
amount of the jud 
amount claimed to b 
Although served w 
suit, Reynolds delay 
the required time 
court now refuses 
ment. 



yesterday. Judge 
denying the mo- 
lds to have judg- 
itered against him 
vor of J. T. Mid*r 
rround that he had 

enough in which 
e. Unless the su- 
es Judge Dancer, 
t the attorney will 

t Reynolds repre- 
>er of land owners 
ts to recover dam- 
: of their property 
y employed him to 
the cases. The 
gment was the 
e due for services. 
Ith notice of the 
;d answering until 
lad elapsed. The 
;o open the judg- 




B07 to M»<t WlUon. 

Washington, Dec. 2. — Master Edward 
Hueyel of Columbus, 4-year-old grand- 
nephew of President Hayes, called with ] 
his nurse at the Wlilte House yester- \ 



WTcrely tai a womaa't strcagth 

and when wife or mother com- 
plains of fatigue, nervousness^ 
loss of appetite or energy^ she 
needs rest, out-of-door exer- 
cise and building up. 

The first thought should be 
Scott** Emulsion, which is 
medicinal food free from alcohol 
or narcotics. Its nourishing force 
quickly fills hollow cheeks, builds 
healthy tissue, enriches the 
blood, restores the healthy glow, 
overcomes languor and 
makes tranquil nerres. 

Notlung equals or compares 
with Scott's Emtdaion for jUSt 
such condlitions, but insut on 

SCOTT'S. At winy drus store. 




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THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 




FORMERLY 

AndersonThoorsell 

fURNITURE Go. 



2181 AVE. W.& 
SUPERIOR ST. 



The Bi^ House w'ltl^tbeUttkRentl 



mestend 



■ 

• ■ 



\ 
























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u 



YOU FIND DISPLAYED ON OUR FLOORS A VERY 

CHOICE STOCK OF 

In Wood, Brass, 
Steel and Iron 

AND — 





Bedding 

Blankets, Comforts, 
Mattresses, Pillows 




KERMANTOWN 
MEN MEET 

Oppose Ordinance Prohibit- 
ing Use of "Shoes" 
on Wagons. 



New Town Hall and Better 

Market Regulation 

Asked. 



Go no further— supply all your bedding needs here. This week 

we have some interesting specials for you. 

GET YOUR PICK QUICK. 

FINE WOOL BLANKETS 



The ordinanct; prohibiting the use of 
a locked wheel or "shoes" on wagons 
In the city of Duluth. parks and play- 
grounds for the community, and a new 
town hall for Herniantown, were among 
the subjects discussed at the meeting 
of the Farmers' and Producers' Club 
of llermautowu last night. 

The farmers contendeu tliat It wouiu 
be almost an impossibility to use a 
brake on wheels of wagons when 
bringing in loads of hay, wood or »>t»\»^r 
trtuff where it la necessary to load the 



w 




$6.00 Values 

—special a Pair 

$3.95 



You will be immensely pleased with tlie quality given in these 
blankets. Bought early last spring, before the raise ni price, we are 
enabled to save you a snug sum on each pair. 

Better Woolen Blankets at $7.50 to $12.50. 
FINE COTTON BLANKETS— Size 60x76 inches, m white, tan and 
gr;iy_the quality we usually sell at $1.35— special 9SC 

this week 

HEAVY COTTON BLANKETS— Size 72x80 inches, >" ^^ay and 
tan— sold all over at $2.75 lo $3.0U a pair— on sale $1.95 

this week ^ 

COMFORTS— Large and Tliick 
$2.50 and $2.75 



Values— 

On Sale at, Each 

$1.95 




Fine soft Comforts of good size and heavy weight, silkoline with 
plain sateen borders, excellent values at $2.50 to $2.75; %\ QS 

^'^!jEW STOCK OF SANITARY FEATHER PILLOWS— In best 
grades of ticking and filling at 98c a pair up to $8.00. Our $2.50 
pillows are particularly good value. 



YANCY DIRECTOR OF 
PERCHERON SOCIETY. 

Chicago Dec. 2. — Four directors were 
elected last night by the Ptrcheron 
Society of America after a discussion 
which threatened to end In personal 
encounters. Opposition arose to the 
re-election of H. O. Millan as director 
from Iowa. Prof. C. F. Curtis of the 
agricultural college at Ames, Iowa, 
was named to succeed Mr. McMillan, 
and others elected were Lieutenant 



Governor Burdlck of North Dakota and 
John Yancy of Minnesota. 

-• 

Eixodiu to Olanta. 

Olanta, N. D.. Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The exodus from Golden 
Valley to Olanta Is now almost com- 
plete. The Northern Pacific has ap- 
plications for fifteen elevator and 
three lumber yard sites. P'oundatlona 
for two elevator buildings have been 
excavated. The livery barn has bei.;n 
completed and a new hotel Is in process 
of erection. 



/ 



?^ ^ /■}' 



j!;^m 



aigons to any con.siderable welgut. 
, iuy also said that a brake shoe of 
ihu proper width would do no injury 
to the paved streets. 

"Think what it would mean If a man 
going down the long hill with a couple 
of tons of hay behind his horses, and 
something would happen to tht, har- 
ness," said J. U. clrady. "He would 
either run Into a telegraph polo or ItlU 
his horses on the hill. It ^ impossible 
to operate a brake on the wheel with a 
load of hay on the wagon." 

The club's road committee was in- 
structed to use its efforts to have the 
ordinance changed so that braKe 
"shoes" of a sulllcient width could be 
used on the wheel.''. 

Plan !■ Opposed. 
The proposed e.stablishment of a 
park and playground and baseball helci 
near the center of the town of Herman 
brought out considerable opposition. 
Opposing members contended that on 
several Sundays during the past year 
rrowds of men had come from the city, 
ostensibly for the purpose of playing a 
ball game but that it had in reality 
been a beer party. It was charged that 
this method had been used to get away 
from the "lid" in the city and that 
while on the surface It probably did 
not show that the beer was being sold, 
nevertheless a collection was taken 
up amounting to 25 or 50 cents which 
was taken up becau.se it "cost.s to haul 
the beer to the country." he park 

proposition was laid over until future 

meetings. , . ..^,i„c. 

The club went on record as favoring 
the erection of a town hall for the 
town of Herman next year. J. «• 
Grady was appointed a committee or 
one to have drafted the proper pro- 
vision and have it included on the bal- 
lot at the town election next spring. 
Market Method*. 
Methods in vogue at the P"hltc mar- 
kets in Duluth were condemned by the 
members of the club. The farmers 
claimed that under the present system 
they were compelled to get up extra 
eariy on market days In order to be 
sure of a stall, and that the first to 
come took the pick of the stalKs and 
that on many occasions aome of tne 
farmers were compelled to use dry 
goods boxes on which to display their 

The" farmers said that they were 
wining to pay for the privilege of us- 
ing the stalls If they could be guaran- 
teed the same stall through the season. 
This method, they said, was In vogue 
In other cities and should be used in 

Duluth. . ^ * «, 

"We make the acquaintance of cer- 
tain customers and would like to have 
their regular trade. The customers 
also would often like to trade with the 
same man," said one of them. vi e 
do not want something for nothing and 
are willing and able to pay for what 
concessions we get." .^ , ».. 

It Is proposed to have the club s 
market committee take the subject up 
with the city commi.'^alon and market 
committees of the various Duluth im- 
provement clubs. 

In n communication from the county 
commissioners the farmers were asked 
to gather what rock there was on their 
places and cord It up at some place de- 
sirable to all. Next .summer, the com- 
munication Informed them. It was pro- 
posed by the commissioners to send 
the countv's rock crusher to the place 
to crush the rock and have it used on 
the various highwnys of the township. 

J. c. wesenbTrg 

TO HEAD YEOMEN. 

John C. Wesenberg was elected fore- 
man of Duluth Homestead, No. 3131, 
Brotherhood of American Yeomen at 
Its annual election held at the "Wood- 
men hall. Twenty-first avenue west 
and First street last night. The lodge 
decided, following the .flection, to hold 
an open installation on Jan. 5 and 
to extend an Invitation to J. H. Mur- 



A REAL NERV^ AND BODY 
I BUILDING IflEDIGINE 

' When you're sick or run-down, keep 
' away from so-called "tonics." The al- 
cohol and dangerous drugs many of 
them contain stimulate you for a few 
minutes after the dose Is taken. — then 
leave you worse off than ever. You 
cannot get well by taking stimulants. 
You are liable to get worse. 

Rexall Olive Oil Emulsion is not a 
stimulant. It Is a real nerve and body 
und blood-bulldlnx medicine. It puts 
the system into phat>e to overcome 
present and resist future sickness. It 
docs not contain a drop of alcohol nor 
anything else harmful. But It builds 
you up. makes you feel better, strong- 
er, livelier — not the first hour — but 
after a few days, when the strength- 
ening, toning and tlssue-bulldlng in- 
gredients have had a chance to work 
through your blood into those muscles 
and organs that need their vitallty- 
givLng help. The four Hypophosphites 
it contains strengthen the nerves 
while purest Olive Oil nourishes them. 
Rexall Olive Oil Emulsion Is an 
ideal, common-sense invlgorator and 
up-builder. There is direct benefit to 
you in every one of its ingredients. 
You who are weak and run-down, and 
you who are apparently well now, but 
are liable to suffer from various cold 
weather ailments, use Ilexall Olive 
Oil Emulsion to get and keep well and 
strong. For the tired-out, run-down, 
nervous, emaciated or debilitated — the 
convalescing — growing children — aged 
people — it is a sen.sible aid to renewed 
strength, better spirits, glowing health. 
Rexall Olive Oil Emulsion — king of 
the celebrated Rexall Remedies — is for 
treedom from sickness of you and your 
family. I'leasant-tastlng — unlike the 
cod liver oil preparations — you'll be as 
enthusiastic about it as we are when 
you have noted Its strengthening. In- 
vigorating, building-up. disease-pre- 
venting etfects. If it does not help you, 
your money will be given back to you 
without argument. Sold In this com- 
munity only at our store — The Rexall 
Store — one of more than 7,000 leading 
drug stores in the United States, Can- 
ada and Great Britain. E. M. Tredway. 
108 West Superior street. Duluth. Minn. 



ty-flrst avenue, left yesterday for a 
two weeks' visit In Chicago. 

For Sale — On monthly payments, lot 
near Twenty-third avenue west, BO by 
140; price, $800. Inquire at St. Louis 
County State bank. 



DATE IS SET 
FORjIEARING 

Butter and Egg Case Will 

Be Considered on 

Jan. 12. 



Duluth Firm Would Compel 
Boat Lines to Give Re- 
frigerator Service. 



FIshmen, oracle; Mrs. Rose Fichtner, 
vice oracle; Mrs. Jennie Lasold, chan- 
cellor; Mrs. Nellie Toors. recorder; 
Lottie Bernard, receiver; Clara Flch- 
ner, marshal; Hulda Manske. inner 
sentry and Julia Relnke, outer sentry. 
The lodge will hold Its annual In- 
stallation of officers at the hall on 
Monday, Jan. 6. 

STREET CATmEN 

GOOD HUNTERS 



The hearing of the complaint of the 
Brldgeman-RuBsell company against 
the lake package carriers to compel 
them to install refrigerator service 
facilities on their boats, has been set 
for hearing before the interstate com- 
merce commission on Jan. 12. 

The outcome of the case is regarded 
as of great importance to the dairying 
Interests of Minnesota and In fact of 
the whole Northwest. Duluth is In- 
terested through the con.slderatlon that 
in the event of the refrigerator service 
on the boats being ordered in by the 
commission as urged, this point might 
be expected to become a dlBtrlbullng 
center for the butter and egg trade 
over a wide territory, supplanting Chi- 
cago ver>' largely In that respect. 

The entering of the present com- 
plaint was precipitated through the 
action of the boat lines last summer 
In filing new tariff.^ with the interstate 
commerce commission placing but- 
ter and eggs on the prohibi- 
tion list. The Bridgeman-RuBsell com- 
pany protested against such action, the 
Duluth Commercial clubs traffic com- 
mission Interpleading in their support. 
Hearing In the case was held before 
the commission In July and subse- 
quently the present formal complaint 
now set for hearing was filed. Francis 
W. Sullivan will appear as attorney 
for the Brldgeman-Uussell company 
and the Commercial club's traffic com- 
mission. 



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A Country of 
Superlatives 



It is fascinating beyond description. A winter 
there amid sunshine and roses and everything 
else harmonizing, is itself sufficient reward for having 
lived. Let us send you descriptive booklets. 

Union Pacific 
Salt Lake Route 

operates two fine trains to Lo3 Angeles. The Lo« Angeles 
Limited and Pacific Limited, both carrying Drawing Room and 
Compartment Sleepers, and Tourist Sleepers, Compartment- 
Library - Observation cars. Excellent dining car service on 
both trains. 

The Lo« Angela* Limited leaves Omaha 11 :55 a. m., arrives Los 
Angeles 4 :30 p. m. and Pasadena 5:20 p. m., second day. The 
Pacific Limited at 12:30 a. m., arriving Los Angeles 10:00 a. m., 
second day. Automatic Electric Block Safety Signals — well 
ballasted roadbed and heavy double tracks. 

H. F. CARTER, District Pass. Agt., Union Pacific R. R. Co. 
23 South Tliird Street, Minneapolis, Minn. 

383 




Several Motormen and 

Conductors Shoot 

Antlered Game. 

street car conductors and motormen 
of Duluth are establishing a reputation 
for other things than collecting 
nickles and tunning controller cranks, 
according to Information given out at 
the street car house last night. About 
twenty of the men went hunting big 
game during the season Just closed 
and the reports show a number of ex- 
pert shots among the employes. 

Nine of those who went hunting, 
brought back big game. Those who 
were successful in bringing In deer 
were: W. C. Smith, Leroy C.lllette. M. 
J. Shaer. Helmer Aar, E. D. Holum. H. 
J. Hollerook, J. B. Klnkhead, William 
De.«jardins und £lmil Thcliu. 

The last two returned with their 
game yeaterdny morning after spend- 
ing three days in the woods near Kel- 
sey, Minn. 

FEARS BOY WAS 

LOST I N STORM. 

The local police have been requesteu 
to seek Information regarding the 
whereabouts of the 18-year-old s6n of 
Mrs. C. Nelson, 103 South Twenty- 
seventh avenue west. The boy left 
home on the steamer Corrlgan shortly 
before the storm early this month and 
the mother fears that he was lost. In- 
formation given airs. Nelson at the 
Lake Carriers' asso<;latlon was to the 
effect that no lives had been lost 
on the steamer Corrlgan. The police 
are of the opinion that the boy has 
wandered away. 

Entertain Luther League. 

The Luther League of the Trinity 
English Lutheran church will be en- 
tertained thi.s evening at the home of 
Mrs. Hugo Swenson, 1910 West Sec- 
ond street. Following a bu.slness meet- 
ing, a social session will be held. 

Club Wi'li Meet. 

The West End Corftmerclal club will 
hold its regular meeting Thursday 
evening at the .Slmonso hall, Twenty- 
first avenue west and Superior street. 
Plans will be made for taking up a 
number of Improvements for the West 
end during the next year. 

West End Briefs. 

Mrs. E. J. Burns, "1911 West Second 
street, has as her guest, Mrs. N. S. 
Watt of Tcrade. AVIs. 

The Svlthold lodge will hold its an- 
nual election of officers at the Sloan's 
hall on Dec. 12. 

John Ledlngham, 1927 West Third 
street, has gone to Chatsworth, Ont.. 
Can., where he was called on account 
of the death of his mother. 

Mr. and Mr.*!. George Jewell of the 
United States block have returned fron; 
South Range, Wis. 

Itobert Stewart, 423 North Twenty- 
first avenue west, has left for a 
month's visit with relatlve.<» in Toronto. 

Mrs. L. P. Whalen, 421 North Twen- 



UNCLE SAM SUING 
CHINA IMPORTERS 

Asks $4,592,1 50 Judgments 
for Alleged Under- 
valuations. 

New York. Dec. 2. — Preliminary pa- 
pers in ten penalty suits against Im- 
porters of China, in which the govern- 
ment asks judgments aggregating 
$4,592,150 for alleged undervaluation, 
have been filed in the Inderal court 
by United States Dl.strlct Attorney H. 
Snowden Marshall. The defendants In 
the suits and the penalties asked are: 

Haviland & Co., 51.R03,132; Theodore 
Havlland & Co.. ?1. 220.849; William 
(iuerln company, $307,534; Vogt &Dose, 
$198,174; Henry Creange, $142,806; Al- 
fred G. Momentas, agent of Porcelain 
LIraouse. $129,958; L. D. Block & Co.. 
Inc., 12.888, and L. D. Black &. Co.. 
$23 849. 

The importations covered In the com- 
plaint date back to Dec. 7. 1910. The 
penalties are sought under violations 
of sections of the customs act of 1909. 



IN U. S. SUPREME COURT 



JOHN C. WESENBERG. 



phy. state manager of the order to be 
master of ceremonies of the evening. 
Invitations will also be extended to 
the West Duluth arid Superior lodges 
to attend the afair. 

The othor officers elected were: Miss 
Anna Duggan, master of ceremonies; 
Mrs J. A. liellmeur. correspondent; 
Mrs Edith Burdash. master of ac- 
counts, and J. J. Hughes, chaplain. 

LIMA M. COUCiNS 

C AMP E LECTION. 

The LIna M. Collins camp. No. 3521, 
R. A. N., of Hermantown, held its an- 
nual election of officers yesterday aft- 
ernoon at the Woodmen hall in the 
town of Herman. The new officers 
elected are as follows: Mrs. Amelia 



What Thin Folks Should 
Do to Gain Weight. 

Physician's Advlee for Thin, Unde- 
veloped Men and Women. 

Thou.sands of people sufTcr from ex- 
cessive thinness, weak nerves and 
feeble stomachs who, having tried ad- 
vertl.sed flesh-maker.s, food-fads, phys- 
ical culture stunt.<* and rub-on creams, 
resign themselves to life-long sklnnl- 
ness and think nothing will make them 
fat. Yet their case is not hopeless. A 
recently discovered regenerative force 
makes fat grow after years of thin- 
ness, and is also unequalled for repair- 
ing the waste of sickness or faulty 
digestion and for strengthening the 
nerves. This remarkable discovery is 
called Sargol. Six strength-giving, fat- 
producing elements of acknowledged 
merit have been combined In this peer- 
less preparation, which is indorsed by 
eminent physicians and used by prom- 
inent people everywhere. It Is abso- 
lutely harmless. Inexpensive and effi- 
cient. 

A month's Aj'stematlc Use of Sargol should produce 
flesh Riiil Ntn'iigth liy prjrTe<tlnff faiilu of dlsostlon 
and by supplying hldUy coiicentraled fnts V> the 
lilood. InonMitetl nourlnhmntf Is oliialnnl from tl.a 
food eaten, ami tlie nddlilonil fats Uiat thin jx-oplo 
ntti.1 are provided. Ilnyoe Drug store and other leajl- 
Ing drug.^Uts supply Sargol uid say there is a larne 
dtjnand for It. 

While this new preps ration htis given splendid re- 
gidt« as a nerre- tonic and vltalUer, It should not l-e 
u..»ed by nervou.s people unieM Ui«* wlah to galii at 
iMat ten pounds of flwlt. 



Washington. Dec. 2. — An appeal 
from the Indiana supreme court's de- 
cision enjoining Governor Mar- 
shall from submitting to the voters a 
draft of a proposed new Constitution, 
prepared by the legislature, was dis- 
missed by the supreme court for want 
of jurisdiction. ^ .,„,„ ,,. ^, 

The Federal law of 1912, validating 
conveyances of land by the Union Pa- 
clllc railroad within its right-of-way, 
was upheld by the supreme court. 

Oregon will have the old cruiser 
Boston for her naval militia. The su- 
preme court declined to compel de- 
livery to a private bidder, who sought 
to overturn an order of Former Secre- 
tary Meyer. , ., *i,^ 

The supreme court approved, for tne 
present, the practice of railroads 
terminating at Jersey City, allow ng 
lighterage charges to the Brooklyn 
Eastern terminal on freight transport- 
fd from Brooklyn to Jersey City. The 
interstate commerce commission con- 
tended that the termln.-il company was 
in reality Arbuckle Bros., sugar relln- 
ers, and that the lighterage charge 
was a discrimination against the Fed- 
eral Sugar Refining company at Yon- 
kers. N. Y^ 

MINISTRY WINS 

I N FREN CH VOTE. 

Paris, Dec. 2. — The government was 
victorious by a narrow margin in its 
first great trial of strength with the 
opposition in the chamber of deputies 
on the Question of the new loan of 
$260,000,000 to cover the budget def- 
icit The loan was voted 291 to 270. 
On Nov 25, Premier Barthou, in re- 
fusing to accept the procedure sug- 
gested by the opposition made the 
loan a question of confidence. 

Leaders of the opposition, after the 
vote expressed themselves as greatly 
encouraged by the smallness of the 
government majority, and as.=ierted they 
would return the attack with redou- 
bled encrgj* on the question whether 
the new isyuo shall b' .">ub1ect to tax- 
ation or Immune like the existing 
rente's The general opinion, however. 
Is that the ministry will win again 
by a small majority. 

D!AM0N~d7RAUDS" 

CAUGHT IN PARIS. 

New York, Dec. 2. — A cablegram re- 
ceived by* District Attorney Whitman 
announces the arrest In Paris of An- 
toinette Bonner and Joseph Brecher- 
Klsllnger. who were indicted by a 
grand jury here on Nov. 14. on charges 
that they had obtained diamonds val- 
ued at nearlv $250,000 to sell on com- 
mission ,and then pawned them. A 
member of the district attorney's de- 
tective staff will be sent to Paris with 
extradition papers for the couple. 

Until about two months ago Ml.»s 
Bonner, who enjoyed the entree to 
manv fashionable homes, was granted 
almost unlimited credit by Maiden 
Lane diamond broker.^. Kisllnger wa.-i 
associated with her in the sale of dia- 
monds. 



Aluminum Percolators 



On Sale During Demonstra- 
tion of Aluminum Ware at 



:>-< 'fc- -i 



Aluminum Ware Sale 

A MCE ciiRisTM.\s GIFT Matty plcccs HOW prJcecl 
within reach of all. Come in and get some of 
these bargains and also hear the demonstrator. 



'gaillo'weST SUPERIOR ST. DULUTH.TirNHi 



■v>5trr<f.;. 




H-O is different from 
raw oatmeal, or rolled 
oats. It's steam-cooked 
under high steam pres- 
sure, by a special pro- 
cess. H-O has all the 
nutriment of the oats, 
also the flavor. 

Home cooking of or- 
dinary rolled oats does 
not give you that. The 
H-O way is the right 
way and the most 
economical. Ready to 
serve in 20 minutes. 




The H-O Company. BuffdIo.N.Y. 
Makers of HO. Xorc^.and Pretto. 




H-Q 



! 



:?> 




Soften the hardest water on wash- 
day with 

GOLD DUST 

Use it wherever there's dirt or grease 
because it cleans and purifies everything. 

5c and larger packages. 



t 



CHICAGO 



"£0f tho GOLD DUST TWiMS 
*^ do your work" ^ 



'^ors'o^^ 



iiiii 



was due to n 
gan except tl 
eased, and 1 
that Mr. Iluss 
ago. 

All the m« 
were queatloi 
Hlg:Klna rega 
moments and 



atural causes. Kvery or- 
e brain, he said, was dls- 
e considered it strange 
ell had not died ten years 

;mbers of the household 
jed by District Attorney 
rdlnsT the past life, last 
Identity of the dead man. 



TWO INDICTED FOR 

DYNAMITE PLOT. 



IndianapoU 
.Tones, secret 
ternational I 
tural Iron 
Davis, an ir< 
on charges c 
unlawfully d: 
by the Fedei 
ported yester 
based on Dn 



i. Ind., Dec. 2. — Harry 
ary-treasurer of the In- 
nlon of Bridge & Struc- 
yorkers. and George E. 
)n worker, were indicted 
f conspiracy to transport 
•namite and nitroglycerin, 
•al grand Jury which re- 
iay. The indictments were 
vis' alleged confession. 



HAYCRAI-T AFTER 

HAMMOND'S PLACE. 



Have You 
Any Money 
for Christmas? 

Well, you could have had, 
if you were saving just a dol- 
lar a month. 

$1.00 will open a savings ac- 
count in this bank. 

If you don't save yourself, 
start the children. 

Open every Saturday eve- 
ning. 

DulQih State Bank 

1924 West Superior Street. 



St. Paul. 
Julius E. Ha 
the Republic 
gress in the 
He said he e 
that the besi 
fact that he 
Mr. Hammoii 
nominee. I 



Minn.. Dec. 2. — Senator 
fCTSitt of Madella filed for 
an nomination for con- 
Second district yesterday, 
xpected to be elected, and 
evidence of this was the 

had filed. In his opinion 
d will be the Democratic 
ersonally Haycraft and 



Hammond are the best of friends, and 
some years ago were associated in th« 
law business. 

Frank Ellsworth of Mankato. who 
has been the Hepubllcan candidate the 
la.sit two campaign.-^. Is expect<d to .-un 
again, and Senator Frank Ciague of 
H«*dwood Falls l.«« nifo likely to file. 



EVERY ORGAN BUT 

BRAIN DISEASED. 



2. — By order 
HIggins, an 



Melrose, Mass., Dec. 
of District Attorney J 
nutonsv was performed yesterday on 
the body of William C. Hussell. who 



the 



was claimed as a brother by 
North I>akota and California men who 



ripmanded half the estate of the late 
IJanTel Hussell. W. C. RusseU died 

'^The ^medical examiner said later 
that the autopsy Indicated that deatb 



Don't Fuss With 
Mustard Plasters! 

There's no sense in mixing up a mess 
of mustard, flour and water and get- 
t 1 n g everything all 
mussed up when you 
can so easily relieve that 
pain or soreness with a 
little clean, white MUS- 
TEROL.B. 

MUST E R OLE Is 
made of I ure oil of 
mustard and other helpful Ingredients, 
combined In the form of a i)lea.sant 
wl.lte ointment. It takes the place of 
the out-of-date mustard plaster, and 
will not blister! 

MUSTER OLE gives Instant relief 




from Sore Throat, Bronchitis. Tonsll- 
itls. Croup, Stiff Neck. Asthma, Neu- 
ralgia, Headache, Congestion, Pleurisy, 
Rheumatism, Lumbago, Pains and 

Aches of the Back or Joints, Sprains. 
Sore Muscles, Bruises. Chilblains, 
Frosted Feet, Colds of the Che^t .it 
y prevents Pneumonia). 
At your druggist's, in 
25c and 50c Jars, and 
u special lart?e liu*«pltal 
size fur $2.r>0. 

Accept no substitute. 

If your druggist c-4.nnot 

supply you, Bend 25c or 

50c to the MUSTE ROLE Company, 

Cleveland, Ohio, and we will mail y<JU 

a jar, postage prepaid. (64) 

DU M. M. KITTinX. Jainalo*. N. Y., »ay«: 

".Sample of Miuterolo waa reeelvwl aJid have found 
It very iUixftnUtrr ln<lcc<L Proilucaa auidi reiwlU{ 
aud as you apeak of U. nu Ulatar." 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



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12 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH H E J? A L D 



December 2, 1913. 




The Latest 

News Published 

on This Page 




T 



! cnnTRai i 




EDITED 
BY BRUCE 




&^tfl IMA 

dU Vw LI nu 




The Herald 

Sporting Gossip 

Is Reliable 




HOW CAN THE CONFERENCE 
" KEE P NOTRE D AME OUT? 

All-American Star Declares South Bend Team 
Could Have Beaten Any Confer- 
ence Eleven. 



DULUTH BOY PLACED 

ON MYTHICAL TEAM 



Baseball Magnates Attempt to Hog the Sporting 

Limelight---Why Jimmy McAleer 

Sold Out. 




BY BRUCE. 

HIS luuthall tiling keeps get- 
ting our goat. It is time that 
une took up other and per- 
haps more diverse labors in 
the sporting vineyard — and 
yet there is one other thing \vc would 
like to be permitted to say. Mr. Chair- 
man, we ask you. Oh shoot, if you 
must. Then very well. 

Now here it is. The .\rmy ever- 
lastingly thrashes the Xavy. Well and 
good. But Notre Dame travels east 
in the patient and humiliated search 
of games and gives the Army one 
grand and good beating. By this act 
the standard of Western football is 
raised in the eyes of the effete and 
cautious East many notches. 

Let us watch, therefore, the pro- 
cedure of the conference at the meet- 
ing when football matters are defin- 
itely decided for the coming season. 
Gentlemen, permit us to go back a 
trifle. In 1909 Notre Dame gave 
Michigan a close beating. Following 
the game certain of the players of the 
Catholic school were protested. This 
protest, if we understand the matter 
correctly, was followed by the stirring 
decision upon the part of the direc- 
tors of athletics of Notre Dame for a 
thorough and conclusive purging of 
the athletic system of the South Bend 
institution. 

We have known of personal in- 
stances where athletes were given 
reasons for attending Notre Dame. 
But why single out this school for a 
horrible e.xample? There have been 
others. It comes simply to the ques- 
tion of picking one leopard and de- 
claring that he cannot change his 
spots. 

If you are fair in your judgments 
of football conditions, you v>ill be- 
lieve, should the conference refuse to 
admit Notre Dame to membership, 
that it is the rankest case of unfair 
sportsmanship that has been held up 
to blind the eyes of any fair minded 
public. 

Yesterday we were talking to a for- 
mer coach of Notre Dame. This man 
Is a former Eastern gridiron star — in 
fact, an All-American selection. His 
statement of the case influenced the 
writing of this article. 

This man has seen all of the big 
W^estern games of the past season anci 
he holds the opinion that Notre Dame 
could have defeated any of the con- 
ference teams. 

Let us say that the winning of the 
conference championship imder the 
present conditions is a sham and a 
hollow mockery. 

Why keep Notre Dame out? Let 
the spectacled professors who rule the 
conference investigate scholastic con- 
ditions at the South Bend institution, 
and if those playing upon the Notre 
Daine team are found to have pass- 
ing marks, why let the team in. 

Pray tell what are the teams of 
Northwestern, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana 
or Purdue in most year-s? Kindly 
answer that question fairly and im- 
partially, Mr. Follower of Western 
loot ball. 

Why not get some real games. 
Think of the wonderful amount of in- 
terest there would have been in a con- 
test between Notre Dame and Mir.- 
ncsota — if this game had been plaj-ed 
after the South Bend team had de- 
feated the .\rmy and made one of th.e 
most illustrious showings in the hi.s- 
tory of any Western team. 

Some of the moribund followers of 
the trend of football were disposed to 
shout knocker at this column. Oh 
very well. But if one fair and impar- 
tial follower of fair play can be found 
who will give fair and judicial reasons 
why Notre Dame should be literally 
barred from playing Western teams, 
after a fair and square investigation 
of Conditions at the Imliana school, 



we, for one, have grossly mistaken 
the tenor of the public mind. 

It comes down to the fact, gentle- 
men, where you are not getting the 
best football. Mossback professors, 
hidebound from class room authority, 
arc arbitrarily holding that such a 
team shall not be allowed to play 
such a team. Chicago had a fair team 
this season — not a wonderful team by 
any means. Let them all in and mis 
up things a bit. Let some of the mem- 
bers of the conference people attempt 
to imitate a real sportsman, even if 
the task is an alarming innovation 
and may establish a precedent for 
some of the other profs. 

They Want It All. 
raOLLOWING the final football 
m game of the season one of the 
major leagues issued the official bat- 
ting averap^es. Permit us to state that 
this hogging of most of the all-ycav 
round limelight is getting to be a 
most pernicious practice. The world's 
series cuts into the football season, 
and the early spring season infringes 
upon the later winter sport season. 
Not satisfied with this the club own- 
ers of the big leagues desire publicity 
all during the winter. This is too 
much. 

* • • 

Where James Slipped. 

HL.\SHED over the news of tho 
day comes the story of the dis- 
posal of the baseball interests of Jim- 
my McAleer in the Boston American 
club. From the under current of 
things that have been let loose among 
the inside guys of baseball, one is led I 
to believe that the letting out of Jake ' 
Stahl was one grand and egregrious I 
blunder upon the part of one James \ 
McAleer. ' 

They do say — ah. but what's the 
use. But anyway, they do say this 
much, that the letting go of Stahl was 
one of the greatest bonehead bulls of 
recent years, and one can't help but 
wonder if the selling of his stock up- 
on the part of McAleer wasn't a 
mournful and dreary realization of 
this fact. 




BRYANT COMPARES WITH 
WO RLD'S BEST SKATERS 

Duluth Boy Touted as the Coming Roller Skating 

Champion---Race With Ceoni Will 

Be Important. 



BROWN AND DENFELD POT 
ON ALL-WESTERN ELEVEN 



MATT BROWN. 



FREDDY BEELL 
IS PJPARED 

Emil Klank Says Dutchman 

Is Ready for St. Paul 

Winner. 



have booked passag-e for Europe and 
will compete In th« British and i.on- 
tinental tournaments. 

They will thus be able to round Into 
form for the International tourna- 
ments and Anthony F. Wilding of New 
Zealand who this year defeated 
Maurice E. McLaughlin of San Fran- 
cisco for the championship of Great 
Britain announces he will be available 
for the Davis cup contests. 

planTgreat 
spojt club 

Organization Forms to Cre- 
ate One of Greatest Sport- 
ing Clubs in World. 



(BY BRUCE). 

In matching: Frank Bryant apalnst 
Roland Ceonl, the wonderful little 
Italian roller skating champion, Mana- 
ger Charley Lockernian of the Audi- 
torium will afford the large list of Du- 
luth followers of the little Northwest- 
ern champion the opportunity of seeing 
Just how good Brj-ant Is. 

For several years the writer has 
taken a deep Interest In the lltle 
skater who has really established a re- 
markable reputation. Starting at the 
old Lincoln park rink as a skate boy 
Bryant rapidly reached the point where 
he could defeat any of the local 
skaters. After several tours of the 
smaller towns of the Northwest In 
which all of the speed boys of "Wis- 
consin, Michigan and Dakota were de- 
feated on small and often uncertain 
skating floors, the Duluthlan won the 
Northwestern championship from the 
veteran title holder, Joe Munch of Mil- 
waukee, which title Is In the possession 

of Brj-ant at the present time. 

Harley Davidson, who is at the pre.?- 
ent time defeating most of the Aus- 
tralians over in the Never Never land, 
came to the old Llnrnln park rink and 
defeated the little Duluth flyer. Im- 
mature and Inexperienced, Bryant was 
out-foxed by one of the greatest and 
also one of the hoadlest skaters that 
the roller game ha« yet produced. 
Bryant In a Wonder. 

That old stuff about the prophet be- 
ing unable to get much glory In his 
native land has In the past more or 
less applied to Bryant. There has 
been those who believed the youngster 
was Just a fast skater* — and nothing 
more. While Manay;er Lockerman of 
the Auditorium may be somewhat 
prejudiced in favor of Bryant, he has 
nevertheless too much wLsdom to make 
his statements too strong. The for- 
mer Milwaukee rink manager holds 



the opinion that Bryant is destined 
to be the champion of the world, and 
further declares that at the present 
time the Duluth boy is fully 25 per 
cent faster than ever before in his 
life. 

"Bryant never knew how to train," 
said Ijockerman today. "He made the 
common mistake of other youngsters, 
in training too much. I took him off 
that stuff and also suggested some 
improvements In taking the corners. I 
have seen them all, Hamilton, Ceoni, 
Davidson, Moore, Martin and scores of 
others, and it is my ho.nest opinion 
that at the present time the Duluth 
boy is one of the greatest skaters in 
the world." 

At tlie present time Brj-ant Is but 
23 years of age. It Is not believed that 
as yet he has reached his prime. There 
are few skaters in the hi.story of the 
game who have hung up the really re- 
markable record that Bryant has made 
at the somewhat tender age of 23 
years. 

Bryant is a clean and gentlemanly 
little fellow. He is a credit to pro- 
fessional sport. It is gratifying to see 
success come to those in any line of 
endeavor wiio amply deserve it, and 
the followers rf the little Ifcater 
believe that Frankle Bryant in every 
way deserves the reputation ho has 
hung up as one of tlie best skaters in 
the United States. 



Winner of Yacht Race Sold. 

Chicago, Dec 2. — The racing sloop 
Michicago, winner in 1911 of the Man- 
hasset Bay cup, was sold here by the 
syndicate owning her, to Charles D. 
Chapln. Tl)e Michicago will be over- 
hauled and used by Mr. Chapln as a 
cruiser at his summer camp at Har- 
bor Point, Mich. 

♦ 

Challenge in Polo. 

London, Dec. 2. — The Hurllngham 
Polo club has forwarded a challenge 
to the American Polo association for 
a series of cup matches in 1914. 



Critic Places Duluth Boys 

Among the High School 

Stars. 



Honor Means Flecognition of 

the Prowess of Strength 

of Central. 



Matt Brown, the dashing and bril- 
liant halfback of the Duluth Central 
football team, and "Gibby" Denfeld, 
the sturdy, aggre.'ss ve and fiercely 
offensive tackle of the same team, 
have won the great and coveted honor 
of being selected aj members of the 
All-Middle Western high school team. 

This honor corresponds to being 

chosen a member of the All-Western 

college team, and simply goes to stamp 

the local boys as football players of 

remarkable ability, a fact that the 

most Duluthlans hive realized for 
some time past. 

Another honor that goes with the 
selection of "(Jraclno" Mathew and 
"Lumber Camp" Glbby, is that the 
really remarkable football team of the 
local high school hss been recognized 
by the critic who makes the selection 
for the mythical eleven. 

Following Is the article: 

"Brelos, Oak Park 111., right end. 

"Hamilton, Minneapolis, East, right 

"Gllis, Milwaukee, South, right guard. 

"Tucker, Minneapolis, West, center. 

"Yerxa, Minneapolis, West, left 
guard. 

"Denfeld. Duluth, Central, left 
tackle. 

"Zimmerman, Scott High, Toledo, 
Ohio, left end. 

"Simpson, Oshkosh, Wis., quarter- 
back, (capt) 

"Barrett, Oak Park, 111., right half. 

"Tyra, Minneapolis, West, left half. 

"Brown, Dulutn, Central, fullback. 



wish to have his name mentioned. Th* 
team as a whole is something out of 
the ordinary and one of the few of it« 
kind ever chosen. 



"Note — This eleven was picked by a 
gentleman who had the pleasure of 
seeing the large majority of the high 
school teams in the Middle West per- 
form. For different reasons he doesn't 



"This is the .season for r'cking the 
mythical football elevens. It has been 
my good fortune to witness a number 
of high school games in the Middle 
West, and as a result I pick the fol- 
lowing players as the best. 

"Thl.s eleven, if they played together, 
could defeat any minor college team in 
the country and could also give either 
Chicago, Harvard or Notre Dame an 
intertstlng contest. 

".Johnny Barrett of Oak Park, 111., 
is half of their scoring machine. He in 
an excellent man on either end of the 
for%vard pass, a good kicker, a fair de- 
fensive man, follows his Interference 
well, picks his holes cleanly and can 
carr>' the ball in excellent fashion. 
Barrett Is first choice for a halfback 
position. 

"At the other half T have r.laced 
Tyra of Minneapolis West Side. He 
gained more ground than any other 
Twin City back and was seldom thrown 
for a lo.9.q. He Ip a fair kicker and a 
good defensive player. When carry- 
ing the ball he was best at plays off 
tackle and at line plunging. 
SenwaUonal Brown. 

"At full the sensational Brown of 
Duluth Central Is placed. Brown is an 
extremely fast man, weighing about 
175 pounds. He is equally good at 
plugging the line In running the ends. 
Like Barrett, he la good at either end 
of the forward pass. On defense 
Brown is every whit as good as on <,f- 
fense. Ho backs up the line in .splen- 
did fashion and at the same time In- 
tercepts many forward passes. 

"Simpson of Oshkosh. Wis.. high 
school is easily the premier quarter of 
the high schools. The champions of 
Wisconsin plays are built around him. 
Weighing 180 pounds and a remark- 
able runner, he combines phy.slcal 
prowess with headwork. He Is abso- 
lutely accurate with the forward pp.ss, 
is an excellent drop kicker and punt- 
er, can hit the line or run the ends, 
and Is a wonder on defense. I would 
name him as captain because he is a 
natural born leader and because of his 
experience. 

"Tucker of Minneapolis West Side 
Is given the pivoted position. Ills 
passing was accurate and his defen- 
sive playing good. He was a regular 
Sarn White on fumbles and had that 
accomplishment so few centers have, 
that of blocking his man. 

"At guards I have placed Terxa of 
Minneapolis West Side and Gills of 
MllwauKee South. Both are stars on 



NOTICE TO 



HUNTERS 

THE B!G GAME SEASON CLOSED ON 

THE THIRTIETH. 




Do not let your 
game heads lay 
around the 
woodshed and 
spoil. 




BrinK them 
to exper- 
ienced work- 
men and 
have the 
work done 
right. Thirty years experience. 

FRANK STOREY 

SUCCESSOR TO T. J . S TOREY 
227 East Superior Street. 



A letter from Emil Klank, manager 
of Fred Beell, which was received by 
the sporting editor of The Herald to- 
day, states that the little Wisconsin 
mat marvel will meet George Lurich, 
the famous Russian, after the contest 
in this city with the winner of the 
Peters-Irsllnger bout. 

"Fred is in grand condition at the 
present time," writes Klank. "The lit- 
tle man has a numocr of big matches 
booked for the East, for the followers 
of the wrestling sport want to have an- 
other look at the fellow they consid- 
ered the greatest for his size and 
weight in all the world. 

"Fred would rather see Peters re- 
turned the winner In the St. Paul con- 
test. Peters broke Beell's shoulder 
over a year ago and was given the 
contest when Beell was unable to con- 
tinue. The victory over Mike Yokel was 
really the tirst opportunity the little 
wood chopper had of testing himself 
out, and now we know that he Is the 
old Beell and ready for any of them. 

"We believe that Peters is one of the 
greatest wrestlers in the world for his 
weight. If Irslinger beats the .St. Paul 
man you can put the Englishman down 
as a wonder. But no matter how good 
they are, they can't scare the little 
fellow 1 am handling — for he Isn't the 
kind that can be scared a bit." 

Frank A. Gotch will referee the con- 
test of tomorrow evening between 
Peters and Irslinger. The bout is looked 
upon as one of the greatest that has 
ever been secured for the Apostle city 
and will be held in the big Auditorium, 
capable of seating 7,000 people. 



All Sixty-Eight Branches of 

Sport to Be Represented; 

Low Cost. 






Chicago, Dec, 2. — What is designed 
to be one of the greatest sporting 
clubs In the world with a program 
abounding In unusual features, is 
promised for Chicago, according to an- 
nouncement Just made. 

The organization, starting with 
2,500 members, with James A. Pugh, 
the yachtsman, as president, has been 
incorporated under the name "Sports- 
man's Club of America." Mr. Pugh 
says that within a year the club will 
have a membership of 40.000. as there 
will be no initiation fee, and the an- 
nual dues will be only ?5. 

A large clubhouse with a stadium 
seating 15,000 persons will be con- 
structed here and it is planned to give 
exhibitions every night of the year, 
giving full play to every one of the 
sixty-eight recognized branches of 
sports. 

"We should havD in both North- 
western and Chicago universities row- 
ing crews equal to those in Harvard, 
Yale or Syracuse, and have intercol- 
legiate contests each year," said Mr. 
Pugh. "The lake front affords an ideal 
place for such events. 

"When I took my power boat Dis- 
turber III to England last year, I was 
treated royally by the Englishmen and 
I have the promise of three of them 
that they will send boats to Chicago 
next year to compete in a regatta." 

E. Mackay Edgar, owner of the 
Maple Leaf, the fastest going craft In 
the world; Noel Bobbins and Count 
Dc.«puJols all agreed to come to Chi- 
cago next year. If we can attract such 
men with what we have now, what 
could we do with such a club as we 
propose eventually to formulate?" 

COACH STAGG 

FAVORS CHANGE 



PACKEY MoF.VRI.,VXD TO 

MAKK WORLD TOUR. 



* 



^ Chicago, Dec. 2. — The globe- * 
M trotting (;inntM and White Sox ^ 
•^ tvlll have nothing on Farkry Mc- ^ 
^ Farlnnd. whowe engagement to -jjt 
^ MUs Margaret Loughlln, Jollet, ^ 
^ III., waM announced today. % 

^ Am noon aa the knot in tied In ^ 
^ the Kpring, Packey and hiM bride ^ 
^ will start on a tour of the world ^ 
^ on their honeymoon. The boxer ^ 
4r will give exhibition bout* abroad MH 
^ to pay expense*!. ^ 

i( McKariand continued training ^ 
^ today for his ten-round mill with ^ 
^ Harry Trendall at St. Louis ^ 
•)|( Thursday night. m 

WANT TH AT DA VTs CUP. 

Australia Will Try Again for Noted 
Lawn Tennis Trophy. 

Melbourne, Victoria, Dec. 2. — Aus- 
tralia will make ariother attempt to 
recover the Dwlght F. Davis, lawn 
tennis cup, now held by America. Nor- 
man E. Brookes and A. W. Dunlop 



Rule of Roughing Kicker 

Would Be Amended By 

Midway Mentor. 

Chicago, Dec. 2. — A. A. Stagg, direc- 
tor of athletics at the University of 
Chicago, will make but one recom- 
mendation at the meeting In February 
of the football rules committee, of 
which he is a member. 

Before leaving Monday for Plne- 
hurst, N. C, for a vacation, the coach 
of the Western conference champions 
said the rule relating to the roughing 
of the kicker should not be enforced 
too severely. 

According to the Maroon mentor, the 
art of blocking punts Is one of the 
best plays In football. Under the pres- 
ent ruling a player who merely bumps 
the kicker after the latter has sent the 
ball down the field should be put out 
of the game. 

It Is generally the case that a player 
of the defending team cannot check 
himself quickly enough to avoid bump- 
ing the kicker, and Stagg believes >nc 
rule should be amended and the offi- 
cials made the sole Judges whether the 
kicker is roughed intentionally or ac- 
cidentally. 




KNOWN TH E 



WORLD OVER 




ANDY Gift for his Christmas! 
a Gillette Safety Rstzor. 



is the Standard Set 



This 

contains triple silver- 
plated razor and blade box with blades, in 
Morocco-covered case. A |^ft that he will 
use, and get more attac:hed to every 
day of his life. 



Other Standard Sets, Sterling Silver and Silver or Gold 
Plate, cased in Seal Leather, Pigskin and Melted, $6 to $12. 

k 

Ask Your Dealer 

GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR COMIPANY, BOSTON 




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Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 




deserves his , 

Another Wonder. 

"The Duluth ol'-vcn had another won- 
der boj^ides their '^^Pt^i"- .^'■";(5:";. „V,t 
la nenfteld. their grejit tnckle. Without 
a Eht" Denftold wan the best llnes- 
tnan amonK the hlprh pchools of the 
Middle Wost. Not an Inch was gained 
over hlin thla year. He could open up 
ereat holes on the offense and was al- 
ways sure of making a substantial gain 
whin called on to do so. 

"For his running mate T have select- 
ed Hamilton the ligrht-halrcd Minne- 
apolis Eaat leader. Ho is a giant 
f.hyslcally and puts a lot of sins^^ 
nto his teammates. Like Dt-nfteld. he 
Is a wonder on defense and can open 
up blK holes on the offense. 

"Zimmerman of P<ott high, Toledo 
and lUelos of Oak I'ark, 111., are the 
leading,' ends. Both are experienced. 
Kood at blo.:kinR the oppo.sinK tackles, 
»ettlnK dow« undt-r kicks, receivinR 
pas.ses and preventing runs around 

"Evfrythina: considered this team is 
a wonder. A heavy, asrgre.sslve line, 
makltier biir holes on offense and act- 
ing like a stone wall on the defensive. 
occa.«'lonally breaking through and 
blo.kiiiR a kick, and a big fa.«t back- 
field able to plunge through the •'"«. 
run the ends, forward pass or kick, 
and directed by an excellent field gen- 
eral thev would gladden the heart or 
any football lover. 

'•On offense Tyra, Denfeld and Mrown 
cou'd buck the line and Rrown. Imp- 
Bon and Barrett run the ends. Barrett 
and Simp.-<on could alternatw forward 
tou'J'^lnL; Simpson would do all the drop 
kicking and punting and Tyra the 
place kicking. ,j _, 

"On defense the four backs could al- 
ternaU- in returning punts, preferably 
Simpson and T?arrett. Any team play- 
ing again.'it them would have to nu"y 
their forward passes because of the 
linemen breaking through. The two 
tackles could smash all end runs, In- 
terferences and nip the runner In 
emashes off tackle, while attempts 
around the end or through the center 
would be fruitless. The backs are fast 
enough to prevent forward passes. It 
•would be a wonderful team. ' 

yost'sTdeOf" 
an all-american 



manson, Edwin Skinner, Isadore Karon, 
Walter Morrison, Homer Collins, Ralph 
Osman, Fred Bates, Allan Hoyt, Doug- 
las Moore, Jack Sosnosky, John Smith. 
Mandy Rosenberg. Samuel Totker. 
Hamilton Phelps. Carl Olson, Lee Rart- 
lett, Elton Gujer, Lawrence Nelson, 
Hymie Silk. Jacob Garon, Clarence 
Jentoft, Lloyd Weverka, Anthony 
Plutnlsky, Thure Westberg. Harold 
Bradlev. John Comstock, Douglas Mc- 
Kay. Raymond Steven*. Clarence Heg- 
land. 



»^^MHNHM n > t*»**»H(»»»»»*»>»»»» 



t 
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NOTRE n.\ME WANTS 

CONFERBNCIi: BERTH. 



% 



NamesTtiree Michigan Men, 

One Chicago and One 

Minnesota. 

Detroit, Dec. 2. — Fielding Tost, 
coach of the University of Michigan 
football team, last night gave out his 
idea as to proper construction of an 
all-Anierlcan eleven. He places five 
Western men. three from his own 
team, one from Chicago and one from 
Minnesota In the class. The selec- 
tion i.s: 

Left end — Fritz. Cornell. 

Left tackle — Ballln. Princeton. 

Left guard — Munns. Cornell. 

Center — Simpson. Pennsylvania. 

Riis'ht guard — I'ennock. Harvard. 

Rigiit tackle — I'ontlus, Michigan. 

Right end — Solon. Minnesota. 

Quarter back— Hughitt. Mlcliigan. 

Left half — Craig. Michigan. 

Right half — Norgren, Chicago. 

Fullback— Brickley, Harvard. 

B!G SQUATbur 

FOR BASKET BALL 



^ ClileaKTo, Deo. 2. — Notre Dame, 
tvhioh huK al«vayM been a (aetur 
n Wr^itern atKletlcn, will apply 
iti for admittanoe to the big con- 
-)!( ferciice. I<'lnal aclon cannot be 
^ tnkcn on (hlM requent until tlie 

# June meeting;, an the HtandluK of 
■■k the ^onth Bond wohool niUNt be 
^ referre«l to the facnltleit of the 
J/H conference unlversitlcH. 
^ Jn addition to taking np the Ne- ^ 
ilK brattka and Notre Dame applica- ^ 
^ tloUN next Satunlay. the BIr Mne -# 
^^^ cuninilttce will award the outdoor ^ 

# conference track and field meet. * 

# • 

i^ ^ ^ ^ -T* ^* <»p .^ .^ J^ ^ '^^'^^"^^'^'^^ ^ I^ J^ J^ jpi ^^ ^ ^aft 

FEDER ALS"A CflVE. 

Rumors Say Plans Are Being Made to 
Invade Milwaukee. 

New York, Dec. 2. — The Federal 

league promoters have decided, to 

abandon Chicago, and are planning to 

take Milwaukee into the circuit, ac- 
(.rding to a rumor started here to- 
day. Jankes Gihnore. who backed the 
Chicago Federals last year, has come 
to the conclusion that it would be a 
waste of gor>d money to compete with 
the White Sox and Cubs for patronage 
next year, continues the story. 

The promoters. It seems, gradually 
are steering away from a conllict with 
the major leagues, and are scheming 
to make headway against the Class 
A. A. American association. 

Milwaukee. In their opinion, can 
support two teams with non-confllct- 
Ing schedules, and for that reason the 
league Is ready to transfer the Chi- 
cago franchise to Milwaukee, where 
the American association had a pen- 
nant winner this year. 



SCHILLING WILL 

COAC H C. H . S. TEAM. 

Coach Schilling of the high school 
athletic teams Is to give several eve- 
nings a week to the coaching of the 
basket ball candidates of the Cathe- 
dral high school. At a meeting of the 
Cathedral school athletic officials held 
last evening, it was decided to seek 
the services of the Central instructor. 
Schilling at once gave his consent and 
will begin immediately to put the 
Cathedral candidates in condition. 



TURKEY APOLOGIZES 
TO ST. PETERSBURG 



Coach Schilling to Start 

Season With Many 

Candidates. 

All of the high school candidates for 
the basket ball team will assemble In 
the gymnar.lum late today and start 
the first tryout of the season. Coach 
Schilling declares that there Is the 
mateiial at Central for one of the 
best teams that has ever represented 
the pile of masonry. 

With the organization of the big 
BQuad of candidates the work of get- 
ting ui> the various class teams will 
be started. I'ractlcally all of the foot- 
ball men will be out for the basket 
ball team, and Coach Schilling has 
Btronjily urged eveiy boy In school 
who has any athletic aspirations at 
all to come out and try to make 
either the first team or one of the 
cla.ss basket ball quints. 

All of the class contests will be 
out of the way before the holidays 
and the first regularly scheduled 
gamo f:>r the school team will be 
played within two weeks. 

Following is a complete list of the 
candidates out for the various tt^ams: 
Wavne Whltely, Albert Armstrong. 
Earl Shaw. Franklin Gogins, T. 
Peterson. Milton Ryan, Robert New- 
comb, Lachlan Taylor, Frank Neff. 
Charles Everett, Robert Walsh. E. 
Mann. Robert Kerr. Paul Flinn. Joe Du 
Moe. Clayton Westover. Arthur Pear- 
son, Leo Moerke, Carl Melander, Percy 
Stevens, Ferdinand Collatz, Arthur 



Regrets Arrest of Musta- 

ptia on Russian 

Steamer. 

Constantinople, Dec. 1. — The Turkish 
government today sent written apolo- 
gies to the Russian government In con- 
nection with the arrest a week ago on 
board a Russian steamer of Kavakll 
Mustapha, who had been sentenced to 
death for the assassination of Shevket 
Pasha, former grand vizier. 

Kavakll has since died In prison, 
where he was awaiting execution. He 
is said to have committed suicide. 

Kavakll was given up to the Turkish 
police on their assertion that he was a 
common murderer. Aft^ward. when 
the Russian government discovered 
he was a political offender. It demand- 
ed his Immediate release. 

The Turkl.sh government, now faced 
with the po^^slbility of a demand for 
an autopsy, has taken the further step 
of dlsmls.sing Azim Bey, ex-prefect of 
police, who had been promoted to be 
governor of the province of Adana after 
arresting Kavakll. 





ENTIRE SCALP 

■ . ■ 

Spread to Body, Limbs, Back and 
Ears, If Scratched Would Bleed 
and Smart. Cuticura Soap and 
Ointment Completely Cured. 

R. F. D. No. 2. Sunfleld. Mich. — "I was 
troubled with eczema. It began with a 8or« 
on the top of the scalp, broke out as apimpl* 
and grew larger imtll it waa a 
large rod spot with a cruat 
or Bcab over it. Thl« becaraa 
' larger finally covering th8 
entire scalp and spread to 
different parts of ths body, 
the limbs and i>ack and in the 
ears. These sores grew large* 
gradually imtil some were as 
large as a quarter of a dollar. 
They would itch and If scratched they would 
bleed and smart. The clothing would Irri- 
tate thom at night when it was being ro- 
movod causing them to Itch and smart so I 
could not sleep. A watery fluid would run 
from them. J^Iy scalp becama covered with 
a scale and when the hair was raised up it 
would raise this scale; the hair was coming 
out terribly. My scalp and body Itched all 
the tims. 

"After using Cuticura Soap and Ointment 
with two aijplicatlons we could notice a great 
difference. My way of using the Cuticura 
Boap and Ointment was to apply the Oint- 
ment to the sores and all over the scalp, then 
after I would wash the sores and scalp with 
the Soap. In a montli's time I was com- 
pletely cured." (.Signed) Mrs. Bertli» 
Underwood, Jan. 3, 1913. 

Cuticura Soap 25c. and Cuticura Ointment 
60c are sold everywhere. Liberal sample of 
each mailed frea. with S2-p. ikin Book. Ad- 
dress post-card "Cuticura. Dept. T. Boston.'! 
*«'Mcn who shave and shampoo with Cu- 
ticura Soap will find it bast for skin and scalp. 



COMMISSIONS RULE 
PENNSYLVANIA CITIES 



Philadelphia, Dec. 1. — Commission 
form of government went into effect 
in a majority of the cities of Pertnsyl- 
vanla today, the system of select and 
common councils going out of exist- 
ence. Hereafter the affairs of these 
municipalities will be conducted by a 
single council of five men, one of whom 
is the mayor. 

With the exception of Philadelphia, 
Pittsburg. Scranton and three or four 
small municipalities operating under 
special charters, all cities in the state 
are affected by the new commission 
law passed by the last legislature. 



NO MORE FINES FOR 
TRUST LAW BREAKERS 



Washington. Dec. 1. — Jail sentences 
only and no fines for violations of the 
Sherman law are proposed in an 
amendment Introduced today by Rep- 
resentative Henry, which also would 
declare illegal a device to restrain 
trade, manipulate prices, prevent com- 
petition or fix standards for controlling 
prices. Organizations not conducted 
for profit and agricultural products in 
the hands of producers would be ex- 
empt. 



WILSON APPROVES 
MAJORITY PROGRAM 



Washington, Dec. 1. — Unless con- 
gress takes a recess during the Christ- 
mas holidays. President Wilson will 
forego his planned ten-day vacation. 
The determination of Democratic lead- 
ers in the senate not to agree to the 
recess unless the currency bill has 
passed by Christmas was approved by 
the president today, and he let it be 
known that he would not leave Wash- 
ington while congress was In session. 

FORDImAN PROMOTED, 

Goes From the Fargo to the Cincin- 
nati Office of Company. 

Fargo, N. D.. Dec. 1. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — C. F. Reynolds has been pro- 
moted by the Ford Automobile com- 
pany to the Cincinnati office and Is 
succeeded by N. A. Enders of Cincin- 
nati. The local office controls both 
Dakotas, Northwestern Minnesota and 
Ea.stern Montana and is one of the 
largest agencies qt the company. 
• 

Boy Killed IVhlle Racliiar. 

Plngree, N. D., Dec. 1. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Racing teams home 
from school proved fatal to Harold 







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WHILE THE SUPPLY LASTS 

A JVonderfuL Large 



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measure 8'/4 inched 

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\Vith a Package of 
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In the New Oval Foil Package 






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Each Bk nket shows the Flag of some 

nation in correct design and colors. These 

extra lar^e size Flag Blankets are not on y 

very attractive and decorative, but also highly 

instructive. The ladies are delighted with them, 

because they make such beautiful couch covers, 

den draperies and oi:her ornaments. 

This Free Offer is to induce more smokers to 
become acqSnted with the QUALITY of MECCA 
Cigarettes, that always affords 

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**The Envy of All Cigarette Manufacturers 



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QUALITY has made MECCA the largest selling brand of cigarettes in 
America. No milder, mellower, more satisfying cigarette ^h^^ .^ECCA has 
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Turkish Blend Cigarettes tor 10c has proved very popular with smokers every- 



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this special offer. All dealers who have not already been supplied may secure a special supply ^ 
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Degler. He was riding In a wagon 
driven by his brother. He fell back- 
wards and crushed his skull, dying a 
short time afterwards. 



DESERTS STRIKERS; 
WORKMAN IS SHOT 



R. Christian of Oakes. Mr. Nelson re- 
moved to Fargo, where he has estab- 
lished a weekly In the Interests of the 
equity society and the Bull Moosers. 

MARRIED TO SEVEN; 
ADMITS BIGAMY 



garment worker who returned to work 
was shot, probably fatally, today by an 
unidentified man who fired from the 
windows of a taxlcab. 

The victim, Harry Skulnick, was go- 
ing to work under police escort when 
he was attacked. 

Two su8pt;cts wero arrested. The 

garment workers' strike has continued 

since last summer. 

• 

Martin, N. D., Paper Sold. 

Martin, NT. D.. Drc. 1. — (Kperlal to 
The Herald.) — The Martin Searchlight 
has been sold by G. L. Nelson to John 



Save Your Health 

Most sicknesses that impair health 
have their start in quite ordinary 
ailments of the organs of diges- 
tion or eliminstion. Stomach, 
liver, kidneys, and bowels are 
quickly benefited by the action of 

BEECHAM'S 
PILLS 

8oM •▼•iTwhere. Is bozM. lOe^ 2Se. 



Pontlac, Mich., Dec. 1. — David R. De- 
vlne, a telgraph operator w^ho was re- 
cently arrested at Cleveland, today 

pleaded guilty to bigamy. Ho was 
sentenced to Jackson prison to servo 
from two and a half to five years. 
County aathorltlos testified their In- 
vestigation Indicated that Devine was 
married to seven women. 



CHICAGO SUBURBAN 
STATION IS HELD UP 



Chicago, Dec. 1. — An armed bandit 
entered a suburban station of the Lake 
Shore & Michigan Southern railroad 
today, bound and gaijged F. O. Rob- 
bins, the agent, and escaped with $700 
of the company's money, shortly after 
more than a hundred coro^iuters board- 
ed a downtown train. 

300 WOMEN SEEK 
POUGE FORCE JOBS 



Chicago, Dec. 1. — The incidents of a 
police career have no terrors for at 
least 800 Chicago women who appeared 
at the city hall today for examination 
as to their fitness fo^4)oltce women. 

At present there are only ten such 



positions to fill, but there will be more 
of them. The Incumbents are tempo- 
rary appointees and must pass the 
civil service examination to hold their 
positions. 

MRS. EKMAN DECLARED 
INSANE BY JURORS 

Hancock, Mich., Woman is 

Sent to Asylum in 

Utah. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. Dec. 2.— Mrs. 
Augustus Ekman of Hancock. Mich., 
who kiUed her 12-year-old daughter. 
Prances Williams, last June, was pro- 
nounced Insane yesterday bv a Jury 
in the state district court hero and 
committed to the Insane a.sylum. The 
body of her daughter was found In a 
trunk at the railway station In Og- 
den. 

900,000 ACRES ARE 
OPENED TO ENTRY 

North Dakota and Montana 

Land Included in 

the Area. 

Washington. Dec. 2. — Secretary Lane 

has announced that classification of 

public lands as Irrigable or non-lr- 

rlgable. In conformity with the ad- 

I mlnlstraUon of the 8 20 -acre home- 



stead laws. Is be 
Isfactorlly. With 
the secretary h; 
than 900.000 acn 
for entry under 
The designations 
In Arizona; 5,50 
000 In Colorado; 
ly 200.000 In Mon 
In North Dakota 
6.700 In Utah; 2 
and 82.500 In W 
on Land 
Secretary Lane 
entry 45.720 acr< 
Southern Califor 
perts of the gee 
valuable for Its 
serve thus creat« 
2,000 acres In t\ 
cated In the foo 
mountains, forty 
field, and nearlj 
Pelridge-Lost H 



ng accomplished sat- 
in the last few days 
IS designated more 
s In Western slates 
:he terms of the act. 
include 260.000 acres 
) In California; 55,- 
27,000 In Idaho; near- 
tana, more than 8,000 
; 274.000 In Oregon; 
1.000 In Washington 
y^oining. 

Wlthtlrawiu 

has withdrawn from 
!S of public land In 
nia believed by ex- 
loglcal survey to be 
:>il contents. The re- 
d Includes more than 
e Sunset district, lo- 
Lhllls of San Amigdo 
miles west of Balter- 
44.000 acres in the 
Ills district, directly 



between two already well developed 
oil fields. ^^ ^ .^ 

Secretary Lane announced that tn« 
president had restored to entry 120,- 
000 acres of supposed coal lards In 
Western Montana. Only a pmall part 
of the land was found to contain coal, 
and that was of a low character. 

— ♦ 

Omatui Man Folk'* UnderKtudy. 

Washington. Dec. 2. — Fred K. Nlol- 
son of Omaha has been appointed an 
assistant solicitor of the state d'-pTt- 
ment with authority to act; as p<)11< Itor 
In the absence of Solicitor Folk. H« 
hnn been in the state department sine* 

1904. ill wiA 

•— 

Japan Laanrkeii BattlrMMp. 

Naga.saki, Japan, Dec. 1. — The new 
Japanese battleship-cruiser Kirlshim* 
was launched today. The big vi-.-i.^el, 
which was laid down March 17. \^\%, 
is one of a division of four vessels of 
the same class. 



NOSE AND HEAD STOPPED UP FROM 

COLD OR CATARRH, OPEN AT ONOE 



My Cleansing, Healing Balm In- 
stantly Clea-s Nose, Head and 
Throat— S to): 8 Nasty Catarrhal 
Discharges. Dull Headache Goes. 



Try "Ely's Cr 
Get & small I 
try It — Apply a 
and Instantly y< 
Btopped-up air 
will open; you 
dullness and hei 
morning! the ca 
catarrhal sore tl 
End such mlae 



earn Balm." 
ottle anyway, Ju.qt to 
little In the nostrils 

)ur clogged no.se and 
passages of the head 
will breathe freely; 
idaohe disappear. By 
tarrh, cold-ln-head or 
iroat win be gone, 
ry now! Get the small 



bottle of "Ely's Cream Balm" at any 
drug store. This sweet, fragrant balm 
dissolves by the heat of the nostrilsj 
penetrates and heals the Inflamed, 
swollen membrf^ne which lines th« 
nose, head and throat; clears the air 
passages; stops nasty discharges and 
a feeling of cleansing, soothing relief 
copies immediately. 

Don't lay awake to-night, struggling 
for breath, with head stuffed; nostrllg 
closed, hawking and blowing. CaturrU 
or a cold, with Its runninjj nose, foul 
mucous dropping Into the throat, and 
raw dryness Is distressing but truly 
needless. 

Put your faith — Just once — In "Ely'if 
Cream Balm" and your cold or catarrh 
will surely disappear. 



I 



3 



1 DEFECTIVE PAGE 




14 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



POLICY OF WAITING 

NOT TO BE ALTERED 

(Continued from page 1.) 



by a tribunal chosen by the parties 

before either nation determines Its 

course of action. 

There Is only one possible standard by 

which to determine controversies be- 

tween the Inited States and other na- 

nouncement that the president would j tlons, and that is compounded of these 
latfT address a special message to con- | two elements: <)ur own honor and our 
aress dealing solely with that subject. . obligations to the peace of the world. 
Building of Alaskan railroads, which j A test so compounded ought ea.slly to 
the president Indorsed; the need for be made to govern both the establish- 
concentratlon by the senate on the | ment of new treaty obligations and the 
pending currency bill, which he em- : interpretation of those already as- 



I 



phasized; urgent necessity of rural 
credits legislation: self-government for 
Porto Rico and Hawaii; ultimate Inde- 
pendence for the Philippines, a policy 
of "common counsel and conference" 



THE MEXICAN SITUATION. 

There is but one cloud upon our 
horizon. That has shown itself to the 



between the Federal government and j ^«"tli of us^ and hangs over Mexlca 
the states on the conservation ques '"----- 



tlon. and a revision of the system of 
primary .lections were among the fea- 
tures of the address. For details of 
»<'vernm(?nt'il buslnej^s, tl-.e president 



There can be no certain prospect of 
peace in America until Gen. Huerta 
has surrendered his usurped authority 
in Mexico; until it Is understood on ail 
hands, Indeed, that such pretended 



BUT ONE CLOUD ON OUR HORIZON 



"There is now but one cloud on our horizon. That has 
shown itself to the south of us, and hangs over Mexico. There 
can be no certain prospect of peace in America until Gen. 
Huerta has surrendered his usurped authority in Mexico ; until 
it is understood on all hands, indeed, that such pretended gov- 
ernments will not be countenanced or dealt with by the govern- 
ment of the United States. We are the friends of constitutional 
government in America ; we are more thain its friends, we are 
its champions ; because in no other way can our neighbors, to 
whom we would wish in every way to make proof of our 
friendship, work out their own development in peace and 
liberty." — President Wilson. 






referred congress to the annual reports i governments will not be countenanced 
of his cabinet oftlcers. o*" ^^^^^ ^^'''^ by the government of the 

Trxt of «h* Message. I'nited .States. We are the friends of 

Following is the presidents address: constitutional government In America; 

we are more than Its friends, we are 



^.(^j|M^A^*4MM^*****AMM^***4^***Af¥»*******¥********#*A^***Jf**^^ 



Gentlemen of the Congress: 

In pursuance of my constitutional 
duty to "give to the congress informa- 
tion of the state of the Union," I take 
the liberty of addressing you on sev- 
eral matters which ought, as it seems 
to me, particularly to engage the at- 
tention of your honorable bodies, as of 
all who study the welfare and prog- 
ress of the nation. 

I shall a.«k your Indulgence If I ven- 
ture to depart In some degree from the 
usual cu.-^tom of setting before you in 
formal r< vUw the many matters which 
have engaged the attention and called 
for the action of the several depart- 
ments of the government or which 
look to them for early treatment in the 
future, because the list Is long, very 



Its champions; because In no other way 
can our neighbors, to whom we would 
wish in every way to make proof of 
our friendship, work out their own de- 
velopment in peace and liberty. 

I I 

I Mexico ha» no Kovernmrnt. i 
I The attempt to maintain one at i 
i tlie City of Mexico han broken I 
t down, and a mere military i 
I denpotlMm liaM been Ket up I 
i whicli li:iM l:ardi>- more than i 
t tlie Mcmblance of national au- i 
I thorlty. f 

• I 

It originated In the usurpation of 



long, and would suffer in the abbrevia- Vlctori-ino Huerta. who. after a brief 
tlon to whicli I should have to subject attempt to play the part of constltu- 
It. I .-hall submit to you the reports of tional president, has at last cast aside 
the heads of the several departments, | even the pretense of legal right and 
In which these subjects are set forth j declared himself dictator. As a conse- 
In careful detail, and beg that they j quence, a condition of affairs now ex- 
niay receive the thoughtful attention , ists In Mexico which has made it 
of your committees and of all mem- 
bers of the congress who may have 



the leisure to study them. Their obvi- 
ous Importance, as constituting the 
Tery substance of the business of Ihe 
government, makes comment and em- 
pha.Ml'^ on my part unnecessary. 

AT PEACE WITH 

ALL THE WORLD. 



' doubtful whether even the most ele- 
mentary and fundamental rights either 
of her own people or of the citizens of 
other countries resident within her ter- 
ritory can long be successfully safe- 
guarded, and which threatens, If long 
continued, to Imperil the Interests of 
peace, order and tolerable life In the 
lands Immediately to the south of us. 
Even if the usurper had succeeded in 
his purposes. In despite of the Consti- 
tution of the republic and the rights 
of its people, he would have set up 
haVpy nianlfestatlons multiply nothing but a precarious and hateful 
us of a growing cordiality and . Power, which could have lasted but a 

little while, and whose eventual down- 



country. 1 am thankful to say, 
peace with all the world, and 



The 
la at 

many 

about 

sense of community of Interest among 

the nations, foreshadowing an age of 

settled peace and good will. 



More and more readily each I 
decade do the nations manifest I 
llieir ^\ illliignCM.<4 to bind tliem- 
scive.s by .•lolcnin treaty to the 
proecK.<«cM of peace, the proc- 
ennrn of frankncKH and fair 
conccHMiun. So far the United 

I StatCN hai« ntood at the front 

I of Hueh negotiation.**. 

I 



She will. I earnestly hope and con- 



fall would have left the country In a 
more deplorable condition than ever. 
But he has not succeeded. He has for- 
feited the respect and the moral sup- 
port even of those who were at one 
time wining to see him succeed. Little 
by little he has been completely iso- 
lated. By a little every day his power 
and prestige are crumbling and the 
collapse is not far away. "We shall 
not, I believe, be obliged to alter our 
policy of watchful waiting. And then, 
when the end comes, we shall hope to 
see cor.stitutlonal order restored In dis- 
tressed Mexico by the concert and 
energy of such of her leaders as prefer 



fldently believe, give fresh proof of her | the liberty of their people to their own 
sincere adherence to the cause of In- i ambitions. 

temalional friendship by ratifying the TUC PMRRCMPY Rli I 

several treaties of arbitration awaiting I M E- V/UnntlMVr I DIL.U. 

renewal by the senate. In addition to I turn to matters of domestic con- 
these. It has been the privilege of the cern. You already have under con- 
depnrtment of state to gain the assent, i sideratlon a bill for the reform of our 
In principle, of no less than thirty-one ' system of banliing and currency, for 
nations, representing four-flfths of the which the country waits with impa- 
popvilation of the world, to the nego- tlence, as for something fundamental 
tlatlon of treaties by which it shall be 
agreed that whenever differences of in- 
terest or of policy arise which cannot 
be resolved by the ordinary processes 
of diplomacy they shall be publicly 



of the modern world in attempting to 
do this. Systems of rural credit have 
been studied and developed on the 
other side of the water while we left 
our farmers to shift for themselves in 
the ordinary money market. You have 
but to look about you in any rural dis- 
trict to see the result, the handicap 
and embarrassment which have been 
put upon those who produce our food. 
Conscious of this backwardness and 
neglect on our part, the congress re- 
cently authorized the creation of a 
special commission to study the vari- 
ous systems of rural credit which have 
been put into cper-atlon In Europe, and 
this commission is already prepared to 
report. Its report ought to make It 
easier for us to determine what meth- 
ods will be best suited to our own 
farmers. I hope and believe that the 
committees of the senate and house 
will address themselves to this matter 
with the most fruitful results, and I 
believe that the studies and recently 
formed plans of the department of 
agriculture may be made to terve them 
very greatly In their work of framing 
approFri^tc and adequate legislation. 
It would be Indiscreet and presumptu- 
ous In anyone to dogmatize upon so 
great and mary-sided a question, but 
I feel confident that common counsel 
will produce the results we must all 

'"trust legislation. 

Turn from the farm to the world of 
business which centers In the city and 
In the factory, and I think that all 
thoughtful obi'ervers will agree that 
the Immediate 5ervlce we owe the busi- 
ness communities of the country Is to 
prevent private monopoly more effec- 
tually than It has yet been prevented. 
I think It will be e.isily agreed that we 
should let the Sherman anti-trust law 
stand, unaltered, as It Is, with its de- 
batable ground about it, but that we 
should as much as possible reduce the 
area of that debatable ground by fur- 
ther and more explicit legislation; and 
should also supplement that great act 
by legislation which will not only 
clarify It but also facilitate its ad- 
ministration and make It fairer to all 
concerned. No doubt we shall all wish, 
.and tiie country will expect, this to be 
the central subject of our deliberations 
during the present session; tut it is a 
subject so many-sided and so deserving 
of careful and discriminating dlscus- 
Bicn that I Fhall take the liberty of ad- 
drossiiTg you upon it in a special mes- 
sage at a later date than this. 



to Us whole business life and neces- 
sary to set credit free from arbitrary 
and artificial restraints. I need not 
say how ep-rnestl> I hope for Us early 
enactment Into law. I take leave to 
analyzed, discussed and reported upon beg that the whole energy and atten- 
tion of the senate be concei^trated upon i 
it till the matter Is successfully dls- j 
posed of. And yet I feel that the re- I 
quest Is not needed — that the members ! 



It In of capital Importance t 
that the l»u>*inc«ji men of this i 
country mhould be relieved of t 
nil unccrtnintle* of law with t 
regard to their cntcrpritsc and i 
InxestmcntM and a clear path I 
Indicated which they can travel I 
'*^lthout anxiety. * 
I 



DEAFNESS 



How to Overcome It 



of that great house need no urging in 
this service to the country. 

FARMERS' CREDITS. 

I present to you. In addition, the 
urgent necessity that special provision 
be made also for facilitating the cred- 
its needed by the farmers of the coun- 
try. The pending currency bill does 
the farmers a great service. It puts 
them upon an equal footing with other 
business men and masters of enter- 
prise, as It should; and upon its pass- 
age they will find themselves quit of 
many of the difficulties which now 
hamper them In the field of credit. The 
farmers, of course, ask and should be 
There is an eminent New York phys- I given no special privilege, such as ex- 
Ician who has had over 33 years of ; ^^^^j^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^j^g credit of the gov- 
toTs'^^rtf' that hrhas'l "r'eUrkibfy ; -nment Itself ^Vhat they need and 
iuccessfui home treatment for deaf- should obtain Is legislation which will 
ness; also head noises, such as buz- make their own abundant and subatan- 
zlng. ringing, etc., in the ears. tlal credit resources available as a 

This successful ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ foundation for joint, concerted local 
•lallst Is Dr. I"^^""]!^,.^ ■ action in their own behalf In getting 

a dlplo- K'iV A the capital they must use. It is to this 

we should now address ourselves 



Good Mews for Those Aff tided. 

Success b)f Naturai Trea!- 

meni After Doctors and 

Hospitals Fail. 



Bpeclaiis 
Coutant, 

mated, certified and 
registered phyei- 
clan. who has 
served the U. S. 
Government as a 
medical official 
and who has held 
other high posi- 
tions. This noted 
physician makes 
some verj' straight- 
forward and re- 
markable state - 
ments, all of which 
he announces he Is 




It has, singularly enough, come to 
pass that we have allowed the indus- 
try of our farms to lag behind the 
other activities of the country In Its 
development. I need not stop to tell 
you how fundamental to the life of 
the nation Is the production of Its 
food. Our thoughts may ordinarily be 
concentrated upon the cities and the 
hives of industry, upon the cries of the 
crowded market place and the clangor 
of the factory, but it is from the quiet 



ready to absolutely prove to those who , . „„ ^f'tu^ ,,r.oT, voUeira anrt tho 

desire to know the truth. Interspaces of the open vaUe> s and the 



Dr. Coutant states that the only true 
method of conquering numerous kinds 



free hillsides that we draw the sources 
of life and of prosperity, from the farm 



of deafness completely is by removing I and the ranch, from the forest and the 



the causes of same 

In nine cases out of every ten, the 
doctor claims, the cause is an inflam- 
mation of m»:'nibranes of the ear or 
passages thereto. 

He asserts that the dominating cause 
of deafness Is one that can, in most 
cases, be reached by means akin to 
those provided by Nature. He is op- 
posed to needless operations; he proves 
that vibration, kotalizing and other 
applications are often successful. 

WHY PEOPLE REMAIN DEAF 



Pt. Coutant axrlalna how numeroua people try one 

doctor. Iui8plt»l (.r remedy after arother, yet nro 

never curcil of tlic'.r deafness. Dr. Cuulant says: 

"Im nie treat a dozen of a thousand deaf persons In 

tholr own homes; tliey need nerer come near iny of- ; of lYlQ banker. 

flee ni't se* nie. Tliey need never .swallow a teaspon- i 

ful of medicine nor submit to any surgical or.eratlon. ! 

I am cnlldent that double as many of theoe deaf 

persci.s Hill rfKaJn their hearing by my method as [ 

it ihey wore being treated iu 9i.'eciallat6' offlee* or In 

hosplials." 

Dr. Coutant has written a treatise. It is a most 

Interesting bu<>k. giving a great amount i:t valuable 

fi- rnutlcn. Many have said It is worth lis weight 

gold. .\ copy of tlitj new treatise will be given 

ee to everyone who applies. 



mine. Without these every street 
would be silent, every office deserted, 
every factory fallen into disrepair. And 
yet the farmer does not stand upon the 
same footing with the forester and the 
miner In the market of credit. He Is 
the servant of the seasons. Nature de- 
termines how long he must wait for 
his crops, and will not be hurried in 
her processes. He may give his note, 
but the season of its maturity depends 
upon the season when his crop ma- 
tures, lies at the gates of the market 
where his products are sold. And the 
security he gives is of a character not 
known in the broker's office or as fa- 
miliarly as It might be on the counter 



It Is as Important that they should ; 
be relieved of embarrassment and set , 
free to prosper as that private monop- | 
oly should be destroyed. The ways of , 
action should be thrown wide open. 

DIRECT NOMINATIONS. ; 

I turn to a subject which I hope can \ 
be handled promptly and without seri- 
ous controversy of any kind. I mean | 
the method of selecting nominees f or ^ 
the presidency of the United States. I 
feel confident that I do not misinter- 
pret the wishes or the expectations of ■ 
the country when I urge the prompt 
enactment of legislation which will 
provide for primary elections through- 
out the country at which the voters of 
the several parties may choose their 
nominees for the presidency without 
the inte.'vention of nominating con- 
ventions. I venture the suggestion 
that this legislation should provide for 
the retention of party conventions, but 
only for the purpose of declaring and 
accepting the verdict of the primaries 
and formulating the platforms of the 
parties; and I suggest that these con- 
ventions should consist not of dele- 
gates chosen for this single purpose, 
but of the nominees for congress, the 
nominees for vacant seats In the sen- 
ate of the United otates, the senators 
whose terms have not yet closed, the 
national committees and the candidates 
for the presidency themselves, in orler 
th;it platforms may be framed by those 



if It Doesn't Cure 
Your Rheumatism 



HE WILL GIVE IT FREE 

There will be no charge whatever for thla valuable 
worit on the subject of ileafnes-s, head noises. Uiclr 
e»U'<es and how to relieve them at home iu Uie 
auletiide of one's room. 

To i.'btaia this book free, it Is only neces-sary to 
write to Hr. Oeorge K. Coutant. 450 C Station K. 
New Voik, N. Y. It will be sent in plain wropper, 
postpaid, free of cost. Those who are deaf (ur bo- 
eomUig io), a.)' well as iliose who are interested in 
others thus afflicted, should UUio thi.i opportunity 
M It may not be given again. We know the doctor 
to bo an honorable, reliable deafness expert, whose 
freatc^t pleasure in life is In enabling deaf people 
to regain perfect hearing, lie has niunerous tc4tl- 
nonluJb from Huluth and other Minnesota people who 
have bet-n wonderfully benefited by m.ill treatment. A 
letter addressed to lUm as above, asking for his 
treatise, wiU bring it promptly, and he will eheer- 
fiUly eivo his opinion upon any case witiKiut charge. 



t • 

I The ngrfcultural department i 
t of the government In seeking to t 
: aMHi.st an never before to mnkc i 
I farming an efficient bnwinrs*, i 
I of ^vlde co-operative effort. In i 
I quick touch ivith the marketM t 
t for foodstuffs. I 



— Subscribe for The Herald 



The farmers and the government will 
henceforth work together as real part- 
ners In this field, where we now begin 
to see our way very clearly and where 
many intelligent plans are already be- 
ing put Into execution. The treasury 
of the United States has, by a timely 
and well-considered distribution of Its 
deposits, facilitated the moving of the 
crops in the present season and pre- 
vented the scarcity of available funds 
too often experienced at such times. 
But we must not allow ounselves to 
depend upon extraordinary expedients. 
We must add the means by which the 
farmer may make his credit constantly 
and easily available and command 
when he will the capital by which to 
support and expand his business. We 
lag behind many other great countries 



FREE 



-Your Money 
Back 



''Medical Advice 
On Rheumatlsm'V 



& 



AREyouBufferinjrwith . _ 

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Dapt. p 
St. Paul, Minn. 





SlXTY-EIQNTY'EiaHT 



responsible to the people for carrying 
them 'nto effect. 

OUR TERRITORIES 

OVER SEA. 

These are all matters of vital do- 
mestic concern, and bcj.lde them, out- 
side the charmed circle of our own na- 
tional life In wlilch our affections com- 
mand us. as well as our consciences, 
there £tand out our obligations toward 
our territories over sea. Hero we are 
trustees. Porto Rico, Hawaii, the 
Philippines are ours. Indeed, but not 
ours to do what we please with. Such 
territories, once regarded as mere pos- 
sessions, are no longer to be selfishly 
exploited; they are part of the domain 
of public conscience and of service. ible 
and enlightened statesmarshlp. Wo 
must administer them for the people 
who live in them nnd with the same 
sense of responsibility to them as to- 
ward our own people In our domestic 
affair.-*. No doubt we shall success- 
fully enough bind Porto Rico and the 
Hawaiian Islands to ourselves by ties 
of justice and Interest and affection, 
but the performance of our duty to- 
ward the I'hlUpplnes Is a more difficult 
and debatable matter. We cr^n satisfy 
the obligations of generous justice to- 
ward the people of Porto Rico by giv- 
ing them the ample nnd familiar rights 
and privileges accorded our own citi- 
zens In our own territories and our ob- 
llgatlon.o toward the people of Hawaii 
by perfecting tho provisions for self- 
government already granted them, but 
In the Philippines we must go further. 

I • 

t We must hold steadily In t 
I view their ultimate Independ- I 
I encc, and wc must move to- t 
I ward the time of that Independ- I 
t ence as wteadlly as the way can i 
I be cleared and the foundations t 
I thoughtfully and permanently t 
t laid. * 

I » 

Acting under the authority conferred 
upon the president by congress, I have 
already accorded the people of the 
Islands a majority In both houses of 
their legislative body by appointing 
five Instead of four native citizens to 
the membership of the commission. I 
believe that In this way we shall make 
proof of their capacity In counsel and 
their sense of responsibility In the ex- 
ercise of political power, and that tho 
success of this step will be sure to 
clear our view for the steps which are 
to follow. Step by step we should ex- 
tend and perfect the system of self- j 
government In the islands, making test | 
of them and modifying them as ex- j 
perlence discloses their successes and ■ 
their failures; that we should more and j 
more put under the control of the i 
native citizens of the archipelago the | 
essential instruments of their life, j 
their local Instrumentalities of gov- | 
ernment. their schools, all the common ^ 
Interests of their communities, and so . 
by counsel and experience set up a i 
government which all the world will 
see to be suitable to a people whose I 
affairs are under their own control, j 
At last. I hope and believe, we are be- | 
ginning to gain the confidence of the j 
Filipino peoples. By their counsel and 
experience, rather than by our own, | 
we shall learn how best to serve them | 
and how soon It will bo possible and | 
wise to withdraw our supervision. 
Let us once find the path and set out 
with firm and confident tread upon It 
and we shall not wander from it or 
linger upon It. 

OPENING UP ALASKA. 

A duty faces us with regard to 
Alaska which seem.s to me very press- 
ing and very Imperative; perhaps 1 
should say a double duty, for it con- 
cerns both the political and the ma- 
terial development of the territory. 
The people of Alaska should be given 
the full territorial form of government, 
and Alaska, as a storehouse, should be 
unlocked. One key to It Is a system of 
railways. These the government should 
Itself build and administer, and the 
ports and terminals It should Itself 
control in the Interest of all who wish 
to use them for the service and devel- 
opment of the country and Its people. 

But the construction of railways Is 
only the first step; Is only thrusting In 
the key to the storehouse and throw- 
ing back the lock and opening the 
door. How the tempting resources of 
the country are to be exploited Is an- 
other matter, to which I shall take the 
liberty of from time to time calling 
your attention, for It Is a policy which 
must be worked out by well-consldered 
stages, not upon theory, but upon lines 
of practical expediency. It Is part of 
our general problem of conservation. 
W© have a freer hand In working out 
the problem in Alaska than In the 
states of the Union; and yet the prin- 
ciple and object are the same, wher- 
ever we touch It. 



I » 

t We must use the resources t 
I of the country, not lock them i 
i up. There need be no conflict i 
> or Jealousy as between state t 
I and Federal authorities, for t 
I there can be no essential dif- t 
I frrence of purpose between t 
: them. * 

I » 

The resources In question must be 
used, but not destroyed or wasted; 
used, but not monopolized upon any 
narrow Idea of Individual rights as 
against the abiding Interests of com- 
munities. That a policy can be worked 
out by conference and concession 
which will release these resources and 
yet not jeopard or dissipate them, I for 
one have no doubt; and it can be done 
on lines of regulation which need be 
no less acceptable to the people and 
governments of the states concerned 
than to the people and government of 
the nation at large, whose heritage 
these resources are. We must bend 
our counsels to this end. A common 
purpose ought to make agreement easy. 

BUREAU OF MINES. 

Three or four matters of special Im- 
portance and significance I beg that 
you will permit me to mention In clos- 
ing. , ^ . X. 

Our bureau of mines ought to be 
equipped and empowered to render 
even more effectual service than it ren- 
ders now In Improving the conditions 
of mine labor and making the mines 



more economically productive as well 
as more safe. This Is an all-Important 
part of the work of conservation; and 
the conservation of human life and en- 
ergy lies even nearer to our Interest 
than the preservation from waste of 
our material resources. 

RAILWAY EMPLOYES' 

LIABILITY LAW. 

We owe it. In mere justice to the 
railway employes of the country, to 
provide for them a fair and effective 
employers* liability act; and a law that 
we can stand by In this matter will 
be no less to the advantage of those 
who administer the railroads of the 
country than to the advantage of those 
whom they employ. The experience of 
a large number of the states abundant- 
ly proves that. 

AVe ought to devote ourselves to 
meeting pressing demands of plain 
Justice like this as earnestly as to the 
t accomplishment of political and eco- 
! nomic reforms. Social justice comes 
first. Law is the machin<'ry for Its 
realization and is vital only as It ex- 
presses and embodies it. 

SAFETY AT SEA. 

An international congress for the 
discussion of all questions that affect 
safety at sea is now silting In London 
at the suggestion of our own govern- 
ment. So soon as the conclusions of 
that congress can be learned and con- 
sidered we ought to address ourselves, 
among other things to the prompt al- 
leviation of the very unsafe, unjust 
and burdensome conditions which now 
surround the employment of sailors 
and render it exti^meiy difficult to ob- 
tain the services of spirited and com- 
petent men such as every ship needs If 
it Is to be safoly handled and brought 
to port. 

PRAISES CONGRESS. 

May I not express the very real 
pleasure I have experienced In co-op- 
erating with this congress and sharing 
with it the labors of common service 
to which it has devoted itself so un- 
reservedly during the past seven 
months of uncomplaining concentration 
upon the business of legislation? 
Surely It is a proper and pertinent part 
of my report on "the state of the 
Union" to express my admiration for 
the diligence, tho good temper, and the 
full comprehension of public duty 
which has already been manifested by 
both the houses; and I hope that it 
may not be deemed an Impertinent in- 
trusion of myself Into tho picture If I 
say with how much and how constant 
satisfaction I have availed myself of 
the privilege of putting my time and 
energy at their disposal alike In coun- 
sel and in action. 



SWEEPING CHANGES 
ARE URGED BY CITY'S 
"BUSI NESS DOCTOR" 

(Continued from page 1.) 

from one end to the other. Scarce- 
ly a department but what meets 
with criticism, accompanied by 
suggestions to bring it up to the 
standard which has been estab- 
lished by the municipal experts of 
the country. 

Voss In Charge. 

Under the arrangements which were 
agreed upon at previous conferences 
of the city council. Finance Commis- 
sioner Voss will have charge of the 
program which has been outlined by 
Dr. Rastall. In this respect the city 
council Is following out Dr. Rastall's 
first recommendation, that the respon- 
Ribllity of the contemplated changes 
be fixed with the finance commissioner, 
avoiding one of the first causes of the 
ailments of Dultith's body corporate, 
scatteratlon and the consequent re- 
sults of everybody's business being no- 
body's business. The preliminary 
changes are to be In the finance di- 
vision and some of them are now being 
undertaken by the city treasurer and 
the city comptroller. In a general 
way the accounting system will be re- 
vised to handle the changes which will 
follow. 

The city council went over various 
phases of the situation with Dr. Ras- 
tall when he was actively engaged in 
his investigations and the concensus of 
the commissioners' opinions was that 
his schedule would be followed as rap- 
idly and as consistently as local con- 
ditions should warrant. 

Kxhanstlvc Report. 

The report contains 150 typewritten 
pages and no copies are available at 
this time. The finance commissioner 
wishes to lose no time In providing 
copies for his colleagues and others. 
This necessarily limits the report to a 
summary at the present time. As the 
copies are available they will later be 
published In more detail by The Herald, 
a section at a time . 

General recommendations Include: 

Combining of the utilities and pub- 
lic works divisions. 

Thorough reorganization of each of 
them. 

Revision of water rates and lower- 
ing cost for gas to the city. 

Conduct of administration, bearing 
In mind that the prlnclnal departments 
of the public affairs division, namely 
park and w^elf<are, should be combined 
with tha city's educational system. 

The employment of consulting ex- 
perts. Including an expert accountant, 
a sanitary and health expert and an 
export on construction and paving ma- 
terials. 

The establishment of a purchasing 
department and stores system for the 
whole city, including the schools and 
the utilities division, resulting In tre- 
mendous saving In money ana Infinite 
improvement in quality of all kinds of 
supplies and materials for every city 
branch. 

Police Chan«reM. 

"U'eedlng out many Inefficient pa- 
trolmen and particularly Improving 
the detective branch of the police 
force, combined with a training school 
for policemen. 

The establishment of a thoroughly 
equipped central repair shop to handle 



Coming of 



The Sunbeam 



How to Avoid those Pains tindJDistresa 
Which so Many Mothers Have Suffered 

I It Is a pity more women do not know of 
Mother's Friend. This remedy softens the 
muscles, enables them 
to expand without 
strain and enables 
women to go through 
the ordeal without 




pain, nausea, morn- 
ing sickness or other 
dreaded symptoms so 
familiar to many 
mothers. 

There is no foolish 
diet to harass the mind. Thousands of 
women no longer resign themselves to the 
thought that sickness and distress are nat- 
ural. They know better, for in Mother's 
Friend they have found now easy it is to 
banish all those dreaded experiences. 

It is a subject every woman should be 

familiar with, and even though she may 

not require such a remedy, she will now 

and then meet some prospective mother to 

whom a word in time about Mother's 

'Friend will come as a wonderful blessing. 

[This famous remedy is sold by all. dnig- 

gists, and Is only $1.00 a bottle. It is for 

external use only. Write to-day to the 

Bradfield Regulator Co., 227 Lamar Bldg., 

Atlanta, Ga., for a most Tftluable book to 

.exnectant mothers. 



all the city's v ork, including that of 
the school boarl. 

Securing mo-e effective and eco- 
nomical garbage collection by trans- 
ferring it to he dfvislon of public 
works. 

Concentrate all Inspection work, and 
leave It scattered through various de- 
partments as £t present. 

Make all departments and officers 
responsible to one specified commis- 
sioner, and not In any case to coun- 
cil as whole, treating a general ex- 
ecutive division by first placing the 
city attorney, city clerk and civil 
service commisi;ion under the mayor. 
No Part Time Employe*. 
Discontinue all part time employes, 
particular mention being made of the 
health commissioner. 

Have the legal department prepare 
an administrative code this winter, be- 
ing a digest of state laws, the charter 
and the ordinances of the city. 

Secure clear co-operation in all di- 
visions. Suggest holding conferences of 
the commissioners and the heads and 
chief employes of the various depart- 
ments at reguh.r Intervals during the 
winter, promoting enthusiasm and ef- 
ficiency and doing away witii the ten- 
dency to individual units not working 
together. 

A campaign for a charter amendment 
to allow an increase of the tax levy, 
prophesying coaslderable Increase In 
tho annual expenditure In the near fu- 
ture. Points out that the people are 
demanding better garbage collection, 
better police piotection, more welfare 
work, better street maintenance. Also 
predicts that government will in future 
urohibit dumping of sewage in the 
lake, which would call for a heavy 
outlay for intersecting sewer system 
and accompany ng plant. 

Attorney revise wording of all con- 
tract forms after careful comparisons 
with other progressive cities. 
New License Syntent. 
A new license system, the present 
badly needing r-!Vision. This would in- 
clude a license Inspector and checking 
system, aided ly a card Index to see 
that none escai)e payments. 

Declares that the audit of receipts 
Is not clear or sure. Would have at- 
torney prepare new digest, with 
treasurer issulrg licenses and collect- 
ing fees, with ap-to-date forms and a 
complete check by the auditor. Would 
make many additions to list of licenses. 
An efficient tudget, forming the ba- 
sis for intelligint, balanced appropri- 
ations, it wou.d show the general ac- 
counts and the audit of the year's ex- 
penses, with complete comparisons of 
revenue and expenditures. Under this 
system the auc Itor would enter the 
budget In his accounting system, so 
that the amount allowed each depart- 
ment would be constantly before him. 
The departments should not be per- 
mitted to exceed their allowances ex- 
cept by a four-fifths vote of the coun- 
cil. It would Include a complete out- 
line for all the next year's work, with 
that of the pa.jt year for ready com- 
parison, and a third column for the 
estimates submitted by the finance 
commissioner. All matters pertaining 
to finance should be under the finance 
commissioner. 

Eliminate needless duplication of 
detail work In the treasurer's office. 
Treasurer now working on shortcuts 
and labor saving devices, some before 
beginning of Dr. Kastall's investiga- 
tion. 

The assessor's office doing a high 

trade of work. Methods should be re- 
uced to definite form and unneces- 
sary work, mostly copying, elimin- 
ated. 

Now Ac<ronn(lng Syiitom. 
A modern ac:;ountlng system, cen- 
tered In the office of the auditor, 
based on valued accrued and liabilities 
Incurred. Treient system practically 
record of cash receipts and expendi- 
tures, which should be secondary. 
Relieve the auditor of much detail 
now falling to him by establishing ac- 
counting systems In each department, 
to be forwarded to the auditor In the 
form of month y reports. Under pres- 
ent system .ludlt does not give a com- 
plete check on department expendi- 
tures. No outside auditor can make 
an effective aulit check. Classify ac- 
counts as to operation, maintenance 
and expense. Complete records of 
i each departmer t, which in a large de- 
' gree do not nov?^ even give rough Idea of 
] results obtained for expenditures. 
Bills may now be paid twice and there 
' Is some evldeiice that this has been 
done. Distlngulsii between operation 
and capital at counts. Operation ac- 
counts those etpenditures Incurred In 
everyday expenditures and capital ac- 
counts those which go Into permanent 
improvements. Open property ac- 
counts, with thorough revaluation of 
all city property, along the line pro- 
posed by the water and light depart- 
ment. Charge depreciation and show 
changes In valae. 

Annual Report 
Get out an annual report which will 
Interest the average citizen and show 
him in concise, easily understandable 
form the actut 1 standing of the city, 
accompanied by a balance sheet, an 
introduction b> tho mayor and finance 
commissioner setting forth the general 
purpose and rt ports from various de- 
partments showing what has been 
done the last year and what Is con- 
templated for he future. Establish a 
definite city pay day, the tenth of each 
month, for instance, and a definite day 
for paying all bills, the fifteenth, for 
instance, not including payments on 
big contracts. Submit the accounts 
from auditor to council monthly, so 
that they may bo intelligently passed 
upon. Do away with all present red 
tape, which reiilly results In no effec- 
tive check or system In payment of 
.bills. Establish an annual inventory 
of equipment and supplies, beginning 
work at once so that it may be put In 
force Jan. 1, 1U4. 

When perm.inently established no 
additional helf will likely be neces- 
sary, but as auditor must do much of 
the constructl\e work, give him one 
or two assistants until that Is done In 
order to relievo him of much of the 
detail which now improperly falls on 
his shoulderj. Secure tho assistance 
of a high-grade public accountant. 

Past affairs of the water and light 
department very unbusinesslike. Ac- 
counts so kep': that a balance sheet 
showing the aosets and liabilities im- 
possible for former years. For a great 
many years the accounts were not even 
balanced. No allowance has been mada 
for depreclatlrn but Incorrect value 
reached by add.ng the cost of mprove- 
ments to the oiiglnal purchase price. 

Mentions steam equipment, aban- 
doned except for emergency, as one 
feature creating a considerable ficti- 
tious asset value. Price paid not prop- 
erly considered or price which could 
be "secured, as this be on profit-taking 
basis, whereas as function of public 
utility Is to give best service at low- 
est cost consistent with good busi- 
ness. States that only rough figures 
are available but believes that If pro- 
per allowances are made for deprecia- 
tion the plant's value will not be much 
In excess of I1 s bonded Indebtedness. 
Even taking tliJ statement which gives 
the value at $-1,088,052 and the bonded 
debt at ^3, 321. COO, he states that hav- 
ing the bonded debt equal to three- 
fourths of the value Is not a good fi- 
nancial condition and one which can- 
not be safely long tolerated. Says 
surplus In 1912 was $156,000. Allowing 
the small amcunt of 2 per cent of 
the total value for depreciation, or 
$81,000, rcduceji this to $76,000, or to 
2 per cent of ttie bonded Indebtedness, 
which Is not approved. 

Gam Plant LiOnem Money. 
"Roughly figures that In 1912 the 
gas plant lost $8,000 while under the 
i most favorable consideration he states 
I that the water plant is making but a 
1 small earning. States that either the 
; city Is not get:lng enough for its gas 
' or Is paying too much for gas. In- 
I cllnes to the h.tter. Suggests that as 
the Zenith F irnace company, from 
1 which the city gets its gas, might be 
induced to compromise upon a lower 
rate if allowed to sell this excess sup- 
' ply to large manufacturing plants. 
' Mentions slmlls r arrangement between 
Great Northern Power company and 
1 the Duluth-Bdison Electric company. 
I States that d apartment's method of 
charging two- thirds of operation to 
the water plart and one-third to the 
gas plant Is ar. Injustice to the water 
plant. Says approved method of pay- 
ing for extensions is to assess bene- 
fits against the property and that the 
8 per cent guf.rantee required by the 
water and light department does not 
pay for the extensions. Difficult to 



make the change, owing to local con- 
ditions, but there is sound logic for It. 
Would revise water rates. The pres- 
ent spread is now too great and the 
present minimum too low. Estimates 
that the cost is not under 6 cents and 
declares that it may be laid down as a 
sound business principle that water 
should not be sold below the cost of 
furnishing it. Would abolish flat rat© 
as far as that can be done. Bears in 
mind that when the plant has been 
thoroughly appraised and actual condi- 
tions positively ascertained an Increase 
of revenue may be necessary, but as- 
serts that if big consumers get water 
so far below cost as at present It would 
be better for them and the city if they 
put in their own systems, If they can 
furnish themselves more cheaply than 
the city. Places hydrant rental as be- 
ing too low. Would -Uminate tax levies 
for the benefit of the department, 
which should be wholly supported from 
its own earnings. States that depart- 
ment should receive city revenue In 
proportion to the service rendered. 
This would leave the taxes now going: 
to the department available for oth,«r 
city purposes. 

Reorganize Department. 

"Advises thorouph reorganization of 
the water and light department, taking 
away from the manager the vast 
amount of detail now falling to hlni 
and allowing him time to devote study 
to the plant and the department as a 
whole. Would create the office of as- 
sistant manager to take much of the 
manager's detail work. Have three 
general divisions, the first being office 
accounts and business procedure, tho 
second, engineering service, and the 
third, maintenance and operation, each 
In charge of a sub-head with the du- 
ties of all subordinates definitely de- 
fined. Indorses proposed new account- 
ing system devised by tJeorge L. Gross, 
secretary of the department, and rec- 
ommends that he be given strong sup- 
port in installing it. Commented ad- 
versely upon a disposition on the part 
of some of the clerks indicating oppo- 
sition to the proposed program of Sec- 
retary Gro.^s. States that unless the 
secretary is given authority to require 
the classification, time sheets and 
methods of reports that are requisite 
parts of tho new system, tho entire 
work may be of no avail. Says store 
system should be established as the 
department now probably loses heavily 
on its purchases through lack of prop- 
er method. Could later work in with 
general city sv=t» m. 

Public WorkM. 

"Declares that the public works di- 
vision is loosely organized, due to lack 
of study and adjustment to the new 
opportunities created by the charter 
commission. Would thoroughly revise 
it. combining the engineering work of 
the works and utility divisions. Would 
combine accounting divisions of the 
works department and the engineering 
department under direction of Secre- 
tary J. G. Futter. who is an accountant. 
The engineer would be made first dep- 
uty to the commissioner and in charge 
during his absence, with the superin- 
tendent of street maintenance second 
deputy in charge in tho absence of the 
other two. Would combine all me- 
chanical inspections under a chief In- 
spector, who would be responsible to 
the structural engineer. These would 
Include housing, building, electrical, 
plumbing and water inspections. He 
would have all permits for mechanical 
and construction work in charge of one 
man, who would be deputy to the chief 
Inspector. 

Street Work. 

Dr. Rastall urges a definite pro- 
gram of street construction, which 
could be developed during ihi wir.ter. 
Would have an expert to consult with 
the engineering department. St.itts 
j finances are only < '>.stacle aiJ '-e om- 
mends wlde.'^pread publicity campn'gn 
I to enlist public suoport. Would 1 fcve 
I a competent const-jctio.-i ^rHng for ui- 
I keep of the streets, use a drag and 
j oil in dirt roads, jtilizin^ sprinKlinij: 
teams for this work, vhich should 
be done when the gr.iund is wet and 
not in need of spii.i.tint.'. States th-** 
as the permanent fuu';! is cripplid. »ir- 
rangenients miglit be male with prop- 
erty owners to ad.'ance the money for 
street improvemenrs as a loan, spread- 
ing the repaymeiif over .i perlu.l of 
years. Adds thit tho finance c.im- 
mis."loner sees no obstacle to this 
plan. 

Health Director. 

Hellevos that a competent man could 
be secured to devote his full time as 
health director at a salary of *2,I0O 
to $3,000 a year. Disapproves of p'-e.«- 
ent plan of health c<jmml8siontr de- 
voting part of his time to the \v.)rK. 
States that with fees rec-^lved from 
the state, the salary of $1,200 was 
augmented to approximately $2,000 
last year, or not much uji'loV tNhat a 
full time director would leoeivo. 

Would transfer sanitary inspe. lion?, 
lodging house Inspections and tho 
abatement of nuisances from tae 
health department to the polk.? de- 
partment. With this relief and the gar- 
bage c(>llection transfer to the wurics 
division, the health department woald 
be able to devote more of Its time to 
true health work. Su,?g.'.st8 h sani- 
tary and health expert, F. W. l?as.s 
could be secured from the e.x tension 
division of the University of Minne- 
sota. 

Would eliminate the featJireq of 
civil service which cause employ-?:? to 
become mere uutomatoms, insti'utin^ 
a merit and promotion system which 
would spur their interest and give an 
Incentive to efficiency. Would leave 
the selection of eliglbles largely in 
the hands of department heads, as 
part of this plan. Introducing the per- 
sonal feature in hiring enipK.yes which 
characterizes the large, successful 

corporations. 

« 

Piles Cured in 6 to 14 Days 

Drueelsts refund luonvi IT IW/At olNTTaK.NT falls to 
cur\> Itiiiiiig. Blind. Hlficdliig or Protniiiiug Plies. 
Flret a;iilicallon gives relief. 50c. 

> - » 

Mrs. M. J. Farley holds the rank ot 
police captain at Dalla.s, Ttxas. 



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P??^•.^^•.v:;^.^•.•^.•>■v.•.^■.•^:VVvV.•X■:v::•!LJ 







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123 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



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Tuesday, 



JHE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



15 



iMM^^»WMMM^M«*MM«««MA«M>MM*^^*' 



^■^■^'P^^V 



THE CUB 



OVUU-L REPORTER 



HOLS SC^OKe - Boo<xHT THlS 
BOTTLE. OF DOV^e. FOR MY COLO 
FROC^ A STREET VEKDE^- ^n' 
e^FTER SVA/aLLOVA/\M6r expose UV 
\T-- X "WHK. VTir ^ ?\mQ POUSHi 



Scoop Has An Economy System All His Own 




By "HOP" 



_ru-i_r J • \' ' — — .»-»^^"^ 



'-l¥^ \T^ PimO P0U5H '^ ?0\SeKE(Si| r \^ ^T^l P\ev^40 P0U5H M\BlN^ 
^V<H' GOT-r^H F(K^3 <5^ DOCTOR -e^NV 




WOULD RECALL HENKE. 



YOUTH KILLED 
AT BROOKSTON 

Blow on Head Accidentally 
Delivered By School- 
mate Is FataL 



that had strayed from Montana or the 
Canadian reservation, but later tnl3 
was found not to be the case. 

BIG FORlTCHILDr 

BURNS TO DEATH 



of burning powder and investiprated. j Opponents o! Mandan city Commis- 

The fuse was not attached to a'>y 
explosive. There appears to have been 
no moilvo for placing it near the de- 
pot. 



BLAME INCENDIARY 



to become conversant with better , i 
farming methodd at the slate peni- 
tentiary, the new method of handling 
the state's farm being conducted un- 
der the direction of Warden Frank S. 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



>-^r% r\f\i ir\r\i r-ir»r" Talcott, and excellent results are be- 
FOR SCHOOL FIREJlnf, obtained. 



Ea.st Grand Fork.=» — Charles Graham 

Bradford, a prominent youn^ railr'>ad 

December j man of this city, was wedded at \Va- 




Mandan, N. D.. Dec. 
The Herald.) — As a i 
row over the locatl 

sioner Are Circulating Petition. I J^ii^^'t'ifere^Ts'" a^clse 

Mandan, N. D., Dec. 2.— (Special to ! in which the ldentity""of""the guilty local people „ „ , , , , nl,. will «rrfvP in this rltv tc 

TH« „<,raM.,-Tha r=c.U ., to be >„- j farU« .PPear, ioJ>l^^o.--^^^ ".^^ 1 ,„Far.o ^^ D A. ^J-^Bj;;- j;-™J''5 : fiW'f'nf/Lr.^ryo'jih S^^^n^ 

yoked by the political opponents of ^^7fai„g after pouring kerosene has continued under the present own- : Baudette— Joe Lagan was taken to 

H. L. Henke, recently elected president ■ around the place and It on fire. The ershlp has severed ills relations with : Minneapolis last week where he w iU 

of the city commission to succeed | Sanies were discovered In time to sa\e the paper and will establish an ad- i be taken care of y [r^"°j j j ** "*" 



short honeymoon trip, the young peo- 

to make 
street. 



Infant Girl Nearly Chokes 

to Death on a Nut 

Bolt. 



Brookston. Minn., Dec. 2. — (.Special to 



Tot Is Left in Bed Alone and 

Overheated Stove Fires 

Clottiing. 

Big Fork. Minn.. Dec. 2.— An over- 
heated stove beside the crib In which 
the lO-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. 
A. E. Peterson of tht.<J place was sleeping 
Monday is supposed to have fired the 



NIP CONFIDENCE GAME. 

Mill CitV Detectives Halt bale OI John Foi-man. resigned. Tlenke was 1 the building but not until considerable ; yertlsing agency of his own. 

^ . I a member of the commission before his 1 damage was done. An official Investl- ^ Langdon, N. D.--Alex Duncan of , dltionjs very eerlou^^. 



Business Block. 



promotion and at the special election , nation Is to be made, which may re- ! Calvin has Just completed the con« 



,, "iir"„ n^^ o While i ^^'e*^*^"** Kennelly by one vote. The j 3^1^ j^ arrests. 
Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. ^. — ^v niie j j^^^^ter at first announced - - 



„ _ a contest. 

John Montgomery Is alleged to have j but T^^ter abandoned that and now his . 



MISTAKEN FOR DEER. 



St. Cloud — Anton Schaefor of Roscoe 
struction of 'a new set of farm build- I appeared before Justice J. I. I>;^»"h'«e 
, ingrs, including a r?sidence liiat cost Saturday and was fined ^.10 and <ost8 
J5.000, the total expenditure being for trapping muskrats before tlie 

opening of the season. 

Bemidji — Logging operators of Be- 





Tho H-rald.)— Dan, the 14-year-oia son\^^g 3^,]! aUye and a special train was 
tit Mr and Mrs. P. A. Banta, was secured and the tot hurried to Deer 
or Mr. ana wira. r. ^ ^ ^^^ »(v>r n'h»>rrt a doctor worked in vain 

Its life but death re- 



n^ighbor. She returned in .a few mln- Montgomery waited in the lobby, and 
ute.^ to find the bed on ftre and tne . ^^ every time he bet on the horses 
child enveloped In flames. The little one ] j^^, picked. Walker said that at the 
--'■ '"' *-"'" '""'* time of the arrest Montgomery was 



accidentally struck "on the back of the Hlver_ where a doctor worked in. vain 



explaining the proposed sale of the 
business block and that he was to bo 
let in on the deal 



aoCia-jMiaii., ov.^vn. .... V .--- - trying to save It 

head by a club wielded by a playmate ^^^^1 i^^t night. 

a* the local school grounds yesterday , 

afternoon sustaining a fracture of th4 ; PROMOTER 
skull that resulted In death at 8:30^ 

ift.n night. ; North Dakotan 

The accident occurred at the after- ^ • ji j •■• 

noon recess In a sort of hockey same j Swindled IVIII 

which has become a ^'^'^ ^]'^'^''"^ j^qI ' Palermo N D.. Dec. 2.— (Special to 

Chlb^^'and'' a *?rn 'can^wer'e the*'Vmple- ; The HeraId.)-Townsite and newspa- Cuyuna Range Town tO HaVC Cfack 
Brents used, and one of young Banta's ; per owner and once prominent In Ml- | 

"' ' state, J. 

embezzle- 

0:80, when his head commenced to ; ^;-;i-^^^^;- „--;;^''f,'{i;,'-Sota." who came Herald.)— At a meeting held In 

ache. A short time afterwards he went 1 y^^^Q ^^t purchase a relinquishment. He the Crosby roller rink last night of 
to bed and soon became unconscious, | ^,^,.^.^,3^^^^ ^^^out ?345 to Hoff and ' ,^^^3^^^ ,,^ii j^ns teams were organized 

after a time got back $200, bring- | ^^^j plans .set on foot for some lively 
Ing the criminal action to secure the 1 ^j^^^j, (i„rinK the winter. From the 



polntlvo 

BEAT CONSOLIDATION. 

Effort to Combine Medina, N. D., In- 
stitutions Falls Through. 

Medina, N. D., Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— For the first time In 
this part of the state school consoli- 
dation was defeated by a large ma- 



mile and a half from Hulycomb, a \il- : 
lage thirty miles northeatst of here. He ^ 
la supposed to have been mistaken for ! 
a deer and killed by an unknown 
hunter Sunday. Gartner was an,,*^"^; 
ploye of the Omaha railway, and lived 



Fergus Falls — A horse owned by 
George Stebblns near Vergas was slsot 
last week because It was hopfle.ssljr 
afflicted with rabies. Dr. Newman, 
who was called out to look at th* 
animal, pronounced It unmist.ibly 



Bchoolmntfs missed the can and 9tr"fj^ i not and In this part of the 
ban back of th>i ear Ho did not feel ^^ ^^^^^ ^,^3 convicted of e 
the effects of tha blow until about ; ^^^^ q^he complaining Viti 



Quint During Winter. 

Crosby, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 



Portage — The body of Arthur Kel- 
Slone ?n ^tiir abandoned" seuier-s'cablr. logg, who died sudlei.ly on Saturday, I ^^'^V;^"^^!'-;^,.}^;^— that the horse be 

aione in aji aua-uu^ ^^^ taken to Baraboo for burial. Mr. \ disposed of at once. 

Kellogg was on his way home from j Deer River — Hans Edstrom of O^cil- 

Janeriville when striokeu. >le wa.i 60 . ^j^^ ^,ho was doing some hunting with 
years of age and conducted a livery , \ihin Harlen near the latter'a cl'ilm, 
Plrvth;nn r-ilrhoc nn RriHnP and North •♦^^'•" '" Baraboo for many years. Re- | returned Monday with about the larg- 
ClOtning tatCneS on Bnoge dnu wurm ,pg,^tly he fell heir to a large portion of ■ ^^t buck so far brought in this sea- 

' the estate of N. R. 3-Cellogg of Chicago. ^^^ 

... -of 



SUICIDE FRUSTRATED. 




O ATlOrirn lAflTU 00 ing caught on the rail and he remained ^ompanv. *ied Saturday in Chicago, this city including F. J. McPartrin. 

OA lioritU Wll n ^)0. suspended till spectators yanked him death being caused by a stroke of and Mayor AV. V. Kane, will ^o to 



passing away in a short time 
Child »arly Choken. 



'--"'- ' ,-,-- J „i t^„ _* iiiK i"" t^ I iiiiii..^». oLwwon lo seour« "•"*' 1 i-ames during the winter. From the 

Doris, the l-V^^V.^x^, k ""^Lrr.w ' other. Anderson was held under bonds f^mesmmr^g in v 
Mr. and Mrs. F. J. MoMahon narrow- ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ to testify ->-<.-—♦ \ariou8 leam., one m 



, I,,,,,, .^^i j.^^, v^ , against 

\y escaped choking to death Monday ^iott 

afteriioun when she got a nut from a ; _^ 

mtle^on*^''^un*s*c"fwed'\hrnut f rom « j BANKER'S CLOSE CALL^ 
bolt on her high chair, and, chlM-like, 1 
put 1' in \\'^x mouth and attempted to 1 
swallow It. She choked, and It was j 
with difficulty that Mrs. McMahon re- 
moved the obstacle. | 



BUYS N EAR B UFFALO. 

North Dakotan Purchases Animals 
Having Characteristics of Bison. 

Kenmare, X. D.. Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — ^At first believing he had 
a straggling buffalo, but later con- 



SKATE S THR OUGH ICE. 

Bowbells, X. D., Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Cashier Alldrln of the | 
Burke County State bank skated 
through the thin Ice on the reser- 
voir and was rescued with difficulty, j 
The water was about six feet deep 1 
and he manged to break his way out 1 
to where friends assisted him from 
his chilly bath. 

FINDS BURNING FUSE. 



players will be chosen to represent 
Crosby In the basket ball field In this 
section. There Is promise of a cham- 
pionship Ave. 

WIDOW is'accused. 

Wife of Murdered Man Alleged to 
Have Caused Family Break-up. 
Devils Lake. N. D., Dec. 2.— There «a 1 Minnesota Pioneer Called at Fair 

an echo of the Freese murder case in 



Finder of $100 Diamond Declines; 
Tender of $5. 

L.lnton, N. D., Doc. 3. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Given a $6 reward for 
finding a diamond worth flOO, and re- 



susp . . ^ 

back from the future existence 

SCOTTISH RITE 

MASONS AT FARGO. 



paralvsis. The deceased was the only Beniiuji this week to attend the meet 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Emery Jones, ing of the Northern Minnesota D.vel- 
resldents of Milwaukee, who lost their opment association. Tlie local dele- 
lives In the Newhall house fire. gates will support Baudette for th« 
Madison — Associa:e Justice R. (i. [ meeting to be held in the summer of 
; Siebeoker of the supreme court of Wis- j 1914. 
con.sin, who last Wednesday underwent | Braln^^rd — County Agricultural Agent 



Fargo. N. D., Dec. 2. — (Special to The < an operation at Rochester, Minn., was | ^^ j_ (^jafke reports the organization 

, . ,.. ^ *», „, ■.»„ T.,i,T, Herald.)— The Scottish Rite Masons in- reported as Improved and is showing ; ^^ ^ Farmers' club at the Pointon 

storing It to the owner. Mrs. John j ^.^^^^ p^^.^^^ today and will remain till > every indication of ultimate recovery. | g^hool house in Xokay Lak- township. 
Jampolsky. James Ehle, a laborer. | p,.iday night In attendance at the win- j Pesbtigo — Returnng from a dance, | q-j^^, oficers elected were: President, T. 
handed $2 back to his benefactor, and 1 ter reunion of the Scottish Rite bodie.''. I mIss Frances Harper of Peshtlgo, guest j q Polnton; vice president, A. ivter- 
declarod that |3 was a great suffi- -phe degrees from the fourth to the ; <j( Menominee friends, late Saturday I ^g^ . gecretarv, William Meade; ire •,»- 
clency for the service he had pen- thlrtv-second will be conferred on a x\\%\\t engaged In a scufile with her 1 ^j-er Roy «'obk. 

formed. ,, ,, t class" of thirty and there will be many , hostess. She fell ugalnst the stove 1 Spooner — Miss Anna Spain, who haa 

The diamond was lost by Mrs. Jam- prominent visiting Masons from all j ^nd an artery In her head was cut. She i,,^^^ tea<hing the primary gradi at 
dsky near her home, falling In the gygj. the state and some from South lost a quart of blood before a physician I u^udettp, since the op«ming of tha 



t,now, and it remained hidden fl\ e 1 j^j^j^ota and Minnesota, 
days before Ehle found It. 



HAD HEADSTONE READY. 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



eluding he had a grade buffalo or a ' Medora, N. D., 
freak. William Kinser. proprietor oft . .. . 



Night Telegraph 

freak. William Kinser. proprietor or i ........ «• 

a meat market here, has a rare anl- Operator MakeS DiSCOVery. 

Medora, N. D., Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — ^A fuse burning In the 
rear of the depot here caused some 
excitement. The night operator, re- 



the local courts, following the ac- 
quittal of the two men charged with 
the murder. Mrs. D. Arens Is suing 



mont Sooner Than He Expected. 

St. Peter, Minn., Dec. 2. — Judson 
Jones, a territorial pioneer of Minne- 



mai on exhibition. He purchased It 

In the hills west of here. The animal 
las a true buffalo hump on Its should- 
ers, horns of a similar shape to a 
buffalo, only longer and the body 
slopes to the rump. At first It was 



luTp";a ;K° anl'Sa. waS' a butMo j furnfng to the depot, noticed the odor 



YOU'RE BILIOUS AND CONSTIPATED! 

LIVER IS SLUGGISH - DIME A BOX 



STt'' Mr'l" V'ee," "the"" -Id";? S°!S^ .ota, died here jesterd.y while bel„» 
murdered man, broke up the family. [ taken to a 
Arens purchased the Freese poolroom | curred seve 
at Admore from the widow 



arrived in time to save her life. j school, tendered her resignation last 

,,_ Fond du Lac — At the funeral of Mrs. ^-eek and It has been accented by 
Margaret Denniston, pioneer resident of ^ the board. She left for Crosby on tha 
Fond du Lac count y, Saturday at^ the \ Cuyuna, where she has accepted a 
home of her daugher, Mrs. G. L. Yapp, j similar position. 
, the musical service consisted of a hymn Rochester — The Rochester N'lirsea' 
which was composed by the deceased ; association Is the name of a new '->r- 



Menomlnee — Harry Elkey, 21 years I o,^iy a bhort time l>efore her death. i ganizatlon that has been formed h*»rew 
old. Is a maniac as the result of brood- j -Wausau — The fol owing officers were The membersiilp is open to all 



Ing' over the loss of the barge Plym- 
outh with Its crew. 

Negaunee — Members of the iviegau- 
nee high school championship basket 
ball team of 1910 have organized for 



FIGHT OVER ESTATE, 

Beneficiary of Well-to-Do Farmer 
Alleges Fraud. 



Furred tongue. Bad Taste, Indiges- ' skin, mental fears, e\erythlng that la ; fraudulent means employed by other 
*. c. .. cl; o«H Ml ..rnhlf. Meid-i horrible and nauseating. A Cascaret heirs. Several others heirs also are 
tlon. Sallow Skm and Miserable Head- I ^^^.^^^ ^.jjj g^jj.^jy straighten you out j Interested with Rosa Houser In her 
aches come from a torpid liver and ^ ^jy n^orning — a 10-cent box will keep i complaint against James Zlkmund und 
.stlpated bowels, which cause your your head clear stomach sweet, liver , other {^el"; ami the case wiU be de- 
Tiach to become filK^d with undi- and bowels regular and make you feel , cide^d by Judge Kneeshaw in district 



,. .r. ^ o /c I 1 « spelling which he had devised. He was 
Grafton, N. D., Dec. 2.— (Special to | j^'^^j^ i^ xew York in 1832, settling in 
The Herald.) — Rosa Houser, an heiress | this stale before It was admitted to the 

of Wlncel Zikmund, a wealthy Bo- j ^r=r^=r==r==== 

hemian farmer wlio committed sul- j 
clde a year ago. charges that she 
signed her name to certain papers and ' 
deeds, relinquishing her rights to her 
share of the estate, by reason of 



hospital. His death oc- , ^^ winter, and will be known as the 
n years short of the time ho ^junml basket ball team, 
had set for it, Mr. Jones having main- ishpeming — Al Owens, who has 
talned that he would live until 1920, spent the previous two years on the 
and had a headstone already prepared, j Mesaba and Vermilion ranges, has re- 
glvlng his death in that year. He had | turned to Ishpeming to visit friends 
been a soldier, teacher, preacher and and relatives until after the holl- 
lawyer. He occupied the latter years of ' days. . , -^ 

his life rewriting the Bible phonetic- Houghton — The remains of John M. 
ally following a system of simplified ] Drake, Jr., who died at Keewatin, Minn., 

were brought to Houghton to the homo 

of Mrs. Wallace, East Houghton. The 
funeral, which was private, was from 
tlie Wallace resl<lence. with interment 



elected bv delegates to the eleventh an- | graduate nurses, and Is not con« 
nual convention of the older boys and | fined to nurses at the hospl- 
workers with boys of the Y. M. C. A.: tal, but Includes the state ho.-^piital 
President. Paul W Tobey, Wausau; ; nurses and those engaged In private 
vice president, V. Uershanger, New , work. Tiie officers are: Presid-nt. Vis* 
London; secretary, Neal Pelchar. . Josephine Webber: vice president. M)« 
Sparta; assistant secretary, John T. Delphine Hines; secretary-treas-iref, 
Hurman, Green Bay. 1 Miss Wilhelmlna Blaska. 



con.'s 

geXd'food, whi'^ch "sours and "ferments j cheerful and bully for montha 
like garbage In a .«will barrel. That's Don't forget your children— their 
the first step to untold ml-sery— Indl- little Insides need a good, gentle, 
gestlon. foul gases, bad breath, yellow ; cleansing, too. occasionally. 

^ ^^ CANDY CATHARTIC^ 



CENT 

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BOXES -ANY DRUG STORE 



25 St 50 CENT BOXES 



WE ARE THE DENTISTS WHOM THOUSANDS OF CITIZENS— OUR 
PATRONS— DELIGHT TO RECOMMEND 

Behind the simple statement of 
the facts of "Painless Work" and 
"Guaranteed Dentistry" stands our 
years of experience, patient skill, 
knowledge, constant study, togeth- 
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equipment money can procure. 

These are the things which make 
"PAIXIiKSS DEXTISTRY" possible 
and which Justify us In guarantee- 
ing all our work for ten years, as 
our practice Is the largest In the 
city. Our prices are correspond- 
ingly the lowest. 

SET OF TEETH $5.00 

HEAVY GOLD CROWN, GUARANTEED BRIDGE WORK, $3.00 

Other work proportionately low. 

NEW METHOD DENTISTS 

25 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. Over Bon Ton Bakery. 

Office Hours: 8:30 A. M. to 7 P. M. 




court. , ^ ^ u. » i 

The estate was valued at about , 
$100,000, and three or four legal heirs | 
are cut off from any Interest In Itj 
through their own signatures to deeds 
and papers cited In the action just 
begun. 

FARMER S' LAN D CLUB, 

Soil Tillers Around Carpio, N. D., 
Are Banded Together. 

Carplo, N. D., Dec. 2. — (Special to i 
The Herald.) — Land owners and busi- I 
ness men of Carplo are affiliated In ; 
the organization of the Carplo Farm- ! 
ers' Land club, an association launched] 
at a meeting held here at the call of 
the Carplo Commercial club. 

The Improvement of farm conditions 
and the placing of farm properties In 
such condition that It will be an 
easier matter to bring new settlors 
here, are the objects of the club, 
which has a membership of about 
fifty, and which will ultimately Include 
practically all farmers within a 10- 
mlle radius of the city. 

Officers follow: President, C. K. 
Chrlstenson; vice president, H. Bitter, 
secretary, Oscar Herom; treasurer, 
Olous Wosteri directors, Peter Han- 
son, K. Stoa. Joseph Dinger, S. O. 
Rldgeway and P. O. Hall. 

MmlCURfPLANT. 

Fargo Is Hoping to Land Branch 
Packing Establishment. I 

Fargo, N. D., Deo. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The chances for Fargo 
securing a branch packing plant are 
now regarded as favorable, as a re- 
sult of the Investigation of conditions 
over the state by representatives of 
the company who found many beef 
cattle and thousands of hogs were 
raised in the state. With the Increased 
com acreage It Is now possible to fin- 




complexion 

PIMPLES and blackheads dis- 
appear, unsightly complex- 
ions become clean, clear, and 
velvety, and hair health and 
beauty are promoted by the reg- 
ular use of Resinol Soap and an 
occasional ^plication of Resinol 
Ointment, These soothing, heal- 
ing preparations dQ their work 
easily, quickly and at little cost, 
when even the moat expensive 
cosmetics and complicated 
"beauty treatments" fail. 

All dniflrsrlits mII Reatnol Soap «nd Res- 
inol Ointment. For trial fise of «arh.write 
to D«pt. 17-43. RMiaoU Baltimora. Md. 



In Forest Hill cemetery. 

Hancock — The jury in the case 
against Aimo Xyberg. a striker, 
charged with assault and battery on 
complaint of Theodore Luokkenen. In 
Justice Eichkern's court, brought In a 
verdict of guilty. The justice Imposed 
a fine of $10 and costs. Nyberg ap- 
pealed the case to circuit court, giv- 
ing bonds covering the liability. 

Calumet — The members of the Calu- 
met Woman's club are engaged In 
their annual Christmas effort. Gar- 
ments will be prepared for the poor 
of Calumet and vicinity, and will be 
distributed to those In need of this 
assistance, through the Calumet Asso- 
ciated Charities. 

Ironwood — The Norrle band boys are 
making arrangements for a "pennant 
ball," to be given at the Elks' hall on 
Friday evening. Dec. 12. 

Hancock — Mistletoe lodge. Sons of 
St. (ieorge, has elected these officers: 
President, William Chapman; vice 
president, Benjamin Trembath; secre- 
tary, John T. Vlckers; assistant sec- 
retary. William Simmons; treasurer, 
William Goudge, Jr.; messenger. J. B. 
Rippon; assistant messenger, R. An- 
drews; chaplain, A. C. Bailey; Inside 
sentinel, William Paull; outside sen- 
tinel John Whinnen; trustee for six 
months, William Simmons; trustee for 
eighteen months, Daniel Hoar. 



Spi 



a 




9 00 Drops 




ALC OUOL 3 PEK CENT 

AV^iclablePreparallonforAs- 
sirailalingihcFoorfamlRegula 
Cing tl le Siomadis andBinvizIs of 



InfUnts /Children 



DAKOTA BRIEFS 



Devils Lake, N. D. — Frank Frye es- 

1 caped with a broken hand and bruised 

head from an accident which migiit 

have resulted more seriously. Mr. Frye 

Is employed as collector for the In- 

, ternational Harvester company, and 

I while out driving through the country 

I near York his team was frightened by 

an auto and he was thrown out of the 

' buggy. 

' Fargo, N. D. — Senator P. J. McCum- 
i ber has 'nominated Herman E. Halland 
1 of Fargo as principal, and Donald 
I Palmer of Manning and Victor E. Wal- 
lln of Washburn, as alternates for ap- 
1 polntment to the United States naval 
academy at Annapolis from North Da- 

I kota. „ „ .,.,-.,, 

Grand Forks. N. D. — Rev. J. B. Mon- 
! roe formerly a pastor In the Metho- 
' dlst Episcopal church In North Da- 
kota, died last week In Algoma, Wash- 
ington, according to word received 
here. Ha Is survived by his widow and 
one son, John Monroe. . ^ , ^ 

Bismarck, N. D.— North Dakota con- 
victs aro being given an opportunity 



^«^! 



Promotes DigestfonOieetfii- 
nessandResr.ContaliisiKitlvr 
OpiunLMorphine norMioixaL 
Not Narcotic. ■ 



jbiutud* 
~ mtr. 



Apci feet Remedy forCOnrf^ 
tion . Sour StDiMcli.DlariTOta 
WomisX^onvulskmsf everiM- 
ne3s MdLossorSLEER 



lifStmile Signature of 



CASTORIA 

For Infants and Children. 

Mothers Know That 
Genuine Castoria 

Always 

Bears the 

Signature 

of 





trZ, B Centaur CowpASSi 
NEW YORK. 



tb months old 



irjinteeduaden 



Exact Copy of Wrapper. 



Thirty Years 

CASTORIA 

TMB OBNTAWN •OMMNT, MCW re«R OltV. 









1 



■f^- 



16 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



{f 



O'v 



A, \i 



THE IRON RANGES 



MINE RESClit 
CAR ^PUIAR 

Instructions Given at Gil- 
bert Appreciated By 
Mines and Employes. 



Banquet and Social for 

Visiting Instructors Given 

in Carlson's Hall. 



N'cltti Tonawandn, N. Y., received the 
contr'act for :::.''taning the heating; BJ'** 
tern at *l-328. .'in-i il-^itl-l^ wTU be 
ho"t\.ater an J *- ^^"^"^rl^^'j'us^ 
65 to 65 de&.. the propuh^Tt^'^K "o^^ 
to be lie^ited to 65 doff. jn 40 below x.^..*^ 
weather. Contractor (Just Ander.«on 
told the council that he could have 
the general contract finished In rive 
weeks. , „ _ 

Other bidders were Lord & Burn- 
ham of Chicago, general contract, 
$3,404; heating, $1,825; John C M9n- 
inger company, Chicago. material, 
general contract. $1,674.57; heating, 
$1,186.75; for installation of both. 
$1,300: Adam Schirmer, Chlsholm. heat- 
ing onlv, Installation and material, 
$2,185; A. C. Schirmer, heating and In- 
staliation of same, $1,728. 

CHISHOLMSUir 

ABSORBING ONE 



MAY ORGANIZE 

BUSINESS CLUB 



Gilbert, Minn., Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Ilerald.J— The government bureau 
of mines rescue car Xo. 8 has been 
Btaiioned here the past week giving 
m.'^truction to the employes of the 
various mining compunies in ine m- 
clnity in first aid to the injured and 
In ilie care and use of mine rescue 
brvaihir.t; apparatus Thl.s work has 
beea cariiwU on by the tjovernment in 
th« coal mines of the country for 
some time, but it is only recently 
that llic metal mint-rs have be.;n given 
this instruction, and this is the first 
timt- that one of the government cars 
has visite.l the Mesaba range. 

Tlie work as practiced by the car 
Instructors is to give lectures and 
pru'lice in the work as nearly as pos- 
sible undt-r conditions in which the 
work will have to be accomplished 
in practice. The car la CQuipped with 
a number of sets of breathing ap- 
pariiliis which shut Hie wearer off 
fr«.m the out.side air and enables him 
to r.spire normally and to work in 
an atmo.sphere which may be devoid 
of oxvKin and fatal to life If taken 
Into the lungs. The instru< tors are 
men who ha\e had actual experit-nce 
in th.- work and exemplify it In such 
a maitner as t<. familiarize their classes 
thorouf-hly with Hie work and to post 
them against dangers v.hich might 
ari.«e in the course of an attempted 
re.'»cue. The rescue corps of the vari- 
ous mines were present and took the 
instruction work very enthusiastically 
and are taking a great interest In 
the subject. „ . ^ 

Are Worklns 'or Safety. 

The miiiiti;^ .•umpanles have been 
making an "extensive campaign for 
ecme time in this work and their ef- 
forts are greatly aided by the gov- 
ernment car. They have also been 
making a great effort toward safety. 
In.^tructious have been issued for the 
operators in the various dtparlmeiits 
In the manner to carry on their work 
■with the greatest degree of safety, 
dJi!:ger .«igi'.3 have been placed at all 
p.>ltit.<» where aciidents might be liable 
to oe.ur, and all apparatus has been 
euirded so as to minimize the liability 
for acidents!. That this work has borne 
fruit is proven by statistics, which 
Bhow that sin<e the .«afety i-ampa gn 
was ."tarled the number of accidents 
ham materially decreased as well as 
their percentage of 8erlousne.«s. The 
phvsicians also say that since the 
men have received lnstructl(ui.% In the 
first aid to the injured thp ca.'^es 
•which are brought to their attention 
are in much better .^^hape for treat- 
ment and the danger of Infeotion has 
also been lessened. As an appreciation 
of t!ie work of the government of- 
ficials In charge of tlie car a ban- 
quet and smoker was given In their 
honor Saturday night at Carlson's hall. 
About 50 employes of the Republic 
Stf-el & Iron company and the Flck- 
ands-Mather company were present. 
F. P. Uuthorford was toastmaster. 
Thoii»e Who Spoke. 

Sp*>tches were made by Messrs. Sul- 
livan and Krogdahl of the bureau of 
mines car, Capt. W. M. AVebb, safety I 
Inspector for the Republic Steel & | 
Iron t'ompany; rieorge Martinson, > 
safety inspector for the Plckands- | 
Mather company. Other speakers were: 
J. .1. Hurley. AV'alter Schoch. William 
Wills. Frank Bowman, Sam Steele. Dr. 
M. I/. Strathern. Capt. D. T. Calne, 
General Superintendent T. A. Flannl- 
gan of the Republic Iron & Steel com- 
pany: C. (}. Fulton and P. It. Cos- 
frove. The entertainment was success- 
ul and all present report that it was 
very interesting and instructive and 
may lead to the formation of dubs 
to further the work socially as well, 
BO a.s to keep up the Interest mani- 
fested. 

CHISHOLM cbUMCIL 

AWAR DS CO NTRACTS. 

Chisholm, Minn., Dec. 2.— (.*=?pecial to 
The Herald.) — .\t an adjourned session 
of the village council last evening, the 
contract.^ for construction of a green- 
house and for heating were awarded. 
Oust Anderson, a local contractor, se-. 
cured the contract for greenhouse, his 
bid being $2,781. the material to be 
used to be straight roof, even span 
Iron pipe frame construction. 

The King Construction Company of 



To Recover $60 Alleged to 

Have Been Stolen By 

Woman. 

Chisholm, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The municipal court de- 
voted yesterday to hearing part of the 
evidence In the case of John Comlsky 
vs. Ethel McCarthy to recover $60 
which plaintiff alleges defendant took 
from him as the two were drinking 
in a wine room, Xov. 5. He alleges 
the money was his wages as a street 
employe and that after Inviting him 
into the drinking room the woman ab- 
stracted the money in the form of blll.s 
from his pocket. 

C'onteinptuou.<4 WltiimN Paninhed. 

During the trial several amusing in- 
cidents occurred. Joe Shombeau, one 
of the witnesses failed to show the 
court the proper consideration and was 
given two days for contempt. His 
contempt for this action caused the 
judge to give him an additional nine- 
ty days for being drunk which con- 
dition was very plain as indicated by 
his actions on the witness stand. 

The case was continued until 
Wednesdav when other witnesses will 
be railed. M. H. McMahon of Virginia 
represents the defendant and Edward 
Freeman the plaintiff and village. 



Rival to Hibbing Commer- 
cial Club Is Being 
Discussed. 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 2.— (Special to , 
The Herald.) — Unless a representative 
gathering of local businessmen attend 
the meeting of the Commercial club 
called for tomorrow evening, steps will 
be taken to form a Hibbing Business 
Men's club. 

That the movement is backed by a 
large number of the representative 
professional men of the village Is 
known by the fact that negotiations 
have already been started for a meet- 
ing place for the new Drganlzation and 
no secret Is made that in their opinion 
the Commercial club will have to "sit 
up and take notice" If they do not 
want to find themselves deposed by 
another society. 

Some Important Mattern. 

"It Is not with any idea of antagon- 
izing the men who have worked hard 
for the interests of Hibbing that the 
new club Is being proposed," said a 
man Interested in the movement, "but 
It Is high time that some steps were 
taken, not only to secure something 
new for Hibbing but to retain what we 
already have. I hear on good author- 
ity that Hibbing may be made a 'tank 
town' by the Mlssabe road which con- 
templates, as I understand it, running 
the morning and noon train Into Vir- 
ginia and serving Hibbing with a ; 
stub train. I am also convinced that : 
Hibbing could If the proper enthusiasm 
were put Into the movement secure an ' 
extension of the Canadian Northern, 
for there Is little doubt but that the 
ore that could be .secured from the In- 
dependent companies would prove a 
sufficient Inducement. There Is also the 
matter of the proposed extension of 
the street car lines to Grand Rapids 
that should be acted upon by some rep- 
resentative body from this village. The 
smaller villages have all gone on rec- 
ord as In favor of the extension and , 
Hibbing, the town that will be bene- 1 
flted most has not said a word." 




SCALFJ. 

MllM 

Ptr llr.UT. 

Calm to 9 

Llglit 5 to 15 

VIbdeiate 15 to 23 

Brisk »5 to 35 

High 35 to 50 

O'ale 50 to 65 

Hurrl-dne €5 and above 

t'. W. RICHARDSON, 
Lockl Fortcaiter. 

EXPLANATORY NOTES 

ObMrrationt taken at 8 a. »-, »ev« ulT-Ullh meridiaa lime. Air pressure redueisd to ee» level hoBAii» (continuous lino) pfis tfirough points oTeioal air prcfTOrc. Iso» m^|<l ritej l^nm) 

pau through poinu of equal temperature; drawn only for lero, freezing, 00°, and 100°. Q clear, Q partly cloudy; « cloudy; R rain; S mow; M rporl niie£lDj^||{aw. fly ^t: 

the wind, ruht figure^ temperature; second, precipitatioo of .01 inch or more for past 24 buurs, thiid, uiaximura wind velocity. .' 



FORECAST TILL 7 P. 
WED.NESDAY 

For Iiuluth. Superior aiid rlclnlty, 
Including tlie Mes.aba and Vermilion 
iron ranges: Purtly cloudy weather 
lonlghl and Weducsday; culder to- 
night with temperature 25 deg. to 
ao dfg ; moderate variable wliMia. 




CIGAR STANDS ARE 
ALLOWED TO STAY 



Virginia Police and Fire 

Commission So Decides 

After Discussion, 

Virginia, Minn.. Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The cigar stands In 
front of saloons will be allowed to 
operate undisturbed. At the meeting 
of the police and fire commission last 
night Commissioner .S. A. Xels<m tried 
to force the board to go on record { 
in regard to the matter after a com- ' 
munication had been read from City 
Attorney Morgan. Attorney Morgan 
staled that tlie stands were In viola- 
tion of the ordinance regulating the 
sale of liquor, but that the situation 
could be met by one of two methods, 
eltiier tins ln.«lalling of full length 
glass doors between the cigar stands 
and bar rooms, which would give a 
full view of the interior of the latter, 
or that the stands be closed on Sun- 
days and during the hours prescribed 
by law that saloons shall be closed. 
President P. A. Coffey stated that so 
far as a view of the interior is con- 
cernetl It can be obtained now and 
that it would be a hardsliip on the 
owners of the stands to compel them to 
remove the fixtures. There are only 
three firms operating these cigar 
stores. 

Some Lively TlltA. 
The .session was enlivened by sev- 
eral lilts between Commissioners Nel- 
son and Coffey and Commissioner Nel- 
son and Chief of Police Rice. Com- 
missioner Nelson objected to the sal- 
ary fixed by the chief of police for 
the drivers of the new police emer- 
gency. When Chief Rice appointed the 
drivers he fixed the salaries at $85 a 
month, that amount having been 
agreed upon by the commission at its 
last meeting. Commissioner Nelson was 
opposed to paying any more than $75 
and said that was a "living wage" 
for any man. After considerable dis- 
cussion, during which the chief and 
police department were criticized by 
the commissioner. the matter was 
compromised by applying the regula- 
tions governing patrolmen to the driv- 
ers. Seventy-five dollars a month will 
be paid for the first 60 days service 
and at the end of that time the sal- 
aries win be raised to $85. 

The commission has under consid- 
eration the purchase of another motor 
driven fire truck of a lighter build 
than the one at present in use and a 
committee will investigate different 
makes in order to give a comprehen- 
.sive report at the next meeting. 



CORRECTIONAL FARM 
IDEA IS POPULAR 



District and Municipal 

Judge and Hibbing Indorse 

Duluth Concern. 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — That the city and coun- 
ty correctional farm at Duluth is a 
boon to the magistrates of the range 
is the opinion of District Court Judge 
Martin Hughes and the officers of 
the local munl<npal court. 

Hardly a term passes In disttlct 
court and not a week In the municipal 
court without men being brought up 
for seme crime which tliough neces- 
sitating pimlshment does not warrant 
a jail sentence. 

Ul8trlot Judge Favors Fnrm. 

"There are men every term. " said 
Judge Hughes, "who are brought be- 
fore me for sentence either as the 
result of a verdict of the jury or more 
often after entering a plea of guilty, 
who should be removed from society 
for a short time but who cannot stand 
the close confinement and physical 
hardships that must be endured In a 
Jail or prison. The new farm fills the 
bill and allows them a place where 
their strength may be retained and 
Improved by work and yet their 
minds cleared by new and more health- 
ful associations." 

In the courts of the range many 
of the prisoners are miners or lum- 
berjacks, men who have been used to 
hard physical labor In the out-of- 
doors. To place them In a jail Is. In 
the opinion of the local magistrates, 
Inflicting more punishment on them 
than the nature of their crime usually 
demands. 



.«5u n s h 1 n e dis- 
pelled the gloom of 
the past few days 
this morning, but 
the best that Is 
promised for to- 
night and tomor- 
row la partly 
cloudy weather: al- 
so more cold, with 
moderate and vari- 
able wind. The chill 
will be some relief. 
A year ago today 
was cold, with tjuow 'on the ground. 
The sun rose this morning at i :35 ana 
will set thi.s afternoon at 4:20 o clock, 
giving eight hours and forty-five min- 
utes of daylight. 

Mr. Richardson has the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Unsettled weather continues from 
the Rocky mountains eastward to the 
Atlantic coast. Light snow or rain fell 
during Mondav or last night over 
Wyoming, Colorado, the Dakotas, Ne- 
braska, Western Iowa, Kansas, Okla- 
homa, Northern Texa.s, Minnesota, Wis- 
consin, Northern Michigan and Middle 
and South Atlantic states. Somewhat 
colder weather prevails In Montana, 
the Dakotas and Southeastern states. 
The winds in the lake region are gen- 
erally light this morning and rather 
variable as regards direction." 



east portion \Ve<lnesday. 

Minnesota— Generally fair tonight 
and Wednesday; somewhat lower tem- 
perature In east portion tonight. 

Iowa — Unsettled weather tonight and 
Wednesday, probably occasional rain; 
colder tonight. 

TemperatnreM. 

Following were the highest temper- 1 
attires for the last twenty-four hours \ 
and the lowest for the last twelve, i 
ending at 7 a. m.: I 



well supper by Mesaba lodge. No. 255 
of Masons, for tiielr first master, D, F. 
Wadsworth and Chaplain Frank Du- 
rant were issued today. The supper 
will be given or Tuesday, Dec. 9. and 
it Is expected that there will be a 
large attendance as the two guests of 
honor, who are to leave shortly for 
their new hom< s in the West, have 
been popular on the range. 



FATAL TO GOOD LOOKS 



Thin Blood and Nervousness Will 
Quickly Wreck Beauty. 

Pale people are generally nervous. 
Thin blood not only affects the com- 
plexion by robbing cheeks and lips of 
color but it also weakens the nerves 
by robbing them of nourishment. 

When you have so far lost control 
of your nerves that you "fly to pieces" 
over the least little noise or excite- 
ment, it is high time to give your 
nerves a rest and to build up your 
blood. The drawn look, the sunken 
eyes, the deepening lines about the 
inouth and forehead, the loss in 
weight, are plain signs that the nerves 
and the body are being poorly nour- 
ished. 

Don't put off taking Dr. Williams' 
Pink Pills any longer. You may be 
nearer a collapse than you think. 

Start on the road to health now by 
getting a box of Dr. Williams' Fink 
Pills from your druggist. 



BlsMyrBel 



Changed by the wearer period- 
ically, it always stays level. Prevents 
run-over heels, slipping, strain on 
ankles. Guaranteed not to work loose. 

J Double "Wmmr 
\RubbT H99l 

is made of best resilient live rubber: 
extremely durable. Greatly minimizes 
wear on shoes and hose. Bottom smooth, 
free from nails or nail holes. Can't mar 
the finest floor, nor track in dirt and water. 
For men, women and 
children. Try them 
yourself and have 
your family fitted 
out. 

At Your 
Dealer's 

Heimbach * 
Rubber Heel Co. 
Dolntfa, Minn. 



L*^ 



50^ 



HJfr'i l>.w 



for 
1 p. 



the 

m. 



-Contln- 



Oeneral Temperatures. 

Chicago, Dec. 2. — Foreca.«tB 
twi-nty-four hours ending at 
Wednesday: 

Upper and Lower Michigan- 
tied unsettled weather tonight and 
Wednesday, probably occasional rains. 

Wisconsin — Unsettled weather to- 
night and Wednesday, possibly local 
rain or snow; colder in west portion 
tonight. 

North Dakota — Generally fair to- 
night and Wednesday; colder In south- 
east portion tonight. 

South Dakota — Unsettled weather to- 
night and Wednesday, possibly snow 
flurries: colder tonight. 

Montana — Generally fair tonight and 
Wednesday; warmer toniglit and in 



AbUoiie 


. 58 


r,(j 


Ali+na 


. U 


42 


AmarlUo 




44 


Battkford .... 


..34 


SO 


BlMuaick .... 


...3« 


?rt 


Boise 


. .A\ 


?S 


Posfon 


. 46 


38 
43 
46 


BufTalo 


. ..62 


Cairo 




CalRary 


...40 


IR 


Cliarleston 


...Cfl 


.'.? 


ChlcflKO 


..54 


40 


Concordia 




.10 


Pavenport 




.'.0 


Denver 


...SO 


?4 


Des Mollies . . 


..51 


50 


Devils Lake . , 


. .54 


18 


D.dge 


..4*8 


40 


r(iib\i<lue 


...IS 




DULUTH .. . 


...38 


S6 


Kiimoutcii 


.42 




Juicaiiaba .... 


...10 


40 


Fort SiiiliU . . 


...70 


54 


Galvf.st(in .... 


...!0 


r8 


Orai:d H.nven 


..02 


40 


Ore*n Bay . . . 


...12 


40 


Hatre 


...38 


12 


Helena 


...38 


16 


Honchton .... 




V^ 


Huron 


...38 


.18 


Indian.ipclis 




r.2 


Jacksonville .. 


...78 


.18 


Kanilo</p9 


. ..S4 


30 


Kaivias City . 


...50 


52 


Keukuk 




52 


KnoxviUe .... 


...58 


46 


\a Crosse .... 




42 


1-ander 




24 


UiulsvlUe .... 


...S6 


5J 


Madison 


...44 


42 


-Marailelte . . . 


...40 


.•?8 


M«-«li. iiic Hat 


. ..:^8 


14 


Meiiil'lils • • • 


. . . cc 


48 


Miles aiy ... 


...40 


:;a 


ililwaukte . . . 


...14 


44 



High IiC«- 



.Minnnl' ?a 30 

Mpilena 30 

Montgomery .... 74 

.Montreal 38 

Moorhead %K 

Xushrill© 

New Orleans 74 

New York 48 

NorUi Platte 42 

(.fklahuma 60 

t)ma!~ja 50 

Pairy .Sound ... .40 

Phoinli :0 

Pierre 40 

Illtbburg 52 

I'ort Arthur 40 

Portland. Or .'50 

iniuce Albert 34 

QuAi^elle oO 

Hiilolih 48 

Ha: 'id City 42 

Hosebiirg 44 

Hcswoll 

St. I/uls 62 

St. Pdul 42 

.Salt I>ake City. ..38 

San l>ii>go 62 

San Francisco — 66 
iSauU Ste. Maria 42 
Seattle 50 



SlierUlati 

Slireveuort .... 

Sioux City 

Spokane 

PlirtiiKfleld, ni 
Spriii«field, Mo.. 
Swift Current .. 

Tampa 

Toledo 

Valentine 

Washington ... 

Wlrhita 

WiUialon 34 

Wiinicmucca ... .42 
Wimiliieg 34 



..34 
..70 
..44 
..38 



.36 
..«I2 
.58 

!46 



12 
22 

"t 
36 

34 

46 

58 1 

44 

40 
54 
40 

38; 

34 
32; 
48, 
34 I 
40 I 
14 
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46 

-8 , 
4« i 
34 
n4 ' 
40 

'JO 

52 
42 
40 

50' 

42 

26 

50 

48 

12 

62 

48 

82 

44 

50 

14 

18 

28 



DISTRICT COURT 

IS IN SESSION 



Judge Hughes Charges 

Grand Jury and Calls tine 

Civil Calendar. 

Virginia, Minr., Dec. 2. — (Special t<i 
The Herald.) — The December term of 
district court opened here today, 
Judge Hughes presiding, with the 
usual court atia -hes In attendance and 
a number of Duluth attorneys on hand 
for cases in >^hich they are inter- 
ested. 

A grand jurj- was selected from 
among tlio.se summoned, charged by 
Judge Hughes, and placed at work on 
pending cases. 

This afternoon Judge Hughes called 
the calendar .and ordered the first petit 
jury case for trial. The session prom- 
ises to be an Iriportant one, as there 
are many criminal and civil cases, the 
most Important of the former being 
the trial of Laze Evlch. indicted by the 
la.5t grand jurj at Hibbing " charged 
with killing Din Rukavina at Buhl 
Dec. 12 last yes r during a quarrel in 
a blind pig. This will probably be 
the first case tried. 



railways, mines and so forth, from 
which enterprises one-fourth of tho 
public revenue is derived. The Soda* 
Democratic movement in Germany i.<j 
only a struggle for the must part 
for popular political contrc>l, for the 
people's supremacy In politics and in 
the business of the state." 

Dr. Phelan will lecture tonight at 
the Commercial club on "Value." 



THIRTY PARTY MEN 
T4) HAVE MEETING 



IOWA MAN IS FINED. 



Does Your Stomach 
Trouble You? 

Mayt's Wonderful Stomach Remedy 
is Successfully Taken in Cases 
of Stomach, Liver and In- 
testinal Ailments 

Ami One Dose Has Often Dispelled 
Years of Suffering 

Wonderful 

will change 
thai • 

Loh^ Faceli 

Mayr't Wonderfut Stomach Remedy catj 

really be termed a wonderful remedy and the 
benefits that it gives in many of the most chron- 
{c ca:.es of Stomach Trouble has spread its fame 



TOWER WAREHOUSE 
BELIEVED FIRED 

Blaze Early in Morning 
I Causes About $4,000 
Loss. 



DISCUSS SHAKE SPEARE. 

Virginia Study Club Devotes After- 
noon to Bard of Avon. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 2. — The Virginia 
Study club dlscus.<»ed Shakespeare at 
Its meeting at the public library Mon- 
day afternoon. Quotations were read 
and a paper on "Shakespeare as His- 
torian, Tragedian and Comedian" was ' 
presented by Mr?. A. T. Gordon. Mrs. ' 
M. E. Fanning read a paper on "His 1 
Stage and Audience." The study of 1 
Shakespeare will be continued at the 
next meeting, which Avill not be held 
until Jan. 5. 



physicians, 
H. Crowe, 
about 150 
down to a 
Hollo- 
after 
which there was a social session and 
smoker. The degree team of the lodge 
will give a dance In the Fay opera 
house on the evening of Dec. 12. 



trustee, Charles Krause; 
Dr. H. W. Morcom, Dr. J. 
After the business session 
members of the lodge sat 
"Dutch lunch" prepared by U. G. 
w-ay and AVllliam Fitzgerald. 



GERMANS DESIRE 

MINING PICTURES 



Opera- 



Virginia W^oodmen Eleet. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Virginia camp. No. 29EB, 
Modern Woodmen of America, held Its 
annual election of officers last eve- 
ning. These were elected: Consul, U. G. 
Holloway; adviser, N. C. White; banker, 
John W. Tremble; clerk, Fred J. Ver- 
vllle; escort, H. Burchell; watchman, 
J. E. Matson; sentry, Anton Halno; 



2._(Spe(ial to 
3 a. m. today 



Tower, Minn., Dec 
The Herald ) — At about 
fire was discovered in a warehouse be- 
longing to E. W. Barnes in which his 

logging equipment was stored, and 
much damage resulted. 'J'he loss Is 
estimated at $4,000, insurance un- 
known. The fire is believed to have 
been of incendiary origin, 

BUYS VAC UUM~C LEANER. 

Chisholm Library Board Purchases 
Device From St. Paul Firm. 

Chisholm. Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The library board Mon- 
day afternoon awarded the contract 
for a vacuum cleaner for the new 
municipal library to Robinson, Cary 
& Sands of St. Paul, on their bid of 
$730. The cleaner Is a three-horse 
power Spence turbine machine with a 
high duty one sweeper. There were 
several bids, Cameron, Schroth & Co. 
of Minneapolis were personally repre- 
sented by J. W Miller. There were 
two local bids, those of Adam Schir- 
mer and A. C. Schirmer & Co. 

itvttocawi. v..i.v^"'"-" - .- ' Many different types of cleaners 

from one end of the country to the other. No [ were submitted which made the 

Patter where you live— you will find people who I awarding of a contract harder, but 
a — A «.;.^ Kt^^^^h # ;.i«v and IntmM. gave tho board much valuable Infor- 
mation. The building which will cost 




PILES QUICKLY 

CURED AT HOME 

instant Relief, Permanent Cure — Trial 

Package Mailed Free to All In 

Plain Wrapper. 




Views of Mesaba 
tions to Be Furnished 
Duluthian Now Abroad. 

Hibbing, M!nn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Pictures of some of the 
large mining properties In the Hibbing 
district are to be furnished Eugene 
Van Cleef, formerly a professor In the 
Duluth Normal school and now special- 
izing in geography at Leipsic, Ger- 
many, following his request trans- 
mitted to local men by the secretary 
of the Duluth Commercial club. The 
Iron ore operations In this vicinity have 
apparently been of great interest to 
the Germans, a representative of that 
government having spent several 
weeks here during the past summer, 
going through the mines and consult- 
ing with the local engineers 

UNIDENfiFJEDMAN 
IS TRAIN VICTIM 



a few days while .in effort was being 
made to locate relatives. 

The man was evidently about 50 
years of age and weighed about 200 
pounds. He had dark hair, slightly 
gray around the ears, and a heavy 
black mustache. He is apparently a 
Russian. 

Engineer Dodge, who was on the 
train which killed the man, claims that 
he did not see him on the track, and 
knew nothing of the accident until he 
discovered blood on the pony trucks 
when he stopped at Highland. 



Pays 



LAID NEW T RACK. 

Canadian Northern Built Twenty-Five 
Miles on This Division. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Canadian road gang 
has finished its work for this season. 

Twenty-five miles of new track Avas 
laid from here north while forty-five 
miles will be built next year. 
ballasting will follow. 



Ite- 



have suffered with Stomach, Liver and lnte$- , 
iinal Ailments, etc., and have been restored to | 
health and are loud In their praise of this rem- i 
edy. There is not a day but what one hear^ o( | 
the Vvonderful results obtained from this remedy 
imd the benefits are entirely natural, as it acts | 
on the source and foundation of these ailments, j 
removing the poisonous catarrh and bile accre- 
tions, taking out the inflamnjation from the in- 1 
testinal tiict and assists in rendering the same 
antiseptic. Sufferers are urged to try one dose— 
which alone should relieve your sulTenng and 

Sinvince vou that Mayr'a Wonderful Stofnach 
emedy s'hould restore you to good health. Put 
It to a test today— the results will be a revelation 
to you and you will rejoice over your quick re- 
covery and once again know the joys of living. 
Send for booklet on Stomach Ailments to Geo. 
H.'Mayr. Mfg. Chemist. 156 Whiting St., Chicago; 
or better still, obtain a bottle from your druggist 

For sale by Wlrth's drug store 
druggl::ts eveivwhere. 



$25,000 besides the site and furnish- 
ings, is of solid brick and Is now en- 
closed and contractors are doing the 
Inside finishing at this time. The 
building win be heated from the city 
hall heating plant by means of under- 
ground pipes crossing Lake street. 
• . — 

Want Board Sidewalk. 

Virginia. Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Residents of West Vir- 
ginia ask that a board sidewalk be 
built to their settlement, which Is a 
mile and a half from the city proper. 
There are ten houses at West Virginia 
and the present route is said to be 
very muddy. The Duluth, Winnipeg & 
and i Pacific railroad provides train service 
'for Its workmen at West Virginia. 



The Pyramid Smile. 

Many cases of Piles have been cured 
by a trial package of Pyramid Pile 
Remedy without further treatment. 
When It proves Its value to you, get 
more .from your druggist at 60c a box, 
and be sure you get the kind you ask 
for. Simply fill out free coupon below 
and mall today. Save yourself from 
the surgeon's knife and its torture, 
the doctor and his bills. 



FREE PACKAGE COUPOM 

PYRAMID DRUG COMPANY. 402 
Pyramid Bldg., Marshall, Mich. 
Kindly, send me a sample of Pyra- 
mid Pile Remedy, at once by mall, 
FREE, In plain wrapper. 



Name 



Street 



City State. 



Two Duluth Employment 

Tickets in Different 

Names on Body. 

Two Harbors, Minn., Dec. 2.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — A southbound 
Iron Range freight train ran down and 
instantly killed a man believed to be 
either Peter Plesar or Pete Pasar, yes- 
terday morning before daylight at 

Mile 49. .,. . . X. w 

The local authorities who brought 
the remains here are not certain about 
the man's identity. Two employment 
tickets were found In one of his 
pockets, and these are practically the 
only means of Identification which 
local authorities are able to find, al- 
though a memorandum book was found 
on the bodv, but the name written on 
it was so blurred and poorly written 
that nothing definite could be deter- 
mined from It. 

WaM Hired In Dnlnth. 

Both the employment tickets were 
Issued by Duluth agencies. One was 
dated Nov. 26. On this ticket he evi- 
dently hired out to the Virginia & 
Rainy Lake Lumber company at their 
camp No. 29. The ticket bore the name 
of Pete Pasar, and the ticket was No. 
16457. The other employment ticket 
was dated Nov. 26 and was Issued by 
the Zenith Employment agency, and on 
this one he hired out to the Alger 
Smith Lumber company 
to their camp No. 4. 

The name written In 
dum book, as near as 
mined, is Peter Plesar. 

Will Hold Remains. 

There were no letters or anything 
to show that the man had any relatives 
or friends, and the local authorities 
harbor little hope of locating rela- 
tives, although Dr. C. F. McComb of 
Duluth and coroner of Bt. Louis county 
was in the city yesterday and advised 
Undertaker Brown to hold the remains 



FAREWELL IVIASONIC 
BANQU ET AT HIBB'" . 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Sp-cla.' to 
The Herald.) — Invitations for a fa.e- 

BACKACHE IS 
A DANGER SIGNAL 

Kidney Troubles, Bl^clder Dis- 
orders, Rheumatism, and 
Serious Diseases Follow. 



Dearly for Violation of Minne- 
sota Oame Laws. 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — It cost George Carlisle 
of Muscatine, Iowa, $26 and costs for 
attempting to ship venison home and 
SlO and costs lor having It Illegally 
In his po.>Jsesslon, as the result of 
George Wood's Interest in law en- 
forcement wlio made the arrest at 
Goodland. 

Wilfred Lapeur and Earl Francisco 
were also arrested at Goodland 
charged with illegal trapping and 
each paid a fine of $10 and costs. 

Fred Francis ':o pleaded guilty to 
selling a number of furs to a Hibbing 
business man or. Nov. 14 and was fined 
$10 and costs. He signed a complaint 
against the bu/er, who will be ar- 
rested. 



North Dakota Scandinavian 

Progressives Would Win 

Over Old Republicans. 

Grand Forks, X. D., Dec. 2.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Scandinavian Pro- 
gressives and Republicans are already 
gathering in Grand Forks for ihd 

meeting that will be held here to- 
1 morrow night of the North Dakot.i 
i Scandinavian Republican league, at 
which time progressive members o£ 
the organization will attempt to con- 
vert It from the Republican ranks to 
the support of the third party. 

Early arrivals on the ground have 
little to say concerning the probable 
result of tomorrow evening's gather- 
ing. The progressives will, at that 
time, renew the assault they made on 
the league a year ago, when they 
failed by a narrow margin to change 
the name of the organization to the 
"North Dakota Scandinavian Progres- 
sive League." 

O. T. Rishoff, secretary of the Re- 
publican league. Is confident that there 
will be no change in the attitude of the 
league. 



Dead Msin identified. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Dec. 2.— (Spe- 
cial to The Horald.) — F. J. Baxter 
was the man who died suddenly at a 
local hospital list week, the Identlfi- 
cati' Lnlng jtst been made. Ho had 
r- i In Noithern Minnesota for 
V years and during the famou.s 
silver campaifin of ISC'6 had 
.• > rgt of the 1 eadquarters. 
« 

Discussed ;$a(«ty Appliances. 

Hibbing. Minn., Dec. 2.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — "he following Hibbing 
men attended a conference of Plck- 
ands-Mather superintendents and cap- 
tains held Saturday at Virginia to 
discuss the use of safely appliances 
in mines to reduce accidents: J. R. 
Fayle, Robert Alurray, M. 13ryant and 
H. Rakerst. 



"INVENTOR" OF WAX 

STA MP BOO K LOSES. 

Washington, Dec. 2. — Frank G. Farn- 
ham, who claimed $1,000,000 from the 
government on the contention that he 

was the inventor of the little waxed- 
page book in which the postofflce de- 
partment sells stamps, lost his case In 
the court of claims. The government 
denied the validity of his patent, and 
contended that the book which has 
become so popular was not entirely 
the one Farnham Invented. 



and was to go 



the 
can 



memoran- 
be deter- 



The kidneys get clogged up, the 
same as the bowels do. Then they be- 
come sluggish, and only filter or strain 
out a part of the waste or poisonous 
matter, all the rest remaining In the 
blood end poisoning the system. 

As soon as you notice the first in- 
dications of backache, pains In the 
sides, or aches around the kidney.", or 
if the urine Is light and pale, dark 
colored, cloudy, thick, or has an of- 
fensive odor, burns, is scalding or ir- 
regular in passage, take a little Crox- 
one three times a day and end these 
troubles before they become more se- 
rious. 

There Is no more effective remedy 
known for the prompt relief and cure 
of kidney, bladder troubles and rheu- 
matism, than Croxone. It soaks right 
Into the kidneys through the walls and 
lining; cleans out the clogged up pores; 
neutralizes and dissolves the poisonous 
uric acid and waste matter that lodge 
In the Joints and muscles, and cause 
those terrible rheumatic pains, and 
makes the kidneys filter the poison 
from the bloo^ and drive it out of the 
system. 

A few days' use of this new scientific 
preparation is often all that is ever 
needed to end the worst backache, or 
overcome the most annoying urinary 
disorders. 

Tou will find Croxone entirely differ- 
ent from other remedies. It Is so pre- 
pared that It is practically Impossible 
to take It without results. An original 
package costs but a trifle, and all drug- 
gists are authorized to return the pur- 
chase price If It should fall in a single 



Charged M 1th StabblnfC. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 2. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — ^■ictor Eklund was ar- 
rested here ye:5terday and taken to 
Mountain Iron charged with having 
stabbed a man at Mud Lake last Sat- 
urdaj'. 

SPEAKSlN SOCIAL 
DEMOdRATIC PARTY 



Dr. Phelan Says Party 
Would Make People Su- 
preme in Germany. 

"Popular Politics In Germany" was 
the subject of Dr. Raymond Phelan's 
university exterslon lecture last night 
at the y. M. C. A. 

Last night's lecture covered the so- 
cial Democratic movement In the 
Fatherland sin<e the fall of Bis- 
marck In 1890. Dr. Phelan explained 
the relation of the Social Democratic 
party to the labor unions of Ger-" 
many and to the German election 
laws, which do not favor political 
control by the people. In Saxony, for 
example, on th< basis of property and 
educational qualifications, the two 
higher classes constitute but 34 per 
cent of the jopulatlon while they 
have 67 per cmt of the votes. The 
two lower clai^ses make up 40 per 
cent of the population but have only 
18 per cent of the votes. 

Social Di'nu»cratlc Party. 

The lecture set forth the political 
activity of tlie Social Democratic 
party, the lessons that It learned in 
the campaign Df 1907, the Catholic 
Socialist m.ovement under Archbishop 
Von Ketteler and Social Democracy's 
triumph In 1912. 

Work for All. 

"Germany Is committed to the prin- 
ciple that the state should see that 
every worker las an opportunity to 
work." said Di'. Phelan. "It is com- 
mitted also to the practice of con- 
siderable publl2 production in state 



WOMAN EMBEZZLER 

S ENT T O PRISON. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. Dec. 2. — Mr.s. Car- 
lotta Thompson Brown, wlio was con- 
victed of having embezzled $21,0<'0 
from a customer while in the broker- 
age business with her husband, was 
sentenced to an indeterminate term in 
the state penitentiary. Judge Cushlng 
later announced that the indeterminate 
term to be served by Mrs. Brown 
would not be less than one year or 
more than ten years. 

HAIR DOESN'T DIE- 
IT HAS TO BE KILLED 

Hair often continues to live and 
grow long- after the death of the body. 
But It Is often killed through neglect 
or misuse. Almost always the woman 
or man whose hair is falling out, or Is 
stringy, lifeless and dull-looking, la 
entirely to blame because of not giv- 
ing It the proper care. It is easy to 
take care of the hair — easy to make it 
more beautiful. Use Harmony Halp 
Beautlfler, to make It glossy, soft and 
silky, and Harmony Shampoo to keep 
hair and scalp thoroughly clean. 

Harmony Hair Beautlfler, delightful- 
ly perfumed with true rose. Is very 
easy to apply — simply sprinkle a little 
on your hair each time before brushing 
it. It contains no oil, and will not 
change the color of the hair, nor dark- 
en gray hair. 

To keep your hair and scalp dan- 
drufC-free and clean, use Harmony 
Shampoo. This pure liquid shampoo 
Is most convenient to use, giving an 
Instantaneous rich, foaming lather that 
immediately penetrates to every part 
of the hair and scalp, insuring a quick 
and thorough cleansing. It is washed 
off just as quickly, the entire operation 
taking only a few moments. Contains 
nothing that can harm the hair, and 
leaves no harshness or stickiness — . 
Just a sweet cleanliness. 

Both preparations come in odd- 
shaped, very ornamental bottles, with 
sprinkler tops. Harmony Hair Beautl- 
fler, $1.00. Harmony Shampoo. oOc. 
Both guaranteed to satisfy you in 
every way, or your money back. Sold 
in this community only at our store— 
The Rexall Store — one of the more 
than 7,000 leading drug stores of the 
United States, Canada and Great Brit- 
ain, w^hich own the big Harmony labo- 
ratories in Boston, where the manv 
celebrated Harmony Perfumes anil 
Toilet Preparations are made. E. M. 
Tredway. 108 West Superior street. 
Duluth, Minn. 



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Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



17 



U 



EFFICIENCY 
QUESTIONED 

Rastall Recommends Close 
Study of Police Depart- 
ment Conditions. 



dpnartment. that the denartmpnt Is leased by Chief Troyer fo1^'>'^'"'?^'^" 
department, tnat xne aepar ^j^^y^^ j investigation. Nelson. It wa^sRjd. had 



L-'U- ^ (J *"' 



I ■ ■> 




The police department has a con- 
Bldtrable number of verj- inefficient 
men on the patrol force, and the .sit- | 
uation is probably especially bad In ' 
the detective division, according to the , 
report which has been submitted by 
Dr M. B. liastftll, who recently 
ploted an efficiency ."urvey of 



trvingr to cover an enormous amoum i 
of territory with a very small force 
of men, and also that a large part 
of the present force was appolntea 
prior to the adoption of civil service 
metiiods. , . , 

"Certain feature.s of this school 
work, such as a digest of duties or 
patrolmen and of the laws and ordi- 
nances which they are expected to 
enforce; series of simple lectures on 
police methods; training for a few 
days by sending out with the mo.st 
competent men on the force, and a 
general study of the Problems and an- 
swers relating to police .^■»'•l^^,»V " - 
certainly be arranged 'fmedialelv. 
8tal.'S the report. "If the Chicago 
school Is m vigorous operation at the 
present time, the commisBloner 
chief should visit and make a 
ough studv of Its methods. 

"A number of detailed services will 
be transferred to the police depart- 
ment if recommendations In oiner 
sections of the report are followed. 
These Inrlude lodging house inspec 



Pine" with Charlotte-: Walker In the 
cast, will open. 



man 
been 



been exhibiting a large "roll" of 
money during the day and appeared 

undulv orosoerous. Nelson «atl3fac- -- — ..^w* 

torllv explained his condition to the ! engaged to train the Ucrman weight 
chief and was allowed to go. 



Paul 
at the 



Conchas, 
Orpheum 



GertTMb strong 
this \ftek, has 



which was scattered on the street as a 
result of the accident. 



and 
thor- 



NOTICE, F. 0. E. 

Annual elertlon of ofTlrfr* will be 
held Thursday evening, Dec. Itli. 
V. M. «iHAI>V, W. 1*. 
fa. A. PKARCE, Ser'y. 



com- 
the 
various city departments. 

He reeommends, after a 
nnilnatinii. a detailed study of the de- 1 
partment. with emphasis on the ques- , 
tlon of personal efficiency and the , 
arrangement of civil service methods 1 
BO ihat the inefficient men will be 
removed and a new list recruited. In 
this connection he states that the pos- 
sibility of establishing a training 
s'-bool along Chicago and New York 
lines should receive careful study by 
the safety commissioner and the chief 
of police. 

Dr. Kistall explains that It must be 
b.u-iif ii) tiiiiid, in judging the police 



tlon. sanitary inspection, abatement or 

nuisances and license and permit 

checking. These recommendations are 

in the direction of enlarging the func- 

, tions of the police force to cover a 

Kri*.f Px- ' general field of public usefulness and 

brief ex- »;,.g^.pntjve work which is having a 

general development over the country 

at the present time." 

— . • 



Jlniu$cmcnt$ 



men for the Olympic games in 
in 1916. Conchas wnrTVave nothing to 
do with the trainlnK gi, the runners 
and jumpers, but tho- 4l«fcU8 throwers, 
the shot-putters, th«if hammer throw- 
ers, and the javelin throwers will be 
under his direction. " B» promised to 
do the work at the personal request of 
the kaiser, which amounted almost to 
an order. 

"The kaiser is much,lnterested In the 
upbuilding of German sports." said Mr. 
Conchas last evening. "Ho had seen 
my work In the army gymnasium, and 
had also seen my act which I gave 
before him by ."peclal order. He got 
the Idea that I was the man he wanted 



Boxrr Pays 91 Fine. 

Morris Paul, a local boxer, who was 
arrested on Nov. 14 last on a charge 
Uerlin I of disorderly conduct, was found guilty 
of the charge In police court yesterday 
afternoon. He was fined $1 and costs 
or ten days in the county jail. He 
paid the tine. 



Xorthland Prlntery. 

Good printing. Call Zenith 494. 



Adv. 




HUNTER'S PARK HOME 

AT A BARGAIN 

Eight-room modern house on Woodland 
avenue ; large lot, 89x150 feet. Price, $6,500— 
only $1,000 cash. 

LITTLE Sc NOLTE CO. 'Ktlll'H"lE*B\=D"o" 




TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



FLASHES BIG "ROLL 

AND IS ARRESTED. 



LYCEUM— "Kismet." 
OHPHKl'M — Vaudeville. 
EM PHIOSS — Vaudeville. 
REX — Photoplay. 



Charles Nelson, 20 years old, who 
was arrested by Patrolman Hunter 
last evening because the 



thought he looked suspicious. 



officer 
was re- 



Our Prc-Holiday Sale 

IS A LIVE ONE BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS 
GIFTS EARLY— Wc Store Free o! Charge 



Rockers and Chairs 

At Big Reductions. 

GRAND KAIMDS PIi:Ci:S. 
Our Solid Mahogany Arm Chair, ^l J. 7^ 
No. 638, regularly $2».50 ^M.-Xmav 

Our SoUd Mahogany Arm 
Chair. No. 020 — <g1 Q 7*5 
regularly $:J».50 . ^ J- «/• ■ «* 

Our Solid Mahogany kockor, 
Xf>. *5»;0, regularly fill AA 
$l'2.r>0. .sale price. ^■■■•■••VV 

Our .^olid Mahogany IU>rker, 
No. 2 1.8. regularly ^BJ Q AA 
Sifi.OO. salo price. ^-■.•'•W 

«Mir Solid Oak or Mahogany 
KiK'kers, No. 1272, covered 
g» niiiiir Spanish leather, reg- 
ularly $21.50, 

sale price 

Our Over-stuffed 
Spanish Leather 
3347. sale 

Our large Turkish Uockers, 
Spanish leather, sale price.. 

And others up to $5.">.O0. 



i^>'?^^^'^W^'' 



$15.85 

Genuine 
Kockor, No. 

$18.50 




Xo. 3345, covered genuine $34*00 



Also beautiful 3-piece Living Room Suites, all just fresh 
from the factory; also beautiful new line of Patent Reclining 
Arm Chairs, priced $12.00 to $45.00. all go in this sale. 

Ask to see our 2 to 5-room outfits from $65.00 to $225.00j 
They are all winners for the money. 



GURNSEY BAKING DISHES— 

Brown, with white lined porcelain, Baking Dishes; sets of 
four pieces; regularly $ 1.20. sale price only 



49c 



Yonr Credit 

in 

Good. 





fflaveAC 





t llome 



IT'S a mighty fine thing to have a case of 
beer in your cellar. It provides for an ever- 
ready beverage for meals, lunches, etc. or 
for mere refreshment of the most heahhful 
kind. 




is particularly well adapted for the home on 
account of its purity and extra healthfulness. 
If you could spare the time to be shown through 
the brewery and bottling house you would 
understand why it is so good. Physicians rec- 
ommend it as a tonic and builder of good, 
rich blood. For convalescents and nursing 
mothers it is the ideal liquid food. 

FITGER BREWING CO. 

Over 30 Years in DULUTH. 



FISTULA, RECTAL AND ALL URiNARY DISEASES OF MEN 

WITHOUT AN OPERATION 



BY OUR PAINLESS DISSOLVENT METHOD. 
We Gnamntee to Cure Every Cane We Aeeept for Treatment. 

For twenty years we have been curing diseases of the rectum 
those of the skin and urinary system and lower bowel. 



I 



and 
During that time 
ouTexperlence'as specialists In men's diseases has enabled us to develop 
a method that Is superior to all others We cure without eursfery and our 
Satlents are never confined In bed and never lose a moment's time from 
their buslnesa. 

with our methods we absorb pile tumors by medication, applied (or 
^rivJn In >bv^ mild electric current. The piles are absorbed In a few 
frcltments'. ^Lvl,™-tv,e^ rectum In a healthy, normal condition. There Is 
no daneer no bad after effcts and no pain or soreness. 

our method is not a "hon.e cure" or a "correspondence treatment," but 
it is an iJpllcatlon"of skilled treatments administered by us in our office. 

Chronic Cob«U(Iou« of Men. 
Our methods of curing Blood Dis- 
ordem, IVervons Decline, Varlco«« 
Yelaa, Piiea, Kidney, Bladder and 
All DlseaseM Peenllar to Men, are 
uneQualed. If you are afflicted with 
or suffering from any Special Acute 
or Chronic Disorder peculiar to men, 
we want you to call. If your case Is 
curable, we know we can cure you. 
We don't care who has failed. 



Trunnes Seldom C»re Rupture. 

Disregard for existing Hernias 
ha« cost many lives. The smallest 
hernias are the most dangerous, be- 
cause of the Increased liability to 
strangulation. We are aware that a 
great deal of fraud has been Pfac- 
tloed in connection with th»; plleged 
r-jre of rupture. We say p.-.sitlvely 
that we cure rupture, to stay cured. 
We cure with perfect safety and 
entail no suffering, and do not de- 
tain you from occupation. 

DO NOT LET MONEY OR FALSE PRIDE KEEP YOU AWAY. 

r-ni»:«iTiT\TION FREE AXD STRlCTJ.Y CO.NFIDESTIAL whether you 
take treatment or not. CaU or write today. Office hours dxily 9 to 8; 
Sundays, 10 to 1. 

PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL DOCTORS, Inc. 

Xo. 1 We«t Snperlor Street, Corner Lako Avennc Xorth, 2)uluth, Mlun. 



A GLORIOUS SCOUNDREL 



Otis Skinner Gives Superb Character- 
iiation of Hajj. the Beggar. 

The most glorious old scoundrel that 
ever cut a throat is Hajj the Beggar. 
As played by Otis Skinner at the 
Lyceum last evening, the old beggar 
of Bagdad in "Kismet" is superb. Mr. 
Skinner him.^elf Is a human dynamo 
sifted with Intelligence — that rarest of 
all jewels in an actor's crown — and n« 
fairly revels In the part of Hajj. 

"Kismet" l.s slmi)ly a page torn from 
the Arabian Nii,'hts. The story is In- 
consequential enough, liirilhng as it is. 
when compared with the wonderful 
charaoterizatioh of Hajj as given by 
Mr. Skinner. Hrieily the play is one 
day's experience of Hajj. Nobody 
knows the exact conditions that exist- 
ed In ancient Bagdad, and therefore 
nobody knowrf wnether tl.e prototype 
of Hajj ever exissted, or whether such 
amazing adventures were po.'^sible In 
tho.se days. But nobody cares, any 
more than one cares to think, while 
reading one of the wonderful old tales, 
whether It really happened or not. 

Neither does "Ki.smet" present a 
moral. It is neither moral nor im- 
moral. It is simply unmoral. Hajj 
loves his dauKhter truly, but cheerfully 
forces her into the harem of the Wazlr 
Mansur. He choke.s his en..-my to death 
with his hands, and stabs his tni-my's 
.•on In the bai k, later drowning him in 
the bathing pool. Then he falls on his 
knees and thanks the good Allah for 
delivering his enemies Into his hands. 
He cheerfully tries to insert a knife 
between the ribs of the good Caliph, 
but after ho has swaggered through 
"his day" and returns to his beggar's 
corner at night, the audience thrill.s 
with sympathy for his mood when he 
klck.s the Interloping beggar who has 
' taken his corner, and tells him to 
"learn to renounce." 

"To the Caliph 1 am dirt: but to dirt 
I am the Caliph," he swaggers. 

IlaM Syiiipathy of Audience. 
Throughout his career of <louble 
dealing, murder, theft, and crime In 
general, Hajj has the thorough sym- 
pathy of the audience. It gives the 
spectator a little jolt when he forces 
i his daughter to go to the harem of 
I Mansur, but by the time he chokes his 
I pet enemy to death In the prison cell, 
I the audience is ready to accept any 
I crime he may commit. When he com- 
i mands his enemy's son to kneel to re- 
! ceive his blessing, and then joyfully 
j rolls up his sleeves and inserts a dag- 
i ger In the neck of the kneeling man, 
! he is gloriou.s. When he gloatingly 
I pushes the wounded man beneath the 
; water of the pool and watches him 
I drown, commenting on the bubbles, 
! and kickng his feet on the floor In 
I ecstacy while he lies on his stomach 
! to push his enemy's face below the 
water, he is superb. 

Yes, Hajj Is distinctively unmoral. 
He has always an air of cool, con- 
scienceless adventure that defies criti- 
cism. The religion of the East gives 
him a fatalistic freedom In crime, to 
which Mr. Skinner brings his tremen- 
dous vitality, his rare intelligence, and 
his supreme artistry. 

Mr. Skinner's impersonation of Hajj 
is so unusual a piece of stage artistry 
that the terms ordinarily employed In 
dramatic criticism seem scarcely 
suited to a consideration of this crea- 
tion bv one man of another man. That 
Is, In brief, the effect upon the audi- 
tor of Mr. Skinner's portrayal — that 
Mr. Skinner Is actually Hajj, or if 
you will, that Hajj Is actually Mr. 
Skinner. 

Whether Mr. Skinner's HaJJ Is an 
Oriental ttype that existed In those 
days of more glamour and poor drain- 
age or whether he is a study of pure 
fancy signifies nothing at all. Tho 
phase that is significant is the perfec- 
tion of his mummery, for It suggests 
the psychological motif. It elaborates 
1 upon that motif, it rounds out the de- 
I fense of that motif and its devolop- 
; ment with absolutely convincing logic. 
' When you leave the theater you feel 
not that Mr. Skinner Is a great actor, 
but that Hajj was a devll-of-a-fellow. 
i The cast Is too large to permit of 
Individual mention. From "the choc- 
olate soldier" as one young woman 
, was heard to describe Mansur's faith- 
; ful Alave, to charming, natural Merle 
I Maddern as Hajj's daughter, it was 

thoroughly adequate. 
I (Gorgeous Production. 

The production Is magnificent, but 
the producer.^ have not made the mis- 
take of carrying realLsm too far, and 
i rendering useless the imagination of 
the spectator. Just for an example of 
the difference might be mentioned 
Hajj's corner whore he was begging. 
I'.felasco would probably have given 
him a real pile of dirt to play In, and 
1 the audience would have marveled at 
the novelty of seeing real dirt — no 
j Joke Intended — on the stage. Mr. Flske 
makes the surroundings suggest the 
I desired picture, but gives Hajj only 
I a dirt colored mat. As he sits there 
' plavlng In the unseen dirt the atten- 
tion is not distracted by wondering 
I when he will wash his hands, but the 
I spectator has a chance to follow the 
lines and watch Mr. Skinner's won- 
1 derful plav of expression. Some writ- 
er has said that anybody can wash 

■ his hands In real water on the stage 
; and make the fact natural, but It 

takes an actor to wash his hands In 
an empty bowl and make the audi- 
ence believe there is water In It. That 

j tells what the "Kismet" production Is. 

! The big tank of "real water" Is there 
In the last act, but It Is there be- 
cause the bathing pool Is necessary to 
the plot. The production Is wonder- 

■ ful. No expense has been spared In 
it seemingly, but it does not detract 

' from the play or the acting. It mere- 
' ly serves, as It should, aa the back- 
I ground for the phture. It Is unob- 
trusively perfect. Instead of being ob- 
I truslvely costly or realistic. A restau- 
rant scene "made" one play seen here 
recently. Tho water tank In "Kismet" 
Is just as big a stage undertaking, 
but it Is a mere Incident In this Flske 
production. 

"Kismot" aa a play steps outside 
the realm of ordinary dramatic criti- 
cism. It can hardly be judged by or- 
dinary standards of dramatic criti- 
cism. The theater-goer must take his 
imagination with him and give him 
self up to the enjoyment 
ventures of Hajj 
reading of one 
Scheherazade. 

The audience last evening complete- 
ly filled the Lyceum, and it 
rnost enthusiastic and warmly 
dative assemblage. "Kismet" 
repeated tonight. 




A. L. Harwood left this morning for 
a business trip on the range. 

W. (J. Mitsch. traveling passenger 
agent of the Chicago Great Western 
road. Is in the city today. 

Harry Lewis, assistant general pas- 
senger agent of the Soo, Is here today. 

O. S. Bradsford of Minneapolis Is at 
the McKay. 

J. P. West of St. Paul Is registered 
at the McKay. , ,. 

T. J. Wilson of Chicago Is In the city. 

W. H. Smith of Brainerd is at the 

Paul' Smith of Hlbbing Is at the St. 



the St. 

In the 



la at the 



of Aitkin Is In 
Kenosha is 
of Brainerd 



at 



1 Louis. , , 

I -Frod Berry of St. Paul is at 
I Louis. . , 

! K. A. Lamb of Deerwood is 

eltr- 

I. Moren of Minneapolis 

.Spalding. 
! William R. Spencer 
' the city. 

\ Waller Freeman of 
; the Holland. 

Sidney Cunningham 
at tho Holland. 

J. McArthur of Sioux City Is at 

George Wilson of Litchfield, Minn., 
is at the Lenox. 

S. C. .Scofleld of Benson, Minn., 13 at 
the Lenox. 



OBITUARY I 



is 
the 



money to stop the passage of the law 
In the legislature, it was declared, ii 
was said that for sone reason money 
was not used for tals purpose, and 
after tho law was passed. It was de- 
cided to use it in an attempt to have 
the law held unconstitutional In the 
courts. It was agreed that the test 
should be made In Duluth. 

"County Attorney ^•Brlen said last 
night that he did not. know about the 
relations between th; underworlds or 
the two cities. A jut ge of the munic- 
ipal court who has been active In the 
•^resent Investigation, declined also to 
discuss the report. 

"The Ramsey county grand jury will 
resume Its Investigation and may re- 
turn more indictments tomorrow. It 
'«! thought that at least two indict- 
ments against former police officers 
will be returnod, although they will 
not be made public i ntil after the ar- 
rests are made." 



the 

Mr. 

he 



was taken In the address, and 
members of the exchange asked 
Robinson many questions which 
answered satisfactorily. 

About the only matter of interest 
besides this address was the report of 
a committee recently appointed to look 
up the matter of publishing a new 
pictorial pamphlet of Duluth. Th« 
present one, known as Gibson's is 
considered greatly out of date, and a 
new and better one Is desired. The 
committee was Instructed to confer 
with the Commercial club and city 
authorities to get their co-operation in 
the venture. 



TALKS INCOIIE 

TAX TO EXCHANGE 




PAUL CONCHAS. 



to train the German athletes. I told 
him 1 knew nothing about track work, 
so he finally told me to take charge of 
the training of the weight men. This 
I have agreed to do, and will spend 
six months previous to the games. In 
training the candidates." 

Conchas was formerly a Gorman so- 
dler. His strength attracted the at- 
tention of the officers, and he was 
given charge of the army gymnasium 
Cologne, where the kaiser saw him. 
He was also a wrestler, both amateur 
and professional, and has a two-hour 
draw with Hackenschmidt to his credit. 
• « * 

Vaudeville Is the order of things 
at the Empress theater for the first 
half of this week. The acts are all 
proving entertaining. Tho Vanoss 
troupe is performing some new and 
original stunts in sensational gym- 
nastics. The feats show remarkable 
strength, together with acurate judg- 
ing of time and distance. The troupe 
consists of three men and a woman. 
Tho Reiff Bros, and Miss Murray are 
getting a good share pf the laughs 
and applause with their neat and ex- 
cellent line of humorous songa and 
dances. Rose and Severns offer a 
sketch entitled "The Automobile Dis- 
aster." Woodward has a novelty with 
his tamboureens. He juggles and bal- 
ances them In all conccrlvable positions. 
The photoplays "For Ills Loved One" 
and "A Fall Into Luck" open and close 

tho bill. 

One of the big dancing numbers In 
"The Heartbreakers," the latest'of 
tabloid musical comedies, which will be 
seen at the Empress on Thursday and 
stay for balance of the week Is "My 
Honolulu Honey Lou." The play is 
filled with amusing situations and 
laughable complications. Curtis Cook- 
sey win be seen In the title role. 
» • * 

"Lady Babble," with Barbara Ten- 
nant In a beautiful cr>stume produc- 
tion appears at the Rex theater today. 
It Is In three parts and Is produced 
by the Eclair company. The musical 
program was especially arranged by 
Mr Runkel, the director of the Rex 
orchestra. Miss Ethel Frances Berry, 
with her pleasing voice, sings a pretty 
ballad. 

A comedy on the same program en- 
titled "Uis Wife's Burglar," Is Inter- 
esting and exciting. It deals with pa- 
tient Mac, who is annoyed by his 
wife's continuous fear of burglars. He 
is called from the office, called from 
bed, called from various other places 
to chase imagined intruders. Deter- 
mined to cure hla wife of her weak- 
ness He buys a mask and takes It 
home with him. "Eddie" and Mb wife 
"Kamona" have In the n»eantime moved 
into the flat next to^ltfac's flat. Eddie 
next evening goci to the club. Stella 
retires. Mac has secreted himself un- 
der the bed. While he is there a real 
burglar enters and proceeds to work. 
Later Eddie returns and under the 
Influence of liquor enters Mac's flat 
Instead of his own. 

Then the amusing complications 
en.'^ue. 




ThoniRK W. llnll, president "' th« 
American Hide & Leather company, 
died at his home In New ^'a'^JV^^'J-I^^^-g 
Dec 2, of heart disease. He was bS 
years of age, was the first ahd only 
president of the American company, 
and in his early life was an Intimate 
friend of Henry H. Rogers. 



The Duluth Real Estate exchange 
had luncheon and a short business 
meeting this noon at the Commercial 
club, in addition to -n hlch they listened 
to a talk by .1. J. Robinson. Mr. Rob- 
inson, who has been writing answers 
to questions on tin* Income tax f'T 
The Herald, talked on that subject to 
the real estate men. Deep Interest 



COMBINE IN 



OPPORTU 



We have a part 
realize on a new 
house, never occup 
beat locations in I 



payment will ban 
if taken immediat 




$500 

will bar 
Immedia 

PULFORD, HOW & COMPANY 



IFYOV /IRELQOWIMG 

FOR A Store. Fl«t 
HovsE, Factory or 

WflREHOVSE To REAIT 

It will Peylfbu 
to Consult Us 

John A. 

Stephenson 

6c CO. 

2 so W. FIRST STRCet 




Pool Formed to Fight the 

Nuisance Abatement 

Law. 



CEHTRAL RESIDENCE LOTS 

PRICES $175 to $400 

Terms; Small cjish payment, bal- 
ance easy weekly or monthly pay- 
ments. 

No interest— No mortgage 
Torrers title. 



CITY BRIEFS 



l.ouse l,faf Aoeountliig Systems. 

M. I. Stewart Company, 'riiones IH. 

Action In Replevin. 

An action In replevin to recover the 
possession of certain lumber and tim- 
ber products In section 33, 55-12, was 
started in district court yesterday by 
the Northern Lumber company against 
Frank Cutliff, O. E. Cutliff and Will- 
lam Cutllff. In case a recovery cannot 
be had, the lumber company asks for a 
money equivalent of |1,960. 

The Rfnl ChrlMtma* BarKalnM 

In furniture aro to be found at the 
factory distributers' salesroom, 2110- 
2112 West Superior street, where you 
don't pay retail prices. Your credit 
O. K. Cameron-Johnson-Horean. 



The dispatch from St. Paul statins 
that dlsclo-^ures had been made of 
plans to flffht the nuisance abatement 
law passed by the last legislature 
and that Duluth Is Involved Jf. no news 
to Chief Troyer, who said this morn- 
ing that he had heard rumors to that 
effect for sometime. 

When the red light districts were 
closed In many towns in the stJite 
many of the women decided to fight 
the new law and plans were then set 
on foot to try a test case and fight 
It to the limit, if necessary. One of 
the St Paul women, it Is understood, 
was to have kept her house open to 
cause the arrest and a test case in the 

^'^Duf'ju.st at thnt time Maud f^-fant 
was arrested in Duluth and a little 
later Madame Cain was taken into 
custody, both of them charged with 
running houses of ill-fame. It was 
then, the chief believes, that plans 
were changed and it was decided to 
let the law be tested in these cases, 
removing the necessity for the St. 
Paul proceedings. 

BIk Pool Mailc. 

Tt is claimed In St. Paul, through 
exposures of Willie Wolff, a middle- 
man among the women of the red 
light district, who is now In the Kam- 
sey county jail, thnt hundreds of dol- 
lars had been pooled to mqk« ,th s 
fight against the new law. Wolff l.s 
now charged with having extorted 
$1,000 from one of the former keepers 
of a resort. , - ,, 

The dispatch from St. Pnul follows: 

"The scandal in the St. Paul police 
dcp.irtmont Is reported to have dis- 
clo-.ed the fact that the underworlds 
of St Paul and Duluth have been 
working together for more than a year. 
Tt Is reported that thousands of dollars 
were pooled by gamblers and keepers 
of disorderlv resorts In an effort to de- 
f< at the abatement law In the last leg- 
islature, and Inter to have It declared 
unconstitutional. 

"Tho latest development comes 
through Willie Wolff, who Is In the 
county jail, charged with having ex- 
torted .<1,000 from a former keeper of 
a report. , , . 

"It was first Intended to 



VfKiTNEY WALL CO., 

301 TOltBEl Bl'll.DING. 

Real Estate Loans. Insurance. 




IF YOU ARE 
DISSATISFIED 

with your pn-sent business, 
investigate 

CROSBY, MINN. 



where busin(«s is good the 
round. For parti :;ular write 
GKOKQK n. CIIOSBY, 
Dulutl , Minn. 



year 



use the 



Decker*H, the Art and (^ift Store. 

Cor. Second Ave. west and First St. 



of the ad- 
as he would to the 
of the old tales of 



was a 
appre- 

will be 

E. R. 



J. 



Amusement Notes. 

Wednesday evening the attraction at 
the Lvoeum will be a notable photo- 
play. In which Maude Fe.ily will ap- 
pear in a film production of "Moths." 
It is a four part production of 
"Oulda's" popular book. 

On Thursday a throe days' engage- 
ment of "The Trail of the Lonesome 



Attendance In liarice. 

An unusually large number were 
present at the meeting of the Duluth 
Ministerial association held at the Y. 
M. C. A. ye.= terday. A bu«-ine8S session 
was held following the regular discus- 
sion. Dr. John W. Hoffman of the 
First M. E. church will be the speaker 
at the next meeting. Commissioner 
Hicken spoke yesterday, but his ad- 
dress was given with the understand- 
ing that his remarks be not made 

public. 

.♦ 

Gneiit ot Hl» Son. 

Dr. T. J. Catlln, M. D., of Palisade, 
Minn., was a guest yesterday at tho 
home of his son, A. C. Catlin, 911 East 
Third street. Dr. Catlln left this morn- 
ing for the Twin Cities, where he will 
attend a meeting of the State Horticul- 
tural society. 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORE- 
CL<JSUltE. 

Default has been made In the con- 
ditions of a certain mortgage duly ex- 
ecuted and delivered by Fred Stan- 
wood, mortgagor, to W. A. Haune, 
mortgagee, bearing date the 26th day 
of (October, 1912, and with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded 
In the office of the Register of Deeds 
In and for the County of St. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, on the 12th day of 
December, 1912. at 3:30 o'clock P. M., 
in iiook 286 of Mortgages on page 024. 
.Said default consldts In the non-pay- 
ment of one Installment of the prin- 
cipal sum thereby secured with inter- 
est and there Is claimed to be due and 
the're Is duo on said mortgage at the 
date of this notice the sum of One 
Hundred Thirty-four and 47-100 
($134 47) Dollars principal and interest 
and no action or proceeding has been 
Instituted at law or otherwl.se to re- 
cover the debt secured by said mort- 
gage or any part thereof. 

Now Therefore, Notice is hereby 
given that by virtue of the power of 
sale contained In said mortgage and 
nursuant to the statute In such case 
made and provided, the said mortgage 
will be foreclosed by the sale of the 
premises described in and conveyed by 
said mortgage, viz: All that tract or 
parcel of land lying and being in the 
County of St. Louis, '-'•'•" "' ^ '^- 




Attrr Hotel Clrrk«' Meetlnic. 

C. A. Hine, chief clerk of the Spald- 
ing and president of the Duluth Hotel 
Clerks' association, today sent a com- 
munication to all of the delegates to 
the Grand Forks convention of the 
hotel clerks of the Northwest, asking 
each delegate to vote for Duluth as 
the place for the holding of the next 
annual convention of the organization. 
Mr. Hine and tho other members of the 
local organization are of the opinion 
that Duluth will land the meeting. 
— -^^ 

Runaway Bey Held. 

Earl Picott, 14 ycHrs old, runaway 
boy from BayOeld, Wis., was arrested 
here yesterday afternoon by Officer 
Andree. He will be taken back to his 
home today. 



State of Minne- 



CUYUNA 

If you want an Investment that 
Is certain to make you some money, 
let us tell vou .'i1 out CIJYCN'A. 

LOCKER-DONAHUE COMPANY 

003-6 Ij<>ntt4lal<i Building. 




Handsoime Home 



New Modern lloune on East Sixth 
street, beyond normal school, 75- 
foot lot, nine rooms, hot water 
heat laundry, mantel and grate 
and ' gas grate, all hardwood 
floors, excellent plumbing, bath, 
separate toilet and toilet in base- 
ment Rarn ^>ilh ttone fuunda- 
tlon-^all for f 13,000. 

ABOVI3 OSri.Y SAMPLE 
Money on Inand to Loan. 

Siryker, Manley&Buck 



sota described as follows, to-wlt: Lot 
number thirteen (13), block number 
sixteen (16) In the Village of ilood- 
wood according to the recorded plat 
thereof on lUe and of record in the 
office of the Register of Deeds in and 
for said St. Louis County with the 
hereditaments and appurtenance.s; 
which sale will be made by the sherllf 
of said St. Louis County, at the 
Sheriff's Office in the Court House In 
the City of Duluth. in said County and 
.=;tate on the 17th day of January, 1914, 
at ten o'clock A. M. of that day. at pub- 
lic vendue, to the highest bidder for 
cash to pay said mortgage debt and 
interest and the taxes. If any, and 
($50 00) Dollars attorneys' fees 



Car Striken Waffon. 

A Woodland car yesterday afternoon 
struck a wagon owned by the Wood- 
land dairy at Bruce street and Wood- 
land avenue, slightly damaging the 
vehicle. No one wae Injured. The 
wagon was loaded wlLU feed, part of 




GARY 

The Steel Plant City of r/innesota 

The place where tlioiiiand* cf Steel Mill and 
other employes will mi.ke their homes. A spleo- 
dlH location for but^eu men. Factory tlte* 
with railroad facilities. Residence lots from $300 
up. Business lots (rtm $1,000 u,j; payable oa 
easy terms. 

Your opportunity to shar« in the benefltt, 
which will accrue by the building of the enor- 
mous Steel Plaiit by the Minnesota Steel tom- 
pany, is now offered. For full particulars address 
or call on 

GARY LAMD COMPANY. 

202 Palladio Bldg-. 

DuUth, Minn. 

Townslte office, corner Commonwealth Avenue 

and Gary Street 



law. 



Dated, November 2eth^l0^13.^^^,^ 

Mortgagee. 
HAROLDSON /t COLTON. 

Attorneys for Mortgagee 1104-1106 
Alworth Building, Duluth, Minn. 



BLOOD POISON 

I'ltiiples, spots on tin skin, sore.-) li. liio inoulti, 
a\cen. falllns lialr. bo lo paitis, caurrh, etc.. tit 
aymptoms. DiUys aie Jjii^iioLW. Send at onra to 
Jir I'.rjwn. b'.'j Arch .St.. I'liiiatleluhia. .'nr K'.IOW.'"' S 
miouL) TUi:A'rMi;NT. Comlncirs proof In a $2.00 
boiii'.— lasLi ft montli. ..„..„ 

Bold In Duluth by R ix Winh. U VI eat Superior 
■Ueet. and tis all Uru^lsis. 



m<)Rtoa(;e forkclosl'rk salk.— 

Default has been made In the con- 
ditions of a certain mortgage, duly 
executed and delivered by H'-rbert li. 
Detweller and Willie Kate Detweiler, 
his wife, mortgagor.^, to W. M. Hub- 
bard, mortgagee, bearing date the 1st 
day «)f August, 19l;j, and with a power 
of sale therein contained, duly re- 
corded in the office of the Register of 
Deeds in and for the I'ounty of St. 
l.,ouis and State of Minnesota, on lh<- 
6th dav of November, 1912, at 11:30 
o'clock" A. M.. in Book 308 of Mort- 
gages, on page 164. 

It Is provided in said mortgage that 
If default be made in any of its pro- 
visions, it shall i>e lawful for the mort- 
gagee, his heirs, I'xecutors, adminis- 
trators or assigns, or his attorney, to 
d« Clare the whole sum tlu-nin spec- 
ified to be due and payable. Said 
default consists in the failure to pay 
the sum of thirty-four d<i!lars inter- 
est, which became due February 1, 
1918. upon the princip.al sum of said 
mortgage, and In the failure to pjiy 
the sum of thirty-four dollars In- 
terest, which became due August 1, 
1913, up<m said prlnelp.nl sum. 

And Whereas, the said W. M. Hub- 
bard, the mortgagee and holder r,t said 
mortgage has duly elected, and does 
hereby elect, to declare the wlndo 
principal sum of said mortgage due 
and payable at the date of this no- 
tice, under the terms and conditi.niB 
of said mortgage and the power of 
sale therein contained; and whcre.-ts 
there is actually due and cl.aim'.d to be 
duo and payable at the date of thl.<j 
notice the sum of nine hundred thir- 
ty-eight and 33-100 dollars, and 
whereas the said power of sale has 
become operative and no action or 
proceeding having been instituted, at 
law or otlierwl.se. to recover the debt 
secured by said mortgage, or any part 
thereof; 

Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby 
Olven, That by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in said mortgage, and 
pursuant to the statute In such ease 
mad.' and provided, the said morlga;;e 
will be foreclosed by a sale of the 
premises d'scrlbed In and conveyed by 
said mortgage, viz: 

The northerly ninety (Nly. 90) feet 

of Lot thirty-two (32). Kast Seventh 

Street, Duluth Proper. First Divisi<m, 

I and northerly ninety (Nly. 90) feet of 

Lot thirty-two (32), Block eiKhtv-ono 

I (81), Duluth Proper, Third IM vision, 

' according to the recorded plat there- 

' of on file and of record In the of- 

' flee of the Register of Deeds In and 

I for said County of Hi. Louis and .St.-ito 

of Mlnnesf>ta, said premises lying and 

being in St. Louis County and State 

'. of Minnesota, with th« hereditaments 

i and appurtenances; which sale will bo 

I made by the .Sheriff of said St. Louis 

• County, at his office in the Court 

■ House, in the City of Duluth. In said 

1 County and State, on the 17th day 

j of December. 1913, at 10 o'clock A. M., 

; of that day, at public vendue to tho 

I highest bidder for cash, to pay said 

d 'bt of nine hundr. d thirty-eight and 

33-100 I>ollar8. and Interest, and the 

; taxes, if any, on said premises, and 

I twenty-five dfdlars attorney's fecg, a« 

stipulated In and by said mortgage In 

case of foreclosure, and the disburse- 

i ments allowed by law; subject to re- 

I demptlon at any time within one year 

I from the day of sale as provided by 

law. 

Dated November 4th, A. D. 191S. 
W. M. HUP>RARD, 

Mortgagee. 
' ALFORD & HUNT, 

Attorneys, 721 -723 Providence BIdff. 
Duluth, Minn. 
D. H., Nov. 4, 11, 18. 26. Dec. 2 and t, 
1918. 

<JRDI:R LlMlTl.Va TIME TO FILW 
CLAIMS, AND FOR HEARINa 
THEREON— 

State of Minnesota, 
County of .St. I.,nul.o — ss. 
In Probate rourt. In the Matter of the 
Estate of Margaret V. Turrish, De- 
cedent. 

Letters of administration this day 
having been granted to Hjnry Turrish. 
It Is ordered. That the time within 
which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claims 
against her estate in this court, be, 
and the same hereby Is, limited te 
three month.s from and after the date 
hereof; and that Tuesday, the 3id <!ay 
of March, 1914, at ten o'clock, A. M., 
in the I'robate Court Rooms at the 
("ourt House at Duluth In said County, 
be, and the same hereby is, fixed and 
appointed as the time and place for 
hearing upon the examination, adjust- 
ment and allov.'ance of such claims as 
shall be presented within the time 
aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Duluth 
Herald as provided by law. 

Dated, Duluth, Minn., Dec. 1. 1913. 
S W. (MLPIN. .ludge of Prob.ite. 
Seal Probate Court, St. Louis Co., Minn. 
D. H., Dec. 2, 9. 16. 1913. 



1 



- - r- 



1- 





¥m 



18 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 2, 1913. 



WHEAT FIRM 
UP TO CLOSE 

Warket Is Bullish on De- 
crease in World's Vis- 
ible Supply. 

Flaxseed Advances With 
Buying By Crushers and 

Light Offerings. 



Duluth Board of Tpa«lo. Poc. 1. — 
1% lirnt n-iHMled sfroiiB up <o the clone. 
l»..C4mb«T ..hent closed 'ic up anil 
Wav 'sc up. December durum closea 
%cup and May 'uc off. 

OatN cloKcd '.c up «* •^•»'"'- };Xt 
elosed unchanued at 52c for the b. st 
KPade. There »vaH no market for bar- 
lev durinur th«" day. , _. 

rut" «.. >Il..ncapoII, May ^^heat 
Ho.ed at 86!i-;8C bid and call* at 

**''lV'\Vln.npe,r December oat* closed 
at 33»^^c and May at 37 '/4C. 

The Wheat market opened steady 
todaV wifh hi^'her oable. There was a 
llfiht demand during the earlj trading 
and prices did not move either \s ay. 
The mar option later became especial- 
ly strong on good buying and short 
covering started through reports of the 
appearance of rust in Argentina 

December wheat opened unchanged 
at 83 \c and gained '^1*c up to the hnal 
hour. The May option opened un- 
changed at ST-hC and ^«'"f,^, t^;„^^^ 
KOi.d milling and general call dexe^oP^^ 
for durum. After opening a fraction 
off at 82 Uc. December durum advanced 
Sic while the May option opened un- 
cha'nirtd at 87c and held there. 

A bullish factor in the day's situation 
was also furnished bv a '•^P^'-t*;^ .^.^I 
crea«e ef 3,i»74,0OO bu in Hie world .s 
vi..ible supply, ^vhlle at the sanie t^mo 
corn -stocks decreased 106,000 bu ana 
oat" 4n\000 bu. Duluth receipts were 
aUo in light proportion and arr vals 
at Minneapolis showed a sharp falling 

off from last year. j^^P''^"^"^,,^^.^^^^'^ 
p<.ints yesterday showing a deereaae 

**V^hUe"no further boats came under 
the elevators for loads today, further 
ehipping before the end of the week is 
a.ssured with a continuance of the 
present fine weather. The development 
of a stronger Eastern milling d^niand 
for deferred delivery to rover outstand- 
ing contracts was noted by operators 
on the local board today. 

December Flax Strong. 

Fair huving by crushers developed 
in flaxseed, and the mi\rket ruled 
Btrong throughout the session as of- 
ferings were liirht. The foreign sit- 
uation v.as firm and Winnipeg al'^o 
Bh<;wed a stronger lendeney. Receipts 
of se. d at Duluth and Minneapolis 
were in small proportions, but market- 
ings at Winnipeg showed a sharp In- 
crease i.ver last year. 

Quotations opened about on yester- 
days basis, but gains of around •\c 
were recorded later. The market 
clo.<ed strong in the new option. 

Dece:nber fl.i.x opened unchang<=>d at 
11.371. and closed at $1.37 \^. and May 
opened i»c up at 51.43 Va and closed at 
|1.43^i. 

At Winnipeg December flax closed 
at 51-lti"8 and May at $1.23-^. 



Ca-iih Sale.* Tuesday. 

Np. i hard ■.thtat, .". cars 

No. 1 liaril wheat, 1 car, to arrive 

xzni{;l>kj.Vi\ 1 liard wheat. 1 car. I»kg 

No. I lianl Hhtat, 2 cars 

No. 1 la til ulirat, 3 cars 

No. 1 juirihern wheat, £rt oais 

No. 1 lurthern «liea'. } car 

No. 1 n..ii;ic-ni wlie:;t, !!• cars 

No. 1 iH-rtlurn niieat. lt!,!'00 bu. to artUe. 
No. 1 iiorthini ulieat, '.'..'..jO bu. to arrive... 
No. 1 r.onht-ni wheat. i.Oi'O bu. to ariive — 

No. 1 liorthtrn. 15 cars 

No. 1 ij. rtlieru wrieat, 10.600 bu. to arrive... 

No. 1 II' rtheni wliiat. 1.300 bu, to arrive 

No. 2 !i< rtl.pm wheat, 4 'an 

No. 2 iioillieni wheat, 1 car 

No. :S IK rtlivTii vi licit, 4 cars 



No. 3 iifinherii wUtat. tear 

No. Z i.ctlicni wheat. 1 oar 

No. 3 !i<r!hc-riii wheat. 1 car 

Sample t^iade wheat. 1 car 

Mont, wlicaf. 1 car. No. 4 hard winter ... 

Mont. nhtaT. 1 car, No. 4 hnrd winter 

Mont, ftluat, 1 car, no gn.de hard winter. . 

Mont, wlicat, 1 car. No. 3 hard whiter 

Mont, wlieat. I car. Ni.. 1 hard w inter 

No. 1 diinim. 19 • ars 

No. 1 Uuri;m. 1 car 

No. 1 durum. 2 cars 

No. 1 durum. 2.400 bu. to arrive 

No. I diii'iin, C cars 

No. 1 durum. 1 car 

No. 1 dunuji. 5.P(Ht bu. to arrive 

No. 3 duniiu. 1 car 

No. 2 doniiu. 1 car 

No. 1 r.iiswl vUieat, 1 car 

Barlev. 1 car 

Barltv, I cat 

Bvle.v, 2 i-are 

No. 1 flisT. 4.30© bu, to arrive 

No. 1 flii.x. 4 vars 

Barley. 4.:ii>0 ba, 10 arrive 

Barley. 4 cir* 

No. 1 na.T. 2.O0O bu, to arrive 

No. 1 flr..\. l.^f'O bu. 10 arrive 

No. 1 fla.\. 21 .ars 

No. 1 '.lax. 1.<H!0 bu, to arrive 



.$ .S6 

. .8G'i 

. .M'a 

. .SC'i 

- .MU 
. .85 
. 83H 
. .85'8 

. .Su% 

. .85*8 

. .85Vi 

. .85% 

- .8:i4 

. .83 Si 

, . .83»a 

. .80 ' 

, . .t.2^ 

.. .82»i 

.. .80 

.. .78 

.. .:i)'2 

. . .83 

.. .81 

. . .84»i 

. . .83 

.. .8JU 

. . .84 

8;h 

.. .8:»» 

. . 8.SH 

.. .S3»4 

.. .s\\ 

.. .81 -i 

. . .83 

.. .47 

. . .45 

.. .46 

. . I.St-'i 

. . l.?i>% 

.. i.srva 

. . l.:;9H 

. . 1.39»i 

.. 1.31* -54 

. . 1 rjr'i 

. . i."<jH 



MARK ET GO SSIP. 

"Our reports are to the effect t.hat 
country elevators through the AVest 
are tilicd up," said W. C. Mitchell of 
Randall. «;ee «& Mitchell today. "They 
are not likely to begin shipr*ing stoeka 
out either till prices are more in line 
with dealers' ideas or till the spread 
between llie I)eren'.ber and May op- 
tions is drawn in closer." 
« « * 

"There i.s a day coming for the bulls 
in the wheat market," said an ooerator 
on the Duluth board of trade t "day. 
"The big .'tocks in the Canaii.'U) r^'orih- 
w^est are now fairly well cleane-l up, 
and there are already indiv.atiors that 
foreigners are coming after our grain. 
The coming of a good snowstorm and 
the checking down of count-.y receipts 
Is likely to bring about higher prices." 



; A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOO-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, DECEMBER 2, 1913. 



Dec. — Open. 

Duluth 83^,b 

Minneapolis ... .82 'h 

Chicago 8«>*i 

Winnipeg 82'<)» 

May — 

Duluth 87>4-7i 

.Minneapolis ... .87-'8 
Chicago 90"i--\ 



Winnipeg 



December 
May 



.88' 



.1- 



lligh. 
.84', 
.83'8 
.87'-,. 
.82 Ti 

.88U 
.87 >4 
.91 'i 



Low. 
.833^ 
.82 
.86Si 

.82'/*-% 

.87H-»i 
.86"8-87 
.90 ^-',i 
.88 



Close. 
.84-»ia 

.82Tib 
.87b 



.88 

■ Bl^-hi 
..90 a; a 
.88b 



Dec. 1. 
.83^ 
.82'tb 
.86*ib 
.82 ^b 

.87 »i-' 
.87b 
.90^b 
.88 ',4 b 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 



open. 

'.si" 



High. 
.83'* 
.87 ',4 



Low. 

.82 »i 
.86% 



Close. 
.83b 
.86T8b 



Dec. 1. 
.82?*a 
.87a 



DULUTH LINSEED MARKET 



December 
May 



Open. 
1.37 Ssb 
1.43Vtb 



Higli. 

1.38 

1.43*4 



Low. 
1.87 'i 
1.43^8 



Close. 
1.31 %h 
1.43 lib 



Dec. 1. 
1.37'^a 
1.43 -^sa 



Y'r ago. 

.80 'i 
.80 •■'s 
.84 'i 
.78 •*4 

.85^ 
.85% 
.90% 



T'r ago. 

.82»^ 

.87 V4 



T'r ago. 

1.26^ 
1.30',^ 



Duluth close: Wheat— On track: No. 1 hard, 86%c: No. 1 northern. 85 '/fee; 
No 2 northern, 83'/i<S84c; No. 1 northern to arrive, 85 '/^c; Montana No. 2 hard, 
86c; Montana No. 2 on track, 85c; December, 84(S:84'i,c asked; May, 88c. Durum 
—On track: No. 1, 83%o: No. 2, 81S«ff82'sc: to arrive. No. 1. 83%c: No. 2, 81%@ 
82»i,c; December. 83c bid; Mav, 86"sC bid. Linseed — On track, Sl.aSU; to arrive, 
$1.39'-4; December, $1.37 -g bid; May. ?1.43'4. Oats— On track. 36"ic; to arrive, 
36"ac. Rye — On track, 52c. , „„^ „^„ 

Elevator receipts of domestic grain — Wheat, 706,321 bu; last year, .94.363 
bu- oats 14 036 bu; last vear, 49,050 bu; barley, 40,248 bu; last year, 134,960 bu; 
rve, 706 bu; last year, 10,422 bu: flax. 156,587 bu; last year, 475,105 bu. 

■ .Shipments of domestic grain — Wheat, 1,613.791 bu; last year. 838.504 bu; 
barlev "'0 119 bu" last vear, 606,122 bu; flax, 818.891 bu; last year, 970.457 bu. 

Elevator receipts of bonded grain- Wheat, 22.726 bu; last year, 27,795 bu; 
oats, 33.341 bu;; last year, none; flax. 1,014 bu; last year, 6.460 bu. 

Shipments of bonded grain — None. 



Buenos Ayrcs wheat closed steady, 



Coi n Wfis 

while the 

a result of 



unchanged to 'sc higher, 
unchanged for December, 
new crop was '•zc lower as 
favorable crop prospects. 

European visible wheat suppr/ was 
reported at 83,256,000 bu ag-a'nst 8o.- 

112,000 bu. 

« « • 

Broomhall cabled from Liverpool — 

"Wheat The steady American cables 

yesterday and lighter Plate offers 
caused shorts to cover at the open- 
ing resulting in an advance of l^d. 
Following the opening, there was some 
realizing in December which declined 
'4d while the distant 



^^ months 

vanced a further 'i,d with good 



United 
recently 
is 



ad- 
^ ^^_^^ ^_ .. _ sup- 

port. 'Yesterdays .sellers re-purchased 
owing to the expected liberal decrease 
in the visible here, firmness in Aus- 
tralian offers, continued light, Kus- 
sian offers and unfavorable reports 

from India. At 1:30 P- m. t*"! ^^^^^u 
tone was steady '» to Xsd higher \\ ith 
March loading the advance. 

"C'orn— opened '«d higher and fur- 
ther advanced '^ to T^d with shorts 
in December excited. Yesterday s ten- 
ders were unexpectedly light ana were 
absorbed by strong interests and 
stocks in United Kingdom decreasing. 
I'late spot was Id higher and there is 
a good demand for cargoes." 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
Foreign crop summary: 

Kingdom — The weather has 
been more favorable and seeding 
about finished with some increase in 
acreage over last year. 

France— The outlook is generally fa- 
vorable but there are increasiug Jfon^* 
plaints of weeds and vermin with In- 
dications of a decrease In the acreage. 
The weather is mild. 

<lermanv — The weather mild with 
the outlook mostly favorable for the 
new crop. . ^, , 

Russia— The outlook for the crop Is 
mostly favorable. ■ , -^ , >j 

Roumania— The crop is backward, 
but on the whole generally favorable. 
The weather is cold. 

Hungarv — The outlook Is favorable. 

Italy — The outlook for the new cop 
is favorable. It Is being demonstrated 
that the new crop v.as greatly over- 
estimated by the government. The 
weather is seasonable. 

Spain — It is unseasonably dry and 
the outlook Is not satisfactory. The 
buving of foreign wheat continues. 

North Africa— Some rain has fallen, 
but much more is urgently wanted. 

Argentine—The weather continues 

Austr.alia — Brormhairs agfnt cabled 
"The yieki will be about 104,000,000 bu. 

India — The .nttlook shows no im- 
provement. It is generally conceded 
the United provinces cannot improve 
as rain has been too long delayed. 

♦ * * 

The Minneapolis cash market was 
steadv. Demand was good but light 
recftipts checked buying, as mills do 
not want to force the premiums higher. 
No. 1 northern blue stem sold at from 
•''fi/3c over December and velvet chart 
at from l'-'a2c over December. Flour 
sales were'just fair. Cash No. 1 north- 
ern sold there at from 84 '4 c to 85 ^^c 
and No. 2 northern at from 84'4c to 

83?iC. 

♦ • ♦ 

Public and private elevator stocks at 

Chicago were reported as follows: 

Wheat total. 8.691.000 bu, increase 

37.000 bu, last year 9.332.000 bu. Corn. 

536 000 bu, decrease 359.000 bu, last 

vear 576.000 bu. Oats, 13,690.000 bu. 

decrease 510,000 bu. last year 2.413,- 

000 bu. 

« * 4 

A wire from Winnipeg received by 
B. E. Baker & Co. said: "I don't think 
bulls need fear the Canadian wheat of 
1913. It looks as 
swept the country 
be any left 
There are 



crease. 1,000 bu; barley, 968,000 bu; de- 
crease, 180,000 bu; flax, domestic, 
1,901,000 bu; bonded, 106.000 bu; total 
flax, 2,007,000 bu; decrease, net, 662,- 
000 bu. Total all grains 16.462,000 bu; 
net decrease. 1,6695,000 bu, 

* • * 

Clearances reported: Wheat. 280,000 
bu; flour, 28,000 bbl; together they 
equal 394,000 bu; corn. 1,000 bu; oats, 
6,000 bu. 

« * « 

Primary markets report the follow- 
ing receipts and shipments today: 

Wheat — Receipts, 1.575,000 bu; last 
year, 1,804,000 bu; shipments, 2,157,000 
bu; last year, 1,288,000 bu. Corn — Re- 
ceipts, 885,000 bu; last year. 954,000 
bu; shipments, 389,000 bu; last year, 
399,000 bu. Oats— Ref-elpts, 1,344,000 
bu; last year, 784,000 bu; shipments, 
net decrease. 1,695,000 bu. 

* * * 

Cars of wheat received: Tear 

Yesterday. Ago. 

Duluth 194 277 

Minneapolis 282 607 

Winnipeg 1,227 682 

Chicago 28 47 

Kansas City, bu 47.000 47.000 

St. Louis bu 13,000 96.000 

* • * 

Cars of linseed received: Year 

Yesterday. Ago. 

Duluth 34 120 

Minneapolis 47 36 

Winnipeg 200 86 

* * * 

Foreign closing cables: Liverpool — 
Wheat, '-ig'-^Bd higher; corn, % "fj Id 
lower. Paris — Wheat, ^Wlc higher; 
flour, ^4@V2C lower. Bei^lln — Wheat, 
'NC lower. Budapest — Wheat, Ic higher. 
Antwerp — Wheat, %c lower. 

MINNEAPOLIsllARKET. 



' Another Sharp Advance in DGcember 
Wheat Prices. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. Dec. 2. — Another 
sharp advance was registered in De- 
cember wheat today. Deferred con- 
tracts were relatively weak. Conges- 
tion caused strength in the December 
market. December closed ^ic higher 
than yesterday and May 'hC higher. 
Local elevator stocks increased 325,- 
000 bushels for three days. 

December opened 82V8c; high, 83 'gc; 
low. 82c; closed, 82 "ic 

May opened 87 '4 (fi 87c: 
low. 86-%''«.87c; closed, 87 

Cash wheat: No. 1 hard. 
No. 1 northern, 84%®857hc; to 
84'^ ''0 SS'sc; choice to arrive, 
Xo. 2 northern, 82*8fi83"8c; 
h.ird Montana, 83T«<Q84"ic; 
wheat, S0%1l81Vac. 

Flax — Receipts, 47 cars; year ago, 
36; shipments, 4. Demand for flax was 
good. Closing prices, $1.36"8 fit 1.40%. 

Barley — Receipts, 69 cars; year ago, 
121; shipments, 84. 

Barley was steady at unchanged 
prices. The demand was fairly good 
for choice malting, but slow for other 
grades. 

Flour — Advanced because of yester- 
day's and todav's advance in wheat. 
Shipments, 59,150 bbl. In wood, f. o. b. 
Minneapolis: First patents. $4.05 it' 
4.35; second patents, $3.85'(( 4.15; first 
clears, $2.80 (« 3.60; second clears, $2.60 
(5 2.80. 

Bran — Unchanged. 

CHlCAllolflARKET. 



high. 87»ic; 
'kc. 

86%(S-86%c; 

arrive, 

85"ic: 

No. 2 

No. 3 



ADVANCES 
CANCELLED 

Stocks.Open Higher But 
;e Most of the 



Reserve 
Daly . . 



Lpsi 



«^i»Gains. 

?,:V 

New Torft.' Dec. 2. — The course of the 
market recently having Indicated that 
real liquidation had ceased, support 
was given organized efforts today to 
put up prices. Technical conditions 
were in favor of an upward movement. 

The tape was studded with a series 
of large transactions in the prominent 
stocks, and prices rose consistently 
through the morning. 

Easier money encouraged specula- 
tion on the long side. 

Call loans renewed at 5?4 compared 
with 8 yesterday. 

Bonds were strong. 

Most of the favorite stocks were 
lower at the opening of the market 
today. The supply of stocks was small 
and the existence of an increased de- 
mand caused the market to reverse 
its tendency quickly. Within the first 
few miilutes of trading prices were 
raised generally above yesterday's 
close. Canadian Pacific, the strongest 
stock, gained a point. 

Covering operations were on a large- 
ly increased scale, the concentrated 
buying of the coal shares causing the 
bears to run to cover at other points. 
Leaders such as Steel, Union Paclflo 
and Reading gained a point. 

Activity contracted and prices shaded 
a trifle after midday. Sustaining value 
of the short Interest kept prices up 
well when the big speculative orders 
had been filled. 

Prices seesawed In the afternoon, 
but ultimately worked lower, ilead- 
ing sold a point below its highest 
figure, but other shares held up bet- 
ter. 

The market closed easy. Exhaustion 
of the buying movement made the list 
vulnerable to professional selling, un- 
der whicii most of the gains were can- 
celled late in the day. American Tele- 
phone was weak at the close. 



Furni'-hed by Gay 
West Superior street. 



& Sturgis. S26 



STOCKS- 



IIigh.| Lovr. I CloaeL 



won't 
States 
where 
back 



though they had 

clean and there 

for the United 

sections up here 

wheat will have to be shipped 

into the country, and one party 



Special attention given to cash 
grains. We give all shipmenta our 
personal aitentlon. 

DULUTH. MINNEAPOLIS. 



thinks Alberta will have to have seed 
shipped back to them. Money Is all 
thi^ way from 6 to 15 per cent. United 
States money and grain exporters 
saved Canada this year. One good au- 
thoritv does not think there will be 
over 6,000.000 bu of all kinds of grain 
at Fort William at the close of navi- 
gation, and country elevators' stocks 
are also small. Receipts v/iU fall off 
to nothing after the first stormy 
weather. Railroads are already look- 
ing for business for their idle cars." 

* « * 

Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No. 
1 hard, 25: No. 1 northern, 50; No. 2 
northern, 28; No. 3. 13; No. 4, 1: sam- 
ple grade, 1: rejected, 2: no grade, 2; 
durum, 32; winter, 28; mixed, 12; total 
wheat, 194: last year, 277: flax, 34; 
last year. 120; oats, 3; last year, 7; rye, 
1; last year, 5; barley, 4; last year, 
25: total of nil grains, 236; last year, 
435; on track, 310. 

* * « 

As a rule members of the Duluth 
board of trade are inclined to be 
bullish on the present market situa- 
tion. It is pointed out that the total 
yields for the present year of eatable 
cereals as shown by the figures of the 
department of agriculture are 231,116,- 
000,000 pounds as compared with a 
five-year average of 242,171,000,000 
pounds, or a deficiency of 5 per cent. 
Compared «\ ith 1912, however, when 
the total was 282,011,000,000 pounds, 
supplies are 18 per cent short. These 
figures include the seven kinds of 
cereals which are available for edi- 
ble purposes including rice and buck- 
wheat as well as corn. 

* * * 

Duluth grain stocks, giving changes 
in two days: 

Wheat — Western and winter, 327,000 
bU; decrease, 26,000 bu: spring, 8.207,- 
000 bu; decrease, 638,000 bu; durum, 
982.000 bu; decrease, 260,000 bu; 
bonded. 553,000 bu: increase, 23,000 bu- 
total wheat. 10,069,000 bu; net de- 
crease, 901,000 bu. 

I'oarse grain." — Oats, 3.105,000 bu; In- 
crease, 47,000 bu; rye, 313,000 bu; In- 



SELL TO ARRIVE ON BULGES 

C. WYMAN & CO. 




DULUTH 



GRAIN COMMISSION 



MINNEAPOLIS' 




ANDALL, PEE& 
ELIABLE URAIN 




ITCHELL CO. 
ERCHANTS 



MINNEAPOLIS 



DULUTH 



WINNIPEG 



Decrease in European Visible Supply 
Hardens Wheat Prices. 

Chicago, Dec. 2. — Wheat today 
showed a tendency to harden in re- 
sponse to a decrease in the European 
visible supply. The bulls were also 
favored by unsettled weather In the 
Northwest and by adverse crop reports 
from India. Demand, however, was 
only light. The market opened tin- 
changed to imP'.ic higher but after- 
ward reacted to last night's level. 

Black rust spreading lii Argentina 
and threatening damage by green 
bugs and Hessian fly In the United 
States brought about later a decided 
upturn. The close, however, was weak 
at ',8@Uc net advance. 

Snow and rain strengthened corn. 
Higher cables counted lilvewise against 
•the bears. Opening prices tiiough, 
which were Vs^tVic to %c up, failed 
to hold as buyers were not urgent. 

Hoisting of prices by Missouri 
points averted any bearish reaction 
here. The close was steady, un- 
changed to i^ic higher. 

Oats developed temporary firmness 
with corn but sagged when corn eased 
back. Most of the trade was in chang- 
ing from December to May. 

Bearish reports on stocks in ware- 
houses carried provisions lower. The 
large run of hogs at the yards acted 
as a further weight on prices. First 
sales were 5c to 10'?il2'.*.c lower with 
a subsequent additional fall. 

Wheat— No. 2 red, 94 's 'fi;95%c; No. 3 
red, 94c: No. 2 hard, 87T4(?i:89c; No. 3 
hard, 87744188c; No. 2 northern, 88^5^ 
98 '/oc; No. 3 northern, 8614^1 88c; No. 2 
spring, 88-8:88 V^c; No. 3 spring, 86'*! @ 
87c. 

Corn — No. 2, 73%ff74c; No. 2 white, 
74<Vi)74V2c; No. 2 yellow. 76®76',^c; No. 
3, 73@73%c; new, 67<g;07*^c; No. 3 
white, 73»^@74c; new, 68'!7 69c; No. 3 
yellow. 74%®75c; new, 69'g)70'l;c. 

Itange of i<rlcc8: 

Wheat — Open. Iliph. Low. Close. 

Pec 80% .87^ .86% .STb 

.May 90',»-?i .0114 .OOH-'i .l»0\a 

Com— 

Dec :i->» .71'/4 .T0H-?4 .TOS* 

May TOSi-% .ToTb ."0?4 .70Ha 

Oats— 

Dec n9%-K4 .SSU-?i .30S .ns>4-»4 

May 41*4 .41% •.41Vi .41%-% 

^ 

liiTcrpool Grain. 

Liverpool, Dec. 2. — Wheat — Spot, 
steady; No. 1 Manitoba 78, l'/4d; No. 2, 
7s Id; futures, steady; December, 63 
lis^d; March, 7s 2 'id; May, 7s l%d. 

Corn — Spot, firm; American mixed, 
6s 8d; La Plata, futures, strong; De- 
cember, 4s 10 %d; January, 5s I'Ad. 

Mldv«'ny Horse Market. 

MinnnEOta Tr.iasfer. St. Paul. Minn.. Der. 2. — 
Barrett & Zimmenuan report: All olasses of hor-es 
met with slow rlearanre. Weather conditions lau.-.es 
a .<;low demand for logging horses. .Numerous Finnll 
.stilpmeiits were made to [wlnts la WiM:onsln ai-.d 
MlniieHdta. Iteceipis light. 

Uiafters $1750245 

Drafters, choice 14(>(Ji 170 

Drafters, comtnnn to good 8ji<J133 

Farm mare* and horses, extra IJ1.5W18S 

Farm marea and horses, choice 105;n].3O 

Farm horse-;, common to good 70^100 

Delivery ht.rees 00^ 2nO 

Drivers and saddler* 8.">w2IO 

Mules, according to size 110^i223 

♦ 

London Stocks. 

London. Eng.. Dec. 2. — American 
securities were quiet during the early 
trading. The market, advanced at the 
opening, but eased off under realizing 
before noon. Later New York bought 
and the list improved sharply under 
the lead of United States Steel and 
Erie. The closing was steady. 



Amalgamated Copper. 

Am. Beet Sugar 

Am. Can 

Am. Car & Fdry 

Am. Smelting 

Am. Sugar 

Am. Tel. & Tel 

Anaconda Copper . . . . 

Atchison 

Atchison pfd 

Bait. & Ohio 

U. F. Ooodrich 

do. pfd. 

a. R. T 

Canadian I'acitic . . . . 

Cal. Petroleum 

Ches. & Ohio 

C, M. & St. P 

Chino Copper 

Chi. & North 

Col. Fuel & Iron 

Con. <Jas 

Den. &. Rio G 

Erie 

Erie 1st 

Cicneral Electric .... 

t;en. Motors 

ciranby Con 

tJt. North, pfd. 

Gt. Nor. Ore ctfs.... 

Guggen. Ex 

Inter-Met. . ■ 

do. pfd 

Lehigh Valley 

Mexican I'etrol 

Miami Copper 

Missouri I'acific 

National Biscuit . . . . 

National Lead 

Nevada Con 

New Haven Ry 

N. Y. CJtntral 

Northern Pacific 

Pennsylvania 

Pressed Steel Car..., 

Pullman , 

Re.iding 

Hay Consolidated .. 

Hock Island , 

Sears Roebuck , 

Southern Pacific .... 

Southern Ry 

Tenn. Copper 

The Texas <:'o. 
Twin City Rap 
Union Paclflc .... 
U. S. Rub. Ist pfd 

U. S. Steel 

Utah Copper 



Tr. 



I 69*1 
j 23 
I 26-1, 
I 43 
! 62% 
1107 
119-s 
; 33 1*8 
I 92% 
I 97^4 
I 92% 
I 16% 
i 79 
I 8 7 '4 
i224'i 
I 17% 
I 67 
I 99'^ 
I 38 
123 «T. 
27"^ 
126 ',4 
16% 
27 T« 
43 
138 
36% 
6 8 '/.J 
123% 
31% 
46'* 
14 
I 57 '2 
,149 
46 
I 21^4 
I 25% 
119 
1 4 3 '.4 
I 16% 
I 78% 
I 96 ',4 
1106% 
109 

1 25 
150'i: 
161% 
I 18 ',8 
I 23 
:172 
I 86% 
t 21 '<j 

29 

|ll3U 

1104% 

1501/2 

99 

56 

48>2 



I 68% 
I 23 
I 251^ 
1 43 
I 62% 
1105% 
!118% 
1 33'.^ 
I 92 
I 97 'i 
I 92% 
I 16% 
I 78% 
I 87 
!223% 
! 17-;8 
I 67 
i 98'-: 
I 37'^ 
;123i'ij 
1 27% 
1126 ',4 
' 16% 
I 26% 
I 41% 
,138 
I 36% 
! 67'* 
1123% 
I 31% 

I 14 
i 57 "2 
1147 
I 46 
1 21 '4 
I 25 'fe 
1118% 
I " 



I 69 'A 
I 23 
I 26^2 
I 43 
I 62% 
ll05% 
119 



43 '4 
I 15 

I 77% 

I 95% 

1106 '^ 

il08% 

I 24 H- 

,150^2 

159% 

I 17% 

22% 

72 

86'/, 

21 H 

28 'i 

112'*! 

104 ^-i 

149's 

99 

54% 
47% 



33'^ 

92% 
97% 
92% 
16% 
79 

8714 

223% 

17% 

57 

991.4 

37% 

\23hii 

27% 

126 »4 

16% 

27% 

42% 

138 

36% 

67% 

123'^ 

31% 

46 

14 

571/2 

il47% 

46 
I 2114 
I 25% 
|119 
i 4 3 '4 
I 15% 
I 77% 
1 95 76 
:106'.. 
108% 
i 25 
;150'i 
:160% 
18'i, 
22% 
172 
86 14 
21'.^ 
29 

113 1/2 

104% 

149% 

99 

55 \i 

47% 



.Silver. 57 %c, up I'ic 

Now York hourly sales: 

11 a. m 107,951 

Noon 142,111 

1 p. m 160,850 

2 p. m 182,150 



Total 211,200 



BOSTON C OPPER STOCKS. 

Closlil.i quotations furnished by Gay 
& Sturgle, 326 West Superior street: 

Liiited Stocks — | Bid. ] Asked. 



Adventure 


1% 


IVj 


Alaska 


19% 


19% 


Alimeek 


245 


250 


Algomah 


96 


1% 


Allouez 


30 


31 


Amalgamated 


69 


69 U 


American Zinc 


151.^ 


16 


Arcadian 


1% 


1% 


Arizona Commercial ... 


4 '4 


4% 


Boston & Corbln 


50c 


75c 


Butte & Ballaklava ... 


414 


4% 


Butte & Superior 


28 


2»% 


Chino 


37U 


37 5i 


Calumet & Arizona . . . 


60% 


61 


Calumet & Hecla 


387 


390 


Centennial 


1214 


13 


Copper Range 


32% 


33 


Daly West 


214 


2% 



East Butte 

Franklin 

Gran by , 

Greene-Cananea 

Hancock , 

Indiana 

Inspiration , 

Isle Royale 

Kerr Lake 

Keweenaw , 

Lake • 

La Salle 

Mass Copper 

Mason Valley , 

Mayflower 

Miami 

Michigan 

Mohawk 

Nevada Cons 

Niplssing 

North Butte 

N'orth Lake 

Old Colony 

Old Dominion 

Ojlbway 

Osceola 

Pond Creek 

Qulncy 

Ray Cons 

Shannon 

Shattuck 

Shoe Machinery 

Superior & Boston 

Superior Copper 

.Swift 

Trinity . . ., 

Tuolumne 

U. S. Mining common. 

United Fruit 

Utah Consolidated . . . 

Utah Coppijr 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Unlisted Stocks — 
Arizona & Michigan... 

Bay State Gas, 

Regole . . ., 

Bohemia 

Boston Ely 

Butte Central 

Butte & London 

Cactus ; 

Calaveras 



6 14 
26% 
47% 



Cons. Copper Mining 

Corbln Copper 

Cortez 

Crown 

Davis 

Dobie 

Dome Extension 

Ely Consolidated 

First National 

Goldfleld Consolidated. 

Hollinger 

Houghton 

Lh Rose 

Mines Co. of America.. 

Montana 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Pearl Lake 

Porcupine Gold 

Preston 

Raven 

Smokey Dev 

South Lake 

Southwestern Miami . . 

Superior & Globe 

Temlskaming 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont 

Tonopah Extension . . . . 
United Verde Extension 

West End 

^Vettlaufer 

Yukon 



1% 

6c 
20c. 

I hi: 
il 91 d 
10c 

He 



2 316 

L 7-16 

16% 

2% 

1% 
2 

94c 
50c 
40o. 
8C0 

6c 

5c 

2c 
10c 
26c 

2% 

'5c' 

14c 

5 

■JiL 

1 7-16;l 
35c 
1 3-16 

6c 

2 



2% 
10c 
S6c 

1% 
11-16 
35c 
12c 

3c 
6-16 

1% 
17% 

3'.i 

2 

2% 
^9c 
80c 
4 3c 
96c 
20c 
12c 

6c 
16c 
75c 

3% 

2% 
16c 
16c 

5^ 

7% 
11-16 
45c 

1% 
10c 

2% 



Xew York Grain. 

New York, Dec. 2.— Wheat— December, 
.May, 98 '^c. 



scuc- 



MARKET LETTER 

Eastern markets were all better today and excellent gains were 
made by the New York list and also the Boston coppers. Activ- 
ity was also the rule in the Duluth list. 

Furthei- news received regarding the RED WARRIOR mine 
and the ricent strike on the 700-level also came to hand from the 
superintendent in his report to the company. This ore body 
is now over 8 feet wide on the 700-level and the ore is the best) 
kind of si; ver-lead carbonates. This news will cause RED WAR- 
RIOR stock to advance to much higher levels, we think, and the 
demand today cleaned up the floating supply and the stock is 
now very scarce. 

Shipments are going forward steadily, and will be increased 
immediately. 

LEIWIS H. MERRITT & CO. 




Xew York Money. 

New York, Dec. 2. — Call money firm, 
4 '4 ^6 per cent; ruling rate, 6% per 
cent; closing, 4%f/4% per cent. Time 
loans firm; 60 days, 5'>j6i4 per cent; 
90 days, 6 per cent; six months, 6 per 
cent. Mercantile paper, 5'2-tJ6% per 
cent. Sterling exchange firm; 60 days. 
$4.81.25; demand, $4.85.40. Commercial 
bills, $4.81 '<. Bar silver, 53 %c; Mexican | 



dollars. 44 %c 
steady; railroad 



Government 
bonds firm. 



bonds I 



Xew York Cotton. 

New York, Dec. 2. — Cotton: Futures 
closed steady; bids: December, 13.19; 
January, 13.05; March, 13.16; May, 
13.10; July, 12.99. Spot quiet; middling, 
13.50; gulf, 13.75. 



South St. Paul Livestock. 

Pomh St. Paul, Minn.. Dec. 2,— Hog*- Rocel^fs. 
0,800; 5c«10c lower; raji»e. |r.35car..'i<); iHllk. 17. 40® 
7.45. Cattle — Reoeijits, 1,700; kUJers, steady 
|5.50(g7.75, eows aiul heifers. $4.50(80.60 
25('i50c hUtlicr. I4.,".n((j9.:;0; feeders 
7.00. Slieep— Keeelpls, e,700 
7. 00; wethers, $3.75(«4.20 



steady. 
Fteadv; lambs, 
ewes, J".j0(a4. 



ttcers, 
•■nlvee, 
$4.50® 
$5.00® 



ChloaRO LlveMtoek. 

Chicago. Deo. 2.— Hogs- Ileoelpts. 32.000; dull. 10c 
lower; l>u)k, $7.55(i' 7.75; Ilglit, f7.1o(a7.70; Mixed. 
|7.40(g7.80; liea»T, $7.45(<j7.85; rough, »7. 40(3 7.50; 
pigs. $o. Of! ^7.00. 

Callle^-HcoeljKs. 7.000; Ftcady t/i a shade lower; 
beeves. $t5.«(t(n I'.dO; Texas ste<>rs. je.HJi^ 7.70; west- 
ern, titeers, J.J.'.'Oftt 7.75; Blockers aiid fecilers. $4.S0(u 
7.40; cows and lielfers, {S.30(u8.10; caKes, $0.5u 
(gU.rO. 

.•^liet-p— Itef-elpls. 2^,000; strong to a .shade higher: 
native, $:iliO(.'i 5. 10; western. $:i.OO(n 'lO; .vearlliig;. 
$5.15c<'6.55; lamhN. iiaUve. $5,l'0(a7.j:'; weiti-'ri;. 
t5.90(a7.53. 



WANTED! 

Parties With $3,000 to $S,000 to Invest 



in a prosperous business (incorporated) ; posi- 
tions to right parties; 7% guaranteed on pre- 
ferred stock. Look this up at once. For full in- 
fornration, Address 123 X Z, care Herald. 



THE PRO DUCE MARKET. 

Chleae'o. 

Chioogo. De«'. 2.— Butter— Firm; receipts. r..206 
lulls; creann'ry extras, ;;."c; estra firsts, Sl@?2c. 
Kggs- Higber; receipts, 3,484 cases; at mark, cases 
Included, noe.'itic; ordinary firsts. X.lfflSoc; firsts, "6 
(aS'c. rulatocs — I'lL-A'ttled; 6l'(368c; rtceipts, 
cars. roultrj-^AUve. utichansed. 



43 



Kew York, 

Ne\\' York. Dec. 2.--IIUIWT—I1 regular, receipts. 7.700 
tubs; creamery extras, 34(3'o."»c; flr-ts, 27t<i;'2c; sec- 
ond^. 234(<i26',2r: ihlrxls. 22U<g23'BO; lield extras, 
30(h32c; firsta. 27(n20c: i.e<'i.nds, 23»a{"26c; thlr.l.^, 
22ia'a23o; state Uiiiry, fliieil. ;;0(!;32c; gocd to prime, 
20("20c; iX'iniiion to fair, 22<i3 25c; process extras, 
25',i(«26c; Imitation creanier>- tlrst-. 24ri:24'2c; fac- 
torj- current make, firsts. 22(a22»sc; fecouds, 201i@ 
21Vjc; packii:g stock, held. 21c; curieot make. No. 
2. 20c. 

Clieese— Steady; receipts, 1,2C0 boxes; state, whole 
milk, held Kpei'inls, 16'smlO\c; average fancy, 
I6V4C; fresh s:<clali', ICVtc; average fancy. 15 '2^' 
ICc; ui.der grades. 12!3talO'4c; daisies, held, lO^iis' 
17c; Wistoiislii whole milk daisies, fresl), 1 .'i % lu, 1 Cc ; 
held. 16(^I6hc; tuiiis ai>d flats, 16>4(gi6',f:c; fiiiius, 
5(<fI3',!iC. 

Kggs — Irregular; receipt.*, 5. WO ca**^; fresh gathered 
extras. 46C"48c; extra nrits, 44^ 45c; firsts, 42<o4oc; 
seconds, .^(.«41c; thirds and pi orer, S0(S37c; dirties, 
25("28e; chei-ka. 2C(n25c; refrigeratcr, sK-clal marks, 
fan'-y. 30(s30',ic; fli-su. 28'i(u 29140; seconds, 273 
28c; thirds to firsts, on dwk, 24(g28^ic; lower grades. 
22^26'ic; dirties. 22(«2fic; state. I'e:insylvanla and 
nearliy lieimery whiles, fine to fancy, SOcntiOc; tath- 
ered wliltes. 54'ii.'8c; hmmery browii.s, 4S(«4{'c: c.ixed 
colors, 42(s48c; we-tern gatliercd whites, 40(iij0ij. 



ACTIVE TRADING 

IN MINING STOCKS 



Trading in mining stocks was more 
active and the market at Boston ruled 
stronger than in several days back 
today. A feature was the heavy busi- 
ness put through In Butte & Ballak- 
lava, attributable to the settlement 
of the Anaconda suit. It was in- 
timated by John A. Percival, secretary 
of the company, that Supt. Newton had 
received instructions to start mining 
operations and ore shipments at once. 

Shattuck was an exceptionally 
strf)ng Is.^iue on the score of reported 
developments at the mine. It ad- 
vanced ?2 to a flose of $26. Butte & 
Superior advanced $1 to J28.50. ciran- 
by closed 62c up at $07.62; Xorth 
Butte 50c up at $24 and Copper Range 
50c up at $32.50. 

Business in Duluth curb stock.^ was 
confined to a few issues, but the 
market was strong through the list. 
Alex Scott sold at $7 and $7.25; Calu- 
met & Sonora at 68c and 70c; Calumet 
& Montana Consolidated at 40c and 
Red Warrior at 78o and 80c. 

«> 4< • 

Gay & .Sturgis received the follow- 
ing cable from London this morning: 
"Practically all our large . selling 
agencies are asking £68 (14.68c) for 
electrolytic here, but quote £67, 12s 6d 
(14.64c) on the Continent." 

* « « 

At St. Louis If-ad clo.sed dull at 
$4.07 »i(J^ 4.10, and spelter, dull at $5.05. 

* • * 

The American Smelting Sr Refining 
company has made a further reduc- 
tion in lead from $4.25 to $4.10. 

* • « 

At the annual Superior & Bo.^ton 
meet'ng held yesterday the entire 
board of directors was re-elected. 

* « • 

STOCKS— Bid. Asked? 

Butte-Alex Scott | 7.00 $ 7.25 

Cactus .02 

Calumet & Mont. Cons, .40 .60 

Calumet & Corbin .06 

Calumet & Sonora .65 ,70 

Carman .27 .32 

Chief Consolidated.... 1.37 1.60 

Cliff Mining CO .70 

Cuyuna-Mllle Lacs.... 2.00 2.50 

Denn Arizona 6.75 7.26 

Keating 88 .95 

Rainbow Dev 9.60 .... 

Red Warrior .75 1.00 

San Antonio 2.00 

Savanna 1.00 1.25 

Sierra 60 .70 

Warren 6.00 6.50 

Warrior Dev 75 .90 

OUTRAGE BY~GERMAN 
OFFICER IN ALSACE 



Seabcrn, Alsace, Germany, Dec. 2. — 
Lieut. Baron von Forstner, who started 
the trouble between the troops and 
civilians here by referring .scornfully 
to the citizens when he addressed the 
recruits of his company, aroused still 
further indigation against the army 
today by cutting down a lame Alsatian 
shoemaker with his saber. 

The titled lieutenant was leading a 
half company of the N'inety-nlnth in- 
fantry from the barracks to the coun- 
try to go through the morning drill, 
when a group of workmen recognizeil 
von Forstner. They hooted the officer, 
who at once halted his company and 
sent a squad of armed soldiers in pur- 
suit. 

The Infantrymen succeeded In catch- 
ing only one man, a lame shoemaker, 
who resisted arrest. Von Forstner 
then came up and deliberately struck 
him on the head with the sharpened 
edge of his saber. The wound is a 
dangerous one. 

The fresh incident has created t>urh 
tension that serious bloodshed ii-- 
feared unless the Xlnety-ninth regi- 
ment is transferred immediately. 



Railroads 



RAILROiiO MEN 

GN ANNUAL TRIP 



A. W. Trf 
C. D. Stock 
H. Thome, 
John J. 0'X< 
tive power 
here today 
local termin 
general mak 
docks and ot 
comp'iny at 

This is or 
the offi<:'iul« 
cago being 
of Mr. Trer 
the Omaha 
have been i 
with a view 

While non< 
much to say 
holm vouchs 
Duluth was 1 
portant traf 
pany's systei 
the recent 1 
surprise mai 
crease in tht 
at this polnl 

All of the 
leave today. 



nholm, general manager: 
well, superintendent; W. 
master car builder, and 
il, superintend».*nt of nio- 
of the Omaha road, are 
for an inspection of the 
als of the road and in 
e .an Investigation of the 
her property of the Omaha 
this point. 

e of the annual trips of 
, the journey from Chl- 
made in the private car 
holm. Along the line of 

system different points 
nspected by the officials 
of malting some changes. 
! of the officlal.s had very 
, General Manager Tren- 
ifed the information that 
oday one of the most im- 
fic points on the com- 
n, and stated that under 
ate ruling it would not 
ly people to see an Ir- 

cmount of busintfcs done 

officials were expected to 



steamers and the number and quantity 
of sailors employ* d need no increase. 

"If this bill becomes a law, in its 
present form," said T. F. Newman, 
general manager of the Cleveland & 
Buffalo Transit company today, "the 
steanu-rs of this company as well as 
those of most of the passenger lines 
on the Great Lakes will be absolutely - 
forced to cease operation." 

A pamphlet sent out by the vessel 
owners declares that 82,000.000 pas- 
sengers have been carried by Great 
Lake lines in the past five years with- 
out the loss of a single life due to 
accidents on steamers. 



11' •» lilt 1 1 



W'ineonhtn PaperK ConmoltdMe. 

Madison, Wi?., Dec. 2. — Announce- 
ment was made Monday of the merg- 
ing of the Dally Cardinal and the 
Wiscon.«in Daily News, the two daily 
newspapers at the state univerpitv. 
The name of the Dafly Cardinal will 
be retained. The board of control v/ill 
consist of five students and the bu.sN 
ness affairs will be under control of 
an advisory board of the faculty. The 
staff of the Daily News will be added 
to the Daily Cardinal. 



SLOW MOVEMENT 

DURING OCTCBER 



St. 
ment 
Head 
clals 
to be 



Paul, Minn.. Deo. 2. — Slow move- 

of coal from the docks at the 

of the Lakes is declared by offi- 

of the Northern Pacific railway 

the chief cause in the decrease 



of $294,044.84 in freight earnings of 
the road in October as compared with 
October, 191.', shown in the earning.? 
statement just made public. Another 
factor Is th<r wheat movement, which 
was lighter than that of last year. A 
decrease in freight earnings of $42.- 
859.04 is shown for the first four 
months of the fiscal year, which be- 
gan July 1, Jis compared with the cor- 
responding leriod a year ago. 

Total operating revenues for the 
month decreased from $7,667,043.76 in 
1912 to $7, 423. 031. .S2 in 1913. 

IncreaNeil Operatlni; Revenues. 

Total opemting revenues for the first 
three months of the current fi.scal 
year, however, were large enough to 
cause an increase in this item for the 
four months from $26,229,713.62 to 
$26,665,744.10. Passenger revenue for 
the month i\-as $1,456,589.33; for the 
four months, $6,507,788.12. 
revenue for the month was 
252.51; for the four months, 
826.01. 

Total operating expenses were 
$4,124,804.76 for the month, an Increase 
of $90,202.46 over the year before. Net 
operating revenue decreased $340,- 
214.90, and operating income decreased 
$378,344.32 for the month. Large In- 
creases in br>th these items, however, 
are shown for the period of four 
months. 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 



One Cenjt a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisciucnt licss Than 15 Cental 

PERFUMES— YOU KNOW MISS HOR- 
rigan's is the place for exquisite per- 
fumes. If you are one of the few not 
aware come In and we will prove it. 

A HARPER SHAMPOO AT MISS HOR- 
rigan's is a glowing, efficacious and 
luxurious shampoo that cleanses, 
soothes and nourishes. 

I THE NEW STYLES IN HAIR G(WD.S. 
liairdressing and hair ornaments are 
at Miss Horrigan's. 

FOR RENT— TWO. THREE OR FOUR- 
room flats, in new brick building- 
all modern conveniences; furnished 
up to date, including gas range for 
housekeeping; In heart of city; must 
be seen to appreciate; rent reason- 
able to right parties. 1030 West 
First street. 

PERSONAL— II>" YOU WILL CALL ME 
up, 1 can give your carpenter and 
repair work prompt attention. A. S. 
Page, Lincoln 185-D. 

WANTED— GIRL TO ASSIST WITH 
housework. 1124 East Sixth street. 



Freight 

$5,652,- 

$18,529,- 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Adolph Hammer and Hilda Olson. 

Andrew Manzinope and Frances «'of- 
fey. 

Sam Anderson and Ruth Strand, both 
of Zim. 

Frank William Pelto and Saima Elsa 
Makl. 

WEDDING PICTURES are a specialty 
with Chiisteneen, 25 W. Superior St. 

SOLID (^OLD WEDDINCi ANU EN- 
GAGEMENT RINGS made and mount- 
ed to ordei at Henrlcksens. 



C. B. (& Q. Hearings Delayed. 



Chicago, D 
bitration boa 
en^es bet wet 
& Quincy r 
were postpoi 
had not nai 
take the pi 
former pres 
tem,